Page 1

the

Roar

A&M Consolidated High School

A

Sound off with Tiger Band on page 11

1801 Harvey Mitchell Pkwy. S., College Station, Texas 77840

Friday, Oct. 28, 2011

Vol. 17 No. 2

DRINK

WITH

DANGER

Harmful effects of alcohol not often realized by students by amy zhang, editor-in-chief *names have been changed to protect student identities

Walter Smith* was driving. It was the morning of a glorious summer day, and he was making his way towards a friend’s house, where he’d be sleeping over. The details seem like the beginning of an innocent story, but the morning’s events would culminate in being one of the worst days of Smith’s life.

Smith had been drinking. He had just come from a party, and recalled one of his friends saying that he could crash at his place afterwards. With a 30-pack of beer in his back-seat, he made his way towards his friend’s house. It was 5:00 A.M.

see "alcohol" on page 3

tolook

PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

where News Viewpoints Snapshots Student Life

pages 2-5 People

pages 14-17

pages 6-10 Sports

page 18-20

page 11 Health and Rec

page 21

pages 12-13 Entertainment/Etc. pages 22-24

nthis ssue

Martial arts students train for years to achieve black belt status. PAGE 16

For some students, the road to stardom is not a straight path. PAGE 17


n the news

2 | news | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

A qu ck view

Forensics Team competes in Houston meet

Five students qualify for next round of jazz band competitions

Tiger Forensics placed second at the South Houston High School meet on Oct. 8 and qualified two students, Zach Bradford and Sara Krusekopf, to the state tournament in duet acting. Other students excelling at the competition were Jeffrey Kettle who placed first in Dramatic Interpretation, second in prose, third in poetry and humorous interpretation, sixth Duo Acting and seventh in Duet Acting. Zachary Bradford placed first Duet Acting, second in Humorous Interpretation, and semifinalists in Domestic Exempt. Sara Krusekopf also placed fifth in Novice Prose. Lucas Cadle placed first in Student Congress and semifinalist Domestic Exempt while Ian Ray placed second in Poetry and third in Prose. Joshua Melton placed third in Novice Prose, and Patrick Lynch finished fifth in Foreign Exempt and was a quarter finalist in Novice Public Forum Debate. Taylor Zhang placed fifth in Student Congress, and Saadman Faridi placed sixth in Student Congress and was presented with the presiding officer award.

At Temple High School, five students qualified for Texas Music Educators Association area jazz auditions on Sept. 27. Katie Higgins, Nick Hoganson, Patrick Lenz, Alex Pappas, and Eugene Ryoo will perform in the TMEA Region Jazz Concert on Nov. 19 in Temple.

Seventeen choir students honored for region choir Seventeen choir students were selected as part of the Texas Music Educators Association Region Choir at Belton High School on Sept. 24. The students are Claudia Lee, Megan Kriger, Ariel Tran, Taylor Bounds, Erin Sherry, Kirby Bramson, Moses Hong, Johannes Kronenberg, Ryan Kreider, Courtnie Sample, McKenzie Forsyth, Kelsey Kipp, Kambrie Kissmann, Jessica Taylor, Teresa de Figueiredo, Brooke Thomas and Allyson Peters.

Sophomore Angelica Majors paints faces at the FFA Car Show on Oct. 22. The event is designed to raise money for the FFA Booster club so that they can provide scholarships for seniors. PHOTO BY ABIGAYLE ENGLISH

Seniors receive National Merit commendations The National Merit Scholarship Program recently recognized 24 Consol students with Letters of Commendations. These include seniors Taylor Beyer, Paige Blomstedt, Shelby Buenger, Zachary Carstens, Fatima Charara, Kitt Crabb, Alina Dattagupta, Sky Dominguez, Joon Eoh, Eric Gan, Marie Guermond, Duru Han, Macy Hicks, Lisa Hsiao, Johannes Kronenberg, David Lee, Kevin Li, Erica Nipps, Alec Paradowski, Debra Roussel, Casey Shomaker, Nicholas Smith, Scott Weaver and Amy Zhang. These students scored among the top five percent of more than 1.5 million students nationwide on the PSAT as juniors in 2010.

Tiger Band wins awards The Tiger Band placed second in class 5A in the 37th annual Blinn Buccaneer Marching Festival on Oct 8. The drum majors Abbie Craigen, Mei Tan and Peter Lambert led the team in their victory. The band was also awarded the outstanding solo/ ensemble award. They also received sweepstakes at the UIL Region Marching Competition in Waco on Oct. 22.

Com ng up Oct. 28:

Outdoor Education Day, Central Park 8 a.m- 6 p.m.

Oct. 31:

Costume-themed YoungLife, Club @ Consol 7:57 p.m.

Nov. 4:

Debate hosts Mock SAT 4:15 – 6:00, Lecture Hall

Nov. 5:

Aggiefest Judging Contests, TAMU from 8-2

Nov. 5:

Gameday Tailgate, Wolf Pen Creek 2-6 p.m., $10-15

Nov. 6:

Daylight Savings Time

Nov. 8:

Election Day

Nov. 10:

AMCHS Jazz Ensemble & Mariachi Concert, at 7 p.m.

Nov. 16:

Veterans Day

Nov. 23:

Thanksgiving break begins

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the roar | news | 3

friday, oct. 28, 2011

‘Alcohol’ continued from page 1

Alcohol brings dangerous effects to unaware students “When I got there, [my friend] wasn’t answering his phone,” Smith said. “I didn’t want to ring the doorbell or anything, so I went and slept in my car in front of their house. I knew their parents wouldn’t care.” At 6:30 a.m., about an hour after Smith went to sleep, he woke up to an ambulance, a fire truck and three cop cars. “Someone had called in on me—some old man, who was like their neighbor, he was in his 70s and felt really bad later, because he didn’t mean to get me in trouble—but he had knocked on the window, and I wasn’t awake, like I wasn’t waking up,” Smith said. “He thought I was hurt, so he called an ambulance, and that’s why the cop cars came.”

High School Impact

According to Students Against Drunk Driving’s website, nearly three quarters of all high school students have consumed alcohol by the end of high school, and more than a third (37%) have done so by eighth grade. While drinking might seem to be a facet of high school, something done by all the “cool kids” or an “inevitability,” the lasting consequences that can occur aren’t always realized. “Young people these days are influenced by more activities than ever before in our society, and drinking is certainly one of those things,” principal Ernest Reed said. “ It’s ‘something fun to do’, and students don’t realize the consequences that go with it. I’ve seen it, I’ve seen young people who have chosen to drink and didn’t make wise decisions, and as a result, their lives were taken, and it’s such a tragedy.” Despite laws prohibiting the consumption of alcohol by people under 21, as well as heavy fines disallowing the sales of alcoholic products to the aforementioned, the act of obtaining alcohol does not seem to be difficult for many teenagers. “It’s a significant problem because it’s so readily available, just like marijuana,” School Resource Officer Patrick Massey said. “If it’s abused, or when people make bad judgements, it leads to personal injury or [the injury of] other people.”

Personal Experiences

Jennifer Ward*, a student who made the decision to stop drinking a year ago, is one of those who realized the possible results of her actions. Her freshman year, she had become friends with a group of girls who “partied hard,” she said. “My grades were dropping, and whenever I was out with [the drinking crowd], I knew it wasn’t something that I should be doing,” Ward said. “I’d come home, and I’d feel guilty about it, thinking about what I [had done], and I was doing things that I wouldn’t normally be doing. In the end, it all seemed completely wrong.” Ward said that since most teenagers drink to have fun, the entire process becomes a th-

rill.

