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EARTHQUAKE SPECIAL EDITION FREE Thursday, March 3, 2011

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FYI

Vital information Page 36

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Amazing story behind the picture

Tots survive 5-floor plunge Page 2-3 NATION

SPORT

PLUS

Simon Power: Why I quit

Sonny Bill Williams: I look forward to doing Cantabrians proud

World

Page 24

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P25

Business Puzzles

P28

P31


A2

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

The Star

Quake disaster ‘When I woke up, they were both staring at me. They were covered in my blood’ A little family is still intact despite being on the fifth floor of the Canterbury TV building where dozens died or are missing, reports Edward Gay

‘‘

I couldn’t get the rubble off. All I could see was sky. I remember saying to him, ‘How is it?’ and he said, ‘You are OK, you are OK’ Kendyll Mitchell

Three-year-old Jett Mitchell hadn’t slept in his own bed since the September earthquake and was receiving counselling on the fifth floor of the Canterbury Television building when the quake struck Christchurch. Yesterday, his mother, Kendyll Mitchell, said it was a miracle that Jett, his 11-month-old sister, Dita, and she survived a five-floor plunge in a building that was reduced to rubble. The three arrived early for the counselling session, shortly before the quake measuring 6.3 on the Richter scale devastated the heart of Christchurch. Ms Mitchell said her son had suffered ‘‘severe anxiety’’ since the first quake in September and she was in the building to get him help. ‘‘We had had six months of hard times. He wouldn’t sleep in his own bedroom.’’ As the CTV building collapsed, Ms Mitchell sheltered Jett with her body. Dita was protected by her stroller. ‘‘I got knocked out at the bottom. I thought we were all gone. When I woke up, they were both staring at me. They were covered in my blood. ‘‘I instantly smelt smoke. ‘‘All I thought was ‘the building was going to fall on us, the steel was going to fall on us.’’’ Ms Mitchell’s pelvis was cracked and one leg had a deep gash. She was partially trapped in the rubble. But Jett had only scratches on his chin and knee and Dita got away unscathed. More than 100 others in the CTV building were killed or are missing. Ms Mitchell was carried from the rubble by a builder who had been working at the site. ‘‘I couldn’t get the rubble off. All I could see was sky. I remember saying to him, ‘How is it?’ and he said, ‘You are OK, you are OK’.’’ Her children were carried from the scene by passers-by. ‘‘They’re both unhurt. It’s a miracle,’’ she said.

Ms Mitchell was photographed by Star photographer Geoff Sloan as she was carried from the scene by her partner’s friend, Mark Hoskin. She said the photograph showed what it was like on Tuesday last week as crowds of people fled the city centre. Ms Mitchell got out of hospital yesterday, and the family are now recuperating in Timaru, where she has relatives. ‘‘I am pretty emotionally broken,’’ she said. But her children are doing well. She said Jett was ‘‘back to normal’’ in quake-free Timaru and was sleeping in his own bed. ‘‘He’s been awesome. We’re very lucky. My little family is still my little family. ‘‘We are going to relocate [to Timaru]. ‘‘No hesitation. I can’t go back . . . for his mental benefit, and mine.’’ Ms Mitchell said she was grateful for the help of the builder who found her in the rubble, and wanted to contact him to say thank you. She has also thanked Mr Hoskin, who is playing down his part in the rescue. ‘‘There are people out there who have done massive contributions. I was just around,’’ he said. Mr Hoskin was on the roof of the Les Mills gym, next to the CTV building, looking at air-conditioning units when the quake struck. ‘‘We didn’t see the [CTV] building come down but we heard it . . . ‘‘It was pretty terrifying.’’ He described the noise as a ‘‘really loud roar’’. Mr Hoskin got down to the street and heard Ms Mitchell calling him. ‘‘I’m friends with her partner. It was so completely random.’’ He said people were working furiously to pull survivors from the rubble. One of those rescued was Ms Mitchell. ‘‘She couldn’t walk properly — she tried hobbling but it wasn’t working,’’

SURVIVORS: Three-year-old Jett and his mother, Kendyll Mitchell, survived the collapse. Mr Hoskin said. ‘‘They were in a state of shock more than anything.’’ He scooped Ms Mitchell into his arms and carried her towards a triage station in Latimer Square where doctors were providing first aid. Mr Hoskin waited for a while, but

had to leave to pick up his own son from preschool. Search and rescue workers were still at the CTV building yesterday, searching for bodies. Nine days after the quake, dozens of people thought to have been inside the building remain missing.


The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A3

Contents P4 Two earthquakes and a soaking

P28 Boost for Fletcher Building

P5 Battle of the Port-a-loos

P29 Williams’ Super debut

P7 Agonising wait for injured dad P9 Emotional farewell for baby Jayden P11 The dead and missing P12 Unsafe dome to be removed P15 Health board says sorry P17 Homeowner rubbishes dump fee P18-P19 Map faultlines before rebuilding: geologist P21 Wedding bells ring despite quake P22 Nicotine warning for children P27 Afghan treasure saved from Taliban

P29 Blues’ cautious reshuffle P30 Brave young lifesavers reel in medals P33 Zimbabwe threat to Black Caps P33 Breakers out to improve P35 Crosswords, puzzles Video Watch how liquefaction works in this amazing homemade video http://t.co/ altuOXP Blogger A Christchurch blogger says there are ‘‘three cities’’ in Christchurch — one is being ignored. http://t.co/LZF7dWW

starcanterbury.co.nz The Star — Earthquake Edition is a special APN publication. Contact us: regionalfeatures@apn.co.nz

From the Editor SAVED: After falling five storeys in the wreckage of the CTV building (left), a crying Jett Mitchell (far left, main picture) and his sister Dita were carried to safety by passers-by. MAIN PICTURE / GEOFF SLOAN

P

OWER! windows and landed on the It’s back on at home rooves. after a week of living And the garden is dying. in the dark. It’s not getting any water. And I can tell you it’s a Rain would be helpful now; great feeling. usually after such a strong No more — at this time nor’wester we get rain a few anyway — sitting in the days later. dark with a torch, counting I’m not counting on it. down the hours, as tens of The gods seem to be against Barry Clarke thousands of us have been. us here in the east. My wife is overseas, visiting her But that’s life. We’ll deal with it. family, and that’s where she’ll stay for What we do need to see in the badly a while. No point coming home. So it’s damaged suburbs is more police and been quiet, very quiet. army personnel. Power means a cup of coffee, toast in The burglars and thieves are out. the morning, a beer that’ll stay cold. The police stopped a young guy on a And TV. bike not far from me the other night. The dog can now get her Vegemite He had a backpack. The cops on toast in the morning (no margarine) questioned him for a while. so it’s one step towards normality for After the September quake the her, too. lowlifes came out fairly quickly, even But yesterday’s wind . . . I’ve been in stealing hot-water cylinders from Christchurch for a long time and I abandoned houses, presumably for can’t remember a nor’wester like it — scrap metal. and it’s March. I get the feeling that there will be We’ve had a crazy summer, with little mercy shown if anyone is caught very few nor’westers. breaking into a house by a So it’s been a cruel blow to get the householder. People I’ve bumped into blast with so much liquefaction lying on the street while walking the dog around. have told me what they’d do if they The dust has gone everywhere, caught someone on their property. piled up against fences, got in through You’ve been warned . . .


A4

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

The Star

Crime and punishment

In brief

Judge: this is no time for crime

Re-build planning

Accused told police have more important things to do than deal with petty offences, writes Jared Savage

It will take more than 10 years to rebuild Christchurch, says acting Economic Development Minister David Carter. Buildings that were safe needed to be identified and opened and, if needed, a fairly aggressive approach taken to pulling down suspect neighbouring properties. ‘‘Then once we’ve got the city safe you can let people back in and start the re-building process.’’ Carter was still getting to know his budget and what money was being spent on.

French set up office

A temporary French consular office has been set up in Christchurch. The French ambassador, consul and head of the embassy’s cultural section will be based at Sudima Hotel, Memorial Ave, near Christchurch Airport. They will be available to French citizens in the city from 10am to 6pm each day. The office will remain in place until further notice. Phone: 021 399 309.

Lawyers restart fund

A fund for lawyers by lawyers that was set up after September’s earthquake has been re-activated. New Zealand Law Society acting regulatory general manager Mary Ollivier said the fund was set up for lawyers around the country who wanted to help their colleagues in Christchurch. The society wasn’t sure how many lawyers had been displaced or how many had been affected but it is expected to be many. Many legal offices were centrally based, around the High and District Courts — both have been shut until further notice, and are within the city’s cordon. Lawyers wanting to donate money can at The No 2 account SBS Bank 03 1355 0561709 00.

Airline apologises

Jetstar has apologised after telling a Christchurch family they would need photographic proof signed off by authorities that their home was damaged in the earthquake before the airline would refund return flights to Australia. Gillian Smith was to fly to Melbourne tomorrow to visit her daughter Sarah who is 41⁄2 months pregnant with her first child. But after last week’s quake, Mrs Smith wants instead to stay put to look after her Avonside home. Because Mrs Smith did not have a phone, electricity and other amenities Sarah has been talking to Jetstar but she had no joy from three separate staff members. But after a call from the Herald Jetstar apologised and said they were seeking to support the Christchurch community.

‘‘In the present state of emergency, the police have far, far more important things to do than to check up on whether you are complying with a 24-hour curfew.’’ In refusing bail to 18-year-old Justin Humphreys on a relatively minor charge of breaching bail, Judge Tony Couch sent a stern message to Christchurch: behave in this crisis or face the consequences. The hardline stance was referred to several times yesterday as Judge Couch sat in the Rangiora District Court. All Christchurch charges have been transferred there during the disaster aftermath. One of those appearing was James Kevin Hogan. The Opawa house where the 40-year-old lived was destroyed during the quake and on March 1 he allegedly assaulted his partner, resisting arrest when police stepped in. Duty solicitor Andrew McCormack asked for bail, with stringent conditions, saying Hogan lost his temper while distraught after the earthquake and was unable to buy medicine to help control his depression. Judge Couch was not moved to release him into the community. ‘‘It involves a serious assault, of

‘‘

You took the time and resources of emergency services that ought to be devoted to more worthy causes HARD LINE: Judge Tony Couch has delivered a stern message. PICTURE / DEAN PURCELL male upon female, it was then subsequent assaults on police who sought to intervene. ‘‘The fact that the current emergency does exist aggravates the matter because police have many important duties to perform in the community during this time,’’ he said. ‘‘It is totally unacceptable that somebody in Mr Hogan’s position should be assaulting them doing their duty.’’ As all future court dates have been adjourned until May 3, Hogan protested about the two-month stretch behind bars.

Judge Couch ‘‘So I’m looking at three months away?’’ The final case of the morning was Aaron Blair Peoples, for an offence under the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act. He was found heavily intoxicated and bleeding in Cranmer Square — inside the police CBD cordon — at 8.30pm on Tuesday, needing St John ambulance help. His house was also destroyed in the quake and he had spent the afternoon drinking at his mother’s home on Champion St. Mr McCormack said Peoples left on

his bicycle, but was so drunk he could not remember how he ended inside the cordon. He asked Judge Couch to remand the matter to another date without entering a plea. The judge responded: ‘‘Why is he asking for a remand without plea when what you’ve told me is an admission of the offence?’’ He told Peoples to reconsider his position, as it was unlikely he would be granted bail, and could therefore be in custody until May. But if Peoples pleaded guilty immediately, Judge Couch indicated a ‘‘short period of imprisonment’’ as a sentence. After a short adjournment, Peoples took the offer. Two weeks in prison was his punishment. ‘‘We all know that this community is in crisis,’’ said Judge Couch. ‘‘You took the time and resources of emergency services that ought to be devoted to more worthy causes. ‘‘This legislation is there to ensure that people and property are protected and to ensure that essential work is not impeded by people being unnecessarily in the way. It must be enforced strictly and firmly, that is what the public expects,’’ he said.

Quake, shake ... and then a sinking feeling ‘‘Mother Nature doesn’t particularly like me,’’ says Sam Martel. In little more than a week the Christchurch teenager has been through the Christchurch earthquake, another in Wellington, and was on board a ferry struck by freak waves on Wellington Harbour yesterday. Sam, 13, was among 28 students on board the East by West ferry when it was hit by the waves about 8.30 am. Passenger Jay Daley said the second wave, which drove the ferry’s bow into a trough, ‘‘blew the windows out and the water came straight in’’. Mr Daley said the first few seconds brought panic on the vessel. ‘‘You just thought it was going to go down in seconds and you had to get out.’’ Sam, of St Andrew’s College, is one

of 16 Christchurch students attending Scots College in Wellington while their schools are repaired. At school when last week’s quake struck, Sam said his fellow students were not injured but some had parents still missing. He went to Wellington on Sunday. On Monday the capital was struck by a 4.5-magnitude earthquake, and yesterday was just his second day at school there. On his way to college from his grandparents’ Eastbourne home, he was on the ferry’s upper outdoor deck when the waves struck. ‘‘I saw the wave come over and heard the glass smash. ‘‘The whole wave came right over the top and hit the seats and I got absolutely soaked.’’ He admitted to getting ‘‘pretty nervous’’ about being washed off the ferry.

DRAMA: Rescue boats were quickly on the scene to help passengers such as Sam Martel (left). PICTURE / GAIL HIGGS-WEST

‘‘It’s been different from all the other stuff. ‘‘I was more concerned than I was with the earthquake.’’ Mr Daley said the students including Sam were ‘‘fantastic’’, organising themselves, handing out lifejackets and helping to keep track of a passenger who was washed overboard. The passenger was rescued.

Within minutes rescue craft were on the scene about 100m off Worser Bay. The soaking passengers were transferred from the ferry to the smaller craft and taken to shore. There were no injuries among the 44 passengers and crew but two were taken to Wellington Hospital suffering from hypothermia. — Adam Bennett

Top golf club uses own well to water course One of New Zealand’s top golf clubs is defending watering its greens and fairways during the earthquake crisis. Several callers to The Star yesterday questioned why the Christchurch Golf Club’s sprinklers were working amid city-wide water restrictions. The club’s general manager, Struan

Cain, said the club was watering its Shirley links from one of its two wells to keep recently sown grass alive. New Zealand’s second-oldest golf links, famous for nurturing 1963 British Open winner Sir Bob Charles, suffered significant damage to the course and 84-year-old clubhouse.

Seven holes and the practice area suffered liquefaction, with irrigation pumps and pipes damaged, Mr Cain said. Pumps in one of the club’s two 20m-deep artesian wells were ‘‘completely submerged’’ in liquefaction. ‘‘We’re using water sparingly from

the other well to keep the grass alive. If it doesn’t get watered for 10 days it dies,’’ he said. ‘‘It’s our water and we’re not affecting the city’s water resources.’’ The club was making water from its well available to residents of Joy St. ‘‘We have been doing our bit for the

community,’’ Mr Cain said. The multimillion-dollar clubhouse had been ‘‘red-carded’’ and was awaiting an inspection by insurance assessors. All four chimneys and part of an external wall had collapsed, and there were serious cracks. — Cullen Smith


The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A5

The survivors

HAZARDOUS HAZE: The dust makes the split in the city zones clear.

PICTURES / BRETT PHIBBS

Dusty suburbs wage battle of Port-a-loos A nor’wester, stinking dust and a lack of portable toilets add to discomfort, writes Claire Trevett On the eighth day, there was wind and dust. In Dallington there is plenty of both, but Port-a-loos are much harder to find. Wendy MacFarlane struggles back toward home from the water and food station on Gayhurst Rd, her children clustered about her wearing dust masks and clutching a few supplies given to them at the station. The sausage sizzle at the food station was hidden beneath a cloud of dust. The dust is a constant haze. After two days of still, hot weather the reeking silt laden with sewage has dried out and the nor’wester now sends it billowing out, coating everything. From the top of the Port Hills, the dust makes the split in the city between quake zones and non-quake zones clear. The northeast — where the soil melted and boiled from liquefaction — is covered in a haze of dust, the other half is clear. With the wind like this, the truckies are heroes. Out at Bromley they drive in a constant stream to the dumping ground, more than 400 trucks from every company possible collecting the silt from piles in the street and dumping 30,000 tonnes off each day. In the streets, nobody hurries be-

cause there is no escape from it. It sticks in the eyes and coats the mouth and nostrils. The efforts of water trucks to dampen the roads are futile. Dust masks are now another essential in Christchurch’s arsenal. A single mother, Ms MacFarlane still has no power or water at home. Every two or three days she and her six children go to a friend’s for a shower. ‘‘Once you get back home you’re dirty again anyway with all this dust and silt.’’ She is a midwife but the schools are closed and her usual child minders had left their homes. Ms MacFarlane uses the description many others have: ‘‘It’s like camping.’’ The optimistic attempt to view it as an adventure is always delivered with the same fed-up shaky smile. There is little fun in ‘‘camping’’ with six children, aged 3 to 10, in such conditions. People don’t complain about their own plight when they know that in the CBD people lie dead. ‘‘We’re fine, we’re alive,’’ is a constant refrain, followed by a plaintive ‘‘but a Port-a-loo would be nice.’’ Eight days on, the Port-a-loo wars are intensifying. In suburbs such as Bexley, Aranui, Avonside, and New

NO ESCAPE: Wendy MacFarlane and her children mask up against wind-whipped dust laden with sewage as they make their way home from a food station in Dallington. Brighton, where the sludge was at its worst and power and electricity are distant memories, there are only a few Port-a-loos, some serving more than four streets. Port-a-loos are the new currency and reports emerge of stealth raids on Port-a-loos in other neighbourhoods and of people hiding them away on their own sections rather than sharing. People hear news of 900 Port-a-loos on the way, another 500 on order. But they never seem to arrive.

MsMacFarlane knows Sumner has a good supply of Port-a-loos — and that they got them early, as did Lyttelton. ‘‘The rich people seem to get them,’’ she says, resigned. In Bexley there is at least one consolation to living near the sewage ponds — they were among the first to have the big piles of silt on their streets carted away, reducing their dust. There are still no Port-a-loos but the bills are still getting through — it’s the postie’s first day back at work.

