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A&M Consolidated High School

Relive the surprises from the choir's musical on page 13

1801 Harvey Mitchell Pkwy. S., College Station, Texas 77840

Friday, Feb. 17, 2012

Vol. 17 No. 4

fightingthesystem School examines effectiveness of fighting policy in stopping altercations by alina dattagupta|managing editor

The tension in the atmosphere is palpable as two students standing in front of each other begin to yell accusations. All of a sudden, a large mass begins to form around them. Loud chants egging on the altercation and the sound of the students hitting each other can be heard from the distance. The words “Fight! Fight! Fight!” are screamed over and over again as the mass grows in size in a matter of seconds. As a coach’s whistle blows soon after the fight starts, the awe-struck crowd begins to scatter as teachers rush to break up the confrontation in a quick manner. The involved students are then escorted to the office of an administrator

tolook

Viewpoints Snapshots Student Life

pages 2-6 People

pages 7-11 Health and Rec page 13 Sports

see "fighting policies" on page 3 PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY AMY ZHANG

where News

where they will be given the consequences for their actions. “The school’s stance on fighting is zero tolerance,” assistant principal Jeff Mann said. “If you are involved in a fight, then there is going to be punishment. We don’t tolerate it. Fighting is not acceptable, and if you go in front of a judge for fighting, he is going to tell you that you always had another choice, which was to get out of that situation.”

pages 12, 16-18 pages 19-20 pages 21-24

pages 14-15 Entertainment/Etc. pages 25-28

nthis ssue

Students involved in mountain biking find ways to exercise for a good cause. PAGE 19

Local Chinese New Year festivities celebrate traditional customs. PAGE 26


n the news

2 | news | the roar

Speech and debate students compete in Houston event The Tiger Speech and debate team competed against 30 schools at the Kempner High School Speech and Debate Tournament and won second place Sweepstakes. Jeffrey Kettle won the Top Actor award. Several students placed first in thier events: Ian Ray in Poetry, Athena Bowery in Novice Monologue, Paul Morgan in Novice Speaking and Carter Park in Novice Oral Interpretation.

Junior wins theatre award The Theatre Department traveled to the Texas Educational Theatre Association’s annual conference TheatreFest in downtown Houston to present “Jake Bright,” which was this year’s PlayFest winner. Written by junior Alyssa Salazar, the play was selected as a winner of the play writing competition. “Jake Bright” focuses on the relationship between Jake, an autistic teenager, and his childhood best friend, Dessy, and the challenges students with disabilities face in public schools. Consol hosted performances on Feb. 9 and 10 to raise money for Autism Speaks, a national charity dedicated to increasing awareness of the spectrum of Autism.

Winter Guard receives first place The Varsity Winter Guard won first place at the McNeil TCGC competition. They advanced to the next category.

friday, feb. 17, 2012

A qu ck view

FCCLA teams earn awards in leadership development events Consol FCCLA students earned awards at the Regional Competition Jan. 28 in Galveston. Ronak Mukadam, Abby Hedge, Sayher Ebrahim, Mishaal Lalani, Shirin Navani, and Arena Ali all received a gold medal for Child Development. Hannah Reynolds got a Gold and Kaneshia Thomas a silver in Etiquette. Grace Wong and Jaiden Harrison received gold in Culinary, while Z’andria Marshall received silver. Brittany Kemp and Cesia Sanchez placed first in Interior Design. They also participated in S.T.A.R. events where Kristen Bettiol, Nicole Gunnels and Jonathon Bradford received a gold in food innovations and Jenna Elsik placed second in Fashion Design. Placing second was Samantha Shepherd and Kara Slaughter in Life Event Planning, and Macey Lively in Recycle and Redesign. Nichole Albrecht placed first in Fashion Construction and Megan James and Danielle Reinecke placed third in Interior Design.

Mock Trial team participates in regional competition The Mock Trial team placed second at their regional competition Saturday, Feb. 4 at Walker County Courthouse in Huntsville. The defense attorneys were Macy Hicks, Austen McDougal and Sid Mitchell. The plaintiff attorneys were Sofia Rojo Del Busto, Mei Tan and Tanner Jasperson. The witnesses were Sarah Morgan, Zach Carstens and Abigayle English.

Senior and football player JJ Loller (formerly Bynum) signs the next four years of his football career to Texas Tech University. Twenty senior athletes signed to different colleges from Florida to Indiana at the assembly on Feb. 1. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

Com ng up Feb. 17:

Talent Show at 7 p.m. in the Auditorium

Feb. 20:

Staff Development/Student Holiday

Feb. 21:

Parent Waiver meetings in the Lecture Hall at 12 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

Feb. 25:

Band Pancake Breakfast at Covenant Presbyterian Church at 7:30 a.m. until 11 a.m.

Feb. 29:

Parent Waiver meetings in the Lecture Hall at 12 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

March 10:

Spring Break begins

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the roar | news | 3

friday, feb. 17, 2012

“fighting” continued from page 1

Leigh Smith (name has been changed to protect student’s identity), who has been involved in two fights, feels that altercations occur because people get overwhelmed with their school work and as a result become easily frustrated with other people. “It’s not necessarily that they want to fight someone,” she said. “It’s just someone’s finally going over the edge, and it just happens to be a fight. People get their frustration out in many ways, and I think fighting is one of them. If someone makes you mad and it happens to be a really bad day, then you are probably going to fight them.” Mann feels that the reasoning behind a fight normally differs based on the gender. “Fights between boys are usually over something that could involve being upset over a girlfriend or basically fighting over a girl. Boys also fight over items they think someone stole from them,” Mann said. “Girls normally fight over gossip. We’ve had issues with things that started with things said on Facebook, which spilled into an issue at school, but we’ve seen that occur with boys as well. It’s really that two people are upset and that they’ve had enough of each other.” Smith feels that the cause for her fights was a personal automatic response. “Because the fights that I have been in were not planned, they were caused by some things that finally pushed me over the edge,” she said. “[Fights are] not the best way to get your feelings out, but [for me] it kind of just happens because of the fight or flight [when in bad situations] mode. My [response] is just fight instead of flight.”

quickly and safely as possible.” Massey also has a certain role as a police officer in the fighting policy. “As a police officer my job is not to enforce school policies but to enforce violations of the penal code,” he said.

counting the facts

from

Causes

from

Fighting policies altered to prevent future violence Prevention counting the facts

Consequences

According to Mann, the severity of the punishment depends on the number of offenses. The number depends on the amount of fights someone has been throughout his or her high school career. “A standard first offense is a meeting with parents, involving police, suspension for up to three days and anywhere from three to five days of ISS,” he said. “The school can also file disorderly conduct charges, that is why we involve the police, and the student can be fined anywhere from $1 to $500 by a judge.” Smith said the consequences have kept her from getting in a fight this year. “[The first time I got in a fight,] I had to serve ISS and OSS, but I also wasn’t able to exempt any finals, which probably was the worst punishment,” she said. “After my most recent fight I got kicked off of one of my extracurricular positions. That was the hardest thing because it was so important to me.” Smith also said that the repercussions that she had to face with her family and peers were not worth it either. “My family, especially my mom, was really disappointed, because they knew I could do better, and they thought I had changed since [my first fight],” Smith said. “Also, a lot of people who I’m not necessarily friends with changed the story and said things happened that didn’t even happen, and it went around the school. It just becomes one dramatic thing that everyone gossips about, and the story gets changed, and the truth isn’t discussed, which is really frustrating. Yet, people still love to [gossip].” Student resource officer Patrick Massey said that the legal ramifications are different than those for the school. “The school will enforce fights with their policy, and the police will enforce the same actions through the legal procedures where the results may be arrests, tickets or making a report in which a detective will later investigate,” Massey said.

Specified roles

Mann has specific procedures that he must follow when a fight occurs. “Our first priority is always student safety,” he said. “If a fight is occurring, our job as administration is to break up that fight as

Mann feels that the school goes through many measures to prevent fights. “A lot of times we hear a fight may occur, and we get the names of the students that may be involved, and we will pull the students out of class,” he said. “We tell them ‘we’ve heard that you are going to fight somebody.’ Sometimes they will own up to it, and sometimes they deny it. We tell them the consequences if they choose to fight. We make sure that they are very clear that we have told them what would happen.” Smith feels that it would be impossible for the staff and administrators to stop all fights from occurring. “I think it’s kind of hard to prevent fights in general because you would have to literally have a whole bunch of people around all the time to make sure nothing is going on,” she said.

2 12

The recorded fights at Consol for 2012 are as follows: August

1

Incentives

In an attempt to prevent the fights that were breaking out, a cause for motivation was added to the policy a few years ago. “Currently we have the [incentive that if we can go] 30 days without a fight in school, then we will have the open campus lunch,” Mann said. “We have yet to obtain that this year.” Smith said that the incentives are enticing, but she does not feel that the whole school should be punished. “I think it was a good idea, but it sucked because I was the one who stopped it because I got in a fight on the 29th day, so we didn’t get open campus lunch,” she said. “I feel like if the administration can come up with a way to still have an incentive but not punish the masses for [some people] fighting, it would be much more effective. Even if it was everyone who doesn’t get in a fight gets open campus lunch, and those who did in the 30 days have to stay back, then it gives those who really want a fight the idea that they are only hurting themselves.” Smith also feels that not only the incentive but the harsh punishments are what have kept her from fighting this year. “People sometimes tell me that they want to fight me, but I tell them that I don’t want to fight them at school because of the consequences,” she said. “If I’m going to lose stuff and not be able to exempt finals, then there’s not a point, and it’s not worth it. It’s not the fights that could be prevented, but harsher punishments or more incentives would make people want to fight less.”

Reflecting

While Smith feels fighting sends a message to the other person, she feels that the cost far outweighs the benefit. “I think fighting gets the point ‘obviously I don’t like you’ across, but in the end, it doesn’t accomplish anything really important,” she said. “There are so many other ways you could [inform someone] that you don’t like them, without fighting.” Smith also feels that fights are disasters waiting to happen and that they can only lead to consequences. “Fighting is just a way for people to get in trouble, and it doesn’t do anything beneficial for anyone,” she said. “Yeah, you might get your anger out, but you’re still getting in trouble. In the end, who is really getting hurt you or the other person? If you don’t like someone, just don’t waste your time on them because there is always going to be a punishment.” If given the choice, Smith would like to change her actions from previous years. “Looking back, [fighting] was probably [a] stupid [decision],” she said. “I probably wouldn’t have participated in the fights [if I had known the consequences]. There were so many other things that I could have done instead of fighting.”

September

1

October

2

November

December

January

4 2

1

School year comparisons: 2011-2012

2010-2011

11 20

Source: Jeff Mann, assistant principal


4 | news | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Upcoming election offers variety of presidential candidates to support BY LEAH CRISMAN staff reporter The year 2012 has a different significance for everyone. To some it will be the year they graduate. To others 2012 is the end of the world. To the candidates

NEWT GINGRICH With strong support from Tea Party Republicans, fundamentalist Christians, Governor Rick Perry and actor Chuck Norris, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s campaign for the presidency has entered the national spotlight. “We don’t have the kind of money that at least one of the candidates has,” Gingrich said after winning the South Carolina Primary, “but we have ideas and we have people.” Gingrich’s position on education is based mainly on the idea of shrinking all elements of the Department of Education, effectively transitioning it to a program that oversees, as opposed to manages education. Gingrich’s plan for reducing education spending relates back to his fiscal frugality as House speaker. “We have [had] one person actually balance the budget in ‘98; his name’s Newt Gingrich,” economics teacher Jason Pratt said.For more information, go to http:// www.newt. org/

vying for the Presidency (or continuation of the Presidency), 2012 will be either the year they rose to the top of the political ladder or the year they had to search for

RON PAUL Although dogged by low poll numbers, Ron Paul has attracted a considerable number of young tech-savvy voters and is following an Internet-based networking strategy similar to President Obama’s 2008 campaign strategy.  Still, with only 7% of the vote in Florida, Ron Paul’s chances of being the Republican nominee appear to be diminishing.  “This is the beginning of a long, hard slog,” Paul said recently.   However, he remains optimistic, and said, “I am proud of our efforts at steady growth.” Programs will not solve the education issues. He feels that “one size-fits-all central planning” does not work. For more information, go to http://ronpaul2012.com/

BARACK OBAMA President Obama, who faces stronger opposition for his reelection than his initial election, began campaigning in earnest this spring. In a recent speech in Iowa, Obama emphasized the importance of his return to the Oval Office. “Our economy is getting stronger, and we’ve come too far to turn back now,” he said. Obama’s stance on education is, unlike Gingrich’s stance, focused not on minimizing the effects of the government, but on strengthening education by intervening on issues like student loans and teacher layoffs. According to debate teacher Roy Rodriguez, Obama’s chances of winning the election and enacting are slim but not unattainable. “If I had to gamble, I would say that President Obama squeaks by,” he said. “[There will] not [be] a landslide victory, but he’ll win barely, just barely.” For more information, go to http:// barackobama. com/

RICK SANTORUM Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum, advocate of family values and decreased government involvement, continues his hampaign after his third place finish in the South Carolina primaries. “We’re going to Florida and beyond,” he said, adding, “this race is just starting. It’s a threeman race. We’re going to be in this race for the long term.” Santorum, like most of the other Republican candidates, feels that education should be in the hands of the “consumer,” the parent. He feels that parents have the fundamental right to direct the upbringing and education of their children. For more information, go to http://ricksantorum.com/

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alternate employment. To those of you who plan to vote in this election, some background information about the candidates and their stance on education is listed below.