“My friends’ entire weekend plans would revolve around drinking. How can we get it, where are we going to go, what are we going to do, whose house, what we were going to tell our parents. It was constantly just planning, planning, planning for that one night, just because it was illegal,” Ward said. “You’re defying what the law says, and a lot of people are into that. If I didn’t drink, well, that was all they did every weekend, so we wouldn’t hang out outside of school that week.” Clearly, alcohol abuse in high school has become a reality. A teenager’s desire for independence, combined with the rebellion and thrills involved with drinking, do not lead to unblemished scenarios. “Drinking is not the best way to go. You can’t [guarantee remembering] anything the next morning. You had all this fun the night before, and you can’t even remember it,” Ward said. “You do things you normally wouldn’t do. A lot of my friends lost things they didn’t want to lose. It really warps what a person thinks is right and isn’t right, and the next morning you’re just going to be hungover and regret everything.” Ward does not regret her decision to stop drinking and warns against getting sucked into the mentality that drinking is danger-free. “Drinking leads to other things: alcoholism, sex. It’s inevitable,” Ward said. “If you’re going down that path, you’re going down that path.”

DEAD Week?

Every four years, the school has stressed the dangers of alcohol in an awareness event known as Drinking and Driving Ends All Dreams (DEAD) Week. Due to logistical reasons, the school has decided to postpone this year’s DEAD Week. The program, which involved a real-time demonstration of the effects of drunk driving using a “grim reaper,” as well as various speakers and a simulation of a fatal car wreck, came to the high school through Chrissy Hester, the current Director of Administrative Services for the district. “Every year, we would raise money to have our after-prom bash, which is designated as alcohol free, so that people don’t go out and drink after prom,” Hester said. “Through that I had gotten to know some of the people from the MADD group, and they actually brought the program to me and asked if we would like to be involved with it.” A large amount of resources were involved with the program, from the fire department’s cooperation to the readiness of local hospitals, as well as the collaboration of the funeral homes, churches, students and staff. It was decided that DEAD Week would be held every four years, to maintain its effectiveness while also being efficient. This year’s seniors will be the first class since the program’s origination to not participate in DEAD Week. “The last time this happened, we almost

didn’t get everyone in[to the gym], and it loses its effectiveness [if not presented to the whole school],” Hester said. “We were on the verge of losing the effectiveness the last time [we] did it, and we’re about 500 more students since then. So, when we got around to talking about it last year, I said, you know, maybe we should put this off until the schools split.” While the administration regrets that a group of students will not be able to participate in DEAD Week, the coordination involved in creating the project did not happen as planned. “DEAD Week is one of those projects which really encompasses a lot of time. It was just a lot of coordination, and we got a little bit behind on this planning,” Reed said. “We initially had two meetings, and we decided that as a result of the extensive amount of work that needed to go on in making this thing successful, and with the amount of students, it was almost impossible to do this year.” Hester also expressed her feelings on having a class of students miss the experience. “I’m really, really sad, because there’s this group who won’t get to have it,” she said, “but I also think it’s more important to do it right and have a group miss it, than have it done ineffectively, because if it’s not done effectively, it loses its power.” The school is in the process of planning a program for the juniors and seniors to ensure that the upperclassmen are still aware of the dangers in drinking and driving. With the long break between DEAD Weeks, the school has not seen a large group of students interested in joining SADD. Junior Justin Garcia, the club’s president, said that students interested in joining can sign up in the nurse’s office.

Aftermath

When the police made Smith open his car door and smelt alcohol, they forced him out and put him in handcuffs. They conducted a more thorough investigation of his car and discovered the beer as well. Smith was fined $1,100, got his license suspended for three weeks and received a DUI (Driving Under the Influence) and a MIP (Minor in Possession) as well. “It’s not worth it. It’s not worth drinking at all underage, and it’s not worth it to drink and drive at any age,” Smith said. “They dropped the MIP, because if I had had it, I wouldn’t have been able to apply for Division 1 schools. A&M, Baylor, they don’t take MIPs.” Since then, Smith has stopped drinking and hopes to set a better example for his friends`. “It’s the scariest thing I’ve ever done. I was so scared. It was probably the worst day of my life. I had just planned on staying out and partying and stuff,” Smith said. “ I’ve never driven drunk before, and I had no idea this was going to happen. Even just being asleep with the keys in the ignition, something could’ve easily gone so wrong.”

Damage by Drinking:

Nearly 2,000 people under the age of 21 die in car accidents related to underage drinking.

Almost

50% of

violent deaths involving teens result from alcohol.

14% of teens have been intoxicated at least once in the last year. Source: www.medicinenet.com Artwork by Isabel Drukker


4 | news | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Multilingualism benefits students in understanding cultures, studies, life

BY DEVIN DAKOTA

staff reporter

While taking a foreign language class is a requirement for graduation, understanding and accepting cultures and people of another language can provide lifetime benefits. “Knowing a second language isn’t just knowing a language, it’s much more than that. It can help you in so many ways,” said senior Alex Zietsman, who speaks Afrikaans and English. Changes in technology and cultural behavior make now more than ever a time to be knowledgeable about different languages. “The world is shrinking with new technology on all different levels, so I think it’s very important that people can speak different languages,” ESOL and English III teacher Vicki Shelley said. Teaching multilingual students has taught Shelley that the rewards of being fluent in more than one language can have an amazing impact on their lives. “If you can’t communicate well, both verbally and in writing, you’re not going to be very successful in a job,” Shelley said. Being multilingual can have just as much of an influence on one’s present as it does on the future. Many students agree that different languages can help them with

several areas of study. “I know when it comes to grammar, I compare the languages I know, because I learn more that way than when I’m in actual English class,” said senior Eszter Kish, who speaks English and Hungarian. Kish’s knowledge of these languages, in addition to French, which she studied in school, also helped her in classes like Geography. Spanish speaking junior Fran Escalon can relate to that. “Sometimes I can understand vocabulary words more than other people. Spanish helps me with the root words,” Escalon said. Recognizing and learning about other cultures are additional benefits of being multilingual. “Students who speak more than one language are usually much more accepting of other cultures,” Shelley said Students agree that being fluent in a culture’s language makes it much easier to appreciate the different traditions and customs. “Understanding a different language helps you from being ignorant about just knowing English,” said Zietsman, who is originally from South Africa. Knowing the language and being aware of the different cultures make it easier to travel the world. However,

sometimes being surrounded by a particular culture helps in learning the language. “Learning a language by going to a country that speaks it is much better than learning it through a classroom,” Escalon said. “Being forced to speak and read a language can help become more confident when speaking it.” The benefits of being multilingual are endless, and students who work for those benefits everyday know how hard learning a language can be, but know it is worth it. “It’s amazing to me how fast the ESL students here transfer from one language to another,” Shelley said. “Hard work and the effort to really make that work for you as a tool is hugely important.”

How to Say, “It’s a great day to to be Tiger,” How saya it’s a in... INDONESIAN: ”Ini adalah hari besar untuk menjadi harimau!” GERMAN: “Es ist ein großer Tag, einen Tiger zu werden!” DANISH: “Det er en stor dag at være en Tiger!” FRENCH: “C’est une belle journée pour être un Tigre!” ITALIAN: “E ‘un grande giorno per essere una Tigre!”

LATIN: “Magna tigris diem!” FINNISH: “Se on suuri päivä olla tiikeri!” ARFRIKAANS: “Dit is ‘n groot dag’ n Tier!” SPANISH: “Es un gran día para ser un Tigre!” HUNGARIAN: “Ez egy nagy nap, hogy egy Tigris!” Compiled by Devin Dakota

Mole Day Mania: chemistry students celebrate Avogadro’s number Celebrated annually on October 23 from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m., Mole Day commemorates Avogadro's Number (6.02 x 10^23), which is a basic measuring unit in chemistry. Mole Day was created as a way to foster interest in chemistry. Schools throughout the United States and around the world celebrate Mole Day with various activities related to chemistry and moles. Students enrolled in any chemistry or physics class celebrated Mole day on Oct. 22 by bringing food related to Avogadros number and Mole Day, creating posters, and making stuffed moles for extra credit. They spent their class time eating, playing games and getting time to relax.

beloved

Sophomores Nasan Tsengeg and James Tipton chow down on “car‘mole’” apples in Sara Eder’s third period Pre-AP Chemistry class. Their class ate food, played games and admired other stuffed moles for the annual celebration of Mole Day on Oct. 22. PHOTO BY DANA BRANHAM