Out in Heathcote Valley there is less silt but most houses are damaged. Julie Bos is living with her husband and dog Murphy in a caravan in her driveway, their son Tom in a sleepout. They had other places to go but wanted to stay near their neighbours. Her house — a 120-year-old brick home — is a wreck. She says she’s ‘‘spooked’’ but is not going to leave, she doesn’t want to say goodbye to her ‘‘Garden of Eden’’. They will rebuild. ‘‘No bricks. It was a beautiful home. We just didn’t realise we were living in a time bomb.’’ Down the road Rhombus Cafe owner Justin Good hopes to set up a coffee stand by the end of the week. ‘‘We called it Rhombus because it didn’t really have a square corner in the place to start with. In fact, maybe now the door might shut more easily.’’ His shop appears salvageable, but next door — a tofu making business — has completely collapsed. Outside, local Dale Finch is dropping his chimney rubble off at the corner. He doesn’t expect to keep his job: he’s a window cleaner on high rise buildings in the CBD. Help was slow to come to this part of Heathcote, partly because the main road was closed by a rail bridge collapse. But two Port-a-loos arrived to service the suburb the day before, complete with hand sanitiser. Luxury. ■ See also: Sanitation worries — P17

Impact tossed fish from tanks at aquarium The force of last week’s earthquake tossed 40,000 litres of water out of tanks at a Cathedral Square aquarium — killing some fish and causing others to be put down. The Southern Encounter Aquarium had to be abandoned as staff and customers scrambled outside when the shaking started. Chief executive Lynn Anderson said half the water in the main tank

spilled over the side, many of the fish going with it. ‘‘A number of fish went over the tank and 50 died as a direct result of the earthquake.’’ One staff member worked furiously to try to save hundreds of others and released eels into the Waimakariri River and carpet sharks into theocean. ‘‘He is exhausted. He’s gutted and doesn’t want to speak about it.’’

A number of fish — including stingray — weren’t as lucky and had to be killed with anaesthetic. Ms Anderson said one staff member had to crawl on hands and knees along a passage while water was spilling out. ‘‘They were heading for the gifts area because that’s where the T-shirt stand was and they thought that it would at least be something soft there to land on them.’’

Another staff member who was standing, cleaning a tank, when the earth moved, fell backwards onto the ground. As he fell, he saw the spire from the Christchurch Cathedral collapse but still ran inside to help safely evacuate the aquarium building. Inside there was water everywhere. ‘‘The visitors in the movie theatre got soaked. One [staff member] moving

through the building was met with knee-deep water.’’ Staff were ‘‘absolutely devastated’’ by the loss of the animals but that could not compare with the devastation wreaked on the city. ‘‘It’s terrible but I want to make clear, as tragic as it is, so many wonderful people were killed going about their business in Christchurch.’’ — Andrew Koubaridis


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The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A7

The long wait

Injured Dad awakens to find baby, partner lost in debris It’s an agonising wait,

Grieving US family frustrated at wait

writes Jared Savage Glenn Prattley’s broken body is in Dunedin; his heart in Christchurch. There has been no sign of his 5-week-old daughter Taneysha, or girlfriend Kelsey Moore since the quake struck. He was walking down Manchester St with the missing pair, as well as sister Rochelle and father Stan. Glenn Prattley pushed Rochelle out of the way of falling glass, almost certainly saving the 21-year-old’s life, but both siblings were knocked unconscious. He woke in hospital with a broken leg — but no sign of Taneysha or Ms Moore. Eight days have passed and Mr Prattley, 28, has been transferred to Dunedin Hospital. Stan Prattley told the Herald the missing mother and child had yet to be identified by police. ‘‘We all think we know what happened . . . but nothing has been confirmed yet. We’re not getting told anything, but the police have to be 100 per cent sure. ‘‘Glenn’s pretty upset . . . that’s understandable.’’ A Crohn’s disease survivor, Glenn Prattley was unable to be reached for comment last night. In Christchurch Hospital last week, he told the Herald-Sun newspaper of the anguish of waiting.

FRUSTRATING WAIT: Glen Prattley (left) says his own escape was such a miracle that the odds were truly slim for his 5-week-old daughter Taneysha Prattley (below) and her mother Kelsey Moore. PICTURE / 3 NEWS

‘‘It’s especially worse, given my daughter is only 5 weeks old. I only just managed to get out of there alive, let alone my 5-week-old daughter being able to get out . . . ‘‘ His mother Gail Prattley said Taneysha was a tiny baby and weighed only 2.6kg when she was born. ‘‘He saved Rochelle’s life, but then he lost his daughter and his partner in the process,’’ Mrs Prattley said. Glenn Prattley is one of many waiting for news of loved ones. Robert Bijl, a long-time friend of CTV’s managing director Murray Wood who remains missing, said the wait was frustrating.

‘‘But what more can you ask for?’’ he said. ‘‘You can’t ask for more than 24 hours a day.’’ Donna Tairakena, wife of Tetaki ‘‘Wally’’ Tairakena, who is missing in the CTV building said she was ‘‘just waiting’’ for news of her husband. She was resigned to the fact it would be his body, not him, coming home, but remained hopeful he would be found. She said tremendous support from friends and family and her faith in God was seeing her through the ordeal and she was ‘‘at peace with everything’’. Yesterday afternoon, the families of those still missing within the rubblestrewn CBD were taken behind the

police cordon to sites where quake victims are thought to be trapped. Superintendent Dave Cliff said the tour was ‘‘very emotional’’ but gave families the chance to witness the extent of the devastation the quake had brought down on the central city.

Victims’ injuries shock hardened identification experts None of the quake victims at the Burnham Military Camp’s temporary morgue have been identified by their families. Most have horrific injuries. The extent of their injuries has shocked identification teams who have worked at the Australian bushfires and Boxing Day tsunami. The head of the New Zealand team, Inspector Mike Wright, yesterday said

MUSIC LOVER: Rachel Conley had just had lyrics from a Beatles song tattooed on her back when the quake struck.

staff were battling to return victims to their families as fast as possible. But the nature of their injuries is making the job impossible without DNA samples, dental records and fingerprints. In some cases those are possible — and that slows the carefully documented process, which can involve up to 35 people. Mr Wright said he could under-

stand why families were frustrated. He wasn’t taking the calls for faster release of bodies personally. ‘‘All I can do is look those people in the eye and say we’re doing our best for you and trying to achieve it in a fashion that has early resolution for everybody. But my number one goal is to do it correctly.’’ The emphasis was to treat victims

with dignity and respect. Identification had been made more difficult because of the wounds suffered by many victims. The ‘‘emotionally and physically draining’’ work was taking a toll on his staff. New Zealanders had been relieved by international crews to give them a few days break. — Andrew Koubaridi

Visiting American Rachel Conley was meant to fly out of New Zealand the day after the earthquake struck, and loved the country so much she planned to return. Instead, her family are among hundreds who have become frustrated in waiting for news of their loved ones. Police have defended the time it takes to properly identify bodies, but that is little comfort to the Conley family. Rachel, who turned 27 the previous Friday, and a friend had just left a central-city tattoo parlour when the earthquake hit. Her stepmother, Deb Conley, said from Ohio the building’s concrete awning and its second-floor brick layers crashed down on Rachel. The family had accepted she probably did not survive. Rachel had been doing a master’s degree in business but put everything on hold to travel. She worked in a Christchurch theatre school. She loved music and had been to get the lyrics, ‘‘There’s nowhere you can be that isn’t where you’re meant to be’’, from the Beatles song All You Need Is Love tattooed on her back. The family had scoured photos of the disaster for a glimpse of their daughter. Mrs Conley has sent police photographs of Rachel, identifying marks such as tattoos, and passed on the exact location. ‘‘Those dots could have been connected much quicker. I’m not being critical. It’s hard on both sides. We’re just waiting,’’ she said. Superintendent Dave Cliff said the victim identification teams had to follow a thorough process. ‘‘We have to have certainty that we don’t return the wrong loved one to the wrong family. We are doing everything we can to return loved ones to their families as fast as possible.’’

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The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A9

Farewell

Emotional farewell to baby Jayden The Christchurch toddler crushed by a TV set touched the lives of many with his cherubic smile, reports Anna Leask He never made it to his first birthday, but Jayden David Harris made a big impact on those who knew him. The nine-month-old’s big blue eyes and cherubic smile captured the hearts of the nation this week, after it was announced he had died in last Tuesday’s earthquake. Little Jayden was in his bed when the quake hit. His mother, Tracey Harris, was in the kitchen making him a bottle. As the house shook violently a 21-inch television fell from a chest of drawers, landing on him. Miss Harris tried desperately to protect Jayden, but the force of the quake knocked her to the ground. By the time she got to him she knew he had suffered massive head injuries. She rushed him to hospital but his injuries were too severe and he died. Miss Harris was flanked by family and friends as she arrived at her youngest child’s funeral yesterday. She approached his tiny white coffin, surrounded by teddy bears, and opened it to say her last goodbye to her baby. She stroked little Jayden lovingly before taking her seat beside him for the ceremony. Jayden’s father, Grant Smith, also sat near his son with his mother and the couple’s two young daughters — Stephanie, 3, and Vanessa, 2, both wearing blue. Jayden’s coffin was filled with his favourite toys, including a tiny blue teddy bear. As the clouds of dust billowed outside, celebrant Pam Morrison spoke of how difficult it was to understand why Jayden had been taken. ‘‘It is a huge departure from the

BEREFT: Grant Smith is assisted behind the coffin of his baby son, Jayden Harris (above). PICTURE / MARK MITCHELL

natural life cycle,’’ she said. ‘‘Our hearts are heavy with sorrow as we struggle to make sense of the death of a little boy. We are facing a loss that is so sad, huge and so heartbreaking that there are no words to say. There are no words of comfort that can cushion the blow of the death of your precious baby son.’’ Miss Harris and Mr Smith were too distraught to speak of their loss. But Miss Harris’ mother, Gabrielle Brooke, spoke of her ‘‘angel’’ whom she called her ‘‘little JD’’. ‘‘Tracey, I’m so proud of you for

being the best mummy in the world for Jayden. You gave him the most priceless of gifts — your unconditional love and you gave him 100 per cent,’’ she said. ‘‘You bravely fought to give Jayden everything that he needed. You were his world. His cheeky grin and his big blue eyes said he loved you with all his heart and spirit.’’ She spoke of Jayden’s infectious giggle and loving nature. ‘‘Jayden, you came into our lives for what feels like too short a time. Yet, my little JD, you have left your footprint

on my heart and enriched my life beyond measure. I’m going to miss you little man.’’ Mr Smith’s sister, Carmel, read a eulogy he wrote for his son. ‘‘On February 22, 2011 my life was turned upside down,’’ she read. ‘‘Jayden, my boy, you have left a hole in my heart that can never be replaced or repaired. You are an inspiration to me, your mother and your sisters. May you go to a better place without pain and sorrow.’’ During the service a black and white photograph of Miss Harris hold-

ing Jayden close to her and kissing his cheek as he gazed at the camera was displayed on the screen. The photograph was so moving it prompted one of his little sisters to walk up to it and say hello to him. Both the little girls were picked up to see their baby brother for the last time. They seemed too young to know what was happening, but realised their mother was upset, cuddling her and telling her not to cry. After Jayden’s birth Miss Harris turned to Holly House, a residential and education programme for young mothers, for help. Manager Cheryl Yusaf said Miss Harris stayed at the house for several months before going it alone with her baby. ‘‘Tracey had limited skills and needed help to parent Jayden. She wanted to be the best mother she could be for her son,’’ she said. ‘‘She sang, she played, she laughed, she talked — she built up a beautiful relationship with him. We asked her to give it everything she had and she did. And now we’re asking her to let him go. ‘‘Jayden was everything to Tracey. She can be proud of that, she made his short life a pleasure. He knew that he was loved, secure and nurtured and he had a lot to smile about.’’ As Jayden was carried from the church, to the hymn Amazing Grace, Mr Smith broke down. He had to be helped outside to say his final goodbye to his son. Mourners released blue and white helium balloons as a tribute to the baby they loved so much.

Afghan refugees flee again — from the hell of Christchurch quakes Hundreds of former refugees from Afghanistan have become refugees again — this time from the city they saw as their safe haven, Christchurch. A group of 110 Afghan refugees, including some rescued from the Tampa 10 years ago, are back in the Mangere refugee centre in South Auckland after joining an Air Force airlift of

hundreds of Christchurch earthquake victims to Whenuapai last weekend. Another group of 230 from Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Somalia and Bhutan flew to Whenuapai on Tuesday. Ajmal Chakari, 32, a spokesman for the group at Mangere, said he was not aware of anyone in his community

who has stayed behind. Mr Chakari, who came to Christchurch via Malaysia in 2002, said the city was ‘‘like my heaven’’ after the terror of Taliban-ruled Afghanistan. He brought two younger brothers, a sister and his parents to join him. He met his wife in Christchurch and their two children were born there.

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Mr Chakari said his family was so traumatised that he doubted they would go back to Christchurch. Canterbury Refugee Council chairman Ahmed Tani, a Somali who has stayed in Christchurch, said about 200 of the city’s 600 Afghanis, most of its 190-strong Kurdish community, about 65 out of 400 Somalis and a few

Ethiopian and Eritrean families had left or planned to leave. But he is encouraging the remaining former refugees to stay because they were now ‘‘part of the city’’. Immigration NZ has postponed an intake of 150 refugees from Burma, Bhutan and Colombia who were due at Mangere this month.

Avon City Ford would like the people of Christchurch to know that our thoughts are with you during this difficult time and both Avon City Ford and Avon City Suzuki are open and able to assist with all your motoring requirements

Avon City Ford

Cnr Main South Road and Epsom Road | Sockburn | Christchurch Ph: 03 348-4129 or 0800 655551 | www.avoncityford.co.nz Rangiora Service Centre | 78 Ivory St | Ph: 03 313-7059 8008151AA


Christchurch EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE

RECOVERING AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE Where can I get water?

Water tankers are being deployed to some schools in areas where there is no running water. All water must be boiled including tanker supplied water and mains water. If you are unable to boil water, add one teaspoon of bleach to 10 litres of water and leave for 30 minutes before use. Check updates on tanker locations on www. canterburyearthquake.org.nz. New Zealand Army has desalination plants processing water in Lyttelton and New Brighton. The City Council will advise when it is no longer necessary to boil water.

Where are the Welfare Centres?

i ;J/0NN* 7'fOJ&1^ AC Sb''NH'/0 7'*NN'^ 7-*NbO/0 i "f-'J(' !K&*PK^ Yf(' "NH'^ 8f0LJ/*f i "&*0(JON VJLK 7PK//H^ GCG W*NN*( 8/fO^ "&*0(JON !/dHN( 7'fOJ&1^ ;fLN( 8/fO^ #*f0&J J( f0 J0M/*1f'J/0 PN0'*N 'Kf' can link you to the support you need. Alternatively you can visit these Work and Income offices between ?f1 = C-1 dNNIOfb( /* ?f1 ] D-1 dNNIN0O(> i V/*0eb = FC 7Kf0O( 8/fO i 8JPPf*'/0 = AB 8JPPf*'/0 8/fO i 8f0LJ/*f = !/*0N* /M W//O f0O "HfIN 7'*NN' i TfJf-/J !/11&0J'b SJ0I = 50J' ? 6KN !*/((J0L(^ AA VJH'/0 7'*NN' i #(Ke&*'/0 !/11&0J'b SJ0I = !/*0N* /M !f(( f0O R//*N 7'*NN' i SJ0d//O !/11&0J'b SJ0I = GDG #HOdJ0( 8/fO i 7KJ*HNb = FZE]FZC VJHH( 8/fO i QNd "*JLK'/0^ FB "N*N(M/*O 7'

Where do I go for medical assistance?

6NHN-K/0N b/&* LN0N*fH -*fP'JPN ,*(' `&0HN(( J' J( f0 N1N*LN0Pb = OJfH GGG_\ UM 1NOJPfH f((J('f0PN J( *N+&J*NO fM'N*]K/&*(^ -HNf(N PfHH VNfH'KHJ0N ] Z@ZZ BGG GGB ] M/* fO%JPN M*/1 f 0&*(N /0 dKN'KN* b/& (K/&HO f''N0O !K*J('PK&*PK V/(-J'fH9( Y1N*LN0Pb jN-f*'1N0'^ /* f0 fM'N* K/&*( (N*%JPN> R//*K/&(N RNOJPfH !N0'*N `E ;JHL*J1 ;HfPN_^ 8JPPf*'/0 !HJ0JP `B hfHOK&*(' 8/fO_^ /* FD V/&* 7&*LN*b /0 'KN P/*0N* /M !/H/1e/ 7'*NN' f0O "NfHNb #%N0&N\

Where do I go for missing person information? 6KN 0&1eN* '/ PfHH J( Z@ZZ 8Yj !8<77 `Z@ZZ AEE FAB_\

Can I drive around?

<0Hb '*f%NH dKN0 N((N0'JfH f0O 'fIN Nc'*N1N Pf&'J/0 dKN0 O*J%J0L\ # 0&1eN* /M */fO( f0O e*JOLN( *N1fJ0 PH/(NO\ ;HNf(N L/ '/ ddd\ canterburyearthquake.org.nz for more information.

Where are there road closures?

6KN*N f*N 'N1-/*f*b */fO f0O e*JOLN PH/(&*N(\ !KNPI ddd\ canterburyearthquake.org.nz for details.

What toilets can I use?

;/*'feHN '/JHN'( f*N eNJ0L OJ('*Je&'NO 'K*/&LK/&' 'KN PJ'b\ 6KN Christchurch City Council is continually assessing the need for portable toilets in your community. For more information check the website www.canterburyearthquake.org.nz. If you have mains water supply you can flush your toilet. If there are any signs of blockage or overflow stop flushing – this may be an indication of damaged -J-N(\ 6KN !/&0PJH dJHH fO%J(N dKN0 (NdN*fLN (N*%JPN( f*N *N('/*NO\ ;HNf(N O/ 0/' -&' -Hf('JP efL( /M K&1f0 df('N J0 -/*'fH//(\ Y0(&*N all human waste is wrapped well and placed in your red bin.