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MITT ROMNEY A dominant force in the Republican primaries, former governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney is the favorite to win the nomination. His popularity, however, has varied from month to month, so another candidate may overtake him despite his efforts to sustain a permanent lead. Romney, who has struggled to win over conservative voters, maintains a tentative lead over Gingrich, his nearest contender. He hopes extensive television campaigning will widen the gap. “We’re going to change the White House and get America back on track,” Romney said. Romney’s position on education is a balance between liberal and conservative values. He says that in order to encourage economic growth, the government should, up to a point, support education. “[The] best thing the country can do is unleash the power of entrepreneurs and get out of the way,” Romney said. For more information go to h t t p : / / w w w. m i t t ro m n e y . com/


the roar | news | 5

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Psychology club enhances learning, encourages student diversity

for various reasons. “Especially since I am no longer taking the class, it gives me a chance to talk about things that I thought were A melting pot of students from every corner of Consol very interesting then, but don’t get to talk about anymore take a seat at a round table every Wednesday afternoon [during school],” Mitchell said. “It’s educational in a at 4 p.m. to draw pigs, play with dots and test their taste good way. You have to take your core classes, but even buds all for the sake of furthering their knowledge in the if you’re not in the class, [being in the club] is a great subject of psychology. way to learn things you would otherwise not have the Psychology is defined as the scientific study of the opportunity to know.” behavior of individuals and their mental processes. Many A school environment is an ideal environment for students find this field interesting and a useful area study. a social analysis club of this kind because of the wide “It fascinates range of individuals me the way the mind who attend. works and how you “You get a can condition it in bigger web of different ways,” “If you’re not in the class, [being in the people [to interact senior member Laura with] then you club] is a great way to learn things you would at home,” Chapman said. Senior Sid junior member Mitchell finds the would otherwise not have the oppor- Grace Wong said. information useful in tunity to know.” Some members many different areas aspire to take of life. their knowledge senior SID MITCHELL and apply it in the “I feel like psychology is future. relevant to any field “I want to go from business to acting,” Mitchell said. “It makes people into psychology as a profession,” junior member Matt less of a mystery. I realize now how much people really Cline said. “I like the idea of being able to talk to people have in common.” and help them through their issues, specifically with By having the class and the club available at Consol, soldiers with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.” it provides a way for students to apply the material to Along with conditioning experiments, personality their personal experiences with people. test and in-depth group discussion, the club is planning “It helps you understand others as well as yourself,” an event for the near future. senior President Becky Zalmanek said. “You never stop “We are in the process of trying to go on a field learning.” trip to an abnormal psychology class at Texas A&M,” The psychology club originated last year when Zalmanek said. “We’re hoping to visit in March.” Zalmanek approached psychology and sociology teacher When referring to her students and her classroom Lindsay Zahn about providing a place for students to environment, Zahn attempts to create a positive gain a better understanding of the field. atmosphere for learning. “The club is great because we really get to explore “I have expectations that [students] will do the some of the things we don’t have time to cover in class,” work,” Zahn said, “but I also strive to make it a place Zahn said. where they can breathe and be themselves and not feel Members of the class appreciate the time after school judged.”

senior editor

PROM 2012

BY KATE WILLIAMS

What Your Favorite Color Says About You

Black- You are easy going and original. You thrive in a calm environment, free of conflict and disagreement. You will try anything once. You are self-assured and capable of being everyone’s friend.

Orange- You are bold, daring and adventurous. You are fearless, funny and cheerful. You love to talk. Your extroverted and buoyant attitude gives you strength.

Green-You are strong willed and determined. You have great perception and awareness. You are relaxed and stable. You provide balance and harmony and you are a peacemaker.

Blue- You have a sparkling personality and take life in stride. You have a youthful imagination. You offer an inner calmness and sensitivity to those who come to you for advice.

Red- You are strong and friendly, always active and love to be competitive. You have courage and conviction and are passionate in your desires. You know what you want and you usually win. provided by psychology teacher Lindsay Zahn


6 | news | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Spring testing will include TAKS, STARR exams BY DANA BRANHAM

features editor

Freshmen, get ready to leave behind the familiar TAKS test and shoot for the stars—the STAAR test, that is. Near the end of the spring semester, the freshman class will become the first to take STAAR (State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness) tests instead of TAKS tests, after TEA, the Texas Education Agency, made state-wide changes to standardized testing. STAAR tests (often referred to as End of Course exams or EOCs) will differ from TAKS tests in several aspects.

“Where TAKS doesn’t really cover what is done in class that year, STAAR/End of Course exams cover only what is done in class that year.” testing coordinator AMIEE PARSONS

“Where TAKS doesn’t really cover what is done in class that year, STAAR/End of Course exams cover only what is done in class that year,” testing coordinator Amiee Parsons said. “[EOCs are] supposed to be harder and that’s going to be a big change for people, especially our freshmen.” Because EOCs cover material learned in class that year and not knowledge from previous grades, there are 12 EOCs a student must take over three years: English I, II and III; Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II; Biology, Chemistry and Physics; as well as World History, World Geography and U.S. History. Furthermore, through the TAKS testing program, a student only had to pass their test for junior year to be able to graduate. However, with the STAAR program, all

EOCs, freshman through junior year, determine 15% of the final grade in courses and contribute towards a cumulative score that will allow a student to graduate or not. Another difference between the two tests is that the EOCs are timed, where TAKS was not. Each student will have four hours to complete an End of Course exam. Understandably, with such changes in standardized testing, many non-elective teachers are being forced to make changes to their curricula. Tiffany Rutherford, English I and English IV AP teacher, said she has had to modify certain areas of study in her English I classes to prepare her students for EOC testing. The most significant of these changes is due to the heavy focus on writing in EOCs tests—there will be three essays on the English I EOC, as opposed to TAKS testing, where there was no freshman writing assessment. “We were primarily a literature based curriculum. However, with the expectations on the writing, the [students] need to write more,” Rutherford said. “So, the freshman curriculum is now almost sixty-forty, with writing being about 60% now, and reading being about 40%.” While to some students these changes may seem arbitrary, the switch to STAAR/EOC tests is far from illogical. The changes began at TEA, when the list of TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills) was adjusted. With the new TEKS, the state wanted a standardized test that would test these abilities more thoroughly, so the STAAR/EOC test was adopted. “I think in this age of accountability, [EOC testing is] TEA’s way of holding us to a higher standard,” Rutherford said. Christi Cheshire, Dean of Students, agrees that while EOCs may be more challenging than TAKS tests, they will raise the bar and level the playing field for student success. “The state wanted to move to a little more comprehensive and thorough testing,” Cheshire said. “That way, if two students go to college from different schools, they know that they’ve covered all the same material because they’ve both taken End of Course exams.”

What you need to know about the STAAR test: 1. STAAR tests are also called EOCs, or End of Course exams. 2. Only this year’s freshman class will take most EOCs this year. 3. There’s one for every core class you take throughout freshman, sophomore and junior year. 4. Each test will focus specifically on a course and test over only the information in that course. 5. It’s timed—you get four hours. 6. It counts for 15% of your final grade for a class. 7. Unlike TAKS, all twelve EOCs count towards being able to graduate.

In short—take it seriously, and do your best, because even if you’re a freshman, this test does matter. Source: Interviewees Amiee Parsons and Christi Cheshire

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the roar | viewpoints | 7

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Junior analyzes ways to become nonconformist icon

“That is so hipster.” Once just a rarely used slang term, hipster has now become a common adjective to describe anything remotely nonconformist, from film photography to vinyl record players. It seems that this nonsensical term is redefining what society considers “cool” and has apparently become an actual word in the process. Perhaps everyone just secretly wants to be hipster. Well, if you happen to be one of those people, you are in luck! From my intense research and observations, I have compiled the following list of tips for the benefit of the hipster-challenged: Dress appropriately You must look hipster so other people can point and say “Look how hipster that person is! I must try and be him/ her!” If you are female, grab an old pair of your mother’s high-waisted jeans and cut them into shorts. For a top, throw on something with a grandma floral print. You are now vintage-chic, very hipster. Males should put on a pair of khaki pants one size too small and throw on a large sweater and thick-rimmed glasses to top off the whole “I’m too cool for society” look. The goal is to appear ever so slightly feminine, but still very much so like a guy. You must hate anything on Candy 95 It is important that you hate all mainstream music with a passion. It doesn’t matter if that new song is catchy or not; consider yourself forbidden to partake in Katy Perryenjoyment. Listen to anything mildly To listen to the writer read his editorial, indie that has been deemed go to http://www.theroarnewspaper. appropriate by blogspot.com for the podcast all your hipster friends (but first, get hipster friends). If your new favorite band Artwork by Joy Cope ever comes on the radio, complain The Roar 2011-2012 Staff

Editor-in-Chief: Amy Zhang Managing Editor: Alina Dattagupta Senior Editor: Kate Williams Executive Editor: Kendra Spaw Photography Editor: Laura Everett Opinions Editor: Elena Edwards Features Editor: Dana Branham Sports Editor: Rachel Kagle News Editor: Abigayle English Assistant Sports Editor: Kimmie Cessna Assistant News Editor: Kelsey Gaines Assistant Opinions Editor: Isabel Drukker Assistant Editors: Anne Finch, Devin Dakota, Janet Ni Staff Reporters: Leah Crisman, Nicole Farrell, Michelle Liu, Shilpa Saravanan Faculty Adviser: Courtney Wellmann Assistant Adviser: Michael Williams

The Roar Editorial The Roar Editorial BoardBoard Amy Zhang, Editor-in-Chief Alina Dattagupta, Managing Editor Elena Edwards, Opinions Editor

The Advanced Journalism class at A&M Consolidated High School, 1801 Harvey Mitchell Parkway South, College Station, Texas, 77840. The opinions expressed are those of the writers and are not reflective of the administrators, faculty or staff of the College Station Independent School District. Submissions to the editors are welcomed but must be signed and should not exceed 300 words. The editor reserves the right to edit submissions in the interest of clarity and length or to not print a letter at all. Letters containing obscene or libelous material will not be considered. The Editorial Board consists of the editor-in-chief, managing editor and opinions editor. The Roar is a member of the Interscholastic League Press Conference (ILPC), the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) and the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA). The Roar is a winner of the CSPA Gold Crown, the 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 ILPC Award of Distinguished Merit, the CSPA Gold Medal Award, the NSPA All-American distinction and 2005 ILPC Bronze Star and 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 Silver Star. College Station Independent School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, sex or handicap in providing education services. Glynn Walker, Director of Human Resources, 1812 Welsh, College Station, Texas 77840 (979-764-5412) has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements of Title IX. Catherine George, Director of Special Services, 1812 Welsh, Suite 120, College Station, Texas 77840 (979-764-5433) has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination. requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

Open-campus lunch policy not providing enough incentive The incentive is certainly there. The allure of spending an hour outside of your fourth period, grabbing a burrito at Freebirds or frozen yogurt from Yogurtland with your best friends. The current school policy on fighting states that as students, we receive open campus lunch if—and only if—the whole campus can go 30 days without fighting. However, in the past four years, the student body has only received open campus lunch once. The incentive has become a let-down, with students not feeling the need to make an effort to stop fights. While the school should be commended in its strong stance against fighting, the current policy should be modified to centralize punishment on students who have infractions. The school could make a larger effort to advertise the privilege of going off campus for lunch. Many students may not even realize the incentive for not fighting, as promotions for the policy have died down in recent months. According to this issue’s In Perspective poll, 58% of students do not even know what the fighting policy is. The first step to decreasing fighting is awareness—if students are aware of the potential consequences their choices will have on the school, many will make a larger effort to correct their attitudes. Certainly, the school should not just receive opencampus lunch, regardless of student behavior—if the incentive is to be an incentive, it must be earned. Nonetheless, punishing a student body for a fight between two students seems a bit extreme. Currently, if two students get into a fight on the 29th day, all 2800+ students in the school are robbed of the pleasures of open-campus lunch. Even the most well-behaved students can feel the beginnings of resentment as they watch the privilege slip away once again, thanks to the poor choices of people they do not even know. It is difficult for a balance to be found between fairness and leniency when it comes to giving students additional privileges. However, as the current fighting policy stands, students are not seeing enough of an incentive to stop violent altercations. The school should make a larger effort to promote the benefits of not fighting, allowing the privilege of open-campus lunch to perhaps grace the hallways of Consol once more.

CONTACT US

janetni

profusely about them becoming mainstream so that everyone knows how hipster you are. Hang out in hipster places You absolutely cannot just go to the mall or the movies to hang out with your posse. You are no typical American teenager! You are a nonconformist. Find quaint coffee shops or bookstores nestled in obscure shopping centers that haven’t been discovered by the majority of the high school population. It is here that you will gather with your hipster friends and discuss hipster things. The Golden Rule of Hipster Never refer to yourself as hipster. By now, if you have been following my spotless guide, you are a devout hipster. You are so hipster that being hipster is too mainstream for you. However, if you call yourself hipster, everyone else will know you are trying to be cool and consequently shun you from society for the remainder of your life. Carry on with your unorthodox ways, you hipster, you. Just be discreet about your coolness. To those who don’t secretly want to be hipster Well, this guide has been rendered absolutely useless to you. You have no need to wear uncomfortably high-riding shorts, or hate Katy Perry or avoid Cinemark at all costs. You are an individual, and you need no guide. Hipsters will be hipsters, what’s “cool” will be “cool,” and you will be you, mainstream or not. Janet is an assistant editor for The Roar. If you need and other tips on how to acheive being a hipster, contact her by email at the. roar.ni@gmail.com.