Sophomore Bianca Sevilla created this “Cookie ‘Mole’ster’” for extra credit in her chemistry class. The more creative students are the more “Mole Bucks” or bonus points they can receive. PHOTO BY COURTNEY WELLMANN

Sophomore Amy Bonnet shows off her “Finding Ne’mole’” she created by sewing together pieces of fabric and stuffing them with cotton. Each student was given the opportunity to make a creative mole for extra credit. PHOTO BY DANA BRANHAM


the roar | news | 5

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Clubs raise environmental awareness to save energy, money

BY ISABEL DRUKKER

and plan to visit elementary schools to discuss the assistant editor environment with the next generation. With reports of endangered animals, deforestation “I think just educating the people about it is and changing climates, the media is sending a steady wave of reminders as to how individuals affect the planet. Each important,” Zietsman said. “[That’s why] we’re going plastic straw ends up in a landfill or the ocean, a plastic on an elementary tour, to educate small children about bag takes at least ten years to decompose and everywhere how important the environment is and how resources people live, work and play previously provided homes for are depleting.” Still, Reed and a number of other administrators hundreds of different species. Consol’s staff and faculty have recently made attempts to make the school’s impact a encourage current students and faculty to participate in energy efficient habits and ways as to not only protect positive one. the environment, but also “Our world is respect the school’s budget. changing because we did “[We’re looking for] change it,” said Alexander anything we can do to save Zietsman, head of the “[We’re looking for] anything we can the school money besides Energy and Environment do to save the school money besides just messing with the air Committee for Student just messing with the air conditioning conditioning and making Council. “We’re trying and making people uncomfortable.” people uncomfortable,” to raise awareness Zietsman said. about conservation, senior ALEXANDER ZIETSMAN Similar to this, Consol sustainability, the recycles all print cartridges environment for the and has replaced personal printers with shared copiers. school and the community.” “Those are all things that are important to use Consol’s Environmental Club, open to all students throughout the year, has similar ideas in mind. In the past, because at the end of the day, it’s going to save us a the club has been responsible for plastic and aluminum considerable amount of money,” Reed said. “If we can recycling in the hallways. Due to the misplacement of the do this, the projected savings in this district alone [can lids at the beginning of the year, however, the majority pay for] seven or eight teachers, that’s a lot of money.” However, what is good for the environment of the semester has been without way to recycle anything does not always come with such obvious benefits. besides paper. “[This semester has] been a rather large series of Sometimes, it can mean sacrificing the pleasures we unfortunate events,” said junior Aidan Riley, president have always taken for granted. “I know students like big cars and big trucks, I of the environmental club. “[But the environmental club understand that, but if you don’t really have a reason does] aim to continue the normal high school recycling.” True to this promise, the blue bins returned on Tuesday, to drive a big truck, drive a small car,” Zietsman said. Oct. 11. Students can reduce the number of plastic bottles “[Do it] just because they’re so much more fuel efficient.” and aluminum cans that are sent to landfills. Besides this, even small steps count when “The recycling on our campus is a big deal,” principal Buddy Reed said. “It’s something the students respond it concerns the environment. According to to. It’s a lot more meaningful than when [I] try to make techsoup.org, if everyone in the United States recycled their newspaper only on Sunday, students aware of it.” Reed said he believes in the importance of teaching 550,000 trees could be conserved. “It’s just recycling for the high school,” Riley the younger generation the importance of preserving the said. “[But] we can hopefully make a difference.” environment. Both StuCo and Environmental Club agree

Going Green on Halloween 1. Buy or make a costume that uses cloth material. Plastic materials will last longer than any Halloween party or trick or treating trip. 2. Adorn your home with reusable decorations, and be sure to fasten them securely in case it gets windy. 3. Take advantage of the holiday by using candles for lighting. 4. If you’re hosting a party, use environmentally friendly foods instead of serving individually wrapped candies.

Source: greenhalloween.org

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6 | viewpoints | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Photographer encourages higher confidence in photo insecurities

Teen drinking may lead to dire consequences Teen drinking is a serious problem, because when teens drink, they tend to drink to excess. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in America, people ages 12 to 20 years drink 11% of all alcohol consumed in the United States. Furthermore, underage drinkers consume more drinks per drinking occasion than adult drinkers, which can prove to be truly detrimental. There is a reason the legal age is 21. It is not to deprive us teenagers of an aspect of life, but rather to protect us from it. There are serious consequences of underage drinking, such as depression, hazy judgment and driving accidents. While the public tends to be aware of these consequences, why is it that underage drinkers decide to defy the law? Why do they want to leave their adolescent years so early? Drinking as a teenager leads to an increased risk of driving while intoxicated, putting not only the driver’s life at risk but also endangering the lives of others. Underage drinking is completely preventable. Educational programs and talking to friends and elders could easily be used as a stress reliever and an alternative to drinking. Sometimes people do not seem to understand the worth of a life. While underage drinking seems to be a worthwhile activity to some, those people should understand that it is not “cool” and does not solve any problems. If anything, it makes them worse. Next time you are pressured or you feel the need to drink, remember there are

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Reversible, interchangeable, switch out who you wish; face it; attractiveness is something that can never be completely agreed upon. One of my friends always says, “We’re all beautiful people!” as her catchphrase. Some people may scoff, but hey—why is she wrong? Self-esteem is an attribute that most people seem to struggle with. I kind of feel hypocritical, since I’ll freely admit—I don’t have the highest self-esteem either. Nowadays, society makes it kind of hard for a person to look in the mirror and say, “I’m amazing.” (If you can, props. Though if you’re conceited, go dunk your head in a bucket of water, there’s limits to self-obsession.) But I’m working on my self-esteem problems, and if Everyone has a defining trait. For most, I’m either ‘that short Asian girl’, or ‘that chick who can be seen lugging you’re insecure as well, you should join me. I think the only way a person can be deemed around a camera bag’ (or two). People who hardly even know me can usually link me to Click, my Nikon D60, rather “unphotogenic” is if they believe that they are. Insecurity easily. If you’ve ever had a DSLR pointed in your direction isn’t flattering if you think about it. After all, a blurry hand, at a football game, there’s a good chance that it might’ve protesting words out of an open mouth, a duck-and-cover pose…not exactly “model” material. been me. I have so many friends who can easily hate on My motivation for taking photos goes beyond the necessity for photojournalism for the paper. When the shutter themselves for one reason or another…it’s these friends who of my camera closes, I treat it as if I’ve frozen time. (Yeah, it’s usually shrug off pictures, seemingly preferring to wallow in their own slump. that cool.) Photographs are frozen moments, Speaking “directly” to them: captured to ensure their permanence. Why hate on yourself? Face it, you’re an Later, I’ll have something to look back incredible person because God made you on, to laugh and say “Oh man, I can’t unique, and no one in the world believe they handcuffed him!” can ever be like you. Dislike that “I had a crush on him?…” expression you always have in “Good grief, Bailey’s gotten so photos? Maybe that’s because the big!”…you get the point. moment’s always captured while I get ridiculously you’re starting to complain. annoyed sometimes when To avoid sounding like a greeting people try to dodge from, card, I’ll stop. But when I get older, hide their faces in, or flatI want to be able to go to “Photos out refuse to take a photo. of Me” on Facebook and be able I can understand if they’re a vampire to easily reminisce on my so-called and are light-sensitive or something, but “Golden Years” without having to dig up old most of the time, excuses are terrible. friends and stalk through pictures, searching for The most common reasons, “I don’t Artwork by Joy Cope that one ridiculously awesome picture where I used look good in pictures,” “Pictures hate me,” can be simplified to one basic statement: “I’m not photogenic.” One to think I smiled too widely or something. When I’m old and of my friends even twists this into “You have prettier and senile, I want to be able to look back at the times when it was “socially acceptable” for me to be weird. When my teeth more important people to take pictures of.” are getting brittle, I want to be able to find those shots of me Really, where does that logic come from? To listen toawkwardly the writer read his editorial, smiling with braces. What’s the definition of “unphotogenic”? Not looking go to http://www.theroarnewspaper. So next time that little Asian girl pops up at your “attractive” in pictures? Okay, can you define that for me blogspot.com for thejust podcast sigh exasperatedly, put your arms around your as well? By the way, is there some kind of official judge of shoulder, photogenic-ness? Please refer me, because I’m still curious friends, and put a smile on. It’ll make her day—and maybe as to if I should have ignored my date’s opinions and curled yours too. Amy is the editor-in-chief for The Roar, well known as my hair for Homecoming sophomore year. “Photogenic”, as a term, is purely opinion. I may think “that girl with the camera.” If you would like to contact her that Ashton Kutcher is a “10,” while my best friend may but would also like to avoid having your picture taken, email think that Sean Bean graces the top of that rating scale. her at the.roar.zhang@gmail.com.