Can I put my rubbish out?

X/* 'KN dNNI R/0Ofb F@ XNe*&f*b ] X*JOfb D Rf*PK IN*e(JON P/HHNP'J/0 dJHH P/0'J0&N\ h/& Pf0 -HfPN b/&* *&eeJ(K J0 e/'K b/&* red rubbish and green organics bin which will be collected weekly. ;HNf(N N0(&*N fHH K&1f0 df('N J( d*f--NO dNHH f0O -HfPNO J0 b/&* *NO eJ0\ 8NPbPHNO 1f'N*JfH( J0 b/&* bNHH/d eJ0 dJHH 0/' eN P/HHNP'NO as these can be stored. If your street is cordoned off or restricted to light traffic please take your bin outside of these areas.

Where can I put rubbish that does not fit in the wheelie bins?

6KJ( Pf0 eN 'fIN0 '/ 'KN ;f*IK/&(N 8/fO /* 7'bc RJHH 6*f0(MN* 7'f'J/0(\ Q/*1fH PKf*LN( dJHH f--Hb K/dN%N* b/& Pf0 INN- b/&* *NPNJ-' f0O PHfJ1 J' J0 f0 J0(&*f0PN PHfJ1\ ;HNf(N O/ 0/' O&1these on the road side.

Is there a fuel shortage?

Q/^ 'KN*N J( 0/ -N'*/H /* OJN(NH (K/*'fLN\ 8NL&Hf* (&--HJN( f*N P/1J0L J0'/ 'KN PJ'b\ 6d/ e&HI M&NH 'N*1J0fH( Kf%N /-N0NO M/* /-N*f'J/0 /&' /M Sb''NH'/0^ f( dNHH f( M*/1 6J1f*&\

If I have to leave my home, when will I be able to return?

6KJ( dJHH ON-N0O /0> f_ 'KN Nc'N0' /M f0b Of1fLN^ f0O dKN'KN* b/&* K/&(N Pf0 eN 1fON safe and functional, repaired and/or b) the restoration of essential services such as sewerage, water and power c) your insurance arrangements

What help do I get if I cannot return to my home because it cannot be repaired?

If you are a home owner discuss this with your insurance company, f0O 'KN QNd gNfHf0O Yf*'K+&fIN !/11J((J/0\ UM b/& f*N f 'N0f0'^ OJ(P&(( 'KJ( dJ'K b/&* Hf0OH/*O\ V/1N/d0N*( f0O 'N0f0'( Pf0 fH(/ P/0'fP' 'KN Yf*'K+&fIN W/%N*01N0' VNH-HJ0N^ Z@ZZ AA? ??A\

Who is responsible for the security of my house?

Wastewater on beaches

Wastewater and sewage has been found overflowing on streets f0O -*/-N*'JN( J0 'KN 3fJ1fJ*J f*Nf\ 6KN (NdfLN Kf( eNN0 OJ%N*'NO and is being flushed through storm water pipes into the sea in 'KN Q/*'K "NfPK[3fJ1fJ*J[;f*IHf0O( f*Nf\ ;HNf(N ('fb fdfb M*/1 rivers, the estuary and the sea, because of sewage overflows into 'KN #%/0 f0O VNf'KP/'N *J%N*(\ ;HNf(N fH(/ ('fb fdfb M*/1 eNfPKN( J0 'KN Q/*'K "NfPK[3fJ1fJ*J[;f*IHf0O( f*Nf\ 3/*I '/ *N-fJ* -J-N( is ongoing and the public will be advised when this emergency procedure is stopped.

Civil Defence Payments

h/& 1fb eN NHJLJeHN M/* !J%JH jNMN0PN -fb1N0'( dKJPK f*N f%fJHfeHN M/* f *f0LN /M PJ*P&1('f0PN(\ X/* Ncf1-HN^ JM b/&9%N KfO '/ HNf%N b/&* K/1N f( f *N(&H' /M 'KN +&fIN 'KN0 !J%JH jNMN0PN -fb1N0'( Pf0 KNH- b/& dJ'K fPP/11/Of'J/0 P/('(\ 6KNb Pf0 f((J(' dJ'K 'KN purchase of essential and emergency items, and are also available M/* 'K/(N dK/ Kf%N (&.N*NO f H/(( /M J0P/1N\ 6/ ,0O /&' fe/&' -fb1N0'(^ PfHH 'KN W/%N*01N0' VNH-HJ0N /0 Z@ZZ AA? ??A\

Accommodation

UM b/& 0NNO f((J('f0PN ,0OJ0L N1N*LN0Pb 'N1-/*f*b fPP/11/Of'J/0 PfHH Z@ZZ VYS; ZZ `Z@ZZ DEC AZZ_\ ;*/-N*'b owners or households with accommodation to offer can also call this number. X/* V/&(J0L QNd gNfHf0O 'N0f0'( PfHHJ0L fe/&' Of1fLN '/ 'KNJ* home, or to alert the Corporation to their whereabouts call the V/&(J0L QNd gNfHf0O VNH-HJ0N Z@ZZ @ZG BZG\

Support and Counselling Services

If you, your family or someone you know needs someone to talk to, we can put you in touch with a range of support and counselling (N*%JPN( M/* M*NN\ ;HNf(N PfHH /&* M*NN-K/0N Z@ZZ AAA @DB\

6KN -*/-N*'b /d0N* f0O[/* HfdM&H /PP&-JN*\ !J%JH jNMN0PN Pf00/' L&f*f0'NN (NP&*J'b /M -*/-N*'b\ h/& 1fb df0' '/ P/0(JON* -HfPJ0L valuable items in storage.

X/* fHH N0+&J*JN( M/* UdJ^ R$/*J f0O ;fPJ,P (&--/*'^ -HNf(N P/0'fP'> i 6N 8&0f0Lf < QLfJ'fK&^ Z@ZZ CFD @FD@^ ddd\0LfJ'fK&\JdJ\0a i 6N ;&0J T/IJ*J^ Z@ZZ @AC @E? /* ZFA BZZ ?DGF

Who do I contact about sewage leaks around my street or property?

X/* RJL*f0'( f0O 8NM&LNN( 'KN*N J( (&--/*' f%fJHfeHN\ Sf0L&fLN SJ0N J( f%fJHfeHN /0 'KN W/%N*01N0' VNH-HJ0N /* b/& Pf0 PfHH 'KN (N''HN1N0' (&--/*' KNH-HJ0N Z@ZZ AAB ?D@^ `Z@ZZ 77QgD5_\ 7N''HN1N0' 7&--/*' QNd gNfHf0O -*/%JON( (&--/*'^ fO%JPN f0O links to the services that new migrants need.

UM (NdfLN J( P/1J0L /&' /0 'KN ('*NN' PfHH ?DG AFGZ\ UM J' J( P/1J0L from your property contact a drainlayer who can determine if damage is on the street or the property. For water leaks it is suggested that you turn off your water at the mains if it appears the leak is between the road and your property. If the leak appears to be /&'(JON b/&* -*/-N*'b P/0'fP' &( /0 ?DG AFGZ\ h/& O/09' Kf%N '/ eN home for us to undertake repairs.

What will happen to my pets?

If you need to leave your house, you should either take your pets with you if possible, or arrange for them to be cared for at a cattery/ kennel or by someone you know. Care can also be arranged at the !K*J('PK&*PK !J'b !/&0PJH #0J1fH !/0'*/H J0 "*/1HNb\ 6NHN-K/0N ?DG AZDD eN'dNN0 @\ZZf1 = C\ZZ-1\ If you have lost or found a dog please contact Animal Control on ZFG FDZ @F?G\ X/* H/(' /* M/&0O Pf'( -HNf(N PfHH 'KN 7;!# /0 ED? AZCA\ 3KN*N #0J1fH !/0'*/H ,0O ('*fb O/L(^ 1JP*/PKJ-( f*N eNJ0L checked to try to identify owners and reunite dog and owner dKN*N 'KNb Pf0\ 3KN*N 'KNb Pf09' *N&0J'N^ *N(P&NO O/L( f*N eNJ0L '*f0(MN**NO '/ 'KN PJ'b O/L (KNH'N* J0 RN'*/ ;HfPN^ "*/1HNb\

Are any schools opening?

All childhood centres, primary and secondary schools within !K*J('PK&*PK PJ'b HJ1J'( dJHH *N1fJ0 PH/(NO &0'JH X*JOfb D Rf*PK\ 6KJ( O/N( 0/' f--Hb '/ NO&Pf'J/0 J0('J'&'J/0( dJ'KJ0 7NHdb0 f0O 3fJ1fIf*J*J jJ('*JP'( dKN*N ONPJ(J/0( /0 /-N0J0L Of'N( dJHH eN 1fON eb J0OJ%JO&fH "/f*O /M 6*&('NN(\ !KNPI 'KN RJ0J('*b /M YO&Pf'J/0 dNe(J'N M/* 'KN Hf'N(' J0M/*1f'J/0 ddd\1J0NO&\L/%'\0a f0O J0OJ%JO&fH (PK//H9( dNe(J'N\

Student Volunteer Army

UM b/& 0NNO %/H&0'NN*(^ 'KN 7'&ON0' 4/H&0'NN* #*1b `ddd\(%f\/*L\ 0a_ J( f (N*%JPN f&'K/*J(NO eb !J%JH jNMN0PN\ X/* KNH- dJ'K J((&N( (&PK f( (JH' *N1/%fH^ %J(J' ddd\(%f\/*L\0a /* 'Nc' '/ CBFA 2VYS;RY^ include a space and your name, address for assistance and type of f((J('f0PN *N+&J*NO\ 8N+&N('( f*N -*J/*J'J(NO f0O 1f'PKNO '/ 'KN f--*/-*Jf'N %/H&0'NN*( M*/1 'KN FZ^ZZZ]('*/0L ('&ON0' f*1b\ If you want to volunteer for the army you can register your details at ddd\(%f\/*L\0a /* -K/0N ?AD @DGD\

What is Operation Suburb?

<%N* /0N K&0O*NO 'Nf1( /M P/1eJ0NO 57#8 `5*ef0 7Nf*PK f0O 8N(P&N_ f0O !J%JH jNMN0PN d/*IN*( f*N O//*]I0/PIJ0L J0 'KN 1/(' f.NP'NO f*Nf(\ 6KN(N 'Nf1( Pf**b /)PJfH JON0'J,Pf'J/0\ h/& 1fb fH(/ eN %J(J'NO eb Y:! f0O J0(&*f0PN f((N((/*( dK/ fH(/ Pf**b JON0'J,Pf'J/0\

EQC Claim

;N/-HN Kf%N 'K*NN 1/0'K( '/ 1fIN f0 Y:! PHfJ1 M/* 'KN FF XNe*&f*b Nf*'K+&fIN\ X/* &*LN0' 0NNO( `JM b/&* K/1N J( 0/' dNf'KN*]-*//M^ (NP&*N /* (f0J'f*b_ PfHH Z@ZZ j#R#WY `Z@ZZ EFBFDE_ f0O f 'Nf1 M*/1 XHN'PKN*( Y1N*LN0Pb 8N(-/0(N !N0'*N( `V&e(_ Pf0 eN 1/eJHJ(NO\ X&*'KN* J0M/*1f'J/0> ddd\Pf0'N*e&*b\N+P\L/%'\0a\

LOOK AFTER YOUR HEALTH, YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS AND NEIGHBOURS. STAY INFORMED AS BEST YOU CAN. ASK FOR HELP. More information canterburyearthquake.org.nz http://twitter.com/ChristchurchCC Christchurch City Council telephone number: 941 8999 Earthquake Government Helpline: 0800 779 997

Earthquake Commission (EQC): Orion (electricity): Quake Support and Counselling: Housing New Zealand Emergency Assistance:

0800 326 243 363 9898 0800 777 846 0800 435 700


The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A11

The victims

REPORTED MISSING

Deborah Roberts - Christchurch Heidi Berg - 36 - Christchurch Gillian Sayers - 43 - England Phil Coppeard - 41 - Redcliffs, Christchurch Christian Carazo-Chandler - 35 Christchurch Brian Taylor - Christchurch Tamara Lia Harca - Romania Elsa Torres De Frood - Peru Tetaki (Wally) Tairakena - 60 -Tainui Isaac Thompson - 21 - Christchurch Sandra Hii - 34 - Malaysia Emmabelle Anoba - Philippines Ezra Mae Medalle - 25 - Philippines

Jessie Lloyd Albaracin Redouble - 25 Philippines Gil Hwan Yu - 23 - Korea Naon Hwan Yu - 21 - Korea Kelsey Moore - 19 - Christchurch Taneysha Prattley - 5 weeks - Christchurch Jayden Andrews-Howland - 14 - Linwood, Christchurch Koy Thanida - Thailand Norm Lee - Christchurch Valquin Bensurto - Philippines John Chua - Philippines Janet Meller - 58 - Christchurch Adam Fisher - 27 - Christchurch Didem Yaman - 31 - Otago Amanda Uriao - 38 - Christchurch Shawn Lucas - Christchurch

Steven Wright - Christchurch Dr Allan Sinclair - Christchurch Ivy Jane Cabunillas - 33 - Philippines Marion Hilbers - Christchurch Lalaine Agatep - 38 - Philippines Erica Avir Reyes Nora - Philippines Teresa McLean - Christchurch Kyle Jack Midgley - Christchurch Nina Bishop - 32 - Christchurch Dr Maysoon Abbas - Baghdad Dr Husam Al-Ani Jane Grant Jewel Francisco - 26 - Philippines John O’Connor - 40 - Ireland Gregory Tobin - 25 - Britain Donna Manning - Christchurch

Stories of people lost in the aftermath of the disaster that struck our city nine days ago, by the people who knew them

MISSING:

DEAD:

HARUKI HYAKUMAN Haruki Hyakuman was studying at an English language school on the third level of the CTV building when last Tuesday’s quake struck. The 27-year-old Japanese national was studying English so he could become a nurse. His girlfriend, Masami Musashi, is in Japan and said she has had no news or contact with Mr Hyakuman since the quake. She said her boyfriend liked to play computer games in his spare time. ‘‘I hope Haruki is ok.’’

JOANNA DIDHAM Joanna Didham is still missing in the CTV building, where she has worked for the past 13 years. Emergency services have said damage to the building is so great it is not survivable. A production manager for CTV, Mrs Didham is mother to Madison, 8, and Jessica, 3, and worked on Shopping with Jo which became Let’s go Shopping. Her husband, Michael Didham, says the emergency services have done everything he could have expected.

DR DOMINIC BELL Worked for The Clinic, a general practice which only weeks before had moved into the CTV building. A witness said they saw him in his exam room shortly before the quake. Dr Bell, who was formerly in practice in Howick, Auckland, has three grown children.

SISI XIN Sisi Xin’s partner Soon Jee Low said he believes the 28-yearold Otago University student was with a friend Didem Yaman at the time of the quake. Ms Yaman, who is also missing, had travelled from Dunedin for a short visit. Ms Xin, who was studying to become a dietitian, lived in Avonside and a neighbour saw the pair heading for town just before lunch.

IAN NEVILLE CALDWELL Ian Neville Caldwell was a builder and was working on a site in Sumner when the quake struck. An online memorial page said boulders rained down on the site, next to the RSA. He has not been heard from since. His name is not among those released by police, however his family have published a death notice. Mr Caldwell is survived by his wife Julie and daughters Olivia and Cassandra.

OFER MIZRAHI Friends say Ofer Mizrahi, a 23-year-old Israeli backpacker, is dead from debris which fell on to the car he was in. One of Mr Mizrahi’s friends, Guy Jordan, was reported in The Jerusalem Post last week as saying the backpacker had ‘‘definitely’’ been killed.

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A12

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

The Star

The economy

Quake bill forces Govt retreat on tax pledge High-income families might lose at least part of last year’s tax cuts in reduced family support if the Government goes ahead with changes mooted yesterday. Prime Minister John Key confirmed comments by his deputy, Bill English, that changes to Working for Families tax credits could be back on the agenda to help pay the costs of the Christchurch earthquake. It reverses a 2008 election promise that National ‘‘intend making no change’’ to Working for Families, reverting to his 2005 election position that it was ‘‘bizarre’’ to give welfare payments to families on $80,000 or $90,000 a year. On Tuesday, Mr English said he could not rule out changes to Working for Families and interest-free student loans because of the huge earthquake double-hit of lower tax revenue and higher costs. Yesterday, Mr Key said tax revenue could be down $5 billion in the year to June because of a $15 billion drop in output from Christchurch. He said he did not expect to charge interest on student loans, but was looking at savings in the $2.8 billion annual cost of Working for Families. ‘‘Working for Families and student

loans are arguably broad and general schemes ... there may be the opportunity to [alter] those schemes, particularly Working for Families where it reaches Bill English into very high income levels and where those people have enjoyed reasonably good tax cuts.’’. Former Labour Prime Minister Helen Clark dramatically increased family tax credits a month before the 2005 election, raising the income allowed before credits were clawed back from $27,500 to $35,000 a year and cutting the clawback rate from 30 per cent to 20 per cent. The changes, unveiled days after a National Party tax cut policy, extended the tax credits from 61 per cent to 75 per cent of all families with children, and raised their cost from $1.1 billion to $1.5 billion a year. The income allowed before clawbacks is now $36,827 and partial tax credits are paid to families earning up to $75,317 with one child; $91,227

‘Unsafe’ cathedral dome slated for removal

with two children; $107,137 with three children; $166,565 with six children. An evaluation last year found 74 per cent of all families with children received credits in 2008. An eighth of these,47,500 of 382,500 families, had incomes of more than $70,000 a year. This included 25,200 making more than $80,000. The Government cut the tax rate on incomes above $70,000 last October from 38 per cent to 33 per cent. Auckland University economist Susan St John said ministers could claw back tax credits from highincome families by raising the income threshold before the clawback starts or raising the clawback rate. ‘‘If they reduced the threshold, the problem would be that there would be a lot of families that would end up being affected around that $30,000 to $40,000 range,’’ she said. Herald calculations show raising the clawback rate to 25 per cent above $70,000, for example, would lower the maximum incomes at which credits could be claimed for three children from $107,137 to $99,709 a year — a significant but not dramatic reduction. It would also wipe out the gains of last year’s 5c cut in the top tax rate for — Simon Collins those families.