If you would like for your opinions to be read, contact the editorial board by sending your letter to the editor. Review our policy for letters before submitting. E-MAIL the.roar@ymail.com


8 | viewpoints | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Passion for writing results in meaningful memories

princesses or hamster scientists, to name a few. I did grow up a little bit, and I began writing short stories, then novels. (Yes, I’m talking ninety-something page manuscripts. No, you may not read them.) Going back to read what I wrote, I cringe at the foolish plots and my sixth grade writing skills. And I cringe a little more when I remember that I, with my super-cool Hotmail account, sent these stories to nearly everyone on my contact list. If you’re reading this, and you were one of those people, I deeply apologize. But when I finally stop cringing, I find myself in this happy, nostalgic state, and it’s because I’m proud of myself for being so dedicated to writing 90 pages of nonsense and for being so willing to share what I wrote with anyone who would read I’ve decided that I write because I don’t want to forget. it. I remember how I even tried sending this “novel” to a Naturally, when I was six-or-so and first beginning few publishers in hopes of one day becoming an author—I to write stories for my parents, I didn’t realize why I was was such a dreamer. I’ve let that go, mostly, but I never want writing. I just did it because I could and because I had the to forget that dream, that dedication, that inspired little girl time. Maybe I was simply enamored with the magic of my who doesn’t come out as much anymore. shiny rainbow journal and the fascinating invention Now, I write less imaginatively and more to of the mechanical pencil and felt that I needed to record all of the particularly important, make good use of them. Maybe it was when I happy, sad, bizarre or simply noteworthy discovered Microsoft Word in all its glory that I moments in life. I keep my moments in decided I had to write. But regardless of why I a journal, a Word document, or various decided to write when I was little, I am so glad I places on the Internet, but that’s no did. Even more so, I’m glad for parents, teachers different than anyone else. If you send and friends who would read my weird little a text, write a Facebook status, tweet stories about fairies or dogs and would tell something, or jot something down in me that they were good. your planner, you’re doing exactly what I don’t want to forget my silly I do. You’re capturing the feelings of a dreams of going to high school and particular moment, recording them forever in consequently becoming a princess written word, and that’s powerful stuff, if you from who-knows-how-long ago, Artwor ask me. kb yM and that’s why, as embarrassing as I guess all I’m really saying is, what you aur ice the journal containing those ridiculous write is precious. So, next time you’re cleaning Vel las fantasies is, I don’t want to get rid of it. Silly as out closets and old school papers, maybe you it seems, I want to hang on to those thoroughly strange should hang on to that first grade journal or the poem and innocent thoughts, even if that just means knowing that you wrote for fifth grade English. If you’re anything it’s buried under the contents of my cluttered closet. I won’t like me, it may be just what you need to remember someday. get rid of old journals because I’m afraid that I’ll forget what Dana is the features editor for The Roar. If you would my imagination is capable of creating. like to contact her and reminisce on old stories you’ve Obviously, not everything I wrote was as childish as written, email her at the.roar.branham@gmail.com.

W hat’s you favorite chir hood TV sh ldow?

danabranham

[insert creativity]

-Preetha Dattagupta, freshman

“Pokemon- it gave me the courag e to be more social with inanimate objects and scream “I choose you , Pikachu!” at girls.”

- Ryan Murphy, sophomore

“Dragonball Z- because they shoot lasers out of their hands!”

-Alex Becker, junior

By Maurice Vellas

“Anticipation”

“Hannah Montana because she taught me that ketchup makes my skin smooth!”

“Arthur because he’s everyones favorite Aardvark!”

Do you think the fighting policy is effective?

no unsure Yes 4%

- Joanna Benjamin, senior

38% 58% 795 students surveyed

“Scooby Doo because I like the way he said ‘Scooby- DooobyDooooo!”” -Irma Escobedo, Spanish teacher


the roar | viewpoints | 9

friday, feb. 17, 2012

leahcrisman Many high school students find themselves faced with a daunting task: convincing their parents they deserve to own and maintain a car. Rejection comes hard and fast for the unlucky, but for those answered in the affirmative, half the battle has yet to begin. A select few receive new trucks or sports cars (the source, I think, of some of the annoying revving c a r engines I hear in the parking lots), but Artwork by Maurice Vellas for the rest of you: welcome to my world. My future car is no beauty. It belonged to my older sister before me, and before that belonged to someone who voted for Bush-Cheney in ‘04 (according to the bumper sticker that refuses to completely part ways). A mysterious accident involving maple syrup and beige carpeting leaves the backseat with both an artistic pattern and a

Paper Clips By Joy Cope

“Almost There”

means for trapping flies. A fine layer of college brochures and gas receipts covers the sticky mess, and any movement in the back seat is accompanied by a quiet rustling. I will inherit this car, and with it, all its assorted features. From the faulty tape player (radio, what radio?) to the car horn that sounds eerily like a duck call, I have come to accept it as my lot in life. Sharing your personal opinions about sixteen-year-olds and cars is a tricky business. Get too whiny about your future vehicle and people tell you to be more grateful because all they have is a ten speed bike; get too nostalgic or obsessed with your car’s supposed character and people start skip reading their way through your article (that said, I still intend to find some sort of nickname for my future car, perhaps based on a Pixar character). Most people I’ve talked to who have received or will receive an undesirable car see it as a source of shame. I find this completely ridiculous as you can a) call your car the ultimate in going green and b) dent the car and no one will notice. The point I want to make is this: whether you own that ten speed bike or have the pleasure of revving your sports car’s engine every morning; it doesn’t matter once you enter the building. Inside the first class of your free high school education with a free newspaper in your hand, your mode of transport is inconsequential. Your current vehicle is temporary. Your grades in high school are not. I have realized this and have come not only to accept my future car, but to appreciate it. I feel like that car is growing on me, and that something is growing in that car as well, be it love or some sort of mold. Leah is a staff reporter for The Roar. To discuss your most beloved method of transportation, email her at the.roar crisman@gmail.com.

letterto theeditor

Dear Editor,

I really appreciate the generosity of the student body here at Consol. This morning (Febuary 8, 2012) I was standing near a table in the cafeteria designated to collect money for the “Hats for Jason” fundraiser. I noticed several students paying more that one dollar to wear a hat and there were even more students paying a dollar (or more) that did not even have a hat to wear. This type of unselfish and generous giving makes me proud to be a Tiger! Thank you students and staff for caring for one of our own. Mr. Jeff Mann, assistant principal

CONTACT US

Old car creates appreciation for transportation

If you would like for your opinions to be read, contact the editorial board by sending your letter to the editor. Review our policy for letters before submitting. E-MAIL the.roar@ymail.com

speak out Discussion Board Each issue, students can submit responses to The Roar’s Speak Out forum. These questions will be posted on Facebook.

Question: Do you think modern day chivalry infringes upon feminist ideals? Will Bonds, junior Yes, I think that modern day chivalry erodes feminism. If feminists desire true gender equality, the status quo should be that men and women are exactly equal; as such, men should not have to open doors or pay for dinner for a woman anymore than they would do a man. Common courtesy should apply to both genders. Ashley Weir, senior No, I don’t. Most women want to be able to achieve the same as a man. But the idea of opening the door, letting ladies go first, meeting parents, things like that are still important to most girls. Kendal Vittrup, junior I actually think chivalry has its place in female ideals. Men being chivalrous is a sign of respect, and all women today really want [is] to be respected, and a man who doesn’t respect me enough to so something as simple as opening the door for me most definitely doesn’t follow the “ideals of modern women.” Add your opinion and see more responses: Friend Roar Newspaper on Facebook. it’s fridayyyy fridayyy gotta get down on fridayyy


10 | viewpoints | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Ordeals from public transportation teach diplomacy

nicolefarrell Don’t try to deny it. Behind everyone’s fresh facades of hip cars and sweet rides, we all know the truth. Most everyone rode the bus. The bus is a curious place where a wide range of species roam, from the acne- speckled breed of teenagers, all the way down to the small rabbit-y creatures called fifth graders.

The bus is also a place of hierarchy and lessons of growing up. The first day of riding the bus is a crucial moment where a small child becomes a Bus Rider, also known as Cool Kid. His mom smothers him with hugs and kisses, and

she hands him a bright plastic lunchbox full of mysteries to be opened at lunchtime. The little kid scampers off and is free of his mom. At least until 4:30 p.m., when the big monstrosity chugs up to the sidewalk adjacent to his dwelling and spits him out. Fast forward to high school. Teens anxiously await the day that they can receive the plastic card that makes that much desired divide between parents and independent young adult even larger and the lame days of riding the ugly, loud, and crowded bus far behind them. Bored expressions cover their faces as they carefully shift their weight when the bus whips around sharp corners. Semi-amused smiles flit over their faces as the kids in the front fly across the ai-

Artwork by Joy Cope

sles into the laps of their classmates. Ha. Novices. Unfortunately, their iPods can’t truly drown out the high pitched squeals and giggles of the tweens, and the pungent smell of Doritos and crayons fill the air. The smell of youth. So over that. I will grudgingly admit the bus is not that bad. I’ve learned some valuable things while being transported. 1. Compromise is key. Choose another seat if a grumpy giant occupies your desired one. 2. Don’t avoid social situations. Reach out and talk to people or be forever labeled as “that kid that sits there alone and never talks.” 3. Follow the rules. Cameras are watching. I’ve met some great friends while riding the bus. We’ve grown up together, and if it wasn’t for public transportation, I never would have realized what fun and accepting people live in a close proximity. It’s really great to know that you’ll have someone to talk to for roughly half an hour after a long day of education. So, the next time your bus hisses to a stop for pick-up again, or you have the privilege of hopping in your own vehicle, remember that feeling of the initial boarding, long, long ago: youthful confidence and excitement for the school day. Be grateful you have a way to get to school and count your blessings: you could have to run there. Nicole is a staff reporter for The Roar. If you’re a current bus rider with similar troubles, or you simply long to reconnect with those days, you can contact her at the.roar.farrell@gmail.com.

Modern time lacks excitement, junior considers time travel

isabeldrukker 2012 reeks. Actually, it’s not too bad so far. But, this is the year that some claim the world will end. This is the year politicians will battle it out for a position that will turn their hair gray (he or she could also go bald altogether, which would actually make for a nice plot twist, seeing as how we haven’t had a completely bald president since Eisenhower). More seriously though, another devastating number of polar bears and gelada monkeys and emperor penguins will die because of global warming. I might have had a few good hair days so far, but on paper, 2012 doesn’t look so hot. Especially since I also have to do college applications at some point. Maybe I’ve just been spending too much time on thisistheendoftheworldasweknowit.

com It’s a real site. Check it out. Get paranoid.) but I’ve been feeling an overwhelming desire to not exist in this time. What with the books we read in English and the movies we watch in our spare time, who wants to live in the present? Who would prefer to live in our world of extreme pollution and bad pop music instead of going back in time to the romanticized world of Edgar Allen Poe? Who thinks it’s better to blog all day than to put on a flapper dress and go dancing or to wander about London on Jan. 30, 1969, and stumble upon a Beatles concert, via rooftop? I always imagine the past as being very sunny. For the present, I don’t think of weather at all, and I don’t know if that’s because I live in Texas or because I’m always on the computer. In short, I’m not exactly disgusted by the pre-facebook age. However, as far as I know, it’s impossible to go back and experience all of those times. So, as a remedy for myself, I think of the quote from the very twenty-first century movie, 50/50. “You can’t change your situation. The only thing you can change is how you deal with it.”

Like the smart aleck that I am, I love to think that I could somehow change my situation, but this isn’t “Where the Wild Things Are”. Escaping the present requires more than my imagination. I’m not about the build a time machine though, I’m horrible at math, same goes for science, (and I actually have some sort of fear of Doc from Back to the Future. It’s the hair, I think.) so the best path for me, is the one following the

ork b

Artw

las e Vel

uric y Ma

movie’s advice and changing how I deal with everything. For me, this means buying lots of canned vegetables. It means continuing to recycle, for the polar bears’ sake. It means probably, maybe, possibly not starting on college applications at the absolute last second. I c a n ’t change that I don’t l i v e in the 1770’s, but I can change, however minorly, a few negativities in my own small world around me. So, yeah, I won’t see the White Stripes (RIP) perform as a neverbroken-up band. But looking on the bright side, I guess, I don’t have wooden teeth. Isabel is the assistant opinions editor for The Roar. If you’d prefer to hang out in 19th century or the Elizabethian era, email her the.roar.drukker@gmail.com, and if she figures out a way to go back, maybe she’ll invite you along.


{opposing viewpoints} friday, feb. 17, 2012

NO

the roar | viewpoints | 11

Are e-books a practical alternative to printed books?

YES

by Shilpa Saravanan , Staff Reporter

by Michelle Liu, Staff Reporter

 I admit, I wasn’t always fond of e-books. A quick foray into both the world of “The Catcher in the Rye” and e-readers left me with a headache, a deep hatred of Holden Caulfield (at least, his character in the first three pages) and a broken Kindle screen.      Over time, though, the benefits of e-readers appear pretty evident. To begin, they are literature’s biggest step into technology’s world—an equal to iPhones and other gadgets. With Kindles and Nooks continually expanding their repertoire, the availability of e-books offers the world of words to the technology-attuned. These e-readers keep tech-savvy readers interested, thus furthering the presence of books itself and preserving books for lengthier periods of time.       Without a doubt, e-books are more convenient than paper books. E-readers offer far more choices through far easier access and are more compact than their paper cousins, in both size and their ability to hold numerous volumes with much less room than paper does. Environmentally, too, e-readers have an advantage by minimizing the number of trees cut down, the number of books that are incinerated and those that are tossed into landfills by publishers. Though some may argue that e-books and e-readers herald the advent of destruction for real, paper books, what they really do is ensure that people continue to read and stay interested in reading. Instead of competing for attention, e-readers encourage a gentle transition--they make reading for both pleasure and academics easier to do.   All in all, what matters more is not the medium of the story, but rather the content itself. By bringing books into the modern world, e-readers deliver this content beautifully, letting words endure and keeping their readers satisfied.