amyzhang

The Roar Staff Editor-in-Chief: Amy Zhang Managing Editor: Alina Dattagupta Senior Editor: Kate Williams Executive Editor: Kendra Spaw Photography Editor: Laura Everett Opinions Editor: Elena Edwards Features Editor: Dana Branham Sports Editor: Rachel Kagle News Editor: Abigayle English Assistant Sports Editor: Kimmie Cessna Assistant News Editor: Kelsey Gaines Assistant Editors: Isabel Drukker, Anne Finch Staff Reporters: Devin Dakota, Janet Ni Faculty Adviser: Courtney Wellmann Assistant Adviser: Michael Williams

The Editorial Board TheRoar Roar Editorial Board Amy Zhang, Editor-in-Chief Alina Dattagupta, Managing Editor Elena Edwards, Opinions Editor

The Advanced Journalism class at A&M Consolidated High School, 1801 Harvey Mitchell Parkway South, College Station, Texas, 77840. The opinions expressed are those of the writers and are not reflective of the administrators, faculty or staff of the College Station Independent School District. Submissions to the editors are welcomed but must be signed and should not exceed 300 words. The editor reserves the right to edit submissions in the interest of clarity and length or to not print a letter at all. Letters containing obscene or libelous material will not be considered. The Editorial Board consists of the editor-in-chief, managing editor and opinions editor. The Roar is a member of the Interscholastic League Press Conference (ILPC), the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) and the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA). The Roar is a winner of the CSPA Gold Crown, the 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 ILPC Award of Distinguished Merit, the CSPA Gold Medal Award, the NSPA All-American distinction and 2005 ILPC Bronze Star and 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 Silver Star. College Station Independent School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, sex or handicap in providing education services. Glynn Walker, Director of Human Resources, 1812 Welsh, College Station, Texas 77840 (979-764-5412) has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements of Title IX. Catherine George, Director of Special Services, 1812 Welsh, Suite 120, College Station, Texas 77840 (979-764-5433) has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination. requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.


the roar | viewpoints | 7

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Rational thought offers solution to profiling tendency

alinadattagupta Renowned world leader Mahatma Gandhi once said “before the throne of the Almighty, man will be judged not by his acts but by his intentions. For God alone reads our hearts.” From childhood we are told not to judge a book by its cover, but understandably it is much easier said than done. Profiling is a battle within ourselves. It’s a battle against our natural habits to not automatically jump to conclusions. It’s a battle against our will to harbor preconceived notions. While profiling does not always result in serious consequences, it tends to arouse strong emotions and sentiments. I understand that nobody is perfect and that first impressions tend to be important, but why is that? Why is it that looks count so much? Why is it that

people cannot stop themselves from judging others by their appearance or by the way they speak? It’s the way we have been raised and the things that we have been told to do. For example, we have been told that it’s dangerous to give rides to hitchhikers. We have been told to approach people living on the streets with caution. Profiling is a trait that we have acquired and breaking away from this habit is very difficult. I personally catch myself in the midst of judging others upon first encounters and basing my whole opinion of them on the one meeting. Who am I to say that they are not well-behaved? Who am I to say if someone is not a good influence? Next time you see someone, take a moment to think rationally before jumping to conclusions. Next time, before you stereotype, stop and rethink. First impressions are not last impressions. In fact, they can be easily modified and replaced with rational thoughts and decisions. Alina is the Managing Editor for The Roar. If you would like to discuss your embarrasing first impressions with her, email her at the.roardattagupta@gmail.com and she’ll promptly respond, no matter who you are.

W hat was y best Hallow our costume? een “I was a tube of toothpaste when I was two.”

-Abigail Kellstedt, freshman

“I basically went as the Grim Reaper with an ax and scared litt le children.” - Aaron Rhodes, sophomore

“I was Scooby Doo for 8 years in a He was my idol.”

row.

Graphic by Dana Branham

-Jacob Dysart, junior

[insert creativity] By Maurice Vellas

“An Artist at Work”

“I was Yoda one year and my brother was Vader. ”

How many languages are you fluent in? Two 24.1%

- Kailey Labove, senior Three 5.1% Four .65%

One 70%

More than four .52%

771 students surveyed

“I was a creepy old man handing out candy in a van.”” -Jason Pratt, history teacher


8 | viewpoints | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Everyone has potential to impact lives of famine victims

katewilliams

Mark Bowden, humanitarian cocoordinator for Somalia said, “every day in the delay of assistance is a matter of life and death for children and their families in the famine affected areas.” I do not take these words lightly, but view them as a plea for help, a voice that speaks for those who suffer. I know I can make a difference, even a small one. The first step is to feel for these children and understand what life must be like for them. Where we have the luxury of having certain times each day we set aside to eat, these people are desperate to find enough food to

In the last 90 days, 29,000 children under the age of 5 have died. That’s 29,000 lives cut short, stories that came to a quick close and 29,000 human beings that could have made this world a better place. These deaths were caused by inadequate nutrition due to a famine across Southern Somalia, Africa. It has become a death threat to those who survive and an unjust murderer to thousands. The health of those suffering is failing. How long will we continue to sit back and wait for a change, before we realize we can be the change? I eat for enjoyment. I sometimes overindulge on things that are not at all beneficial to my body and end up causing more damage than good. The idea that I can eat more in one hour than a child in Somalia eats in one week sickens me. I realize that there is no way for me to magically teleport the food on my plate to a starving, malnourished child in Africa, but that doesn’t give me an excuse to sit back and continue stuffing my face. Physically, I am on the opposite side of the planet, where my hand can’t reach out and comfort, but my heart is there. My heart is hungry to help. This gives me a reason to move. My deepest desire is to take every action and put forth what effort we can to make a difference. We have the resources, but we just need to act on them. We have the help, but we just need to ask. We have the ability, but we just need to do it. With each passing day, the famine is only Artwork by Joy Cope getting worse.

speak out Discussion Board Each issue, students can submit responses to The Roar’s Speak Out forum. These questions will be posted on Facebook.

Question: Do you think the driving age should be raised from 16 to 18? Keith Kennedy, senior No, parents should just teach their kids how to drive before going

to driver’s ed. My dad made me drive every night for like three months before I even started driver’s ed.

Mitchell Isbell, senior I have a crazy idea, what if [we]... Dare I say, leave it like it is? I mean it’s worked for so long. It’s not broken,. Let’s not fix it. I say just don’t give licenses to morons,and there will be less wrecks. Is that too much to ask for? Kendall Vittrup, junior Just think about all those new drivers on a college campus! I mean

it’s bad enough having two or three grades of high schoolers and there’s only what a couple thousand of us? And you want it to be that way on a campus full of 50,000 while they’re away from their families and any real authority? I just think that in theory it’s a good idea, but in reality it would probably be worse. Add your opinion and see more responses: Friend Roar Newspaper on Facebook. it’s fridayyyy fridayyy gotta get down on fridayyy

survive. The second step is to act on these emotions and take responsibility. It is frightening to go out of our comfort zone and seek change, but it brings joy to the soul and peace of mind to know that our actions have the ability to save someone’s life. I am not asking you to join me in fighting these hunger pains, but begging you. More than 640,000 Somali children are acutely malnourished. How many will add to the 29,000 dead? Let us stop watching the death toll climb on the news while we sit comfortably on our couches. On Nov. 19, 2011, there will be a fundraiser to raise awareness and support for this international issue. By participating, we can address an issue that is bigger than our school, our community and our country. Let’s be a part of something bigger. Let’s decide to be aware, be affected and be assertive. Kate is the senior editor for The Roar. If you have any idea on how to make a difference in the lives of the less fortunate, email her at the.roar.williams@gmail.com.