The dome of Christchurch’s Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament will be removed after an engineering report revealed it could topple in an aftershock. Engineers met the Catholic bishop, Barry Jones, yesterday to consider the future of the badly damaged basilica. The engineers’ report, based on an exterior inspection, reveals the dome is forcing weight-bearing structures outwards and presents a severe hazard to the surrounding area.

Removal of the dome can only be done by cranes at a distance from the building. A decision on the future of the cathedral will not be made until a detailed engineering report is done when the building is deemed safe to enter. In 2000, the basilica was one of 10 buildings chosen to represent New Zealand architecture in a 10-volume series on architecture in the 20th century.

Our deepest thoughts and sympathies are with all those affected by the tragic events in Christchurch We’re doing everything we can to help our customers through this extremely difficult time. An emergency response team is in place to handle increased claims calls and specialists have been flown in from overseas. Several members of our assessing team are already in Christchurch to help safeguard the health and safety of those most affected by the earthquake. Our Christchurch branch experienced severe structural damage and is closed until further notice.

TOW0303_18x81.2

We’ve set up a special site www.tower.co.nz/ earthquake where you can find useful information on claims. If you have any questions about any of your policies please don’t hesitate to contact us toll free on 0800 808 808.

3 important things to do: 1. Be safe. Always follow the advice of Emergency Services and take precautions around damaged buildings and flooded areas. Also, be alert to dangers around you, like unstable chimneys, brick walls and glass. 2. secure your property. Take whatever action you can to prevent any further loss or damage, without putting yourself at risk. 3. taLK to us aBout your cLaim. If you have any questions about any of your TOWER policies please don’t hesitate to call us on 0800 808 808.


We are here to help you. To our customers, our local team, our friends and loved ones in Christchurch, You are in our thoughts, and in our hearts. As Christchurch, Canterbury and all of New Zealand come to terms with last week’s earthquake, we are here to help you in any way we can. Our local team have put in a huge effort since last week, working tirelessly to help our customers and to get as many Westpac banking services as possible up and running in Christchurch and the surrounding region. Please let us know if there are other ways we can help.

From all of us at Westpac We have the following services available for you:

Today’s open branches •

Upper Riccarton

Hornby Mall

Ashburton

Papanui

Rangiora

Amberley

Halswell

Riccarton

Kaiapoi

Insurance claims

Merivale

If you need to lodge an insurance claim with us please call 0800 738 641

Bishopdale

Lincoln

Fendalton Mall

Relief packages Assistance is available for affected personal and business customers, including emergency overdrafts, loan repayment holidays and waiver of early withdrawal costs for term deposits. For more details about your options, please call us. Personal customers call 0800 400 600 Business customers call 0800 177 567

Today’s available ATMs We also have around 70% of our ATM network available around Christchurch. Please visit westpac.co.nz for detailed information on branch and ATM locations.

Mobile ATMs We will have mobile ATMs available in various locations around Christchurch later this week.

For more detailed information visit westpac.co.nz or call us on 0800 400 600 or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/westpacnz

Westpac New Zealand Limited

WES0606_quake_CS2_R


Canterbury Earthquake Important information for AA Insurance and SIS Insurance customers. Customer Response Team

The Customer Response Teams are based

Our Customer Response Teams are on the

in temporary mobile offices in several

ground in Christchurch and ready to assist

Christchurch locations.

all AA Insurance and SIS customers.

For the most up to date locations:

Whether you’re in need of emergency funds, temporary accommodation or simply want to get your claim under way – we are

Call us: 0800 339 539 Online: www.aainsurance.co.nz www.twitter.com/AAInsuranceCRT

there, waiting to help you.

Urgent assistance for AA Insurance customers

Urgent assistance for SIS Insurance customers

If you need urgent assistance right now, call AA Insurance on:

If you need urgent assistance right now, call SIS Insurance on:

0800 500 216

0800 101 026

Remember there is no rush for you to make a claim: the first priority is the welfare of you and your family.

Remember there is no rush for you to make a claim: the first priority is the welfare of you and your family.

Please don’t hesitate to call on us. Be assured that our company is operational, ready and able to assist.

SIS Insurance is a division of AA Insurance Limited

AAI/CHS/030311

Our thoughts remain with everyone in the Canterbury region. We are committed to supporting you in any way we can during this extremely difficult time.


The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A15

The evacuated

Health board says sorry for Nelson mix-up

Basketball visit cheers young Jock Young Canterbury cancer sufferer Jock Mowat was cheered up by New Zealand Breakers basketball player Paul Henare (pictured) at Starship Hospital in Auckland yesterday. The 6-year-old was diagnosed with a rare aggressive form of leukaemia at the beginning of last year and almost died waiting for a bone marrow transplant. Midway through January, Jock was flown to Starship Hospital for surgery after doctors found a matching donor from New York. ‘‘He’s finally on the mend. He’s been a sick little dog for so long, but he’s finally getting better. It’s such a relief,’’ his mother, Susan, said. Members of the Breakers visited Starship yesterday to help put a smile on the faces of some young patients. Mrs Mowat said the visit cheered him and Jock is now a Breakers fan. She said the family are looking forward to returning to their Canterbury farm, which was not damaged in the quake, as soon as Jock is well enough to travel.

Health officials have apologised to the day offered his ‘‘sincere apologies’’. family of a Christchurch rest home ‘‘Unfortunately in some cases we patient who had to be rescued by her were not able to contact family memfamily before being sent to Nelson bers prior to the evacuation,’’ he told against their wishes. The Star. ‘‘Safety of residents was our Lorraine Dunn, 89, was taken home prime consideration. We had to move from Nazareth House hosquickly as the facilities they pital by family members on were in were not safe, and Friday after they found her we had beds available at rest tagged with the label ‘‘Nelhomes out of Christchurch.’’ son’’. Mr Meates confirmed 261 They had asked to be told patients had been transif she was to be evacuated ferred to rest homes from from the Princess Margaret Invercargill to Auckland. Hospital, where patients The decision to move from badly damaged them out of Christchurch Nazareth House had been was not taken lightly ‘‘as we Lorraine Dunn placed. know how disruptive this Crippled after a major stroke and is’’, he said. barely able to communicate, Mrs Dunn Mrs Smith said the family thanked has a large supportive family and Mr Meates for the apology. ‘‘I undernetwork of friends in Christchurch and stand that they were very busy at the is visited every day. Daughter Maria time, but they had all our cellphone Smith said a move to Nelson would numbers and we’d specifically asked to have been a death sentence. be informed if Mum was being moved Canterbury District Health Board from Princess Margaret.’’ — Cullen Smith chief executive David Meates yester-

Important Information for Businesses in Christchurch

Business Recovery Information 0800 50 50 96 A business focused call centre is now operational from 7am -7pm, Monday – Saturday.

Website www.recovercanterbury.co.nz This website provides practical advice and information for business recovery.

The Earthquake Support Package The initial six week earthquake recovery package for employers and employees is available now. It is made up of two parts: •

An Earthquake Support Subsidy to help employers keep paying wages Earthquake Job Loss Cover to support employees whose employer believes their business is no longer viable

Commercial Space

Displaced businesses

Trauma

Central city cordons will remain in place for some time.

If you are unable to access your usual place of business please register your new location with us urgently by calling 0800 50 50 96.

Most people involved in a traumatic incident experience some kind of emotional reaction.

It is unlikely you will be able to access your office/ server/ equipment in the near future. Limited commercial space is available but moving very quickly. If you require assistance looking for space please ring us on 0800 50 50 96 and we will do our best to help you.

This is critical, particularly for central city businesses that may be facing demolition.

Ensure your staff are coping – be understanding and accommodating. Psychosocial support is available through Victim Support on 0800 842 846.

To apply online go to: www.workandincome.govt.nz To apply by phone call: 0800 779 997

McCARTHY

Call Centre

Our thoughts are with everyone in the Canterbury region following the February 22 earthquake. We are committed to supporting all businesses through this extremely difficult time. We are here to help. We have a team of business recovery coordinators on the ground ready to provide support and advice to you, help you access wage subsidies and connect you to services that can help you get back on your feet.


At times like this the most precious thing we can do is simply support each other Words can’t describe what many of our friends, neighbours, families and workmates are going through – but words, well chosen, are also some of the most comforting, reassuring and healing things we can offer. For this reason we are doing all we can to ensure our customers can reach each other, talk and communicate with each other and the world using our network. So from February 22 to March 12 we are providing our residential customers in Christchurch free national and international calling from their landlines.* Secondly, for any Christchurch customers experiencing financial hardship through these times, we would also like to offer a little support. If you are a residential customer with hardship issues due to the earthquake, and you would like help with your bill, call

0508 24 24 11 (CH CH 11)

If you are a business with similar concerns, please call

0508 24 24 12 (CH CH 12)

For more information, links and updates, please go to

www.telstraclear.co.nz/go/earthquakesupport

*The offer applies to all national and international calls (except 018, 0900 and other special numbers and services) made from Christchurch-based residential fixed lines from midnight on February 22 to midnight on March 12. Christchurch customers who receive a bill for national and international calls made between February 22 and 24 will receive a credit in their following month’s bill.

TCINT0006CHS


The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A17

The clean-up

Homeowner rubbishes council dump fee For $110, I should have left my ruined carpets on the roadside, angry local tells Nick Tolerton An Avondale man is furious he was charged $110 at the rubbish dump when he dropped off stinking, siltsoaked carpets from his ruined house. Bob Schumacher of Scoular Pl was charged that for two trips to the Styx Mill EcoDepot on Saturday during his earthquake clean-up. Liquefaction sent a slurry of water and mud surging through the doors of his house and up through a crack which opened in the lounge. When he took the filthy carpets and underlay to the dump, he was charged $56 for his first load and $44 for the second trip. The council charges by weight, and hasn’t waived this for the quake. It was petty to do that to people who had lost their homes, said Mr Schumacher. ‘‘It’s punishing people trying to get rid of stuff,’’ he said. ‘‘I would have thought the council could have said that for the next week people affected by the quake wouldn’t be charged anything.

ON THE MAT: A slurry of water and mud raced through Bob Schumacher’s Scoular Pl, Avondale, home and ruined carpets and underlay. ‘‘A few might take advantage of that, but the genuine ones would

outweigh them,’’ Mr Schumacher said. He noted that Mayor Bob Parker

Aranui relieved: toilets will ease health worry

M

DRAPES NEED CLEANING?

DE NTI STRY ON M E R IVALE

I

f you want to freshen up your home, one of the best things you can do is to clean the drapes. Not only will they look and smell better, but regular cleaning also helps to keep the fabric in good condition. At Eastern Drycleaners we are experienced in cleaning all drapes including satin, velvet, cotton, thermals, and even silk. Our largest machine has the extra feature of cleaning drapes at a lower temperature than is needed for cleaning clothes. This virtually eliminates the risk of shrinkage and means that usually your thermal drapes can be cleaned with complete safety. As well, you will find that our prices are about the best around. If you’re not sure about proceeding we are happy to call and give you a free quote and we give free pickup from and delivery to your home in the Christchurch area. We’re also delighted to remove and rehang the drapes for you. And at your request we can provide treatment for mildew on linings, rectify smoke and water damage and restore the length of drapes which may have shrunk due to contact with water or from previous cleaning. Just give us a call. We will be happy to talk to you. Cut out this advert and present it with your drapes, together with your two garments or one blanket which we will dryclean free, for every $100 of drapes cleaned.

1st Floor , Merivale Mall Ph:355-8297

LONG WAY TO GO: A Port-a-loo in Avonside. PICTURE / GEOFF SLOAN

be an understanding about how they should be distributed. ‘‘There are major issues in the east. Council have operated on a basis of people ringing the 0800 number to identify a need for them. But if they haven’t got a telephone, cellphone or a paper they don’t know what number to ring. How on earth do they ring? ‘‘People with the highest needs are missing out completely,’’ she said. The suburb needed more hot water, and hot meals to keep people’s immune systems up.

‘‘We need to make sure that people are being properly fed. Giving people one hot meal a day would be the best thing we can do for their health.’’ It was impossible to tell how many people had moved out of the eastern suburbs. ‘‘A lot of people have moved in with family in close proximity.’’ Anzac MacDonald’s Hampshire St house was badly damaged so he and daughter Axzyah, 5, are living in a tent in their front yard. — Caroline King

Open as normal for all your Dental needs

Grant Slade

The team hopes you are well and looking after yourselves and your family needs. dentistry@merivale.co.nz www.dentistryonmerivale.co.nz

Manager

Eastern Drycleaners Ph. 3794-600 8010218AA

On the ninth day after the quake, the badly hit eastern suburb of Aranui finally has Port-a-loos. There have been concerns lack of sanitation could pose a severe health threat to the area, where many still have no power, water or sewerage. Te Rawhiti Family Care Centre practice manager Jo Grenon said sanitation was a big issue. ‘‘There are people in their 80s having to go to the toilet godknows-where,’’ she said. She understood the only Port-a-loo in the area had been at the clinic. ‘‘We don’t mind them using our loo, but for the whole area it’s not enough,’’ she said. To help people stay clean, Bishopdale Seventh Day Adventist Church organised a ‘‘shower shuttle’’ from Aranui to Pascoe Park campground in Styx Mill. The bus, lent by Canterbury Leisure Tours, ran for the first time on Tuesday. Christchurch East MP Lianne Dalziel said more resources were desperately needed. ‘‘It’s taken a week to get portaloos into the area. There’ve been poorly distributed — there doesn’t seem to

had said the council was trying to do everything they could for people hit by

the quake. ‘‘Here’s one way they could have helped, and they haven’t. ‘‘I hope he enjoys a latte at my expense.’’ Mr Schumacher knows of another earthquake victim stunned by the charges. ‘‘We could have dumped it all at the side of the road, like a lot of people have done,’’ he said. ‘‘$110 later, I almost wish I had.’’ Burwood-Pegasus Community Board chairwoman Linda Stewart said the charge was ‘‘unbelievable.’’ It was unfair and unrealistic to charge people at a time like this, and if Mr Schumacher hadn’t got rid of the carpets, they would have become a health issue in no time. If people kept their receipts from the EcoDepot, they should be reimbursed by their insurance company or the welfare fund, she said. A council media spokesman told The Star householders should take up issues like this with the council call centre, ph 941 899. A week after the quake, Mr Schumacher is still cleaning up. Like many residents in his area, he is still without power and water. Yesterday he was digging the last silt out of his garden. It had been nearly 1m deep through his property, and he was shovelling the last of it out of his garden shed.

Also Shop 311 Eastgate Buckley’s Rd, Ph 389 5300 (next to post shop)


Liquefaction

Liquefaction

GEOLOGIST:

AFTERMATH: DAY 10

Map faults before rebuild

14,000

people have been given Govt financial assistance

Recent quakes were on unknown lines and there may be more to discover, writes Isaac Davison

The location and scale of potential faults under the Canterbury Plains must be understood before Christchurch pours billions of dollars into rebuilding, says a geologist. Both the September earthquake and last week’s deadly tremor occurred on faultlines that did not exist on GNS Science’s database. University of Canterbury geologist Mark Quigley said further ‘‘blind’’ faults could lie under Christchurch. He said priority should be given to creating an ultrasound-like image of the subsurface. ‘‘We’ve so far been struck by two faults we didn’t know about. So here’s the question: is there a fault that’s really short but capable of a magnitude-four earthquake in the immediate Christchurch area? This can be answered. And we need this data before we even talk about rebuilding.’’ Dr Quigley said cities on similar faultline networks, such as Los Angeles, had done three-dimensional seismic surveys, allowing informed engineering decisions. While aware of the need to tread sensitively after the quake, he believed it was a matter of urgency. The main obstacle is funding. Dr Quigley said geophysical tests under the city would be relatively inexpensive — about $1 million. . Studying aftershocks gave some clues to the potential for faults under Canterbury. This could be augmented by seismic surveys. The combined studies could map a faultline to within 100 metres. The most common method of surveying is to use a truck-mounted device, commonly used for oil and gas exploration, which pounds the earth. Instruments called geophones are placed alongside the truck’s path, and measure the strength and angle of the vibration when it returns. This data is used to map the earth’s crust. Because of the cost and complicated nature of the process, scientists have mostly focused on mapping areas where there is a surface rupture or known activity. University of Otago geologist Andrew Gorman said geophysical surveys would be helpful, but were complicated. Some surveys taken in the Canterbury Plains in September did not provide a convincing image. Dr Gorman has recently worked on mapping parts of the alpine fault, which runs along the spine of the South Island. He said measuring the faultlines in the foothills of the alps was relatively straightforward, because of the clear distinction in rock on either side of the fault. This was not the case under Christchurch.

30,000 25,000

chemical toilets in use

houses and businesses still without power

500

University of Canterbury students moved to Australia

66%

of Christchurch has water services

What is liquefaction

Collapsed 160 DEAD buildings 240 on soft soil – QV

PREDICTED DEATH TOLL

Soil loses strength and stiffness in an earthquake, causing it to behave like a liquid. The suburb of Bexley received extensive damage caused by liquefaction

Other areas at risk Formation of water fountain and sand boils

Bay of Plenty Mount Maunganui, Papamoa, Whakatane, Ohope

Before the earthquake Loosely packed grains. Pore spaces filled with water.