Kindles and Nooks are everywhere now. Admittedly, I went through a stage where I thought it would be cool to have a Kindle and have the ability to take my entire library everywhere I went. At the time, though, I didn’t realize that I couldn’t just transfer my favorite paperbacks into e-book form. I had to pay. Perhaps, for people who own only a few books, e-books are more convenient. But I spent a good amount of money building my library of print books, and I’d rather not throw all of that away by switching over to an e-book reader. Prices for popular e-books are rarely cheaper than those for a regular trade paperback. Perhaps, if e-book coupons came packaged with regular books, I might reconsider my position, but the current situation requires people to buy the same thing twice. Furthermore, thrift stores have cheap, used print books, which contain the previous owner’s highlights, notes, and dog-ears. Whenever I buy such a book, I feel a connection to that person. I know their favorite quotes, the places they stopped while reading, and sometimes even their name. But you can’t buy a used e-book from the e-book thrift store. There is no such thing as a used e-book. They are stored on a machine, and pulled up on that machine when you want to read them, and then put back into the machine when you’re done. And that’s that. I suppose all of this comes down to the fact that I’ll miss books when they’re no longer available. I’m very attached to my books, broken spines, missing covers and all. I love the rustling sound when I randomly thumb through pages to read the ending of a story before the beginning. I love that new-book smell, and that old-book smell, too. And I want future generations to continue to experience books in the way people have for hundreds of years.

student responses. The Roar surveys students to find out their opinions on e-books. Do you or anyone in your family own an e-book?

I think, much like iTunes and CDs, e-books will be more than an alternative, but will never completely replace

46%

No

54%

books.

“ Yes

Tara Lokke, sophomore

In the future, do you think e-books will...

68%

9%

remain a popular alternative

Even though e-books are portable and easier to store, some people just like the feel of an actual book, like me. Anjali Yadav, sophomore

replace paper-back books

be a passing fad

printed e-book

50%

50%

23%

Would you rather use an e-book or a printed book for school? 85 students surveyed


12 | people | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Custodians work diligently to better school life, atmosphere BY ABIGAYLE ENGLISH

news editor

Cafeteria tables are always wiped Sbisa Café and even baking at a bakery. clean. Rarely do the hallways become He’s worked at other schools before but cluttered from trash. Paper towel leftovers admits that he enjoys Consol the best. are always cleared from the restrooms, “After working for the University I and the toilet paper always restocked. If went and worked for Bryan ISD before a sick kid decides to toss his cookies, the coming to here, and I cannot see myself remnants are immediately disposed. Every leaving this school for a while because of morning students return to school to find the great atmosphere,” Ayers said. the miscellaneous bits and pieces of paper Tohkubbi also enjoys the job because of picked up and trash cans emptied. Every all the friendships he’s made at the school. night while students are resting comfortably He actually has some friendships here that in other beds, a team of 15 men and women go all the way back to when he was a high are working hard to repair the school. school student, he said. “Most of the team gets here at 3:30 “I was a student at A&M Consolidated p.m. and works until 11:30 p.m.,” Head a long time ago and had Mr. Slovak for Custodian John Tohkubbi said. government,” Tohkubbi said. “It makes The custodians are divided into teams me laugh because he and his classroom who work different still haven’t shifts so that the changed.” school can be “Sometimes things make our F r o m cleaned constantly. his long “I’m a part of jobs harder... but we just clean f a m i l i a r i t y the day team, so it up and try to keep a positive with the I get here around s c h o o l , 11:00 a.m. and attitude every day.” Tohkubbi said work until 7:30.” the only thing custodian JOHN TOHKUBBI Jerry Ayers said, he would “Some people change would arrive as early as 6 a.m. so that the school be to widen the hallways so students do is in top shape before everyone gets here.” not have to suck in their stomachs while Each custodian has a specific section of in some parts of the school. Linda Reyes, the school that they are responsible for. a night shift custodian, said she didn’t have “Most custodians have 20 to 25 any modifications for the school. classrooms that they clean every day. We “I probably wouldn’t change anything have so many various jobs to make sure about the school,” Reyes said. “Certain everything’s clean from the carpet to the air places remind me of certain things, like the vents,” Tohkubbi said. one time I slipped on soap that I had just While the janitors have very tough jobs mopped on the floor.” to accomplish, they said they work to stay Even though the custodians must spend positive and keep smiling. countless hours here preparing for the “Sometimes things make our jobs students, they also have lives outside of the harder like graffiti, broken windows, senior school. pranks,” Tohkubbi said, “but we just clean it “I love days off because I get to take up and try to keep a positive attitude every care of my grandkids and take them to the day.” park,” Reyes said. Small acts of appreciation help boost Tohkubbi enjoys Astronomy at home, morale and the attitude of the team. exercising, Tai Chi meditation and visiting “When I get down, I just pray and read with his family. Jerry likes working out with my Bible,” Ayers said. “But all the things basketball or football but mainly enjoys that the teachers, Student Council and the volunteering and going to church. PTO do also help to keep us going, along “When my father passed on I just with daily thanks from the students.” learned that I need to live life and live it Ayers started his job at Consol with right,” Ayers said. some past experiences through part time jobs at Texas A&M University working at

first shift:

• 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. • Workers open main doors, unlock restrooms, turn on all lights and prepare the cafeteria for breakfast.

second shift:

• 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. • Workers will respond to office calls for accidents and maintain restroom cleanliness.

John Tohkubbi, head custodian, laughs while riding the Zamboni machine. If he could tell students at Consol one thing, he said he would tell them to “stick with their schooling and pursue their dreams,” and to thank students for their gratitude. PHOTO BY DANA BRANHAM

Custodian Jerry Ayers cleans up after lunchtime. “If anyone needs help, I want [students] to know that they can come talk to me,” Ayers said. PHOTO BY ABIGAYLE ENGLISH

third shift:

• 11 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. •Workers maintain cleanliness, clean up after lunch and begin night crew routines.

Linda Reyes cleans up during the day shift. Reyes said students need to “listen to [their] teachers, and finish school. [They] don’t want to become a custodian like me.” PHOTO BY ABIGAYLE ENGLISH

fourth shift:

• 3 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. •Workers will each clean about 25 classrooms and one set of restrooms.

source: John Tohkubbi


the roar | snapshots | 13

friday, feb. 17, 2012

AMCHS Choir Presents:

BYE BYE

Set building, rehearsals yield successful choir performance

BIRDIE Freshman Carter Heath, sophomore Bryan Conlee, seniors Joy Pfuntner and Erin Sherry sing “Kids” on Friday, Feb. 3. Sherry commended the “very, very colorful” set that the entire cast contributed to building. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

by Laura Everett, photography editor

Rosie and Albert, played by seniors Natalie Hatley and Zachary Bradford, fawn over Conrad Birdie, played by junior Ryan Kreider on Friday, Feb. 3. Bradford said that memorizing lines was the most difficult task in preparing for Bye Bye Birdie. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

Sophomore Marianne Muyia and senior Zachary Bradford perform during the showing of Bye Bye Birdie on Feb. 3. Bradford shared the role of Albert with senior Ted Cross and Muyia and senior Allyson Peters shared the role of “Mama” May Peterson. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

The curtains open and Consol’s choir students take the stage, with a cornucopia of singing and dancing, as they perform the musical “Bye Bye Birdie” on Feb. 3-5. “When I first joined choir, [the annual musical] was something I really looked forward to,” senior Ted Cross said. Preparations for choir’s performance of “Bye Bye Birdie” began with an audition process in which hopeful cast members were asked to perform a song and monologue. While choir members could write down requests for particular parts, ultimately, choir director Travis Angel made the final decision for casting, junior Taylor Bounds said. This musical differs from previous performances by the choir, such as “Oklahoma” last year, and “Grease” from the year before, as more choir students have the opportunity to play important roles. “Most of the people in [the musical] have at least little bity roles,” Bounds said. “They sing a line in a song or they say ‘conductor!’ That’s different from years past where there’s been the lead and then the chorus. In this one, there’s a gradual [division between the sizes of roles]. Actually, this is the first year in a long time that a freshman has gotten a part, although it is only a few words in a song.” However, earning a role in the musical is only the beginning. “This is the most stressful time of year,” senior Erin Sherry said. “I would like to think musically we are ahead, but that is not always the case.” While the choir students are well-accustomed to singing on stage, acting in the musical has added a new dimension to their already much-practiced hobby. “You get to be a different person on stage than you do in normal life,” Cross said. “Singing, you get to sing how you usually sing. But when you act, you

can be anybody you want.” However, the show consists of much more than just audio-appeal. Bengal Belle director Jana Joerns choreographed the dancing that accompanied these songs, Bounds said. “Quite honestly, my favorite part is the dancing,” Bounds said. “I like the singing, but I sing all the time. It is nothing new. I don’t [usually] dance.” These students have done much more than rehearse singing, dancing and acting. The entire cast has participated in building the set, a task that proved more time consuming than anticipated. Cross credited the minor set-backs to “too little time and so much to build.” “This was one of the biggest sets we’ve ever done in a choir musical,” sophomore Bryan Conlee said. “It wasn’t until a week before the actual performance that we finished the set work.” This colorful set has taken multiple Saturday’s worth of hard work, senior Erin Sherry said. “We build everything from the ground up,” Bounds said. “And we use the same stuff every year until it is so screwed into that you can’t get a screw in there. That’s a really big deal that I never thought of before I participated in a musical: we built it; we painted it.” All of the hours put into the preparations paid off. “I was looking forward to our first performance and seeing if we could pull it off,” Conlee said. “And we did. I wasn’t nervous. I was running more on positive emotions.” When the curtains close, the choir students were able to breath a sigh of relief, but not without first commending themselves for their hard work. “I think, honestly, seeing the end product and knowing you were a huge part of it with the set work. Obviously, the performance is fun,” Bounds said. “I just love seeing how many people show up and are interested and invested in what we’re doing – it is just really cool.”


14 | student

life | the roar

through Dating Decades the

the roar | student

friday, feb. 17, 2012

life | 15

Teachers uncover the differences in dating throughout the past four decades

by: Elena Edwards, opinions editor

Between school dances and coasting through town, dating in the was a popular and cheap opportunity to spend time with a significant other for teenagers and young adults alike. “Dating was going out with one person, or sometimes with another couple, rather than as a group,” chemistry teacher Vanita Vance said of dating in the 1960’s. “We would go to a movie, go to the local hangout to see and be seen, ride around in the car, go to school dances or parties or go out to eat.” The 1960’s is widely known for being a dance-crazed generation, presenting teenagers the opportunity to express themselves with dances such as the twist, and to make known their affections for another by slow dancing with them, then known as “strolling.” “Our school used to have "sock hops" after football games in the gym (that's why it’s called"sock hop" - no hard shoes on the gym floor), and those were a lot of fun,” Vance said. “One of the local churches had weekly dance parties where lots of teenagers would go and hang out, socialize, dance and spend time together. Those were also a lot of fun. When I was in high school, no one would consider going to prom or homecoming or a school dance like Sadie without a date. It just wasn't done.” Possibly the biggest difference between dating in the 60’s and dating today is the affordability of dates, Vance said. “At the time it cost about $1 each to go to the movies, Cokes were around 25 cents or so, and gasoline was about 25 cents per gallon, so it didn't cost all that much to go out on a date, not like it does today,” Vance said.

1960’s

The 1970s- a generation when Rock and Roll was first flooding through the stereos of the youth and dating widely revolved around teenagers’ new-found sense of freedom and rebellion. “Dating in the 70’s was much more monogamous than the group dates that I see today,” calculus teacher Mary Selcer said of dating in the 1970’s. “Dances and hanging out at drive-ins was a really popular thing to do when I was a teenager.” Selcer recalls that school dances were a popular way to socialize not only with one’s significant other, but with everyone. “I loved the dances,” Selcer said. “Black Sabbath was big then, so there was always a lot of rock, and our dancing was more like a mosh pit. It was always crazy fun, and you danced with everyone, not just your date.” While texting and computers are popular means of communication for today’s youth, school was the opportune moment for many teenagers of the 70’s to talk to their crush. “Lunch was huge,” Selcer said. “Talking with friends was like today’s texting. You would tell a friend something who would tell a friend, who would eventually tell the guy you liked.” Selcer believes that the modern dependency on technology to communicate with one another has made dating more difficult. “Facebook has changed dating a lot,” Selcer said. “Raising a daughter in the time when talking online and through texting was becoming popular, I saw more fights happen through things that were said online.”

1980’s

Dating in the meant many of the same things as it does now, and with the same youthful desire to pursue the opposite sex, dating required teenagers to seek their inner courage during pursuit while being able to enjoy the coming of age technology that was then so new and exciting. “One of the big things to do was watch movies at someone’s house because the 80’s marked the onset of household VCR’s,” English teacher Freda Carraway said. “Cutting town was also a common amusing distraction. This meant driving really slowly repeatedly on a designated route and just seeing who was out and about. Mostly kids who didn’t have steady girlfriends or boyfriends liked cutting town because it was a way to meet people from neighboring towns or schools.” With cell phones and household internet not yet an available means of communication, teenagers would rely on their house phone as a way of contacting and pursuing one another. “Real telephone calls were an absolute must,” Carraway said. “If the phone rang, look out! My brothers and I, who were all teenagers at the same time, would take each other out rushing to get to the phone first. ” Despite these small differences, Carraway believes that the nature of dating in the 1980’s is still very similar to today. “Courting is considerably different, with the onset of cell phones, texting and Facebook, but actual dates seem to be about the same,” she said. “One thing I have noticed, though, is that it’s really common for teenagers today to go all the way through high school and never have a steady boyfriend or girlfriend. I don’t think that happened as much at my high school, and I think that’s a good change.” Science teacher, John Tollett believes that today’s relationships revolve too much around publicity and technology. “We were much more exclusive, and much more respectful of each other,” Tollett said. “There was no place where we posted everything about our relationships. It was private, and as a result, better. ”

1990’s

The were a time when a new sense of independence pulsed through many teenagers. Females began to take their love lives into their own hands, and dates often times consisted of attending sporting and church events and embarking on out-oftown road trips. When pursuing an individual, teenagers of the 1990’s would often resort to note writing or phone calls to contact their special one. “Junior high was the best,” Psychology teacher Lindsay Zahn said. “Usually you would write a note to the person you liked asking them if they would ‘go with you’, or you would have a friend ask them. We didn’t have cell phones, so in order to [call that person] you would have to call the house. If you were lucky, you had your own phone line separate from your parents so it wouldn’t be so embarrassing.” History teacher Jason Pratt recalls that popular hang-out spots in high school were teenappropriate clubs, church events and sporting events. “Lots of kids would go to Carz, a dance club for high school aged kids where no alcohol was served,” Pratt said. “My friends and I took our dates to the variety of sporting events available in Houston: Astros, Oilers, Rockets and the rodeo were good for dating as well. I had the most fun in church provided entertainment. There were lots of really big churches, and each church had 4 or 5 big high schools that went to the youth group. The girl I married went to the same church, but went to a different high school.” Pratt believes that certain changes in today’s social standards have resulted in interactions between teenagers that he doesn’t agree with. “I don't know how dates have changed between when I was in high school and today, but I do know about how kids dance. Guys then would have loved the girls at the dances today. Even at Carz, the girls would have never danced like so many of the girls dance today or be so promiscuous.”