Paper Clips By Joy Cope

“Busy Days”


the roar | viewpoints | 9

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Facebook continuously disturbs work, disrupts life spending way too much time on this online social network.    While in class or talking with my friends at lunch, Facebook finds its way into the conversation. “Have you seen this person’s status? What is that about?” Or, “I saw that on Facebook I look at the clock and say to myself, “what will five mi- too.” This social nenutes hurt?” I open my laptop and my fingers automatically twork has made its know what to do. Before I know it, I am looking at my newsfe- way through the world ed and valuable minutes of my time are wasted on Facebook. and is affecting multi    Throughout high school, I have been associated with ple numbers of people friends outside of school through Facebook. Looking at in positive and negatiphotos, liking statuses, and wishing friends happy birt- ve ways. For example, hday and having an IM conversation in the comfort of Facebook can become my home is a way for me to connect with my frien- a problem by people lads. Being able to know when certain events or club me- shing out on others and etings are around school has benefited my priorities too.  causing a “Facebook fiOne negative affect I notice Facebook having on me and ght.” Having a cyber fiothers is the amount of time spent on Facebook rather ght can accomplish very than on homework or other important matters. I have be- little by not saying it dicome a victim of ignoring homework just to see other rectly to a person’s face. people’s statuses about how they are not doing homework. Hiding behind words     Even when I am away from a computer, there is conveni- typed on a computer ently a Facebook application for smart phones. Sometimes can make situatiI find myself opening the Facebook application without ons stay the same realizing what I am doing because I have become pro- or even worse. grammed to do so. I have challenged myself in the past to     In contrast, has give up Facebook for a set amount of time. I end up accom- Facebook Artwork by Maurice Vellas allowed me plishing my goal, but often fall back into my old ways of

kimmiecessna

to make sure my friends and classmates are doing well and are in high spirits. Seeing a gloomy Facebook status posted by somebody makes me notice I need to lift them up by saying something encouraging. Facebook can be a great outreach opportunity to help those who need the encouragement.    Facebook has become a part of my life by using it as a way to reach people through status’ including Bible verses, quotes or song lyrics, in the hopes it will give off a little reassurance to someone who might be in need of some. However, I am also guilty of spending too many hours of my time surfing the newsfeed, ignoring homework and other important items. As the homework piles on, spending less time on Facebook is not an option anymore, but a requirement for making the grades to graduate. Kimmie is the assistant sports editor for the Roar. If you wish to comment on her editorial, and posibly tell her how much you’like’ it, email her at the.roar.cessna@ gmail.com and she’ll respond as soon as she’s done checking her Facebook.

speak out Small changes make driving more economical for student end up in the same place.

Tightening the Gas Cap

kelseygaines Gas prices have the ability to drain our wallets, or for some of us, our parent’s wallets. Recently oil prices were raised due to the decrease in the amount of a dollar. Unfortunately, driving is the main way of transportation in this city, and making that trip to the pump once or twice a week is inevitable, but it doesn’t have to be a guilt trip when we do find ourselves filling up. There are ways to help make this trip less painful on our conscience and our wallet.

Carpooling

We live in a city that is great, but just not convenient for walking or even riding a bike somewhere, so we’re stuck driving ourselves to get from place to place and, in result, we use a lot of gas. The more people you can load up in one vehicle, then the fewer people who will be using gas. If need be, the person who’s driving can ask for a dollar or two donation to make it fair on them as well. There’s no point in everyone taking their own cars if everyone’s going to

Gas has the ability to be evaporated just like any other type of liquid. Therefore, after you fill up, make sure to screw on your gas cap as tight as you can. This will help keep the gas that you paid for where it needs to be. The small things are what will pay off in the end.

of miles per gallon. Once again this a small task that takes a small amount of effort to carry out, but can b e beneficial.

Art

Taking Out the Junk

I know I have a tendency to leave all sorts of random junk in my car, and the added weight that I’m too lazy to move could actually be hurting the miles per gallon that I get. The extra weight causes a car to work harder and decreases the amount

a Vell rice

au

yM

heart to drop into my stomach. It makes my experience at the pump less of a heartache.

Saving the Extra Change

s

kb wor

of money that causes my

Using Cruise Control

For two reasons, use cruise control when possible. Cruise control keeps you at a constant speed, which allows you to get optimum amount of miles per gallon. Cruise control also takes away the temptation to speed and leaves you to simply steer the car.

Never Going Below Half Tank

One of the best things my dad has taught me is to never let my gas tank get below the half way mark. This way I never have to have those moments where I question if I can make it to the gas station before my car runs out of fuel, and when I do fuel up, it’s never a large amount

One last tip, if you don’t like change or don’t ever really use it, empty it out into a jar that’s dedicated to gas money. I promise you’ll be surprised by how much money will accumulate after a month or two. The money that you would have thrown out or not used suddenly is able to pay for your gas. It doesn’t matter if you’ve been driving for a while, still have your permit, or aren’t even driving at all, knowing these few tips can really help you save a few bucks in the future . Filling up doesn’t have to be a moment of mourning. You can feel good going to the pump and knowing that you’re doing what you can to get the best gas mileage possible for your car. It only takes a small amount of thought and effort. Kelsey is the assistant news editor for the Roar. To thank her or share advice, email her, free of charge, at the.roar.gaines@gmail.com.


{opposing viewpoints} 10 | viewpoints | the roar

YES

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Is Pottermore a worthwhile investment?

NO

by Anne Finch, Assistant Editor

by Laura Everett, Photography Editor

Before we get off on the wrong foot, I would like to express one sentiment with extreme clarity: I have always been completely overcome with love for Harry Potter. I listened to the books on cassette tape before I could read and dressed up for midnight premieres of both the books and movies. I have enjoyed every step of Harry’s growth from the neglected child in the closet under the stairs to the international franchise consisting of eight movies, several video games, Leggo sets, Halloween costumes and an entire theme park. Of course, I should be frantically refreshing my email right now, in the hopes of finding my Pottermore acceptance email. But I have little intention of doing so.    With this summer’s release of the final Harry Potter film, it seems relatively likely that the Harry Potter craze will slowly begin to die. Pottermore strikes me as a desperate attempt on J.K. Rowling’s part to maintain a continuous level of interest from her fans. The entire concept of Pottermore is frustrating, as this “unique online experience” stands little chance of comparing to the timelessness and beauty of the novels. This website simply comes across as a weak afterglow of a magical and inspiring series that shaped much of our generation. Besides, fans with a desire for an interactive accompaniment should be reminded of the pre-existing video games and be redirected to the entire theme park devoted purely to Rowling’s magical world.     Ultimately, I wish to preserve the integrity of the Harry Potter phenomenon. In years to come, I am sure I will re-open each book and find myself easily captivated once more with the happenings at Hogwarts, and when I do, I sincerely hope that my view of the novels has not been tainted by the large array of “spin offs,” such as Pottermore.

I take my fulltime job as a hardcore “Potterhead” very siriusly. I became a fan at the age of six, and as I progressed through elementary school, my ever-present reading material was, rather than simple muggle literature, a Harry Potter book. That love has continued through now, and I’m proud to say that I’ve remained a Potterhead, and I plan on staying one. Always. Which is why I was thrilled to FIND out that the rumors about something called Pottermore were true, and that Supreme Queen Rowling planned on creating an interactive reading experience. I registered for the website as soon as I could, and am now a semi-proud Slytherin beta tester. Although I’m a tad bit biased, I don’t understand what could possibly deter people from an interactive journey through the life of my favorite supermegafoxyhot magical character, Harry. Pottermore is the long-awaited chance to re-enter back into the time of scheming, squealing and fangirling over the escapades of the Golden Trio, but this time, to experience the magic firsthand. I’ve loved having the chance to trek through an absolutely gorgeous online version of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, and I can’t wait for the chance to peruse the other books in the series as well. I don’t understand what’s not to love about Pottermore; with House sorting, dueling, potionmaking and, most importantly, exclusive information from Headmistress Rowling herself, I foresee a drastic drop in my grades in the near future. But for something as amazing as Pottermore, I’m not complaining.

student responses. The Roar surveys students to find out their opinions on Pottermore. Do you have a Pottermore account?