Pavement

What happens When the ground shakes during an earthquake the soil particles are rearranged and the soil mass compacts and decreases in volume. This decrease in volume causes water to be ejected to the ground surface. settlement of ground

soil particle

Auckland south of Auckland, waterfront, North Shore beaches

Sediment layer Water-saturated granular layer

During the earthquake Tightly packed layer

Sand boils

Wellington/ Wairarapa Wellington harbour and Island Bay, Petone Valley, Paraparaumu

Pavement Canterbury Kaiapoi, New Brighton, Bexley, Pegasus Bay

Before earthquake

During earthquake

After earthquake

Sand injected into overlying sediment

Contractors move the vast amount of silt caused by liquefaction at a tip in the suburb of Bexley.

PICTURES: Brett Phibbs. HERALD GRAPHIC

The two buildings that claimed the greatest number of lives in the earthquake were built on soft soil prone to a ‘‘large increase in shaking’’ and with high susceptibility to liquefaction. The risks are outlined in Quotable Value property-hazard reports which reveal common features of concern for the sites of the Canterbury Television and Pyne Gould Corporation buildings, in which more than 100 people were killed. The Government has ordered an inquiry into the safety of affected buildings. Yesterday, Prime Minister John Key said as many as one-third of buildings in central Christchurch might have to be demolished. The hazards identified in the QV reports — obtained by the Herald — are likely to also apply to other buildings in Christchurch because of the ground conditions. Owners of the CTV and PGC buildings say they were given clearance after the last big quake in September, and engineering reports had been obtained. But concerns have been raised about the safety of the CTV building. Lionel Hunter, sole director of CTV building owner Madras Equities, told the Herald he lost a good friend in the building’s collapse. ‘‘If we had known anything was wrong with the building, I would have pushed it over myself,’’ he said. CTV chairman Nick Smith, who lost many of his staff, said he had no qualms about trusting the judgment of the building owner and the engineering reports ordered. ‘‘I’m not an engineer. You accept the expert advice, and you hope it’s correct,’’ he said. The property-hazard reports for both buildings, compiled from a variety of official sources, say they are on ground classified as ‘‘very soft soil’’. ‘‘In a strong close-by earthquake these materials could cause . . . a moderate increase in shaking for high-rise buildings. ‘‘In a strong distant earthquake these materials are likely to cause a large increase in shaking.’’ The reports also say the buildings are ‘‘in an area where the ground is classified as having a susceptibility to liquefaction that is very high’’. GeoNet project director Ken Gledhill said liquefaction probably occurred in central Christchurch as well as in the suburbs, but large buildings were expected to have substantial foundations to combat it. Madras Equities spokesman Ken Jones said the Christchurch City Council cleared the CTV building after September’s 7.1-magnitude quake. A detailed structural engineers’ re-

‘‘

If we had known anything was wrong with the building, I would have pushed it over myself. Lionel Hunter

port commissioned by the building’s manager had raised no issues about the structural integrity of the building. ‘‘The report recommended internal and external work to repair superficial damage to the building fabric sustained in the earthquake and its immediate aftershocks,’’ he said. This work was being done at the time of the building’s collapse. ‘‘The February 22 earthquake appears to have generated unusual forces that relatively modern buildings built to recent seismic standards were not able to withstand,’’ Mr Jones said. A written statement from the company that owns the PGC building said: ‘‘The building was green-stickered after the September quake. The owner had four assessments and reports prepared by structural engineers after the September earthquake and then again after the Boxing Day earthquake’’. The director of the company, Stephen Collins, could not be reached for comment. Mr Key said yesterday that a third of the buildings in central Christchurch might have to be demolished. Before they could be replaced, geotechnical work would have to be done on the land, and deep piles could be needed to reach solid ground. ‘‘We are talking two years before you see much,’’ he told NewstalkZB. ‘‘In five years you will see quite a bit, in 10 years you will see a lot.’’ Rebuilding Christchurch would be ‘‘a 15-year job’’. Buildings erected under modern building codes could survive without damage, and that was shown by the Inland Revenue Department building across the road from the CTV site. ‘‘It is a normal glass building,’’ Mr Key said. ‘‘Not a pane of glass broken, it is in perfect condition.’’ He suggested that because of the number of central-city buildings under threat of demolition, Christchurch might develop as a city with large satellite business districts.

— Jarrod Booker


Liquefaction

Liquefaction

GEOLOGIST:

AFTERMATH: DAY 10

Map faults before rebuild

14,000

people have been given Govt financial assistance

Recent quakes were on unknown lines and there may be more to discover, writes Isaac Davison

The location and scale of potential faults under the Canterbury Plains must be understood before Christchurch pours billions of dollars into rebuilding, says a geologist. Both the September earthquake and last week’s deadly tremor occurred on faultlines that did not exist on GNS Science’s database. University of Canterbury geologist Mark Quigley said further ‘‘blind’’ faults could lie under Christchurch. He said priority should be given to creating an ultrasound-like image of the subsurface. ‘‘We’ve so far been struck by two faults we didn’t know about. So here’s the question: is there a fault that’s really short but capable of a magnitude-four earthquake in the immediate Christchurch area? This can be answered. And we need this data before we even talk about rebuilding.’’ Dr Quigley said cities on similar faultline networks, such as Los Angeles, had done three-dimensional seismic surveys, allowing informed engineering decisions. While aware of the need to tread sensitively after the quake, he believed it was a matter of urgency. The main obstacle is funding. Dr Quigley said geophysical tests under the city would be relatively inexpensive — about $1 million. . Studying aftershocks gave some clues to the potential for faults under Canterbury. This could be augmented by seismic surveys. The combined studies could map a faultline to within 100 metres. The most common method of surveying is to use a truck-mounted device, commonly used for oil and gas exploration, which pounds the earth. Instruments called geophones are placed alongside the truck’s path, and measure the strength and angle of the vibration when it returns. This data is used to map the earth’s crust. Because of the cost and complicated nature of the process, scientists have mostly focused on mapping areas where there is a surface rupture or known activity. University of Otago geologist Andrew Gorman said geophysical surveys would be helpful, but were complicated. Some surveys taken in the Canterbury Plains in September did not provide a convincing image. Dr Gorman has recently worked on mapping parts of the alpine fault, which runs along the spine of the South Island. He said measuring the faultlines in the foothills of the alps was relatively straightforward, because of the clear distinction in rock on either side of the fault. This was not the case under Christchurch.

30,000 25,000

chemical toilets in use

houses and businesses still without power

500

University of Canterbury students moved to Australia

66%

of Christchurch has water services

What is liquefaction

Collapsed 160 DEAD buildings 240 on soft soil – QV

PREDICTED DEATH TOLL

Soil loses strength and stiffness in an earthquake, causing it to behave like a liquid. The suburb of Bexley received extensive damage caused by liquefaction

Other areas at risk Formation of water fountain and sand boils

Bay of Plenty Mount Maunganui, Papamoa, Whakatane, Ohope

Before the earthquake Loosely packed grains. Pore spaces filled with water.

Pavement

What happens When the ground shakes during an earthquake the soil particles are rearranged and the soil mass compacts and decreases in volume. This decrease in volume causes water to be ejected to the ground surface. settlement of ground

soil particle

Auckland south of Auckland, waterfront, North Shore beaches

Sediment layer Water-saturated granular layer

During the earthquake Tightly packed layer

Sand boils

Wellington/ Wairarapa Wellington harbour and Island Bay, Petone Valley, Paraparaumu

Pavement Canterbury Kaiapoi, New Brighton, Bexley, Pegasus Bay

Before earthquake

During earthquake

After earthquake

Sand injected into overlying sediment

Contractors move the vast amount of silt caused by liquefaction at a tip in the suburb of Bexley.

PICTURES: Brett Phibbs. HERALD GRAPHIC

The two buildings that claimed the greatest number of lives in the earthquake were built on soft soil prone to a ‘‘large increase in shaking’’ and with high susceptibility to liquefaction. The risks are outlined in Quotable Value property-hazard reports which reveal common features of concern for the sites of the Canterbury Television and Pyne Gould Corporation buildings, in which more than 100 people were killed. The Government has ordered an inquiry into the safety of affected buildings. Yesterday, Prime Minister John Key said as many as one-third of buildings in central Christchurch might have to be demolished. The hazards identified in the QV reports — obtained by the Herald — are likely to also apply to other buildings in Christchurch because of the ground conditions. Owners of the CTV and PGC buildings say they were given clearance after the last big quake in September, and engineering reports had been obtained. But concerns have been raised about the safety of the CTV building. Lionel Hunter, sole director of CTV building owner Madras Equities, told the Herald he lost a good friend in the building’s collapse. ‘‘If we had known anything was wrong with the building, I would have pushed it over myself,’’ he said. CTV chairman Nick Smith, who lost many of his staff, said he had no qualms about trusting the judgment of the building owner and the engineering reports ordered. ‘‘I’m not an engineer. You accept the expert advice, and you hope it’s correct,’’ he said. The property-hazard reports for both buildings, compiled from a variety of official sources, say they are on ground classified as ‘‘very soft soil’’. ‘‘In a strong close-by earthquake these materials could cause . . . a moderate increase in shaking for high-rise buildings. ‘‘In a strong distant earthquake these materials are likely to cause a large increase in shaking.’’ The reports also say the buildings are ‘‘in an area where the ground is classified as having a susceptibility to liquefaction that is very high’’. GeoNet project director Ken Gledhill said liquefaction probably occurred in central Christchurch as well as in the suburbs, but large buildings were expected to have substantial foundations to combat it. Madras Equities spokesman Ken Jones said the Christchurch City Council cleared the CTV building after September’s 7.1-magnitude quake. A detailed structural engineers’ re-

‘‘

If we had known anything was wrong with the building, I would have pushed it over myself. Lionel Hunter

port commissioned by the building’s manager had raised no issues about the structural integrity of the building. ‘‘The report recommended internal and external work to repair superficial damage to the building fabric sustained in the earthquake and its immediate aftershocks,’’ he said. This work was being done at the time of the building’s collapse. ‘‘The February 22 earthquake appears to have generated unusual forces that relatively modern buildings built to recent seismic standards were not able to withstand,’’ Mr Jones said. A written statement from the company that owns the PGC building said: ‘‘The building was green-stickered after the September quake. The owner had four assessments and reports prepared by structural engineers after the September earthquake and then again after the Boxing Day earthquake’’. The director of the company, Stephen Collins, could not be reached for comment. Mr Key said yesterday that a third of the buildings in central Christchurch might have to be demolished. Before they could be replaced, geotechnical work would have to be done on the land, and deep piles could be needed to reach solid ground. ‘‘We are talking two years before you see much,’’ he told NewstalkZB. ‘‘In five years you will see quite a bit, in 10 years you will see a lot.’’ Rebuilding Christchurch would be ‘‘a 15-year job’’. Buildings erected under modern building codes could survive without damage, and that was shown by the Inland Revenue Department building across the road from the CTV site. ‘‘It is a normal glass building,’’ Mr Key said. ‘‘Not a pane of glass broken, it is in perfect condition.’’ He suggested that because of the number of central-city buildings under threat of demolition, Christchurch might develop as a city with large satellite business districts.

— Jarrod Booker


CHRISTCHURCH

Our thoughts are with you. The following stores are back open:

8:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm 8:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm Barrington Ashburton Belfast Greymouth Hornby Rangiora Northlands Rolleston Riccarton Timaru For any queries regarding Christchurch store openings, please call 0800 422274

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The supply of stock may be temporarily affected due to the earthquake.


The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A21

The determined

Beach wedding goes ahead Dogged by earthquakes, Amy Gregory and James Allen of South Brighton will go ahead with their beach wedding in North Canterbury this weekend. The couple paid a deposit on their house in the week before the September quake, but after insurance was refused they had to wait until October to settle the purchase and move in. Cracks in their house have widened since last week’s tremor. They have lost the chimney, have no power or water and Ms Gregory’s wedding dress can’t be retrieved from a badly damaged Cathedral Square building. They could be forgiven for delaying the ceremony. But with the help of family, friends and strangers, they are determined to tie the knot at Gore Bay on Saturday afternoon. ‘‘All our friends wanted something positive — to celebrate love and life,’’ Ms Gregory told The Star. ‘‘We thought, ‘We’ve just got to go ahead’.’’ With her wedding dress trapped, a friend in Wellington told a radio station about her plight and offers of gowns flooded in from around the country. Photographs were displayed on a website for Ms Gregory to choose. ‘‘I’ve tried on four already. Three were too small and one was too big,’’ she said. ‘‘I just can’t believe people would send a wedding dress down to a complete stranger.’’ Catering arrangements were

coming from Scotland, the US, China and Australia. ‘‘Things have changed because of the earthquake, but it doesn’t matter,’’ Mrs Gregory said. ‘‘We’re all still alive.’’

Punting staff have described what happened when the quake struck while they were carrying tourists on the Avon River. Edward Hocken and Timothy Campbell were ferrying tourists along a central city section of the river. Campbell said seconds after the shaking began, the shallow part of the river drained completely while he was ferrying four adults and two children. The punt came to an abrupt halt. Campbell, who was only metres downstream from the Armagh St bridge, recalled watching it ‘‘move impossibly’’ from side to side. He and his passengers witnessed the partial collapse of historic Provincial Chambers further upstream. The shaking ceased and Campbell recalled a moment of total silence without the usual sound of flowing water. This was followed by screams and sirens, then the sound of gushing water as the river resumed its flow and surged through fissures in the riverbed. Campbell jumped off the punt into the river and pushed it to the horse-cleaning ramp on Victoria Square, where his passengers disembarked and joined the gathering crowds. Hocken, 18, told a similar story of punting four German tourists between Victoria Square and the Town Hall when he heard the ‘‘horrendous noise’’ that preceded the violent aftershock.

— Cullen Smith

— Adrien Taylor

SOME THINGS BORROWED: Amy Gregory and James Allen are determined their wedding should go ahead to ‘‘celebrate love and life’’. thrown into disarray, but North Canterbury women have come to the rescue, baking cakes and cupcakes. ‘‘It’s just so lovely,’’ Ms Gregory said. ‘‘We’ve been blown away with all the people willing to help.’’ A social worker, she and Mr Allen,

a sales manager, had known each other ‘‘for years’’ but travelled overseas and met again at home in 2007. ‘‘We’ve been together ever since.’’ Ms Gregory’s mother, Ann, said some of the 90 guests had pulled out due to the quake, but others were

River emptied of water: punt staff


A22

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

The Star

Nation

Child poison cases climb

Parents trying to quit smoking need to be reminded their medicine can be dangerous, writes Martin Johnston People who use nicotine replacement therapy are being warned of the harm it can do to children — after a huge rise in calls to the National Poisons Centre and three ‘‘serious exposures’’. Nicotine gum, lozenges and related products are safe if used by smokers at recommended dosages, but major overdoses can cause symptoms including irregular pulse, breathing difficulties and, in some cases, death. The Government, through the Quit Group, promotes and subsidises nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) as a quit-smoking aid. The National Poisons Centre has recorded a steady increase in calls about the exposure of children to NRT, from five in 2004 to 49 last year. In a report to the Ministry of Health, the centre says there have been three ‘‘serious exposures’’ in Nelson recently. Nelson-Marlborough District Health Board paediatrician Dr Nick Baker said yesterday three preschoolers had been hospitalised with symptoms including nausea, salivation, agitation and vomiting.

NICOTINE OVERDOSE ■ Symptoms can include sweating, vomiting, convulsions. ■ Lethal dose in children is 1mg per kg of bodyweight — 30mg in a 30kg child, for instance. ■ Nicotine gum contains either 2mg or 4mg of nicotine per piece. ■ 5 calls to National Poisons Centre in 2004 about children exposed to nicotine replacement therapy. ■ 49 calls last year.

They recovered. ‘‘Many people carry around a potentially lethal dose of nicotine. We advise that people treat their nicotine replacement therapy as a medicine and keep it out of reach of children.’’ The poisons centre report says in one case it investigated, the child had ingested 25 pieces of gum.

NRT gum comes in a range of flavours, such as mint, fruit and liquorice. The products’ data sheets say it tastes bad if chewed too quickly. The poisons centre says brief skin or oral exposure to used NRT skin patches in children is usually not harmful. Three-quarters of the children about whom calls were made to the centre required medical referral for treatment or monitoring. ‘‘Any more than a minor exposure to pharmaceutical nicotine should be considered potentially toxic in children,’’ Dr Michael Beasley of the poisons centre said. The ministry’s senior adviser on tobacco control, Carl Billington, said that after it was notified of the issue last week, it asked the Quit Group to remind parents to keep NRT, like any medicine, out of children’s reach. The Quit Group said it had sent the new warning to its Quitline advisers and quit-card providers. Its practice was to tell clients to dispose of leftover NRT carefully, away from children and pets.

DINING OUT: Adventurer Bear Grylls, in New Zealand to film a new series, rates weta as the worst thing he’s eaten.

Adventurer pays tribute to Kiwi strength Adventurer Bear Grylls has paid tribute to New Zealanders’ strength following the Christchurch quake. ‘‘It’s a real privilege to be in New Zealand and stand alongside you guys and everything you’re going through as a nation,’’ he said yesterday. It’s high praise from the star of the Discovery Channel show Man vs Wild — in which Grylls is dropped into remote areas and battles the elements to find his way out. He was filming in the Southern Alps when the earthquake struck last week. ‘‘When terrible things happen it brings people together, and if there’s one thing I’ve learned about New

Zealanders it’s that you’re tough and you’re resilient and you will come back.’’ Grylls was in Auckland to talk about his New Zealand adventures, which included abseiling down a 40m waterfall using a flax rope and dining on possum, huhu grubs and a tree weta. He rated the weta the worst thing he’s eaten: ‘‘I’ve never tasted something that really does taste as you imagine poo would taste.’’ Grylls helped raise money for the Christchurch quake and the Pike River mine tragedy, giving a talk last night about his Mt Everest climb.

we are open Our thoughts and sympathies are with everyone affected by the Christchurch earthquake.

Fresh Choice, The Warehouse and many other stores are open for anything you may need over this time.