60’s 70’s 80’s 90’s

Here are some fun and inexpensive alternatives for dates with your significant other. Cut each strip out, throw them in a bowl and pick at random for a surprise date.

Dating on a

Dime

•Make dinner and challenge each other to a dessert cook off. •Rent a Redbox movie or catch a matinee at Cinemark •Go to a park and fly a kite, or take your dog for a walk •Go on a bike ride •Challenge each other to a few card games or board games •Grab breakfast for dinner- it’s cheaper than dinner meals and delicious!


14 | student

life | the roar

through Dating Decades the

the roar | student

friday, feb. 17, 2012

life | 15

Teachers uncover the differences in dating throughout the past four decades

by: Elena Edwards, opinions editor

Between school dances and coasting through town, dating in the was a popular and cheap opportunity to spend time with a significant other for teenagers and young adults alike. “Dating was going out with one person, or sometimes with another couple, rather than as a group,” chemistry teacher Vanita Vance said of dating in the 1960’s. “We would go to a movie, go to the local hangout to see and be seen, ride around in the car, go to school dances or parties or go out to eat.” The 1960’s is widely known for being a dance-crazed generation, presenting teenagers the opportunity to express themselves with dances such as the twist, and to make known their affections for another by slow dancing with them, then known as “strolling.” “Our school used to have "sock hops" after football games in the gym (that's why it’s called"sock hop" - no hard shoes on the gym floor), and those were a lot of fun,” Vance said. “One of the local churches had weekly dance parties where lots of teenagers would go and hang out, socialize, dance and spend time together. Those were also a lot of fun. When I was in high school, no one would consider going to prom or homecoming or a school dance like Sadie without a date. It just wasn't done.” Possibly the biggest difference between dating in the 60’s and dating today is the affordability of dates, Vance said. “At the time it cost about $1 each to go to the movies, Cokes were around 25 cents or so, and gasoline was about 25 cents per gallon, so it didn't cost all that much to go out on a date, not like it does today,” Vance said.

1960’s

The 1970s- a generation when Rock and Roll was first flooding through the stereos of the youth and dating widely revolved around teenagers’ new-found sense of freedom and rebellion. “Dating in the 70’s was much more monogamous than the group dates that I see today,” calculus teacher Mary Selcer said of dating in the 1970’s. “Dances and hanging out at drive-ins was a really popular thing to do when I was a teenager.” Selcer recalls that school dances were a popular way to socialize not only with one’s significant other, but with everyone. “I loved the dances,” Selcer said. “Black Sabbath was big then, so there was always a lot of rock, and our dancing was more like a mosh pit. It was always crazy fun, and you danced with everyone, not just your date.” While texting and computers are popular means of communication for today’s youth, school was the opportune moment for many teenagers of the 70’s to talk to their crush. “Lunch was huge,” Selcer said. “Talking with friends was like today’s texting. You would tell a friend something who would tell a friend, who would eventually tell the guy you liked.” Selcer believes that the modern dependency on technology to communicate with one another has made dating more difficult. “Facebook has changed dating a lot,” Selcer said. “Raising a daughter in the time when talking online and through texting was becoming popular, I saw more fights happen through things that were said online.”

1980’s

Dating in the meant many of the same things as it does now, and with the same youthful desire to pursue the opposite sex, dating required teenagers to seek their inner courage during pursuit while being able to enjoy the coming of age technology that was then so new and exciting. “One of the big things to do was watch movies at someone’s house because the 80’s marked the onset of household VCR’s,” English teacher Freda Carraway said. “Cutting town was also a common amusing distraction. This meant driving really slowly repeatedly on a designated route and just seeing who was out and about. Mostly kids who didn’t have steady girlfriends or boyfriends liked cutting town because it was a way to meet people from neighboring towns or schools.” With cell phones and household internet not yet an available means of communication, teenagers would rely on their house phone as a way of contacting and pursuing one another. “Real telephone calls were an absolute must,” Carraway said. “If the phone rang, look out! My brothers and I, who were all teenagers at the same time, would take each other out rushing to get to the phone first. ” Despite these small differences, Carraway believes that the nature of dating in the 1980’s is still very similar to today. “Courting is considerably different, with the onset of cell phones, texting and Facebook, but actual dates seem to be about the same,” she said. “One thing I have noticed, though, is that it’s really common for teenagers today to go all the way through high school and never have a steady boyfriend or girlfriend. I don’t think that happened as much at my high school, and I think that’s a good change.” Science teacher, John Tollett believes that today’s relationships revolve too much around publicity and technology. “We were much more exclusive, and much more respectful of each other,” Tollett said. “There was no place where we posted everything about our relationships. It was private, and as a result, better. ”

1990’s

The were a time when a new sense of independence pulsed through many teenagers. Females began to take their love lives into their own hands, and dates often times consisted of attending sporting and church events and embarking on out-oftown road trips. When pursuing an individual, teenagers of the 1990’s would often resort to note writing or phone calls to contact their special one. “Junior high was the best,” Psychology teacher Lindsay Zahn said. “Usually you would write a note to the person you liked asking them if they would ‘go with you’, or you would have a friend ask them. We didn’t have cell phones, so in order to [call that person] you would have to call the house. If you were lucky, you had your own phone line separate from your parents so it wouldn’t be so embarrassing.” History teacher Jason Pratt recalls that popular hang-out spots in high school were teenappropriate clubs, church events and sporting events. “Lots of kids would go to Carz, a dance club for high school aged kids where no alcohol was served,” Pratt said. “My friends and I took our dates to the variety of sporting events available in Houston: Astros, Oilers, Rockets and the rodeo were good for dating as well. I had the most fun in church provided entertainment. There were lots of really big churches, and each church had 4 or 5 big high schools that went to the youth group. The girl I married went to the same church, but went to a different high school.” Pratt believes that certain changes in today’s social standards have resulted in interactions between teenagers that he doesn’t agree with. “I don't know how dates have changed between when I was in high school and today, but I do know about how kids dance. Guys then would have loved the girls at the dances today. Even at Carz, the girls would have never danced like so many of the girls dance today or be so promiscuous.”

60’s 70’s 80’s 90’s

Here are some fun and inexpensive alternatives for dates with your significant other. Cut each strip out, throw them in a bowl and pick at random for a surprise date.

Dating on a

Dime

•Make dinner and challenge each other to a dessert cook off. •Rent a Redbox movie or catch a matinee at Cinemark •Go to a park and fly a kite, or take your dog for a walk •Go on a bike ride •Challenge each other to a few card games or board games •Grab breakfast for dinner- it’s cheaper than dinner meals and delicious!


16 | people | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

book people

Avid readers give insight into personal connection, interest for books by Anne Finch, Assistant Editor Many students at Consol are completely familiar with traveling the hallways of the school with book in hand or in backpack; textbooks, workbooks, books assigned by English classes. However, for other members of the student body, reading is a recreational pastime, as well as an academic requirement. Junior Deni Warzon has been an avid reader since she first discovered a love of reading in intermediate school. “Everything was occupied, all the playground sports, just sucked, so I went to the library and found Goosebumps and started with that,” she said. Warzon added that her reading also provides a helpful escape from schoolwork. “[Reading is] a way to get out of class without actually being out of class,” she said. “In books, it’s a different world, so you don’t really have to pay attention to all this, you just get sucked into the book.” Sophomore Brook Versaw agreed that reading can be an enjoyable escape from reality. “Books have a lot that we can learn from, [but] they’re a good source of enjoyment,” she said. “They’re a good way to spend your free time, and they’re more wholesome than sitting around and doing nothing. You feel productive, but you’re also enjoying yourself.” Sophomore Julianna Masabni reiterated the idea that

reading can be an excellent escape, but can also help students reap some academic benefits. “It’ll make you smarter,” she said. “I read new words every day, and if I’m like ‘Whoa, I don’t know what that means’, then I’ll look it up and I’ll make sure I use it. It’s a way to keep thinking.” Junior Erin Taylor agreed that reading can offer academic benefits, and that reading, not only as applied to literature but as a skill, is helpful for life. “So much of life is centered around words,” she said. “Everything that is preserved is written down, and if you don’t read, you can’t find things out.” Versaw noted that books have helped her expand her mind in a way that the ability to read alone cannot. “Reading has changed my perception on a lot of issues,” she said. “We live in a society that has changed a lot over time, and reading books really broadens your perception of life because they talk about things you have no experience with.” As well as having practicality for life and school, Taylor said that avid reading also helps develop social connections. “It helps you connect with other people who read a lot,” she said, “because you can compare books and authors the same way other people are really into celebrities and talk about and compare them.” Although all self-proclaimed bookworms, Warzon, Masabni, Versaw and Taylor all professed slightly different tastes in books. Warzon was particularly vehement when it came

The Perks of Being a WallFlower by Stephen Chbosky A teenager reveals the problems in his family, social life and past through a series of anonymous letter. Despite his trouble, he manages, to obtain a suit, a book of poems and his drivers license during his freshman year.

Top 5 Must Reads

My Most Excellent Year by Steve Kluger This under-appreciated yet awesome book follows the lives of high school freshman Alejandra, T.C. and Augie as they deal with musicals, orphans, Mary Poppins and falling in love.

A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers This book, based on a story in the Bible, shares a story of unconditional love. Redeeming love is an enticing book that cannot be finished until the last word is read.

Nine Stories by J.D. Salinger J. D. Salinger compiles his short stories into one, compact copy of his worn-out adults, precocious children and their issues and connections to themselves and the world. His stories dance with witty dialogue and concise language.

to realistic fiction when compared to her favorite genre, fantasy. “I like dark and gloomy [stories], but my favorite part is the magical stuff,” she said. “The thought of doing something we can’t do every day is the best part. Who wants to read about real life when you can experience real life?” Taylor also said she enjoys fantasy and sci-fi more than realistic and historical fiction. “I like fantasy and sci-fi better, probably because they’re less realistic, so they can be more entertaining,” she said. “You don’t necessarily have to know much about modern things. Sometimes historical fiction will to link to things that have happened in the past, and if you don’t know what happened, you’re lost.” Masabni, however, expressed no dislike for any specific genre, although she also said she preferred science fiction. “I like all books,” she said. “A book that has romance, or friendship, or whatever genre Harry Potter is, that’s my book. Despite their different preferences, each of the four girls expressed the joys of reading not just out of necessity and for school, but recreationally. “A book always waits. Your favorite TV show may not be on until later, but a book’s still there,” Versaw said. “A book is something that you can put away, carry with you, and with technology expanding, you can put it in your pocket on a smart phone and pick it up later and read it. It’s a way to broaden your horizons, to teach you about places you’ve never been before.”

Source: Compiled by The Roar Staff

The first in a planned seven-book series, A Game of Thrones has something to offer for all kinds of fantasy lovers. Seventeen years after a violent rebellion, the Seven Kingdoms lie in a shaky peace, but when northerner Eddard Stark moves to the capital, everything changes. Nobles indulge in backstabbing and intrigue while a small group of men on the border fights otherworldly forces that threaten them all.


the roar | people | 17

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Former principal pursues passion to become Director of Student Activities By Isabel Drukker Assistant Opinions Editor The framed pictures decorating former principal Buddy Reed’s office walls show his love for sports and activities, but the proud, satisfied look in his eyes as he recalls his time as principal at Consol says something more. “I lay my head on a pillow at night, and I rest well because my heart’s right,” Reed said. “Everything I’ve done is student centered. I’ll always have a listening ear, and I’ll always be near.” Since becoming principal in 2008, Reed has made it his goal to establish Consol as a school worthy of statewide recognition for superiority. After three and a half years, he is moving forward to become the district’s Director of Student Activities. “Three and a half years ago, we had issues and we needed someone with an iron fist to resolve,” interim principal Gwen Elder said. “[Then,] Mr. Reed came, with an accountability standard, he had high standards—we had to do more; we could not settle for mediocrity.” Reed and his staff achieved this by individualizing each student and expressing the importance every person at Consol has. “When I [first] came here,” Reed said, “I wanted to look stu-

dents in the eye, and I wanted them to see me as an individual that was always going to put them first.” For Reed, this meant introducing himself to everyone, starting with student leaders the summer before school started, where current student body president, Celina Malave, met him before beginning her time at Consol. “He was really receptive towards the students,” Malave said. “He really wanted to talk to the student leaders and try to get them involved with his decision-making. He’s been like a loving mentor.” Similar leadership inspired Reed to seek a career in education, and he takes pride in having an influence on students. “When I was a youngster, I was influenced by a number of people,” Reed said. “The most influential people were educators. They were great mentors to me, and I wanted to have the same sort of impact that they had on me.” During his time as principal, Reed emphasized the importance of the no-fighting policy, proposing a deal where thirty days without violence would be rewarded with an open campus lunch for those able to leave the school and free ice cream for those who stayed. “He believes in a safe, disciplined learning environ-

Mr. Reed’s Parting Words I will leave you – staff, students, and parents - with one of my favorite quotes from Washington Irving, “Great minds have purpose, and others have wishes.” We all must ask ourselves, what are my purposes and plans for continued success? As you know drifters float on chance with little vision and in reality the stream gets more perilous by the moment. I would challenge all to re-evaluate that purpose and commitment, be resolute, never submit to passiveness drifting - it is truly dangerous…for the course of least resistance is always down stream. It takes a strong person with pride, passion and purpose to make it upstream.