I think it’s a lovely way for avid journey with the series.

No

Yes

time to devote to Pottermore,

Which Hogwarts house do you think you belong in?

Gryffindor

Potter fans to continue their

94.5%

5.5%

Even though I don’t have the

Hufflepuff

Cynthia Zhang, sophomore Harry Potter was cool while it was going, but it’s over now. Going through each book online is a waste of time.

Kaitlyn Romoser, sophomore

Do you plan on getting a Pottermore account when it opens to the public?

15% 9%

Slytherin

57%

None

8% 11%

91.2% No

Ravenclaw

8.8% Yes

76 students surveyed


the roar | snapshots | 11

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Built on Pride

Tiger band earns top scores at U.I.L.

By Dana Branham and Laura Everett features and photography editors To band students, standing in the field of Astroturf feels like home, regardless of what stadium they find themselves in. It is a warm Saturday, and the band stands together at parade rest, awaiting their next command anxiously before they begin their final marching competition of the year. Two short whistles. Band! One short whistle followed by a long whistle. Pride! The band snaps into the attention position, ready to perform. The band sees the head drum major begin to conduct, hear the taps from the center snare drum and the show is set in motion. Eight minutes later, as the band exits the field, they are overjoyed to hear their results. On Oct. 22, the band competed in the U.I.L. competition in Waco and received a “1” as a top rating. “[Band has] taught me humility,” drum major senior Abbie Craigen said. “You don’t have to be the best to enjoy the organization that you’re in, and you can grow through your struggles and be the best you can be. It helped me just realize that you don’t have to be perfect to be accepted.” These realizations have extended to the diverse population that makes up band. “We get so many people, from all walks of life,” senior Nick Hoganson said.

“We wouldn’t be together if it weren’t for a common center point.” Despite their differences, the band has come together to perform and learn as a group. “All in all, the band is strong,” assistant band director Pieter DuPlooy said. “The kids are great, and it’s just a matter of how can we bring my philosophy and the things that I did in my education, how we can bring those here and try and see if we can take this band to the next level.”

Junior Megan Nicholson plays with the woodwind ensemble on Oct. 7 at Kyle Field. The band received the “Best Ensemble” award at the Blinn Buccaneer Marching Festival on Oct. 8. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG Junior Devon Harris, freshman Savannah Troy, junior Boyce Unger and freshman Kade Kennedy perform with the front ensemble on Oct. 7. “Front ensemble continuously improved,” junior bass player Katie Brice said. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG Senior snare player Evan Ball performs for the student section during third quarter of the Crosstown Showdown at Kyle Field on Oct. 7. As center snare player, Ball has the responsibility “to be focused all the time,” he said. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT Saxophone players sophomore Raymond Corbett, junior Abby Lestina, freshmen Sydney Garrett and Riley Park, sophomore Justin Key and juniors Eugene Roo and Patrick Lenz stand at attention on Oct. 7. The band earned second place at the Blinn Buccaneer Marching Festival on Oct. 8. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

Freshman Stacia Roberts, sophomore Pearson McCreary and senior Sid Mitchell play in the Killeen Ellison stands on Sept. 29. “People outside of band don’t understand the bonding and unity,” McCreary said. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT


life | the roar

Zach Reeves: thespian

PHOTO PROVIDED BY ZACH REEVES

the roar | student

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Beginning his acting career his sophomore year, senior Zach Reeves discovered his passion after he auditioned for his first play with his sister. “As soon as I started rehearsing for my very first show, I fell in love with theater,” Reeves said. “I have been doing it ever since.” Reeves explains acting as a therapeutic way of expressing suppressed emotions. “Acting gives you a chance to express emotions that you wouldn’t normally be able to,” Reeves said. “It’s a way to vent how you feel about something going on in your life. It’s a really peaceful feeling to be able to share that with people who watch you.” Reeves feels that natural talent is only part of being a successful actor.

life | 13

Raquel De La Bastide: ballet dancer

“You can only get so far with a natural inclination to act,” Reeves said. “I wouldn’t have gotten where I am if it hadn’t been for hours of practice and dedicated mentors helping me along the way.” He describes what he finds the most rewarding part of putting time and effort into a production. “It’s so great watching the audience getting really into the show even if it’s a really lighthearted play,” Reeves said. “My goal is to get [the audience] emotionally attached to the characters so that they feel like they can connect or relate to the characters.” Reeves plans on continuing his theatrical career in college. He hopes to eventually become a professional actor and perform on Broadway.

Since senior Raquel de la Bastide was three years old, she has been surrounded by ballet and continues to make it her source of inspiration and improvement. “We have always visited the Houston Ballet,” de la Bastide said. “Seeing those people and how amazing they are makes me work harder in class the next day. I have been working on this my whole life, and to see improvement is a great feeling.” After attending a seminar that informed dancers on what a life of dance looked like, thirteen-year-old de la Bastide decided to pursue a career as a professional ballet dancer. “When I go to college I am planning on double majoring in dance and business,” de la Bastide said.“I eventually want to join a company after I graduate.”

The pressure of being an individual, competitive dancer requires emotional and physical strength. “To be successful you have to believe in yourself, otherwise it’s too hard and the pressure will get to you.” When the curtain is pulled, and the music starts, de la Bastide describes the feeling of walking into the spotlight. “When I first step on the stage, I get really nervous,” de la Bastide said. “The experience is exhilarating. When I step off, I just want to do it all over again.” She defines her reasons for her dedicated pursuit of ballet as simple. “You have to do what makes you happy,” de la Bastide said. “And dancing makes me happy.”

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY RAQUEL DE LA BASTIDE

12 | student

Illuminating Talents Exceptional students pursue abilities outside of school walls By: Kate Williams , senior editor

Junior Logan Livengood’s inspiration for her artwork derives from her feelings and experiences that day. “I’ll doodle on my papers in class and then look at my doodles later and use them as an inspiration for something and add on to them,” Livengood said. “If I’m in a happy mood, I will draw flowers and things that are really girly, but if I’m in a more chill mood, I tend to draw trees and birds and more natural things.” Livengood views her work as part of her identity and uses it as a way to express her originality. “When I paint, my work is like me on a painting,” Livengood said. “It’s a visual representation of who I am. It’s easier for me to explain things through drawing

rather than words,” she said. Livengood describes art as a lifestyle instead of a hobby or extracurricular activity. “As a teenager I spend a lot of time in my room,” Livengoods said. “That’s where my inspiration is at its finest and where I want to be. I want to be painting. Even if I’m working on homework, I still have a notebook next me so I can draw on the side.” As an artist, she would rather not be given guidelines or limitations on what to create and how to create it. “I don’t like being told what to draw. I like to draw what I feel,” Livengood said. Livengood finds her happiness in art and considers it her niche, she said.

Gianfranco Hidalgo: musician Junior Gianfranco Hidalgo expresses his emotions through performances and the music he is producing. “You can tell how I’m feeling by the instrument I’m playing and how I’m playing it,” Hidalgo said. Hidalgo feels that the music industry is growing, and he is eager to advance with it. “Whatever is new, I want to learn it,” Hidalgo said. “I’m learning more about music everyday.” Hidalgo feels he is the happiest when he is performing, no matter how he participates. “I don’t have to be the lead guitarist. As long as I’m playing an instrument, I’m happy,” Hidalgo said. Growing up in a music-oriented family, his love for music started when he was younger and

progressed over time. “My family loves music, so I have always been around it,” Hidalgo said. “Eventually, I started recording my music and once I got a feel for it, I decided that is what I wanted to do for life.” Hidalgo has his own producing business where he is paid to edit and perfect several artists work including his own. “Being a producer is cool, because at the end of the day, you can say that you made music,” Hidalgo said. Gianfranco practies, produces and records in his personal studio in his home. “I have a studio that takes up half of my house,” Hidalgo said. “My parents are very supportive of what I’m doing and don’t mind being surrrounded by it.”