256 Barrington Street, Christchurch • Ph. 03 332 4221 Over 36 Stores • Gift Vouchers • Free Parking • Open Every Day • Proudly supporting community safety


We are open and operating and able to help with replacement glass The staff at Christchurch Glass extend their sympathies to everyone affected by the devastating events of last Tuesday. We understand that at this time there are pressing priorities that need attending to and that for each of us they will vary.

P29_17606_CHCHSTAR_R

The earthquake affected our team as well, but we’ve been luckier than most and we’re ready to help out. So if securing your property is a concern, call us and we’ll get to you as quick as we can.


A24

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

The Star

Nation

Minister declares early retirement from politics High-flying, young Cabinet Minister Simon Power says he will leave Parliament at the next election, a decision that has shocked Prime Minister John Key who believes Mr Power would have made ‘‘a fine Prime Minister’’. Mr Power, 41, entered Parliament as a 28-year-old and over the past three years has won an enviable reputation as an intelligent, hardworking minister across his justice, commerce and state-owned enterprises portfolios. He has long been tipped as future leadership material. Yesterday the Rangitikei MP told the Herald it had always been his intention to leave politics after 12 years and a single term as a minister. He planned to pursue a career in the private sector and the married fatherof-two said there were no family or health reasons behind his decision. ‘‘I had a three-year plan which we’d decided to execute once we came into Government and it had always been my plan to do that and then to exit. ‘‘I’ve been privileged to be given all

MOVING ON: Simon Power says it is time he pursued a new challenge. PICTURE / MARK MITCHELL of the portfolios I asked for when we came into office. I’ve been given enormous scope for reform and that’s what I’ve been able to do. ‘‘I knew where I could handle a certain amount of structural reform across those portfolios and introduce a certain amount of change which each

sector would be able to take. I understood that the next phase was going to be consolidation and settling down, and that’s not where my strengths are.’’ Mr Power said he was proud of introducing protection orders for victims of domestic violence, better treatment of victims and children in the justice system, big advances in a single economic market with Australia, establishing the so-called ‘‘super regulator’’ for financial markets and taking electoral law reform ‘‘off the political agenda’’. Mr Key said he was ‘‘stunned and flabbergasted’’ when Mr Power told him of his decision on Sunday evening. ‘‘We just didn’t see it coming. I think he’s done an outstanding job as a minister . . . he’s very bright and extremely hardworking.’’ But Mr Power said he’d never harboured leadership ambitions and there was nothing more he wanted to achieve as a minister or politician. — Adam Bennett

Key loses balance of Power And the next leader of the National Party is . . . well, step up to the mark, Steven Joyce. If John Key stepped down tomorrow, the only other viable candidate just ruled himself out. Simon Power’s decision to quit left Mr Key ‘‘stunned and flabbergasted’’. He is not the only one. Politicians normally stick around long past their use-by date. In barely three months, however, two senior ministers have walked away — the other being Defence Minister Wayne Mapp. Mapp’s move is understandable. He is 59 this month, and unlikely to get any higher up National’s pecking order. Power’s decision is much harder to fathom. Assuming National wins the forthcoming election, National’s fourth-ranked MP would have basically been given any portfolio he wanted in the subsequent Cabinet reshuffle. His departure is a major loss for National. Articulate, competent and fastidious to a fault, Power is also blessed with a high degree of common sense — a commodity which tends to evaporate once someone is ensconced in the Beehive. He was touted as a future leader.

JOHN ARMSTRONG political correspondent

But while National has been odds-on to win this year’s election, 2014 will be a much more difficult proposition. If National loses, it means Opposition again, possibly for two terms. As leader, that would mean it would be 2020 before Power got the keys to Premier House. In the interim, there would always be the possibility that someone might leapfrog him. Power poo-poos such supposition, saying politics is winning the battle of ideas, not a beauty contest. When it comes to explaining why he is quitting, Power has to be taken at his word. But that will not eradicate the nagging feeling that there must be other reasons why someone who even yesterday was saying politics flowed through his veins is not staying for the long haul. Then again, 12 years in Parliament may be long enough.


The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A25

World

Flood of refugees creates border chaos Libyans watched from a window of the immigration post as the 20,000 fleeing Egyptian, Bangladeshi, Chinese and Iranian workers heaped up against the border wall. Already up to 75,000 have struggled into Tunisia, but yesterday the crossing system collapsed as thousands of men, almost all Arabs desperate to escape Muammar Gaddafi’s state, fought with local Tunisians who — under the eyes of the army — attacked them with stakes and iron bars. Many of the soldiers hurled plastic water bottles and biscuits into the masses of refugees who began to jump the border wall, heaving family members through breaks in the cement. Most of them had gone without food, water or sleep for four days. Josette Sheeran, executive director of the World Food Programme, announced: ‘‘We are doing all we can — we are working through this situation. And it’s never too late.’’ But it was. Sheeran arrived with 80 tonnes of food, most of it high-energy biscuits, which were thrown over the wall at the crowds once she had left. More to the point, Firas Kayal, of

Gaddafi forces surround rebel-held town ROBERT FISK the UNHCR, took one look at the young Tunisians beating the Egyptian refugees, said a crisis had been reached at the border and that 14,000 refugees had crossed in the past 12 hours alone. ‘‘The Tunisians’ capacity to help has reached its limit,’’ he said. ‘‘We are bringing in two UN flights today filled with tents for these people inside Tunisia. We are helping the local authorities and people to cope.’’ What Kayal did not say, of course, was that the men beating the refugees were the ‘‘local people’’. All day it went on, as the men squeezed against the gate, animal roars breaking out among the thousands behind them. Unconscious men were carried over the frontier wall and laid side-by-side in the sand and on the tarmac by Tunisian doctors. They were brought round with

DESPERATE: Almost 75,000 refugees have struggled into Tunisia fleeing the Gaddafi regime. PICTURE / AP water and by nurses who massaged them. Many simply sat on the road, shaking their heads and weeping. By dusk, the Tunisian army had climbed the gate — literally advancing several yards into Libya — to drag barbed wire along the wall. The Tunisian authorities had by nightfall turned the nearest camp into a refugee city.

Libya’s regime moved to reassert control of its western border yesterday as fears of civil war grew. Forces loyal to Colonel Muammar Gaddafi were reported to have surrounded the town of Nalut on the Tunisian frontier. Mistrata, Zawiyah and Zintan, towns that overthrew security forces, scrambled to erect barricades and test weapons they looted from military bases. ‘‘In the years ahead, Libya could become a peaceful democracy, or face protracted civil war, or descend into chaos,’’ United States Secretary of

State Hillary Clinton told the House Foreign Affairs Committee. Clinton said Washington understood the Libyan opposition wanted to ‘‘be seen as doing this by themselves’’ as they mulled ways to dislodge Gaddafi and his forces from the capital Tripoli and the few other areas he held. But she said the Pentagon and Nato allies had ‘‘begun to look at potential planning, preparedness in the event that we feel it’s necessary for both humanitarian and other reasons that there would have to be actions taken.’’

‘‘When Tunisians arrive in boats in southern Europe, you call it a crisis,’’ a doctor told me sharply. ‘‘But when tens of thousands of Egyptians try to cross our border from Libya you give them biscuits and forget us.’’ Adel Jumaa, a young Libyan who had just escaped across the southern Tunisian border, spoke of Libyan

special forces checkpoints, of senior police officers shot by the regime, of the people of western Libya who wanted to get rid of Gaddafi but were unarmed and too fearful to leave their homes. Libyans who had spoken to foreign TV stations by telephone had been arrested and ‘‘disappeared’’.

— Telegraph Group Ltd

— Independent

Canterbury Earthquake Emergency Relief. The impact of the Canterbury earthquake tragedy is wide reaching and our thoughts remain with our customers, colleagues and the entire Canterbury community during this difficult time. While services are currently limited due to earthquake damage, we are working hard to help our customers in any way we can. Our Hornby, Northlands and Riccarton Mall branches are open 10am to 4pm. Our Lincoln branch is not open today.

The following ATMs are currently open, fully serviced and safely located. • • • • • • • • • •

Fendalton, corner of Ilam & Clyde Roads. Hornby Mall, Main South Road. Bishopdale Mall, 135 Farrington Avenue. Barrington Shopping Centre. Lincoln University Branch. Northlands, Papanui. Riccarton, corner Blenheim Road & Acheron Drive. Riccarton, 112 & 129 Riccarton Road. Riccarton, Bush Inn. Riccarton Westfield.

Special emergency relief package for ASB customers. To relieve any immediate financial concerns, please talk to ASB about our special emergency relief package. To find out more, please call us on

0800 272 007 or visit asb.co.nz

The status of our branches and ATMs is being updated frequently, but circumstances may change at short notice. For an up-to-date list of available ATMs, FREE text ‘ATM’ to 575, go to asb.co.nz or call 0800 803 804. ASB 0423C

ASB Bank Limited.


COLENSO2299RED

Latest Christchurch updates from Vodafone During this difficult time, Vodafone offers its condolences and support to all those affected by the Christchurch earthquake. Our focus remains on strengthening the performance of our network and getting all of our stores back up and running to assist you with your communication needs. The Vodafone truck is also serving as a temporary store solution.

Vodafone store and truck locations Open store locations in Christchurch • Hornby: 418 Main South Road • Northlands: 5 Main North Road • Riccarton Mall: 129 Riccarton Road (Pak'nSave end of the mall) Vodafone truck: Located at ‘Home Base’, 119 Marshlands Road, Shirley. The Vodafone truck is equipped with handsets, chargers, free access to Wi-Fi and staff to provide help where possible.

Tips for staying in touch during an emergency Divert calls from your Vodafone landline to any New Zealand number Vodafone will provide call diversions from your Vodafone fixed line home phone or your business line to your mobile phone number of choice without any of the usual diversion charges. Please contact us on the following numbers to speak to a Vodafone agent:

Saving your mobile’s battery TXT rather than call as it uses less of your mobile’s battery power. It also keeps cell-sites working for longer for everyone. Voice calls should be kept short, and never hesitate to call 111 for emergencies.

Consumer customers: 0800 438 448 Business customers: 0800 438 458

Our customer service centre is here to help so please don’t hesitate to contact us on 777 for info on store hours, the trucks location or any concerns you are having about your bill and/or Vodafone services.

vodafone.co.nz/redalert


The Star

A27

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

World

Pressure accelerates with carbon tax plan Death threats and electoral backlash against independent MPs crucial to Prime Minister Julia Gillard have underlined the fragile path ahead of the minority Labor Government. Pressure on two pivotal New South Wales independents — Tony Windsor and Rob Oakeshott — has mounted since they supported Gillard after last year’s election, and has accelerated with plans for a carbon tax. Nor has Gillard been able to take their support for granted: both opposed the tax levy imposed to help stricken states recover from the summer’s devastating floods. It passed the House of Representatives with the votes of Greens MP Adam Bandt, West Australian Nationals crossbencher Tony Crook and north Queensland independent Bob Katter. Crook and Katter are conservatives more naturally aligned to the Opposition. While courting the crossbenchers, Gillard has to balance support from the Greens against the need to maintain a clear distance from them, to avoid constant claims from the Opposition that the Greens are running the Government’s agenda.

GREG ANSLEY in Australia

Most recently, Gillard has had to stamp on demands from the Greens that petrol be included in carbon pricing, a call made well before any detailed work began and potentially damaging to a campaign that has already drawn heavy flak. The carbon tax proposal will test Gillard’s leadership and her ability to haul the independents into her order of battle, even with cracks appearing within the Opposition — notably continued support for emissions trading from former Liberal leader Malcolm Turnbull. Turnbull has made no secret of his ambitions to again lead the party, adding to strains within the Coalition. But Opposition Leader Tony Abbott is whipping his troops into line while anger grows — and support falls — for Gillard’s proposal to introduce carbon pricing from July next year as a

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transition to an eventual greenhouse emissions trading scheme. Failure could end Gillard’s political career. The issue helped topple former Liberal leaders Turnbull and Brendan Nelson, and was a big factor in the coup that deposed former Labor Prime Minister Kevin Rudd. To succeed, Gillard needs to win, and hold, three independents. She can probably count on Bandt and Oakeshott, but Windsor and Wilkie have yet to be won over, while Crook and Katter are unlikely to be convinced. For the three independents whose votes Gillard is best placed to win — Oakeshott, Windsor and Wilkie — the merits of the plan that finally emerges will need to be weighed against sentiment in their own electorates and their own political survival. Party polling published by the Daily Telegraph yesterday said almost twothirds of state voters were ‘‘firmly’’ opposed to carbon taxation. Oakeshott, a renegade National who was re-elected last year with a 62 per cent to 37 per cent margin over rival David Gillespie, has lost ground in a seat that since its formation in 1952 had been held by his old party .

GOLD: A piece in the exhibition.

PICTURE / AP

find a hiding place for the best of the collection. His team took six nondescript trunks to a vault in the presidential grounds, where it remained in secret. When the Taliban took Kabul in 1996, a party of Kalashnikov-wielding fighters burst into Askarzai’s office. ‘‘They put three pistols to my head, one in front and one each side and said they would kill me,’’ he said. ‘‘They told me I had to open the door.’’ After taking them to the vault, he was asked: ‘‘What’s in that room?’’ pointing to the annexe which held the treasure trunks. ‘‘Just ceramics,’’ Askarzai lied. Then he turned the key backwards to break it in the lock, sealing the vault and its secret. — Telegraph Group Ltd, AP

CPIT Re-start

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Students, staff and their safety remain CPIT’s first priority and all students will be offered study options either through CPIT or other providers.

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Proud to see Canterbury moving forward together For all appointments Phone 348-8716 Fax 341-5873

The shy bureaucrat with a neatly trimmed moustache and brown corduroy suit surrounded by the paperwork of Afghanistan’s unruly finances is an unlikely national hero. Ameruddin Askarzai spent 45 years rising through the country’s central bank. But his place in Afghan history is guaranteed by the revelation of a national secret that he kept — despite the Taliban putting a gun to his head in search of gold. More than 230 pieces of treasure dating back 4000 years will go on show at the British Museum today. The exhibition gathers the cream of Afghanistan’s archaeological inheritance, after thousands of years of trade and conquest. Yet all this might have been lost without the quiet banker. Askarzai became the bank’s official key holder for its vaults as Soviet, French and American teams combed the nation for forgotten cities. In 1978, Soviet archaeologists broke into a low mound near the ancient kingdom of Bactria in the north. It held six burial chambers containing 21,000 pieces of ornaments, crowns, jewellery and coins that had lain there since the time of Christ. Yet the Bactrian gold was soon threatened by its fame. When Soviet troops began leaving in 1988, Askarzai was asked to help

CPIT is committed to delivering our 2011 academic year as soon as possible. Our City Campus remains closed until at least 14 March. CPIT’s Trades Innovation Institute is planned to re-start 14 March.

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• CPIT Trades and related programmes planned to start 14 March. • Other classes will recommence as soon as facilities become available. • Students and staff should register their details and current status on the CPIT website. • CPIT will contact staff and students on a regular basis, either directly or through the website. • CPIT will continue to work closely with Civil Defence authorities to determine access to our campus areas, to conduct comprehensive building and safety inspections. “Whilst we recognise that the earthquake has had an enormous impact on our community I have been heartened by the response, of not only our staff and students in assisting with the recovery of our community, but also by the many offers of support we have received to ensure CPIT can get up and running as soon as possible,” says Kay Giles, CPIT CEO. “Over 100 CPIT nursing, midwifery and medical imaging students are working with Canterbury’s Health Services, one of our fashion students is making clothing for the ICU unit, and many of our trades staff and students are assisting with recovery work out in the suburbs.”

A drop-in centre for International Students is now operating Monday to Friday, at the CPIT Campus Connect site in Hornby. Unit A, 375 Main South Road Hornby Christchurch Opening Hours: Mon-Fri: 11am to 3pm Phone: 03 961 0540

To register online and for immediate updates please visit : www.cpit.ac.nz


A28

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

The Star

Business YOUR STORIES

Back in business We’re gathering stories about Christchurch small businesses rebuilding after the earthquake. Send your tips, resources, offers of help or questions we can get answered to: online-editor@nzherald.co.nz Craig Joynt, Exhibit Group says the company’s Stevens St building is awaiting a verdict from inspectors. ‘‘A massive cleaning-up and repair job and we might be okay. We are sending all the showroom displays to Auckland for service and refurbishment. We will have them ready to go as soon as we get the okay to return. If you are making your event marketing decisions from other centres, we have teams from Auckland and Wellington to help.’’ Richard O’Brien, whose online company Biz Buy Sell advertises businesses for sale, says his office in Middleton and home in Cashmere suffered minimal damage. His business is focused outside Christchurch and was not too badly affected by the September quake but he expects a slight slump this time around. Elliot Duston, Luxon Advertising says the company’s offices have been in the CBD ‘‘for most of its 30-year history and more recently in Cashel Mall. We ran out into the street on Tuesday to help people trapped by falling masonry and did whatever we could — in true Kiwi fashion. Now, with the amazing help of clients, friends and family, we are in 90 per cent working order and ready to start to get back some sense of routine; to progress work for the clients unaffected by the earthquake and continue to do what we can for those still reeling from the aftermath, privately and in their businesses.’’ Tania Biddles, Q Brand: ‘‘Our office was located right in the centre of the city, and although the building is still standing, our offices are uninhabitable . . . we are just trying to set all our staff up from home and hope to start operating again midweek.’’ Scott Shore, Adgraphix: ‘‘Power and water is back on, we are ready to go . . . The more printing and signage work we can secure the better it is for our customers, our suppliers, us and ultimately our city.’’ Photonewzealand: ‘‘Firstly, thank you for the kind words of support we have received in the last week. Our team remain safe and with their families. They are sorting out the damage to their homes and looking after their children, families, friends and neighbours. Although our office is still closed, our systems are all up and running.’’