The

only way is to lift the anchor and grab an oar, or two oars, going in the same direction. As you know when we all pull together in one direction, the sky is truly the limit. Please remember…it matters most not what you get out of life, but what you give! It truly has been great serving as your principal each and every day on this campus. I often say, and it is so true…

It truly has been great to be a “TIGER’’ and still is.

Principal Buddy Reed and his son watch the Tigers from the sidelines during a football game last fall. Reed’s new position as Director of Student Activities allows him to coordinate athletics and fine arts organizations in grades 7-12. PHOTO BY LLISON GARLICK.

ment,” Elder said. “Mr. Reed is not one to sit behind his desk. Whether you see him in the hallway, in the cafeteria on duty, or outside on the bus loop, he is visible, and I think that’s important.” While Reed encouraged the school to strive for statewide recognition, he also stressed the importance of maintaining a violence-free campus to teach students the power of affecting others positively. “Respect who you are, but also respect those around you,” Reed said. “Character has always been an important aspect to me, and I think it’s overlooked in public schools. We worry a lot about academics, but when you don’t have good character in the school, all the other things suffer.” This idea of honoring one’s character reflects that in good sportsmanship, a trait that Reed has tried to teach at Consol, and will now carry on to his new position. “I’m really sad to see him go,” Malave said. “[But I’m also] excited for his new position. He’s always loved sports and extracurricular [activities], so that’s going to be perfect.” Elder shares the same bittersweet feeling, saying that while she’s happy to see him in a role, he is sure to enjoy, his presence

at Consol will undoubtedly be missed. “He’s a part of our family,” Elder said. “He’s done a great job here at Consol, and just to see him depart [makes you sad] because it’s like a part of you is leaving your family.” As Director of Student Activities, Reed will coordinate groups such as band, orchestra, choir, athletics, and other extracurricular events at both high schools. “I believe that extracurricular activities give students another side, another perspective into the educational realm,” Reed said. “I think they [students] need to be involved with that because I think it’s so impactful [because] the camaraderie of working together teaches so many principles. I’m looking forward to that.” Even more so, Reed said that he finds inspiration not in the students’ teamwork, or even in the resulting product. What Reed finds the most moving is the students themselves. “The students [in activities] represent that Eye of the Tiger, that pride, that passion, that purpose that we have in life,” Reed said. This passion and “thrill of the fight” Reed has promoted over the years holds more significance than simple lyrics to a catchy song. “Whenever he asks you what

you see in the Eye of the Tiger, he really wants you to think outside of the box and just go beyond what you’re told you can do,” Malave said. With this in mind, Malave and the rest of the class of 2012 will graduate, leaving Consol only a few months after Reed, who has expressed admiration for the growth in maturity he has noticed in the seniors. “They’re exceptional. They’re premiere. They’re the best of the best, they represent the Eye of the Tiger,” Reed said. “They represent everything that is right with this campus. They’re leaders and mentors and they’re those young people that are going to go out and blaze a trail for others to follow.” Whatever the name of his position though, one lesson remains that Reed believes the students of Consol must remember. And upon saying it, he looks determined with all the intensity of the Eye of the Tiger. “Consol is a special place. I knew that when I came,” Reed said. “Don’t ever take that for granted. That’s the most important thing [about here] that you don’t have to share with anybody that’s coming into this building, that’s been a part of this building, that’s left a legacy here. It’s a special place. Don’t take it for granted.”


18 | people | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Excellent Educator

Teacher inspires students through dedication, determination to help by Kimmie Cessna, assistant sports editor Grading labs, staying late after school, being involved in school activities, teaching new material and helping students achieve success are the many tasks chemistry teacher Casey Akin accomplishes. “I wanted to be a teacher when I realized I was good at explaining things to people,” Akin said. Akin was raised just down the road in Caldwell, Texas and graduated from Texas A&M University with a biology degree. “I started off wanting to be a doctor, but ended up with a biology degree because science was my favorite subject,” Akin said. Akin is in her ninth year of teaching and after all the years, she has come up with techniques to keep students engaged in the work. “I allow some conversations during class, demonstrations, applying things in chemistry to real life and corny jokes,” Akin said. Along with teaching, Akin is involved with many extracurricular activities including Robotics and Leo Club, Science Bowl and UIL Science. “Robotics consists of coming to practices, offering advice, traveling with the team and keeping them safe,” Akin said. “Leo Club involves service projects outside the community.”

Alongside school activities, Akin enjoys reading, exercising and cooking. “I have been training since October for a half marathon in March,” Akin said. Akin is described as an awesome person by another teacher and a friend, Michelle Jedlicka. “Mrs. Akin’s best quality is how much she cares about her students, friends and everyone around her,” Jedlicka said. Jedlicka and Akin enjoy spending time together outside of school. “We go to the gym together a couple of times a week and we love getting pedicures,” Jedicka said. Another aspiration Akin would not mind is following fashion. “I used to work at Dillard’s organizing the displays,” Akin said. “I love clothes.” Challenges Akin faces are minor compared to the rewards teaching brings. “The most challenging thing about teaching is taking attendance because I get so excited when everyone is here,” Akin said. “Teaching is rewarding because I get to know my students and when they bring me something cool about chemistry like in a book, I get excited.”

Science teacher Casey Akin reviews with her AP class. She will be moving to the new high school in the fall. PHOTO BY ALINA DATTAGUPTA

Akin folds clothing at a fundraiser for Leo club on Feb. 11. She has been the club sponsor for three years. PHOTO BY ALINA DATTAGUPTA

Mrs. Akin's Favorites...

movie: My Fair Lady food: popcorn season: summer

TV show: Big Bang Theory

Chemistry teacher Casey Akin performs an experiment involving vinegar and baking soda on Monday, Feb. 6. In addition to teaching, she is a College Board consultant who helps train other AP teachers. PHOTO BY ALINA DATTAGUPTA

actor: Tigger from Winnie the Pooh and Arnold Schwarzenegger Artwork by Michelle Liu


the roar | health

friday, feb. 17, 2012

& rec |19

by Michelle Liu, Staff REPORTER

Mountain bikers form club, pledge to ride for multiple sclerosis Pulling up her pant legs, junior Bettie Oliva reveals the patchwork of scrapes across the front of her calves. “They’re kind of a bloody mess,” she said. “Everyone else, of course, doesn’t fall as much.” Oliva refers to the other members of Consol’s Mountain Biking Club. She has garnered her scratches from her practices with the club, which began this year after a high school biking league for all of Texas was recently established. “My dad was the one who really spearheaded the effort,” senior Creed Flynn said. “He’s attended an orientation for the whole league.” The club practices three to five hours each week at various community trails, such as Lake Bryan and Georgie K. Fitch Park. Flynn said that the club practices crosscountry biking, or trail-riding. The trails the club rides on contain obstacles, as well as elevation changes and occasional jumps or drops, he said. “It’s basically about speed,” senior Dustin Fry said. Fry emphasizes the flexibility of the sport as well. “Mountain biking is exactly as difficult as you want it to be,” he said. “Anybody can start mountain biking.” Like Fry, Flynn stresses the positive aspects of mountain biking. “I do it because I love it. It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “If you’re interested in mountain biking, definitely give it a shot, because I haven’t met anybody who hasn’t tried it once and not been hooked on it.” The club also intends to participate in competitions that begin in late February. “I need to build up speed, get in shape and practice cornering,” Oliva said in regards to preparation. Despite being the self-claimed “most inexperienced rider” in the club, Oliva acknowledges the support offered. “I am the only girl. It’s actually not

bad,” she said. “[The boys] like to make sure that I’m okay a lot of the time.” Fry and Oliva also participate in MS 150, a team that serves as Fry’s officer project for Interact Club this year. MS 150, a 150-mile bike ride that spans two days and the distance from Houston to Austin, raises money for multiple sclerosis. “It is a good opportunity to see what you’re capable of,” Fry said. The school’s MS 150 team has practiced since September of last semester, biking for over two hours every Saturday. They prepare for the annual cycling ride, which takes place on April 21 and 22 this year. Consol’s MS 150 team also includes, as its third member, senior Marie Guermond, who devotes her time to the team for family reasons. “I have an aunt who’s diagnosed with multiple sclerosis,” Guermond said. “It was the first opportunity I had to do something for her.” Due to the time constraints, the team bikes shorter distances to build up intensity instead, Fry said. He said they ride on country roads with little traffic, both for the practical aspect and the aesthetic quality— they have few intersections and are more scenic than city roads. The three team members practice together on Saturdays for several hours, biking numerous miles each time. Guermond participates to acknowledge her own ability, as well as to help others. “I just want to finish [MS 150] to be able to know that I can ride 150 miles and also to know that I can benefit my aunt and other people who have multiple sclerosis,” Guermond said. “I like the feeling that I’m not doing it as part of a race or a competition.” Fry, however, does have goals on the team’s agenda. “I would like everyone to finish riding safely, and I don’t want anybody to finish last,” he said. “I want to finish strong.”

Senior Creed Flynn rides through Hansel Park on Feb. 7 as part of the mountain biking club. Flynn and his family began planning for the club during the fall semester, and they started practicing regularly at the start of the spring semester. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

Senior Dustin Fry bikes through Hansel Park on Feb. 7. As the bikers need to raise $400 each for the ride, students can support multiple sclerosis research and the school’s team by dropping off donations in Mr. Jason Pratt’s room, G-1280.PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

What’s the difference between mountain bikes & road bikes? Mountain Bikes are...

• made with wider tires to increase surface area and friction. • made with wider handlebars for greater control. • heavier in general. • used with dirt trails, rocks.

Road Bikes are... • designed for speed.

• equipped with bent handlebars for aerodynamics. • used mostly on paved roads. source: http://www.wisegeek.com


20 | health

& rec | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Off-Season Off the Field

Fall extracurriculars engage in new activities for spring semester

by Shilpa Saravanan, staff reporter Fall is long gone. The boys of the season have moved on, as have the organizations that accompanied them every Friday night for months. This semester, they are all otherwise engaged, equally, if not busier than they were last semester. “The fall and the spring are very, very different,” said color guard co-captain Laine Huebner. The color guard performs with the band at each football game, but in the spring, the two go their separate ways. The members consider the spring semester’s performance to be much more difficult than the one performed on the field. Though the fall show covers all 100 yards of the football field and is performed in the cold and rain, the movements in the spring show are less complex, the judges are seated far away, mistakes “aren’t really a big deal,” said Huebner. However, in the winter and spring, the show is indoors, with the judges seated closer to the performers. “We have to be much more expressive and nuanced,” Huebner said. Meanwhile, the band, a halftime constant in the fall, prepares for a busy concert season. Most of their time will be spent practicing for the UIL Concert and Sight-reading contest in April, which entails a performance of three pieces and then a sight-reading exercise. “The fall can be exhausting, with the demanding marching schedule,” said band director Pieter Duplooy. However, in the spring, the band will get an opportunity to relax. Every four years, they perform at Disneyworld in Orlando. This trip is an excellent out-of-state opportunity for the band, as well as a “chance for the band family to just be together,” Duplooy said. The other staple of halftime, the Bengal Belles, is currently preparing for their contest and spring show. “[The spring semester] is definitely a lot more intense,” said junior Conneley Sears. “We’re in panic mode.” The Belles spend up to 13 hours per week getting ready for the intense competition against drill teams from all over Texas. They are working on four group routines for the contest. In May, the Belles perform their spring show. “This is our time to show our stuff,” Sears said. The cheerleaders, on the other hand, feel that the spring

Junior Katie Cannon rehearses after school with the Bengal Belles. The Belles have been practicing hard for an upcoming competition on Feb. 25 in Austin. PHOTO BY JANET NI

Junior Dan Havens and his teammates run drills at practice during fourth period. The football players compete with each other in relays and races on Wednesdays as part of spring training. PHOTO BY JANET NI

semester is “half as busy” as the fall. “There’s much less pressure,” said sponsor Mary Selcer. During football season, the cheer squad prepares a new routine for each pep rally, with several hours of practice after school and at night. This semester, though they do perform at every home basketball game, Selcer said that overall, the season is “more laid-back.” March cheer tryouts are approaching, and due to the opening of the new high school next year, NCAA judges will judge both next year’s Consol cheerleaders as well as the new CSHS cheerleaders. The cheerleaders are currently working on routines for both.

The stars of fall Friday nights, the football team, aren’t slacking off either. “We compete in everything,” Coach Kyle Walsh said. “We’re not worrying about X’s and O’s right now – we’re getting the body ready for next year.” The team splits up into eight groups that compete against each other in the Tiger Challenge. The challenge encompasses a wide range of areas - relays, wrestling, community service and academics, among others. “In the fall, we play the game. It’s fun,” Walsh said. “The spring is work.”