PHOTOS BY MELISSA HIDALGO

PHOTOS BY KATE WILLIAMS

Logan Livengood: artist


life | the roar

Zach Reeves: thespian

PHOTO PROVIDED BY ZACH REEVES

the roar | student

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Beginning his acting career his sophomore year, senior Zach Reeves discovered his passion after he auditioned for his first play with his sister. “As soon as I started rehearsing for my very first show, I fell in love with theater,” Reeves said. “I have been doing it ever since.” Reeves explains acting as a therapeutic way of expressing suppressed emotions. “Acting gives you a chance to express emotions that you wouldn’t normally be able to,” Reeves said. “It’s a way to vent how you feel about something going on in your life. It’s a really peaceful feeling to be able to share that with people who watch you.” Reeves feels that natural talent is only part of being a successful actor.

life | 13

Raquel De La Bastide: ballet dancer

“You can only get so far with a natural inclination to act,” Reeves said. “I wouldn’t have gotten where I am if it hadn’t been for hours of practice and dedicated mentors helping me along the way.” He describes what he finds the most rewarding part of putting time and effort into a production. “It’s so great watching the audience getting really into the show even if it’s a really lighthearted play,” Reeves said. “My goal is to get [the audience] emotionally attached to the characters so that they feel like they can connect or relate to the characters.” Reeves plans on continuing his theatrical career in college. He hopes to eventually become a professional actor and perform on Broadway.

Since senior Raquel de la Bastide was three years old, she has been surrounded by ballet and continues to make it her source of inspiration and improvement. “We have always visited the Houston Ballet,” de la Bastide said. “Seeing those people and how amazing they are makes me work harder in class the next day. I have been working on this my whole life, and to see improvement is a great feeling.” After attending a seminar that informed dancers on what a life of dance looked like, thirteen-year-old de la Bastide decided to pursue a career as a professional ballet dancer. “When I go to college I am planning on double majoring in dance and business,” de la Bastide said.“I eventually want to join a company after I graduate.”

The pressure of being an individual, competitive dancer requires emotional and physical strength. “To be successful you have to believe in yourself, otherwise it’s too hard and the pressure will get to you.” When the curtain is pulled, and the music starts, de la Bastide describes the feeling of walking into the spotlight. “When I first step on the stage, I get really nervous,” de la Bastide said. “The experience is exhilarating. When I step off, I just want to do it all over again.” She defines her reasons for her dedicated pursuit of ballet as simple. “You have to do what makes you happy,” de la Bastide said. “And dancing makes me happy.”

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY RAQUEL DE LA BASTIDE

12 | student

Illuminating Talents Exceptional students pursue abilities outside of school walls By: Kate Williams , senior editor

Junior Logan Livengood’s inspiration for her artwork derives from her feelings and experiences that day. “I’ll doodle on my papers in class and then look at my doodles later and use them as an inspiration for something and add on to them,” Livengood said. “If I’m in a happy mood, I will draw flowers and things that are really girly, but if I’m in a more chill mood, I tend to draw trees and birds and more natural things.” Livengood views her work as part of her identity and uses it as a way to express her originality. “When I paint, my work is like me on a painting,” Livengood said. “It’s a visual representation of who I am. It’s easier for me to explain things through drawing

rather than words,” she said. Livengood describes art as a lifestyle instead of a hobby or extracurricular activity. “As a teenager I spend a lot of time in my room,” Livengoods said. “That’s where my inspiration is at its finest and where I want to be. I want to be painting. Even if I’m working on homework, I still have a notebook next me so I can draw on the side.” As an artist, she would rather not be given guidelines or limitations on what to create and how to create it. “I don’t like being told what to draw. I like to draw what I feel,” Livengood said. Livengood finds her happiness in art and considers it her niche, she said.

Gianfranco Hidalgo: musician Junior Gianfranco Hidalgo expresses his emotions through performances and the music he is producing. “You can tell how I’m feeling by the instrument I’m playing and how I’m playing it,” Hidalgo said. Hidalgo feels that the music industry is growing, and he is eager to advance with it. “Whatever is new, I want to learn it,” Hidalgo said. “I’m learning more about music everyday.” Hidalgo feels he is the happiest when he is performing, no matter how he participates. “I don’t have to be the lead guitarist. As long as I’m playing an instrument, I’m happy,” Hidalgo said. Growing up in a music-oriented family, his love for music started when he was younger and

progressed over time. “My family loves music, so I have always been around it,” Hidalgo said. “Eventually, I started recording my music and once I got a feel for it, I decided that is what I wanted to do for life.” Hidalgo has his own producing business where he is paid to edit and perfect several artists work including his own. “Being a producer is cool, because at the end of the day, you can say that you made music,” Hidalgo said. Gianfranco practies, produces and records in his personal studio in his home. “I have a studio that takes up half of my house,” Hidalgo said. “My parents are very supportive of what I’m doing and don’t mind being surrrounded by it.”

PHOTOS BY MELISSA HIDALGO

PHOTOS BY KATE WILLIAMS

Logan Livengood: artist


14 | people | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Swimming with Science

Aquatic science class provides opportunity, new experiences with marine life By Kimmie Cessna, Assistant Sports Editor Nearing the classroom, music is being played. Entering the room, eyes can be shocked at the sight of fish tanks lining the classroom. Ears can overhear the filters going in the fish tanks and the variety of fishes swimming. This is what aquatic science is all about. “Aquatic science has a little oceanography and marine biology. Day-byday the students are in groups and take care of their own aquarium by collecting data points, feeding them and changing the water,” aquatic science teacher Matthew Young said. The aquatic science class is in its second year, and as a new class, it is still in the process of being fully established. “I was asked to make the class because the school needed another science class to offer students,” Young said. With the new class, a new curriculum must be built, which requires time and many sources. “I went to many different websites, like A&M Galveston and professor websites, and went through the curriculum and put the different classes into units I use in my class,” Young said. Taking aquatic science may be a beneficial class for students wanting to pursue aquatic professions or just enjoying their last science class.

“This class can be beneficial for general biology and wildlife fisheries. If someone wants to major in science, this class gives a decent preview,” Young said. Aquatic science requires many materials to keep the fish alive. Young pays for most of this himself, like aquarium tanks, food, and medicines. “I usually find things I need at garage sales or craigslist, and I sell muffins to help out with the class,” Young said. Students who are in the class are new to the curriculum and find the class to be a different experience from other science classes. “What I like about aquatic science is how peaceful and relaxed it is,” senior Alexa Cepeda said. “There is not a lot of pressure, and we are there to learn and have fun.” One thing that makes the class stand out is the responsibility the students have to take care of their fish tanks and having to rely on a group, Cepeda said. “I like how it is very hands on and we get to take care of fish,” she said. “It is direct responsibility, not like other classes.” Cepeda said another great aspect about the class is the teacher. “I like how Mr. Young cares about us and asks how we are doing,” Cepeda said. “He makes sure he is getting what we need to be successful in class.”