Garage kickstarts car repairs to meet surge in demand Eastern suburbs are returning to some normality as businesses reopen their doors. A North New Brighton garage, Hopman Motors, is among them, opening on Tuesday. With no power, water or sewerage in the area, the Travis Rd garage used a generator to continue work. Owner Andre Hopman said there had been a lot of demand to fix damaged cars. Dozens needed earthquake-related work to broken CV joints, burst radiators and broken cam belts from driving through liquefaction. The workshop was relatively unscathed. with only a few cosmetic cracks. It had been inspected and cleared as safe, as had the car hoists, he said. A number of cars were in the workshop at the time. One fell off its hoist but was not damaged and no one was injured. ‘‘There were about 10 cars [in the workshop]. People just had to get them back as they wanted to leave. ‘‘We had a bit of a responsibility to them to get them back on the road,’’ he said. As Motor Trade Association Canterbury president, Mr Hopman felt a need to be proactive and set a good example by getting up and running. He was on the phone in his office when the quake struck. ‘‘We were thrown around like rag dolls but everyone in Christchurch was the same,’’ he said. Workers ran outside to the street. ‘‘The whole road just opened up, the earth just let go. It was so scary.’’ His other business, Hopmans QEII Quality Cars sales yard, never closed. Manager Russell Mead said part of

TURNING THE KEY: Andre Hopman has re-opened his garage, with ‘‘a lot of demand’’ to fix or replace damaged cars. the reason was to prevent vandalism. ‘‘This was a Colombo St-type thoroughfare. Because traffic was being diverted, all these thugs were kicking the cars in. So we were on security watch as well as potential sales watch.’’ They had already sold four cars to people who had lost theirs in the quake. ‘‘As soon as it was announced to them that their cars were irretrievable, they got in touch. They have to have transport,’’ he said. ‘‘They’ve seen we’re flying the flags, we’re one of the few businesses in the

‘‘

People just had to get them [cars] back ... they wanted to leave. Andre Hopman

area that is open.’’ The earthquake damaged a few cars in the yard as they shook and collided

with one another, he said. It was unknown whether any equipment was damaged because there was still no power at the yard. A woman was trapped in her house next door, Mr Mead said. Mr Hopman helped carry the woman, Jenny Parker, in her 60s, through the liquefaction. ‘‘She couldn’t leave her house. The whole house was full of liquefaction inside,’’ Mr Hopman said. His home in Cashmere had some internal damage but was thankfully structurally sound, he said. — Caroline King

Rebuilding pushes up Fletcher prospects Financial analysts have upgraded Fletcher Building’s outlook after last week’s earthquake. Matt Henry of Goldman Sachs changed his rating from hold to buy and forecast net profit after-tax of $333 million this year, $393 million next year and $513 million in the year to June, 2013. Rob Mercer of Forsyth Barr in Wellington has also upgraded Fletcher. Henry said the company would be included in the ASX200 index after March 18. Fletcher chief executive Jonathan Ling yesterday released an investor presentation to the NZX. He cited growth from more work and the number of dominant market positions the $5 billion company controls in the building materials, construction, supply, manufacturing and distribution sectors.

INVESTOR TOUR: Fletcher chief executive Jonathan Ling. Henry said Fletcher would benefit ‘‘materially as volume and operating leverage compounds through to a significant boost in earnings.’’ The Christchurch reconstruction was unprecedented, Henry said. House repairs would amount to at least $5.8 billion, and $1.9 billion of nonresidential remediation would be

undertaken from 2012 to 2016. Infrastructure repairs of $1.9 billion would would take priority. The rampup in construction would not start until next year, he said. Ling is speaking in Australia, Britain and the US, on a trip with investor relations general manager Philip King. The presentation emphasised Fletcher’s Australasian dominance in products crucial to the Christchurch rebuild. It is New Zealand’s sole manufacturer and leading supplier of gypsum plasterboard and number one in Australasia in the bulk glasswool insulation market. AHI Roofing and Decra Roofing Systems make Fletcher a global supplier of metal roof tiles. Retail chain PlaceMakers controls 34 per cent of the market in core building materials sectors and 85 per

cent of its business has a trade focus. Fletcher is number one in the supply of long steel, the decorated board market and in the medium density fibreboard and number two in particleboard. It controls 15 per cent of New Zealand’s aggregates markets, 55 per cent of the cement market, 34 per cent of readymix concrete market and half the pre-cast and concrete pipe market. Fletcher Residential is the country’s biggest house builder. Fletcher Construction has commercial and engineering capabilities, having built up a large workforce with internationalstandard expertise. ‘‘Canterbury earthquake repair work will be significant,’’ Ling’s presentation said. ‘‘Commercial construction activity appears to have bottomed out. Infrastructure spending to dip in 2011 before growing in 2012.’’ — Anne Gibson


The Star

A29

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

Sport

Charged debut for Williams on Super field The Crusaders are ready for their first game since the quake. It’s a first for Sonny Bill Williams, too. He talks to Dylan Cleaver Four months after his entrance as an All Black, Sonny Bill Williams will play his first game of Super rugby. With his innate sense of drama, he could hardly have a more emotionally charged stage for his Crusaders debut. The Crusaders travel to Nelson today for their first ‘‘home’’ game of the season and their first since the devastating earthquake that hit Christchurch nine days ago. The convert from league describes himself as one of the ‘‘lucky’’ ones. He’s been unable to reach his central city apartment, crashing at a mate’s place, and yesterday revealed that his mum, Lee, had wanted him back in Auckland in the days after the quake. ‘‘But there are a lot of people much worse off than us,’’ he said. ‘‘There’s a lot of destruction. I count myself lucky and I know the rest of the boys do too. ‘‘I’m looking forward to getting out there and doing Cantabrians proud and hopefully getting back to a little normality. It will be emotional for us at the game but we’ll have to keep things in check to be able to compete.’’ To that end, Todd Blackadder yesterday brought mental skills coach Gilbert Enoka into their temporary camp at Lincoln.

‘‘It was great to have that conversation about the trauma that everyone has gone through,’’ the Crusaders coach said. ‘‘It’s a very abnormal situation and it’s normal to feel stressed but we trained very well, a great sign from the players that they’re ready. We trained like demons, actually.’’ With heavy irony, tomorrow’s clash is also the match designated by the Crusaders as a fundraiser for the Pike River mining disaster. The Crusaders will be wearing the red and white livery of the West Coast in special edition jerseys that will be auctioned. Williams’ popularity and profile should ensure his No 12 will be one of the most sought-after. Williams last played rugby when the All Blacks beat Wales at Cardiff on November 28 to complete a fourth Grand Slam. He has spent more time in the boxing ring than on the field since, winning his second professional heavyweight bout in January. A stress fracture to his foot ruled him out of the Crusaders’ opener — a 24-22 loss to the Blues at Eden Park. So much has happened since that dizzying night that rugby has been one of the furthest things from the minds of

FIRST UP: Sonny Bill Williams wants to do Cantabrians proud against the Waratahs. New Zealanders, and Cantabrians in particular, but Williams said he felt fitter now than when he joined Canterbury last year. During that campaign, he struck up a potentially frightening midfield combination with Robbie Fruean, a duo that will be tested by the Waratahs. The New South Welshmen have been awesome in the opening two rounds, but they have yet to come up against a forward pack as physically unrelenting as the Crusaders’, or an attacking force spearheaded by Dan Carter, Williams and Fruean.

‘‘

I’m looking forward to getting out there and doing Cantabrians proud Sonny Bill Williams

To accommodate Williams, Adam Whitelock — who played second-five as a stop-gap in the round against the Blues — moves to the left wing, replacing the injured Tu UmagaMarshall. The only other changes will be on the bench, where Quentin MacDonald and Tom Marshall join the 22. The Waratahs — coming off thumping 43-0 and 30-6 wins over the Rebels and Reds respectively — have made one change to their starting 15. Daniel Halangahu replaces injured first five-eighths Berrick Barnes.

Blues caution shows in major reshuffle ‘‘You are faced with different challenges, particularly when you travel and come out of physical games, and there are players with bumps and bruises and there are players who are fresh,’’ the Blues coach said. ‘‘It is going to be a 22-man effort at altitude. It’s tough but it is a mental challenge. At altitude you weigh up the best team to start and the best team to finish.’’ But retooling the pack will bring its risks against a Lions side which has shown much more sting, fitness and control under former All Blacks coach John Mitchell. The Lions lost both games narrowly but they were playing the Bulls and Stormers — last year’s Super champions and runners-up. ‘‘We’re definitely on an upward spiral,’’ Mitchell said this week. Mitchell and his backline assistant,

former Blues five-eighths Carlos Spencer, have made just one change, Wickus van Heerden for the injured George Earl. Conversely the Blues have shuffled their players. McAlister has been picked to guide the backline after being cleared of concussion and playing 30 minutes last week. Left wing Stowers makes his first start for the Blues instead of Rene Ranger while in the pack, openside flanker Luke Braid will debut in place of his older brother Daniel. Other backup forwards, Kurtis Haiu, Pater Saili and Tom McCartney also start. Haiu’s promotion to start at lock looked likely but not at Anthony Boric’s expense. Boric was one of the more consistent players against the Sharks while Ali Williams was seldom involved but has retained his place.

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Four All Blacks, including captain Keven Mealamu, have been shifted to the Blues reserves while another, Luke McAlister, has been called into a rearranged side for Saturday’s match against the Lions in Johannesburg. Jerome Kaino has been promoted to skipper against a Lions side which has lost both matches of this year’s series. New selections in the backline are Sherwin Stowers and McAlister while Peter Saili, Luke Braid, Kurtis Haiu and Tom McCartney are up to do the business against the Lions pack. The shakeup follows the 26-12 loss to the Sharks, where the Blues’ standards were well down on those they showed in opening the Super Rugby series with a win against the Crusaders. Pat Lam believes this game at altitude in Johannesburg will need the collective impact of 22 players.

NATIONAL SPONSOR

A bland showing in Durban leads to serious changes, writes Wynne Gray

SUPPORTED BY

PUBLIC NOTICES SALE OF LIQUOR ACT 1989 SECTION 18(3): Addington Raceway Limited has made application to the District Licensing Agency at Christchurch for the Renewal of an On Licence in respect of the premises situated at 75 Jack Hinton Drive and known as Addington Events Centre. The general nature of the business conducted under the licence is: Function Centre. The days of which and hours during which liquor is to be sold under the licence are: Monday to Sunday 7:00 am to 1:00 am the following day. \ The application may be inspected during the ordinary office hours at the office of Christchurch District Licensing Agency at 53 Hereford Street, Christchurch. Any person who is entitled to object and wishes to object to the grant of the application may, not later than 10 working days after the first publication of this notice, file a notice in writing of the objection with the Secretary of the District Licensing Agency, PO Box 73013, Christchurch 8154. This is the first insertion of this notice.


A30

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

The Star

Sport

Brave young lifesavers reel in medals Christchurch surfers

BOARD MEETING: Young lifesavers from around the country presented a signed surfboard to Canterbury competitors at the event.

didn’t let the quake upset their chances at

‘‘

the NZ champs, writes Nick Tolerton A team of young Christchurch surf lifesavers shrugged off earthquake woes to shine at the national under-14 championships at Mt Maunganui. The quake prevented about half the youngsters getting to the four-day contest which started last week, but 15 competitors from five clubs made it — although some missed the first day. They had to borrow boards because theirs were on vehicles which turned back from Wellington when people heard about the quake. Most families had to make new arrangements to get to Tauranga, and the homes of at least two competitors were damaged. But the hardships didn’t prevent them winning their share of medals, including three golds. South Brighton team manager Juliet Dickson said that was a fantastic effort. Kids sometimes had to wait at the start while a borrowed board was brought to them from another race

To get these results on boards they were not familiar with was absolutely outstanding Juliet Dickson

finish. ‘‘The officials were very sympathetic, but it was still very unsettling for the kids,’’ she said. The other young lifesavers pre-

sented the Canterbury team with a signed board. A draw was made to decide which club would receive it, and Sumner’s name came out of the hat. Two of Mrs Dickson’s South Brigh-

ton competitors were among the most successful. Millie Johnston won the run-swimrun and was third in the surf race, and Andrew Trembath was second in the

run-swim-run and in the diamond, and third in the board race. Brittany Tucker (Sumner) won the diamond, and was second in the runswim-run and in the surf race. Waikuku Beach’s only representative, Hosea Watson, won the beach sprint. In the team events, Trembath and Louis Godfrey (Sumner) teamed up for third in the boys’ board rescue, and Brittany Tucker and Brittany Andrews (both Sumner) were third in the girls’.

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CALL US FOR EMERGENCY REPAIRS Helping our customers through this difficult time is our highest priority. We have experienced builders on hand to make emergency repairs to your property. Our focus is to make your house as safe, secure and watertight as possible for now. This might include securing windows, roof repairs or reinforcing walls in imminent danger of falling.

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FARMERS, PAK‘nSAVE & KMART NOW OPEN The majority of stores have also opened their doors. Pak’nSave Other retailers

8.30am–8pm Open until 6pm

Our thoughts are with the people of Christchurch at this time.

westfield.co.nz/riccarton WES/TS/180


The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A33 Sport

Black Caps braced for spin attack New Zealand are taking no chances against ‘fearless and dangerous’ Zimbabwe, writes Andrew Alderson Zimbabwe have been largely written off as a means for the New Zealand cricket team to roll the arm over and swing the willow at leisure on their way to the World Cup quarter-finals. That assumption fails to consider the African nation, so long the political pariahs, actually did win a one-day international against Bangladesh in their tour to the subcontinent in December, unlike New Zealand. They have produced a number of solid performances of late, even against Australia in group play, largely through a spin attack revelling in the conditions. On the Bangladesh tour, spin accounted for 14 of the 25 wickets they took in four completed matches. Little has changed at the World Cup, as was seen against Canada in their second group game. The combination of the left-arm orthodox Ray Price, off spinner Prosper Utseya and leg spinner Graeme Cremer accounted for eight Canadian wickets. The 34-year-old Price has been opening the bowling — some describe him as a fast bowler trapped in a slow bowler’s body — with success since he returned to internationals in 2007. His eight overs picked up three wickets for 16 runs against Canada. New Zealand will need to prepare to counter a level of aggression which has him ranked as the third best one-day bowler in the world. But New Zealand is taking no chances, stacking two of the three nets at training with local spinners as well as using Daniel Vettori and Nathan McCullum with a new ball. Coach John Wright kept a close eye on proceedings. The New Zealand batting line-up is understood to have been told future places at the tournament could be up for debate with further failure tomorrow night. New Zealand bowling coach Allan Donald spent time with Price and a number of his Zimbabwean teammates

during a stint coaching in the country. ‘‘Zimbabwe play fearless cricket, they don’t stand back for anybody. ‘‘I’d call them an uneducated but dangerous cricketing nation at the moment, having been out for so long. ‘‘Price is a great influence on their youngsters. He’s a passionate guy who likes to get stuck in. We should just be glad he’s not a quick bowler because he’s got that mentality.’’ Martin Guptill and Jesse Ryder

‘‘

Zimbabwe play fearless cricket, they don’t stand back for anybody. I’d call them an uneducated but dangerous cricketing nation at the moment, having been out for so long.

Allan Donald

have been part of New Zealand’s batting inertia. Guptill rifled off a century against Ireland in the warmups but has scored just one 50 on the subcontinent in 12 official one-dayers. Ryder has a top score of 34 in 10 ODIs in this part of the world. ‘‘We’ve had a talk [with Wright],’’ Ryder says. ‘‘We [the top and middle order] realise we are a weak point at the moment. The plans we’ve set in place are to be only two to three wickets down after 35 overs. I love

PRESSURE ON: Kyle Mills (left) and Nathan McCullum at a practice session ahead of the Zimbabwe game. playing spin, so patience is the key; like being happy to milk singles.’’ Guptill acknowledges playing spin

has been the main focus at training: ‘‘To counter the number of spin bowlers in their side, we’ve been

PICTURE / AP

rotating the strike regularly [in practice] and hopefully in the game the boundaries will eventually come.’’

Breakers out to improve more than a few points They’ve been out-muscled, out-shot and out-enthused for much of the last month, but the Breakers expect to be the ones doing the outing in their topof-the-table Australian Basketball League clash with Townsville Crocodiles tonight. Out-scoring the Crocs, that is, and shutting out the only club that can threaten their claim to a minor premiership that seemed a formality until just over a week ago. ‘‘We see this game as a must-win,’’ veteran forward Dillon Boucher said. ‘‘We are going in with a lot of focus. I’m not saying we didn’t for the other games, but we don’t want to be a team that has slipped three games in a row and have that snowball effect. We want to take care of what we need to and come away with a win.’’

MUST-WIN: Dillon Boucher puts the hard word on his Breakers team-mates PICTURE / GETTY IMAGES

Boucher and his team-mates realise they have looked less and less convincing as the weeks have slipped by. Having begun 2011 with eight straight wins, they have dropped consecutive games to playoff-chasing clubs Gold Coast Blaze and Wollongong Hawks. The signs of a decline appeared before those defeats, with the Breakers needing double overtime to see off the Blaze on the Gold Coast and being severely pushed by lowly Melbourne and an injury-hit Perth. The players had rejected the notion their massive lead atop the ANBL had affected the team’s hunger, but now Boucher concedes that may have been the case. ‘‘We have lost the last two games against teams that are desperate to make the playoffs. As much as we want

to say it’s not, sometimes it is hard to have that same intensity as a team that is fighting for their life.’’ Intensity won’t be a problem. Victory would take the Breakers to 19 wins, within a victory or a Townsville loss of claiming the minor premiership and top seeding for the playoffs. Whether the Breakers can overcome the interior defensive struggles that opponents believe is their major — and perhaps only — weakness remains to be seen. With 2.13m centre Luke Schenscher, the Crocs pose a massive challenge. Forwards Russell Hinder and Rosell Ellis are also major threats but Boucher was just as wary of a guard line that destroyed the Breakers in the sides’ only meeting this season, in Townsville on New Year’s Eve.