Upcoming Events

Feb. 25

March 9

March 7-11

April 18

• Color Guard Competition • Bengal Belles Contest • Band Disney World Competition

• Cheer Tryouts

• UIL Band Concert and Sight-reading Competition


JUST FOR KICKS friday, feb. 17, 2012

Boys soccer goalie enjoys unique role on varsity team

By Janet Ni, Assistant Editor The ball is a black and white blur on the field. The players’ cleats move swiftly as the ball is passed strategically back and forth. At the other end of the field paces senior Kyle Duncan, boys varsity soccer goalie. He watches the action intently, tense and ready to dive or leap for the ball at a moment’s notice. Hours of training and conditioning lead to possibly one critical moment in an entire game. Duncan has been playing soccer for about 12 years and has been on the school team since his freshman year. Currently, he is involved in competitive soccer as well, resulting in about 20 hours a week spent on the soccer field for Duncan. Although it is time consuming, school soccer relaxes Duncan rather than being a burden to his busy schedule. “[Soccer] is actually my stress reliever,” Duncan said. Duncan’s favorite part about school soccer is being with his friends. Duncan enjoys playing with his teammates and having fun. Along with the camaraderie he shares with his fellow players, Duncan has also developed good relationships with his coaches. “[My coaches] brought my self esteem up when it was low and helped me out,” Duncan said. Boys soccer coach Chris Kovacs commended Duncan’s goalkeeping abilities. “[Duncan is] the tallest guy on the team. A lot of times [there are] goalkeepers who are really tall and have trouble getting down to get the low shots. As long as Kyle’s been here, he’s been the opposite,” Kovacs said. “He’s been really good with [blocking low shots] because he gets down very quickly.”

scoring the goal

boys varsity soccer

Junior Jordan Fritsche scores against teammates in practice on Feb. 9. Fritsche plays midfield on the varsity team. PHOTO BY JANET NI Senior Kyle Duncan practices keeping on Feb 15. Duncan has been playing soccer for 12 years. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

Duncan has additionally improved greatly since he first joined the team. “Every year he’s been getting better and better,” Kovacs said. Duncan said his position as a goalie is most distinguishable because of the absence of running and frequent collisions. However, the lack of running and dribbling is not the only thing that sets Duncan’s position apart from the others. “[As a goalie], I’m more in command, controlling the defense,” Duncan said. Kovacs elaborated on the mental focus necessary for goalkeepers. “Goalies are a rare breed. There’s games where [the goalie is] not going to

see very much action and might be called upon once to make the save,” Kovacs said. “[The goalie] has to be focused throughout the whole game, whether it’s a barrage of shots coming at [the goalie] all the time or having to make one save in the entire game.” In the future, Duncan hopes to continue playing soccer in college. “At the moment, I’m trying to find a school to play for,” Duncan said. Kovacs thinks that Duncan shows promise as a player. “I think he could be successful, and I want to help him in any way I can,” Kovacs said. “He’s awesome.”

Past JV Games: JV Record: Feb. 7: Win over Ellison, 6-0 3-0-0 Feb. 10: Win over Bryan, 1-0 Feb. 14: Win over Shoemaker, 5-0 Next JV Game: At Copperas Cove - tonight at 6:30

Overall Team Record: 3-1-0 Past Games: Feb. 3: Win over Temple, 4-0 Feb. 7: Win over Ellison, 4-0 Feb. 10: Tie with Bryan, 2-2 Feb. 14: Win over Shoemaker, 5-0 Upcoming Games: Copperas Cove-tonight at 8:00 p.m. At Harker Heights-Feb. 24 8:00 p.m.

Girls

Boys

soccer

the roar | sports | 21

Varsity Record: 8-3-3 JV Record: 2-3-2

Varsity Upcoming Games: Feb. 17: Copperas Cove, home at 7:00 p.m. Feb. 18: Woodlands Tourney Feb. 21: Harker Heights at 7:00 p.m. Blake Martin:

“Getting to hang with all the players just makes it all that much better.”


22 | sports | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

there is no pl te like HOME Consol varsity looks forward to upcoming season By Kendra Spaw Executive Editor

For many Consol varsity baseball players this is the last time to put on that cap, lace up their cleats, look at their teammates and friends they have played with for years and walk out on that diamond with heads held high. After last season’s long run in playoffs, with a record of 27-6, the Consol baseball team looks forward to a new year that will bring an end to their camaraderie. For senior Riley Ferrell, this season is all about embracing his childhood for the last few months of high school. “I’m looking forward to having fun being a kid for the last time,” Ferrell said. The team is striving to get farther in the playoffs this year and eventually win a state championship, senior Alec Paradowski said. The talent accumulated on the baseball team is one to be noted, and the team has high hopes. “Our biggest strengths are our performance out of our pitching staff,” Ferrell said. “There’s more than a handful of guys that can jump up and produce for us.” While most of the players believe the team has no weaknesses. Paradowski, on the other hand, believes the team will face some minor struggles with the new batting equipment they are using. The team has already been conditioning hard to prepare for the season, along with other things. “We’ve been working on the uniforms a lot,” Paradowski said. “I don’t want to give anything away, but we’ll be looking pretty fly.” The work that the team does to improve goes on and off the field to improve strength, friendships and courtesy. “This year I think we’ve worked on being respectful young men and staying out of trouble,” Ferrell said. With the high expectations the baseball team has, they cannot do it without people to cheer for them. The baseball team has been in need of more supporters over the past few years, and the team would like to remind the student body how much impact they can have on a game, senior Ford Moore said. “I want more supporters at the games because we feed off of the crowd’s energy and seeing a bunch of fans excites us,” Paradowski said. Some school teams have fan buses that give transportation to students for out of town games. A majority of students don’t know how to get to the games

baseball

or do not have a ride, so the baseball team hopes to get one this season. “A fan bus would be great!” Paradowski said. “Having the student body behind us, especially in the playoffs, would be incredibly motivational.” Fan bus or not, fans equate to excitement, Ferrell said, that’s all there is to it. Usually with any sport there is a big rival game that gets the most attention from a crowd. For Tiger baseball, there are three. “The Bryan game is always a good one, but our first home game against The Woodlands is a big one,” Moore said. Last year The Woodlands baseball team beat Consol baseball more than they had anticipated, yet Consol hopes to return the favor this year, Paradowski said. Not only are Bryan and The Woodlands games something to get excited about, but Belton is also a favored game amongst the team. “The Belton game has to be the biggest hype game to me,” Ferrell said. “There’s a lot of unfinished business that’s carried over the years, and the game is always exciting.” Although for most of the varsity baseball team this is the end of high school baseball, it is a new beginning to college baseball for some. Moore will be playing at Sam Houston State University next year alongside seniors Seth Holbert and Austin Ray. Paradowski will be traveling to Wofford College in South Carolina, and Ferrell will be at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth. The seniors that will be moving on are sad to see the end of baseball with teammates they have played with since the age of eight, Holbert said. “The biggest thing I’ll miss is being a kid,” Ferrell said. “We are all moving on to bigger and better things whether it be going on with our athletic career or going to college to get a degree. We are all headed towards growing up and living in the real world.” As they look forward to the future they can’t get too distracted because they still have one season left to show what they’ve got here at the high school. “I would never turn down the chance to play professionally, but you can’t look that far into the future,” Paradowski said. “Right now my only goal is to win a state championship.” The baseball team is excited to show the district and the state what we have to offer and play to their best potential. They plan to walk out this season with heads held high.

Senior Seth Holbert prepares to pitch the ball past home plate during a home game on Feb. 10 . Holbert has been on varsity for two years. PHOTO BY KENDRA SPAW

Senior Ford Moore swings at a ball on Feb. 10. Moore signed with Sam Houston to further his baseball career. PHOTO BY KENDRA SPAW

Upcoming Games: Tonight in Montgomery at 5:30 and 7:00 p.m. Feb. 21 in Oak Ridge at 7:00 p.m. Feb. 23-25 in Pearland at TBD Feb. 28 in Tomball at 7:00 p.m.

Signed Athletes: Alec Paradowski- Wofford College Seth Holbert, Austin Ray and Ford Moore- Sam Houston State Riley Ferrell- Texas Christian University

Last year’s record: 29-6

Varsity Baseball player Colby Turton:

“[I’m looking forward to] winning district, again, building lasting relationships with fun guys and to also get past the third round of playoffs.”


the roar | sports | 23

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Girls basketball team earns spot in playoffs by Amy Zhang, Editor-In-Chief

“On three. One, two, three—” As calls of “Lady Tigers!” echo through the gymnasium, the girls’ basketball team breaks out of a huddle, anxious to get back in the game. For them, the obnoxiously loud buzzers and cheering crowds are just parts of late nights in various gyms, playing their hearts out in the sport that they love. The team’s positive outlook brought the Lady Tigers to playoffs; however, they lost their first playoff game at the last second in a heartbreaker game against Mesquite in Fairfield on Monday Feb.12. Despite the Lady Tiger’s efforts, the final score was 51-50. “The season [went] really well [though],” sophomore Blair Schaefer said. “We [got] better every day.” As the varsity team is composed of seniors and juniors, the team dynamic built itself to a point where the girls know each other well. The camaraderie in the locker room shows on the court, where the girls support each other with whooping calls and loud cheers, pats on the back and encouraging words. “These girls, they’re my family,” senior Tiara “Twin” Tucker said. “If we can’t go to anyone else, we’re there for each other.” Even though the season has ended, the Tigers primarily lost to high-ranked teams, frequently by small margins of points. The team had several strong games as well, with all the girls providing stellar performances in each game. “Some of our losses are to the top teams in the state, so we feel pretty good,” Heintz said. “We won the McDonald’s tournament for the first time in 12 years. They seem like they’re having fun, and that’s the second most important thing behind staying safe.” The team recognizes that they have some points to improve. “We have really great chemistry, but if things aren’t going our way, we’ll get frustrated,” Schaefer said. “In that area, we need to learn how to keep going hard, just [moving] on from it.” The Lady Tigers relied on their foundation of strong defense to carry them through the rest of the season. “Defense is always our game plan. We base everything off of it,” Schaefer said. “We [got] offense from our defense, and we practice defensive drills every day in practice.” With high hopes for a good season, the team strove for victory, combating opponents with the great intensity. Senior Morgan Smith said that she looked forward to the rest of the season, regardless of performance, as it was her senior year. Several of the other seniors echoed her sentiments. Even though the girls will not be continuing in the playoff race, the journey has truly been a powerful experience. “One of the quotes I go by is that ‘Good or bad, nothing lasts forever,’ ” senior Tiara Tucker said. “You’ve got to make the most of what you have right now.”

basketball

Sophomore Blair Schafer passes in the game against Belton on Feb. 7. Schafer has been on varsity since her freshman year. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

Senior Tori Tucker dribbles in the game against Belton on Feb. 7. Tucker scored eight points in this game. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

Girls

Boys

Overall Varsity Record: 25-10

Overall Varsity Record 24-7

JV District Record: 14-0

Overall JV Record: 18-13

Senior Tiara Tucker scores against Belton on Feb 7. Tiara Tucker has started on varsity for three years. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

Top Scorers: Alex Caruso Jimmy Gilbert Josh Stewart

Junior Josh Kipp:

“It’s a team sport, not individual. It takes hard work to get good at Basketball.”


tee TEAMWORK

24 | sports | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

to the

Senior captain provides encouragement for golf teammates BY NICOLE FARRELL

Senior Angela No practices her swing at Traditions Golf Course driving range on Feb. 9. No has been playing golf for about 10 years. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

staff reporter

There’s more to golf than pressed khakis, groomed grass and shiny clubs. Girls golf team captain senior Angela No leads the way with encouragement and leadership. “[Angela is] an accomplished golfer,” girls golf coach Mike Terral said. “She’s good at her craft, but more importantly, she’s just a wonderful girl. The epitome of good manners and just caring about other people. She’s been tremendous for us.” No began playing golf at a young age with her dad back when she lived in Seattle. “My dad started playing, learning golf there,” she explained, “I started with him. I had fun playing it so I continued it here.” No is considered a team leader by her coach and teammates. “[Angela’s] encouragement is great,” sophomore Randi Miller said, “she’ll help you when you need it.” “I really like how well our team gets along, and how it’s not just a sports team, it’s like a little golf family,” Miller added. Sophomore Brooke Bayliss appreciates No’s contribution to the team’s closeness. “[Angela] is by far the best player and has the most experience. If we have questions and Coach isn’t around, we know Angela is there to help us and show us the drills. She really wants to make us better,” Bayliss said. Terral also acknowledges No’s leadership and character. “There’s two basic kinds of leaders: vocal and by example,” Terral said. I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve told the girls, ‘Now if you have any questions about how to behave during practice, look over at Angela and behave the way she’s behaving, because she goes about her business. She’s an encourager of the girls, but her nature is that she’s

fairly reserved. But she’s a great example and leader.” Although No competed at district for the last three years, she looks forward to what the team can accomplish. “Our goal this year is to try to make district and go to regionals. That’s a goal we set as a team,” she explained. “It’s very encouraging for me to see how we’re all working hard together, trying to improve every day,” No said, “I really like playing high school golf because golf is a solo sport, an individual sport, but in high school golf, you play as a team, which is different. It’s fun to play with your team.” In reaching goals and improving, No emphasizes a positive attitude, as well as the power of hard work and diligent practice. “In golf, I keep this mindset, even if you make a bad shot or have a bad hole, that’s behind you,” she said. “You need to focus on what’s ahead of you at that moment. What’s already done, it’s already over. It’s good to look past that, and be more optimistic.” For No, high school is as far as she plans to go with competitive golf, but she said she looks forward to playing it as a hobby for the rest of her life. Lessons learned from golf can apply to the rest of her life. “There’s rules to golf,” she said. “Keeping to those rules and playing by the rules teaches integrity and honesty. Also, confidence because it’s kind of nerve-wracking to have everyone watching you, or your team is depending on you to make that putt. Having that confidence of all your hard work and practice [and believing] it will all work out.” And that confidence, integrity, and honesty encourages others and can help lead the girls golf team on the road to success this season. “[The team] respect[s] what she can do with a golf club in her hands, they respect how she got to the point where she can do that with a golf club in her hands, and most importantly, they respect her as a person,” Terral said.