‘‘They are really well balanced across the floor,’’ Boucher said. ‘‘They have got shooters on the outside and big men on the inside. They have got weapons all over the show and they definitely hurt us up in Townsville with their shooting. It really broke us apart.’’ The Crocs may have been deadly in Townsville, where they have gone 11-1, but it has been a different story on the road, where they have posted just three wins in 10 matches. With their next match a return trip to Townsville on Saturday week, the Breakers will be keen to get the job done in their own building tonight. But a defence that shipped 104 points to Wollongong on Sunday will have to improve dramatically. — Steve Deane


CLUBS NZ: WARMLY WELCOME MEMBERS, THEIR GUESTS & AFFILIATE CLUB MEMBERS

E N T E R T A I N M E NGGuide T uide NEW ZEALAND

CANTERBURY REGION

CLUBS

H

WE ARE OPEN

O RNBY ORNBY W WORKINGMEN’S ORKINGMEN’S

C

C CLUB LUB

L

U

B

Westview Lounge

Management, Staff and Executive extend best wishes to everyone affected by the Christchurch Earthquake, especially those who have lost loved ones. Our thoughts are with you.

Saturday 5th March 8pm - Midnight:

INVISIBLE INC COMING EVENT: Sat 2nd April

ELVIS/ORBISON SHOW feat. Greg Belcher & Tony Gregory Hunt plus Live Band

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Friday & Saturday from 5.30-6.30pm Succulent roast & dessert

Looking for a venue for your special occasion? Check out our function rooms! 17 Carmen Rd ph 349 9026 Members, guests & affiliates welcome

75 LONDON STREET PH: 389-5778

Website: www.rwmc.co.nzEmail: rwmc@clear.net.nz

CLUB CLOSED DUE TO MASSIVE EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE THE RICHMOND CLUB IS CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

WE WISH TO THANK ALL OUR READERS, MUSICIANS, SHOW TIME PROMOTERS THE RICHMOND COMMUNITY AND IN PARTICULAR OUR MEMBERS WHO ALL HAVE SUPPORTED US. OUR THOUGHTS ARE WITH EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN AFFECTED BY THIS TERRIBLE DISASTER. REGARDS, THE PRESIDENT, MANAGEMENT, EXECUTIVE AND STAFF.

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Tickets available at the club office ph 349 9026

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ENTERTAINMENT news & advertising

Members, their guests and affiliates welcome

We are Open Our thoughts and best wishes are with everyone affected by the earthquake. - Executive, management and staff

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The Star

, Thursday, March 3, 2011

A35

Puzzles THE

1

2

CROSSWORD

3

4

5

DECODER

6

Each number represents a different letter of the alphabet. Write the given letters into all squares with matching numbers. Now work out which letters are represented by the other numbers. As you get the letters, write them into the main grid and the reference grid. Decoder uses all 26 letters of the alphabet.

7 8 9 10

11 12

13

14

15

16 17

18

20

19

21 22

23 24

LF"*KK

1 Religious types (colloq) (3,5) 7 Spacious (5) 8 Entrance (9) 9 Dry wine (3) 10 Possesses (4) 11 Gentle, calm (6) 13 Outcome (6) 14 Embraced (6) 17/18 Politician who transformed Auckland into a Super City (6,4) 20 Professional charge (3) 22 Staff and friends who hang around someone famous (9) 23 Propose (5) 24 Surreptitiously (2,3,3)

B*>,

1 Lizard (5) 2 Relies on (7) 3 Witty remark (4) 4 Banks Peninsula township (6) 5 The cat in Footrot Flats (5) 6 Strung up (7) 7 Remainder (7) 12 Scrounger (7) 13 West coast town (7) 15 Musical instruments (7) 16 Defeated (6) 17 Coral outcrops (5) 19 Adversary (5) 21 Shove (4)

003

WORDBUILDER

Fill the grid so that every row,

R P I S A

column and every 3x3 SUDOKU every box contains the digits 1 to 9.

How many words of three or more letters can you make, using each letter only once? Plurals are allowed, but no foreign words or words beginning

Good 13 Very Good 16 Excellent

23

The number game that improves your arithmetic

!%$ &% #'("

8%)& 3=5J &#!05#/ each KenKen is a registered trademark of Nextoy LLC

vertical and horizontal line has to contain the numbers 1-6, and the numbers canĂ­t be repeated in any row or column.

H#% =%)& &#!05# I=%A ' %I=&%/ The numbers in

each heavily outlined set of squares, called cages, must produce the number in the top corner. For example, :+ means the numbers add up to 5, 6G means the numbers multiply to equal 9. Š 2010 Gakken Co Ltd

&)#

: Numbers can be repeated in a cage, as long as they are not in the same line or row.

C B=D=%& 04 47

@ B=D=%& 184 508 540 590 664

745 807 815 832 861

< B=D=%& 4295 5538 7420 8694

: B=D=%& 9 B=D=%&

10678 18556 51114 52031 78127 87410 87520 91784

0611283 6296889

7 B=D=%&

11593656 37041885

B?F*B?"

KEB*1E

,4 F"*KK>*"B L$(0&&: 1 God squad, 7

>*"BHE8.B?"

air, airs, ais, asp, pair, pairs, par, pars, pas, pia, psi, rai, rais, rap, raps, rasp, ria, rias, rip, rips, sap, sari, sip, sir, spa, spar.

,E-H?" ;E,

Roomy, 8 Captivate, 9 Sec, 10 Owns, 11 Docile, 13 Result, 14 Hugged, 17/18 Rodney Hide, 20 Fee, 22 Entourage, 23 Offer, 24 On the sly. B0I2: 1 Gecko, 2 Depends, 3 Quip, 4 Akaroa, 5 Horse, 6 Lynched, 7 Residue, 12 Bludger, 13 Reefton, 15 Guitars, 16 Beaten, 17 Reefs, 19 Enemy, 21 Push.

SOLUTIONS 1?,1?,


, Thursday, March 3, 2011

The Star

FYI Water

■ Emergency water supplies are available at the welfare centres.Freestanding water tanks will be replenished at the following sites: From 4pm to 4.30pm: St Albans, Cranford/English Park; Hammersley, Quinns Rd; Marihau, Innes/Mahars; Waimari, Tilman/Blighs; West Spreydon, Lyttelton St. From 11pm to11.30am and from 4pm to 4.30pm: Richmond, Alexandra/Pavitt; Banks Ave; Burwood, New Brighton; North New Brighton, Leaver St; Wharenui, Matipo St; Somerfield, Somerfield St. All day: Queenspark, Queenspark Ave; Pioneer Stadium; Cowles Stadium; Redcliffs; Shirley Primary; Parklands Mall; Diamond Harbour First School; Governor’s Bay Fire Station; Lyttelton Main School; Lyttelton Port; New Brighton; Brooklands; Mansfield Hospital; Shirley Intermediate; Disraeli Reserve; Heaton Intermediate; Manning Intermediate; Cashmere, Hackthorne; Beckenham, Norwood; St Martins, Albert/Roscoe; Woolston, Ferry/Hopkins; Mt Pleasant, Hornbrook; Sumner, Hardwick/Colenso; Bromley, Kawau; North Linwood, Woodham. ■ Water must be boiled before drinking. If unable to boil, residents can add 1 tsp of bleach to 10 litres of water and leave for 30 minutes before use. ■ There is a total ban on watering gardens in Christchurch and people with power should shut down any automatic irrigation systems. ■ TOILETS: For portaloo locations/servicing, contact 941 8999 or info@ccc.govt.nz. Be patient, the call centre is overloaded.

Supermarkets

■ SuperValue and FreshChoice supermarkets open: Edgeware SuperValue, Fendalton Rd SuperValue, Wairakei Rd SuperValue, Lincoln Rd SuperValue. Parklands FreshChoice (9am-7pm), Merivale FreshChoice. ■ Countdown’s Avonhead, Hornby, Kaiapoi, Northwood, Rangiora, Church Corner and Ashburton stores are open. ■ All Pak’n Save, New World and Four Square (apart from Lyttelton) stores are open and fully stocked. ■ Riccarton Bunnings Warehouse on the corner of Blenheim Rd and Foster St is open for essential supplies only. The Shirley branch will remain closed until further notice. ■ Couplands stores open are: 254 Barrington St, cnr Racecourse and Yaldhurst Rds, cnr Carmen and Buchanans Rds, cnr Ferry and Aldwins Rds, 101 Main North Rd by Northlands.

Power

■ 86 per cent of the city has had power restored. More than 27,000 homes in East Christchurch are still without power. ■ Generators that can service 200 homes at a time are being bought in to service the eastern suburbs. ■ It is hoped power will be restored to half of the homes currently without power by Sunday (6 March). ■ If you are leaving your home, or do not have the power back on yet, turn the power off at the mains, unplug appliances at the wall, and turn the stove off.

Where to stay

■ Housing New Zealand is providing a temporary accommodation service. To get housing help or to offer temporary accommodation, call 0800 435 700, see www.housinghelp.govt.nz or go to one of the Christchurch welfare centres. ■ Welfare centres: Pioneer Stadium, 75 Lyttelton St, Spreydon, showers close at Pioneer at 8pm and open again at 9am; Baptist Church, East Belt, Rangiora; Burnside High School, 151 Greers Rd, Burnside; Windsor School, 170 Burwood Rd, Burwood. ■ Cowles Stadium (Pages Rd) is an information centre that can link you to the support you need. ■ Residents of Christchurch may want to get away

What you need to know in the aftermath of the quake now or may wish to consider a homestay in a few weeks’ time. To express interest in staying with a Hawke’s Bay family or in any one of the generously provided accommodation offerings, registrations may be made online at http:// www.surveymonkey.com/s/VZQMLDJ or by phoning (06) 834 4114. ■ More than 1400 offers of accommodation for quake-stricken Cantabrians have been offered on www.quakeescape.org.nz ■ Let neighbours, friends and family know if you are leaving your home.

Fuel

■ The following BP stations have reopened and are trading: Woodend Service Station, BP 2go Halswell, BP Connect Rolleston, BP Connect Bush Inn, BP Connect Fendalton, BP 2go Sockburn, BP Papanui, BP Westburn, Sawyers Arms BP. BP 2go Ashburton and BP 2go West Melton are only open to Emergency Services at present. ■ The following Shell stations are open: Belfast, Templeton, Carmen Rd, Kaiapoi, Curletts Rd, Southbrook, Ruapuna Raceway, Brywndwr, Yaldhurst, Burnside, Bishopdale, Darfield, Brougham, and Ferry Rd. Shell truckstops are open in Hornby, Templeton, Southbrook and Amberly. ■ The following Mobil stations are open: Hagley South, Papanui, Redwood, Wigram, Amberley, Ashburton, Methven, Rakaia, and Rangiora. ■ The following Caltex stations are open: Ashburton, Hornby, Russley, Rangiora, Bishopdale, Redwood, Blenheim Rd, Kaiapoi, and Culverden. ■ Civil Defence advises there is no need to stockpile fuel. The BP distribution terminal is open and fuel is being distributed to service stations that are open around the city. ■ GAS: Contact Energy is providing free Rockgas LPG to anyone who needs it for a limited time. There is a maximum of two refills per person. A 9kg bottle can filled for free at any of these service stations: Challenge, 45 Halswell Rd, Halswell; Challenge, corner Milton and Selwyn St, Christchurch; Challenge Waimak, Main North Rd, Kaiapoi; Caltex, Blenheim Rd, Riccarton; Caltex, Lincoln Rd, Addington; Caltex, 315 Main North Rd, Redwood; Caltex, 66 Riccarton Rd, Riccarton; Challenge, 11 Opawa Rd, Opawa; Butler Automart, 261 Stanmore Rd, Richmond; Blighs Rd Service Station, corner Blighs and Idris Rd, Papanui; Rockgas North Canterbury, 61 Williams St, Kaiapoi.

Cordon

■ Plans are progressing to allow people to retrieve vehicles abandoned within the CBD cordon, and for limited access to some buildings. Threats to personal safety remain the main reason behind the continuing restrictions and will restrict access to high-risk areas. Affected people can expect to start hearing from authorities within the next 48 hours.

Rubbish

■ Private vehicles are preventing kerbside collection trucks from carrying out their usual collection throughout the city. Please keep the areas around bins and rubbish collection vehicles clear and remain off the roads where possible. ■ Any items that don’t fit in wheelie bins can be taken to the Parkhouse Rd or Styx Mill Transfer Stations. Normal charges will apply; however you can keep your receipt and include it in your insurance claim.

Help line

■ Call the Ministry of Social Development’s Government helpline, 0800 779 997, for information about all government services and support.

Phones & post

■ Telecom and Vodafone’s cellphone networks are up and running.

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■ A campaign is under way to collect analogue landline phones from around the country to distribute to people who only have cordless landline phones which rely on power. These can be dropped to any Telecom store during working hours. ■ Telecom has made all payphones in Christchurch free to use. Free WiFi is available at Telecom Riccarton Mall, Cafe Zero and the Westpac Centre in Addington. ■ Yellow has made all calls to 018 originating from the Christchurch region free. ■ Christchurch residents are advised to use a landline when possible or text when using a cellphone to free up the network for emergency response teams. ■ POST: Mail that can not be delivered will be held by NZ Post for collection.

Donations

■ St John has set up www.donatechristchurch.co.nz for people wanting to donate. ■ Prime Minister John Key launched the global Christchurch Earthquake Appeal. Donations can be made at www.christchurchearthquakeappeal.g$ ovt.nz ■ Red Cross is also co-ordinating donations. Go to: http:/ /www.redcross.org.nz/donate ■ Telecom has set up a text donation service for the Red Cross appeal. Text 4419 to make an automatic $3 donation.

Health

■ The public is urgently being asked to stay away from all beaches, as seawater is contaminated with sewage. Residents are also being reminded to stay away from rivers and the estuary, because of overflows into the Avon and Heathcote rivers. ■ CDHB asks older people with urgent health or disability needs to phone (03) 337 7765. ■ Six triage centres are open, including Latimer Square; Sanitarium Factory, Papanui; Spotlight Mall, Beckenham; Bealey Ave 24-hour medical centre; Princess Margaret Hospital; Christchurch Hospital (urgent only). ■ Healthline 24 hours service is staffed by registered nurses who can assess health needs, and give advice on the best level of care. Call 0800 611 116. ■ Fisher & Paykel has set up free community laundries at two sites: 79 Shands Rd, Hornby, open 8am to 4pm, (03) 344 4622; and Berswick and Charles St (located in a Portacom), open 8am to 4pm, contact Dave on 021 995 973. A third site is planned for Rolleston Community Centre. ■ Mental health workers are asking those who experience mental health issues to make contact. ■ Counselling service Lifeline, call 0800 543 354 or 0800 111 757. Skylight trauma and grief support line, call 0800 299 100 or 04 939 6767. ■ West Christchurch Women’s Refuge safe house is open at the moment to provide shelter and support services to women and children.

Roads

■ Main North Rd (Papanui) between Sawyers Arms Rd and Vagues Rd is partially closed, one lane only; Main Rd — Redcliff (Cave Tce to Nayland Str) is now open with temporary traffic lights in place; Frost Rd, Burwood is now open; Brougham St, Port Hills Rd, Halswell Rd, and Lincoln Rd are open. ■ Lyttelton Tunnel is open to emergency services and residents only. Residents require a permit to enter the tunnel. ■ Information on earthquake damage to state highways in Canterbury will be regularly updated on www.highwayinfo.govt.nz or is available by phoning 0800 444 449.

Transport

Weather Today

max 24°

Fine weather. Northeasterlies freshening. Lyttelton tides: 2.2m 4:23AM 0.5m 10:35AM 2.2m 4:41PM 0.6m 10:55PM

Tomorrow

morning min 14° max 28°

High cloud. Northwesterlies, fresh at times. Lyttelton tides: 2.2m 5:07AM 0.6m 11:18AM 2.2m 5:26PM 0.6m 11:38PM

Saturday

morning min 15° max 23°

Rain from afternoon. Fresh cool southwest change. Lyttelton tides: 2.2m 5:48AM 0.6m 12:00PM 2.2m 6:09PM

Sunday

morning min 12° max 18°

Rain easing to a few showers. Southwesterlies ease. Lyttelton tides: 0.6m 12:20AM 2.2m 6:29AM 0.6m 12:41PM 2.1m 6:51PM

$

A36

■ All services, both bus and ferry will be free for two weeks from today.

Other tides offset from Lyttelton: Kaikoura +18 mins; Waimakariri Mouth +10 mins; Avon/Heathcote estuary +45 mins; Akaroa -43 mins For the latest weather information including Weather Warnings © Copyright Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited 2011

■ All bus services travelling to the city will terminate at either Bealey Ave (northern services) or Christchurch Hospital (western and southern services). The terminus in each location will have a campervan staffed by Environment Canterbury staff. These staff will provide information, issue, and reload cards as required. ■ A regular shuttle will connect these two city terminus points at a frequency of 15 minutes. ■ All services will operate between 7am and 7pm daily seven days a week.

Flights

■ Christchurch Airport is open. ■ Australian passport holders or Australian permanent residents who have lost or misplaced their passports must report to the Australian High Commissioner’s desk at the International Arrivals Hall before checking in. ■ Other foreign passport holders who have lost or misplaced their passports should report to the Burnside High School Welfare Centre where they should register with the Red Cross before going to the airport.

Missing people

■ Red Cross has set up a dedicated telephone number for those people concerned about the whereabouts of missing friends and family. Call 0800 RED CROSS (0800 733 276). People inquiring from outside New Zealand should call +64 7 850 2199. ■ Google has launched a people-finder page and on Twitter people can find loved ones or let them know they’re all right on #eqnzcontact.

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Clean-up

■ If possible, residents are asked to pile silt on the roadside (not on grass berms) and this will be collected. ■ The Student Volunteer Army has mobilised 13,000 volunteers to clear silt and help in other ways in suburban areas. They have a website set up for people to contact if they require assistance — www.geoop.com/volunteer-army.php.

nzherald.co.nz starcanterbury.co.nz facebook.com/nzherald.co.nz twitter.com/nzherald

The Star Midweek 3-3-11  

The Star Midweek 3-3-11

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