Boys Past Tournament Results: 2nd place at Oak Ridge Invitational 9th place at Aggie Cup Invitational 2nd place at Crown Colony Invitational

golf

Top Players: Max Miller Beau Moore

Senior Russell Corbelli: “I want to win district and make it at Regionals, possibly to state this season.”

Girls Past Tournament Results: 7th place at The Lauren Johnson Memorial Top Players: Angela No Savannah Batista Kambrie Kissmann Next Event: Magnolia Invitational on Feb 24-25

Senior Savannah Batista: “As a team we can all work hard to achieve our goals.”


the roar | entertainment | 25

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Local gyms offer various workouts for all genders

reviewed by Kate Williams

I started my workout at Gold’s Gym on Texas Avenue by running from my car to the key scanner, while telling the people at the front desk to put my name down for the

reviewed by Elena Edwards

Upon entering Aggieland Fitness Dome at 2:00 in the afternoon, I was immediately welcomed by the friendly face of a young woman who worked the front stand, and who was happy to help me sign in and show me around the gym.

reviewed by Kimmie Cessna

Entering the gym, I glanced around at the few people intensely working out on the various machines and put my belongings on a convenient shelf in the back of the gym.

Body Flow class. I grabbed a yoga mat provided by the gym and readied myself for the heartpounding workout ahead. I slowly scanned the room to find everyone barefoot in loose shirts and tight pants with their hair down. A little surprised, I slipped off my shoes while the friendly instructor introduced herself and explained some of the moves prior to the beginning. After that, the class consisted of limbs flailing, deep breathing in and out through the nose and stretching muscles I didn’t know I had. Yoga, Pilates and Tai Chi and I became real close friends during the hour that I surrendered myself to an intense full body experience. The class focused on core strengthening as well as flexibility and

balance. Members of all ages can participate thanks to the options that the instructor offers if the move is too challenging or if you want to take your body to the next level. I have visited various classes multiple times since then, each walking out the door with an accomplished feeling. You can visit for a day for $10, a week for $35 or a month for $75 and the cost of a membership ranges from $30-$40 per month. You receive a complimentary training session when you sign for a membership where your diet and weight are assessed. The gym hours are from 5 a.m. to 12 a.m.

The circular first floor was very open and filled with different assortments of work out machines that I had never before seen in my life. The gym wasn’t packed by any means, and a few people roamed through the floor quietly while minding their own business, giving the huge open dome a quiet sense of relaxation. On either side of the walls were stairs leading up to the second floor, a half circle floor looking down on the rest of the gym, lined with treadmills and ellipticals all set up with televisions on each machine, providing both entertainment and a sense of privacy for members. Towards the back of the gym, which was recently extended, members have the luxury of using a massive indoor basketball court, several rooms filled with biking machines and lined with mirrors for the different classes, such as Zumba, yoga, cycling, pilates, group power and group

core, and a relaxing area with couches and chairs. The bathrooms are incredibly sanitary and appeal to the appropriate gender (for example, the counters were stocked with deodorant, blow dryers and hair spray for women) along with showers, dressing rooms, lockers and my favorite- the sauna. The gym hours, ranging from 5:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on weeknights provide a wide range of time for busy teens to make an appearance after a busy day. However, with the membership cost being nearly $40 a month(a bit pricey for a teenager if you ask me), the quiet and at times eerie stillness of the gym and sense of privacy, and from the age of the people I saw within the gym, I feel that it appealed more to older members than young teenagers. Nonetheless, my experience at Aggieland Fitness Dome was a pleasant one, and it has my recommendation.

I noticed a scale to weigh myself before or after a workout, but I definitely opted out, dreading the number that would appear. Walking around, I started on the treadmill and worked my way to a nice jog for about half a mile. The machine did a neat job of displaying a track and showing how fast and how far I ran and once I worked the television above the machine, I enjoyed watching Pretty Little Liars. After about a half mile, I made my way over to the mat section in the gym equipped with medicine balls, jump ropes, individual mats for abs and Bosu balls. Then I headed over to the elliptical machine to work on another half mile. Finally, I did a couple reps on bench press and called it quits. I finished off the workout with stretching and some refreshing water.

My overall experience was quite positive considering I worked out in a gym for the first time ever. The gym was pretty clean with only a couple issues. When I went to cleanse my hands after working out, the hand sanitizer machine was out of disinfectant which made my hands feel a little dirty. The only other complaint is the shelves I placed my belongings on were out of sight and I think lockers would have been a more appropriate and protective storage area. One outstanding feature I love about this gym is its hours: the gym is open 24 hours seven days a week, working out easily fits into my busy schedule. The gym offers payment plans from month-to-month to a year with a price of $25.99 per month. If you have not found a gym to fit your schedule, Aerofit 24/7 is the perfect fit.

”The gym has very nice equipment,” junior Riley Simms said, “but getting a membership is expensive. I would recommend visiting and getting a seven-day pass to try it out. It also gets pretty busy, but if you want to avoid crowds, go early in the morning or late at night.”

“The Dome is an awesome gym for my friends and me to play a pick-up game of basketball or pump some iron,” senior Woody Wu said. “All of their equipment is state of the art, and the trainers take their jobs seriously. If you are looking for a casual workout or a serious routine workout, the dome is the place to be.”

“I like the Aerofit Express on Wellborn Road because of its location,” junior Jacob Ayres said. “It’s right by the school, so I can go on my way home. I also like it because the people that work there are extremely helpful.”


26 | entertainment | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

by Devin Dakota, assistant editor

Chinese New Year celebration leads to cultural expression

Brilliant colors and exciting music filled said. up the night sky as people from all different Another important part of the backgrounds came together in honor of one celebration is the traditional ethnic food. of the most celebrated holidays around the “We have a really big meal, with a world – Chinese hot pot placed New Year. in the middle “It’s part of of the table,” our history, it’s Miaou said. fun, but also a “You can put way to remember whatever you what our ancestors want in it, and did,” junior Esther it’s boiling Parulian said. while we eat.” Chinese New Though Year has still Chinese New sophomore EMILY MIAOU maintained its Year celebrates symbolic meaning the coming of throughout history. a new year, its symbolic meaning is shared “Family is really important to our with different American holidays. culture,” sophomore Ivy Lee said. “Family “It’s almost the exact same thing as is the biggest thing.” Christmas,” Lee said. “The American New The holiday is a time for people to Year is more of a year coming and going, reconnect and share memories and stories. and we’re mostly celebrating it with our “I think it’s one of the times where my friends, celebrating what’s going to get family actually sits down, and we can have a better. But in Chinese New Year, it’s really really long conversation,” sophomore Emily all about family.” Miaou said. Chinese New Year brings a time for Families everywhere bond through the both people of Asian decent and others to traditions of the holiday. appreciate and embrace Chinese culture. “The parents pass out red envelopes “I feel that [Chinese people] should take to each of the kids, and we usually have to some time to celebrate it, because it is who do something crazy to get the money, [like] they are, and they shouldn’t just completely touch our forehead to the ground and say adapt to this [American] culture,” Lee said. some Chinese saying,” Parulian said. Through generations, different stories Chinese New Year celebrates symbols and legends have let Chinese culture and traditions that come from Chinese continue to prosper all around the world. culture. “It’s about remembering my heritage,” “Red is definitely a big color. It Miaou said. “It’s something where I can represents wealth and prosperity,” Parulian show my culture to other people.”

“It’s about remembering my heritage. It’s something where I can show my culture to other people.”

Junior Joy Cope participates in the craft activities at the Chinese New Year celebration at Sbisa Dining Hall at Texas A&M on Thursday, Jan. 26. The festival included paper cutting, origami and painting. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

A martial arts student from the International Shaolin Wushu Center in Austin grimances at the crowd during the Texas A&M Spring Festival on Jan. 28. The artists performed many different martial arts techniques. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

A Texas A&M student shows Girl Scouts how to make origami items at Sbisa on Jan. 26. The dining hall organized a large event for the occasion involving food and cultural activities. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG A big part of Chinese New Year celebrations is the food. Sbisa offered many different dishes for their event. PHOTO BY DEVIN DAKOTA


@CONSOL

the roar | entertainment | 27

friday, feb. 17, 2012

by the Valentine’snumbers

healthy happenings

a few V-Day statistics

a look at sophomore Abi McDougal’s typical lunch

water

lunchbag

$119.67

what the average American will spend

9 million+

15%

the number of pet owners expected to buy gifts for their pets this year

sausage, cheddar cheese, blueberries and a tangerine

strawberries and an almond-flour date-loaf

compiled by Rachel Kagle, sports editor

“I have a crazy diet (no gluten and no added sweeteners). That means I can’t eat cafeteria lunches, so I bring my own lunch every day. Sometimes, it would be nice to just buy a lunch, but I definitely feel better when I bring my own food! “

64% $75

the average price of a dozen longstemmed roses

the percentage of U.S. women who send themselves flowers

the measured percentage of men who don’t make plans in advance

1913

the year that Hallmark produced its first Valentine

Source: http://www.wisebread.com/weird-thingsyou-didnt-know-about-valentines-day

guess who?

4)

“I can peel bananas using

my toes!”

Match the fact with its teacher!

1)

“I had a pet llama named Andy.” 5)

3)

“I was a contestant on ‘The Price is Right’!” “I

acted in a play in high school with Jim Parsons (Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory).”

husband for before we got

6) “I watched the Cowboys play the Packers in the famous ‘Ice Bowl’ game!” Answers: 1) Mrs. Gautreaux 2) Mrs. Edwards 3) Mr. Pratt 4) Mrs. Parsons 5) Mrs. Aalbers 6) Mr. Slovak

2)

“I knew my two weeks engaged!”


28 | etcetera | the roar

friday, feb. 17, 2012

Teens find innovative way to save money, create business ey Assistant s l e By Kines News Editor Ga

Paying full price for items has people thinking before they purchase in this day and age. Saving money and being wise with one’s expenses has become as hip as gauchos and hair feathers once were. The desire to have everything name brand is slowly fading into wanting to make each dollar stretch as far as it can. Women especially have become creative in ways to feel better when handling their expenses and have in turn created a new term for themselves: Recessionistas. It comes as no surprise that a variety of Recessionistas that walk the halls at Consol. In the eighth grade, sophomore Kensey Boykin realized that what she had been paying for simple shirts at places like Hollister and Abercrombie weren’t worth

the money she was putting forth, so instead of simply complaining about prices, she decided to do something about it. Boykin quit paying outrageous prices and began to take part in the art of thrifting. Thrifting involves consciously putting effort towards one’s shopping to find clothes at a much more reasonable price in order to get more items for less money. “Obviously since you’re getting it for a lower price, it’s not always going to look put together,” Boykin said, “but, I’ve learned that I’ve got to be more open minded when looking for stuff.” Thrifting usually entails shopping at places that buy and sell gently used clothes, instead of places that sell their clothes for more than what they are worth. For instance, Boykin once bought a shirt at Plato’s Closet for $3 and had a friend buy the same item for $15 more from a store in the mall. Boykin has found that thrifting can be hard if looking for specifics, but she remembers she can even find articles of clothes in places like HEB. It creates numerous opportunities for possible cheap purchases, which is how smart thrifting begins. Junior Kacey Kerr has also found ways to wisely spend her money instead of settling to pay more than she desires. Kerr bargain hunts not only for clothes, but anytime she shops; she had learned to be patient and with practice, she’s found her own techniques. “Just because you find a good deal on something doesn’t mean you need to get it, because then you just start wasting money,” Kerr said. Kerr and a friend hosted a Christmas party over the break and were able to adequately feed 20 girls for fewer than $50 dollars. They

accomplished this by taking time to price compare items at different stores and buying off brand instead of name brand items. Being a Recessionista can be more than just taking extra steps to save money. It can also be about looking to make money as well. Even Though senior and painter Maci Greene enjoys giving her paintings away as gifts, Greene needed to find ways to raise money for a mission trip last summer to the Dominican Republic. She was encouraged to sell her paintings to friends and family and was able to raise over $300. “My favorite part is hearing feedback,” Greene said. “People always seem so happy when they get homemade gifts, so I try really hard to create something they’d love to make sure they feel like the money they pay was worth it.” Recently Greene started to sell her paintings on the popular website Etsy.com to be able to get more money for her trip back to the Dominican this upcoming summer. Even though being a Recessionista sometimes takes more work, the effort put forth becomes worth it when one is a b l e to buy more and still have more money. It becomes more than just taking a few extra steps to save and make money, but a lifestyle. “[You feel] better at the end of the day with what you spend your money on,” Kerr said, “and that makes it worth it.”

How can you be a Recessionista? • •

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Before going to the mall next time you want a new outfit check out places like Plato’s Be open minded to wearing and buying different things and see Closet & Goodwill. Checking these places before spending $20 on one shirt will have where that leads you. Most of all, be patient. you feeling a lot better about your purchases. Beforeat going to the mall time clothes. you want They a new have outfit check Look Etsy.com for next cheaper an easy return out places like Plato’s Closet & Goodwill. Checking these places policy. before spending $20 on one shirt will have you feeling a lot When buying a more expensive item, research and visit places to better about your purchases.

make a Etsy.com smarter buy. Look at for cheaper clothes. They have an easy return policy. • Be open minded to wearing and buying different things and see • where Check out for ways to spice up old outfits. Their thatPinterest.com leads you. Most of all be patient. ideas are cheap, and with a little effort, you can completely Compiled by Kelsey Gaines change up an outfit. •

Tights: TJ MAXX-$10 Shorts: Forever21. com-$13.50 Top: Grandmother’s closet-free

Source: Compiled by Kelsey Gaines

photos by kelsey gaines

Dress: Forever 21-$22.50 Belt: Forever 21-$6.50


The Roar Vol. 17 No. 4