Senior Aaron Cruz cleans the fish tank as the Aquatic Science Aide on Oct. 18. The tanks are cleaned weekly to ensure a safe environment for the fish. PHOTO BY KENDRA SPAW

Fun Facts about Aquatic Science Teacher Matt Young • Runner up for homecoming king in high school • Worked with his father in a vet clinic throughout high school as a surgery technician In Aquatic Science a pair of students are assigned fish that they are responsible for taking care of for the duration of the class. Maintenance of the fish consists of cleaning the tank, measuring the temperature of the water and feeding marine life. PHOTO BY KELSEY GAINES

• Ran cross country throughout high school and a little while attending Texas A&M • Bakes, cooks and brews in his spare time compiled by Kimmie Cessna


the roar | people | 15

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Highly-involved senior prospers through participation in various activities By Kelsey Gaines, assistant news editor As the bell rings and students venture into the hallways, they pass hundreds of students, some they have never seen before, and some they see every day. Whether they realize it or not, the attitude of others can really impact day. Those who know senior Peter Lambert rarely leave a five second encounter with him without a smile. His ability to brighten other’s day despite his crazy schedule truly sheds light on who he is. Lambert is a highly-involved student at Consol but also partakes in various time consuming activities outside of school. Despite the fact that his weekly schedule is constantly packed, he has a mature outlook on the priorities of what he does both in and out of school. “It’s all about managing your time in order to give yourself opportunities to do things outside of school work,” Lambert said. “So, you have to prioritize what’s most important, and sometimes school is not number one.” His way of thinking was not always so open and calm. This past summer Lambert traveled with a team from his church to Peru where his life was truly impacted, he said. He learned many valuable life lessons from the experiences he encountered there. “Before I went to Peru, anytime I wasn’t doing anything, I was thinking about the things I needed to do,” Lambert said. “Since the trip I don’t worry about stuff as much. I just do what I’m doing now, and I do what I’m going to do later.” This new mindset has allowed Lambert to take on the responsibility this year of being one of the three drum majors for Tiger Band. Lambert said he takes his new position very seriously. “[To be a drum major] is to be the example for a band member on and off the field in your behavior in practice, in commitment to your studies and your involvement in the community,” Lambert said. “It’s also to lead the band, whether it be teaching them, leading them in practice or conducting.” The band program has been a large part of his high school career. “[Band] is like a little community of people who think the same way. It’s a place where it’s easy to express yourself and help others do the same,” Lambert said. “Without band I’d be a little more awkward.” Because of band and various other activities, Lambert’s week consists of a tight schedule of early mornings and late nights that would be draining to any student. He still manages to take five AP classes this year. His enrollment in such rigorous courses is preparing him for his aspirations to be a biochemist.

“Ever since I discovered that I actually had fun reading my chemistry and biology textbook, I thought something was either wrong with me or that this is what I needed to do,” Lambert said. Though this career pathway will take at least ten more years to accomplish after graduating, Lambert is prepared for the challenges that lie ahead and eager to be challenged. As for his parent’s opinion on all that he takes on and what he aspires to be, his father Paul Lambert has full faith in his son. “I am confident that he can achieve whatever he is focused on,” Mr. Lambert said. His talents don’t end with his accomplishments at Consol but continue to flourish with his involvement and interest in many unique hobbies outside of school. Lambert is involved with the arts through dancing and singing. Lambert started singing in a choir when he was in kindergarten and has been singing in choirs ever since. He finds enjoyment in the way music expresses feeling so deeply, he said. “It’s more impactful to hear something sung than spoken,” Lambert said. “It’s something I’ve always done, so I don’t see any reason to stop.” Alongside of his passion for singing, there lies an even stronger interest in dancing. Lambert’s liking sparked after being awarded the best dancer out of his cotillion class in the seventh grade. He began to take classes and after many hours and a large amount of hard work, he has become a very talented ballroom dancer. Lambert has come to really appreciate and enjoy what he is able to do. “[I like] the subtle communication and the complexity of the steps,” Lambert said. “You don’t realize how hard it is until you do it. It’s hard to appreciate good dancing until you do it.” On top of everything else, Lambert is a parliamentarian for student council, a member of his church’s youth council, treasurer of NHS and part of the youth band at his church. Free time is treasured when given, he said. “In what free time I have, I like to watch TV, play piano, get new music, go to the movies, have dance parties and cook,” Lambert said. As if he did not do enough, Lambert entered a competition this summer called The World Food Prize Organization, which required him to research how certain factors in an area of the world affects that area’s production of agriculture. The purpose of the organization is to draw awareness of what is going on to better the global food security and research what can be improved in the future. Lambert flew to Iowa in early October for a conference after passing through the first round of interviews and presentations at Texas A&M.

A Week with Peter Lambert

MONDAY

• Band Practice • Theatre rehearsals • StuCo Meetings • Younglife

TUESDAY • • • •

Band Practice Tutoring Breakaway “TV catch up”

Compiled by Kelsey Gaines

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY • Piano lessons • Theatre rehearsals • Church

• Band Practice • Band Council meeting • Grey’s Anatomy

Lambert said at times all of what he does gets to him. Despite the odds, he still manages to bring a large amount of joy to many through his spunky attitude and unique personality. Senior Celina Malave knows Lambert personally and cherishes their friendship. “The English language has yet to create an adjective to properly describe Peter Lambert,” Malave said. “He is beyond talented, brilliant in random ways and is such a sweet blessing to all who meet him.”

Senior Peter Lambert conducts the band during the pep rally on Oct. 7 for the game against Bryan High. Lambert played euphonium before being selected as one of the three drum majors. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

FRIDAY

• Band Practice • Football game • WhatABurger after the game

SATURDAY

• Theatre rehearsal • Aggie Game • Practice piano • College applications • Hang out with friends


16 | people | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Soul of a Warrior

Involvement in martial arts improves physical skills, lessons a B y A li n a D a t t a g u p t M a n a g in g E d it o r

BY ALINA DATTAGUPTA

A sport of self-defense and competition, martial arts also helps with mental and moral development. “Martial arts have been a great experience for me growing up,” said junior Kevin He, a third degree blackbelt. “It has allowed me to grow in my leadership experience through teaching others and taught me how to properly manage my time. My life would be very different if I hadn’t started it. If anyone has the opportunity to try out martial arts, they should because it is a great activity that can drastically change their life.” Senior Nathan Robinson, who has been competing for two years and just received his black belt, agrees that there is a rigorous process before moving up to the next level. “[You have to pass] a rigorous exam that tests physical skills,” Robinson said. “[It] includes board-breaking, form demonstrations, sparring higher belt levels and both defensive and offensive techniques with rattan sticks, knives, guns and other, unconventional items like ties and baseball caps.” The sport not only deals with physical abilities, it helps improve morals and helps student improve techniques.

“I have to teach little kids, and from this I’ve become more responsible, disciplined, self-driven, and I have respect for both others and myself,” Robinson said. Sophomore Ankur Annapareddy, who is a third degree black belt, said his favorite part are the competitions. “I enjoy competing because I get to go to new places and meet new people,” he said. “When I practice at my school, I only have two or three people that can tell me how to improve, but when I go to a competition, I have the whole judge panel and all the other black belts in my ring.” Because He has to be 18 before becoming a fourth degree, much of his time has been focused on other aspects of the sport. “Since I have a long time before I’m testing for my next rank, I’m currently working on a demonstration and a demo team,” He said. “My specialt y would be weapons. I’ve been working with them for the past seven years, but only recently in the past three years have I started working on freestyles with them.” He has two favorite parts to the sport: its physical aspect as well as its versatility. “I enjoy sparring. Who doesn’t like hitting people?” he said. “[At the same time] Martial Arts is one of those things where there are many possibilities and options that one can try out. There is something for everyone.” He feels that his biggest accomplishment often amazes people.

“[I have] developed the control to stop a kick or punch half an inch or less from a target without hitting it,” he said. “[Also I am] able to do a kickup butterfly, aerial k-stand from a handstand.” Robinson feels that Martial

Arts is a n impor- t a n t t o learn.

skill

“Everyone should take Martial Arts,” he said. “It is a great sport and can provide great exercise throughout your life. You would be surprised how just a little knowledge can be a great advantage when someone picks a fight with you, especially when it concerns your safety or the safety or those around you.”

Senior Nathan Robinson does a jump side kick. He is a first degree blackbelt. PHOTO BY JANET NI

Fighting the Fight: Different forms of Martial Arts Tae Kwon Do

Kung Fu

Judo

Muay Thai

Karate

Ju Jitsu

The world’s most widely practiced martial art, Tae Kwon Do is a Korean fighting art that looks very similar to Japanese karate. It is an Olympic sport, an artistic discipline, a system of self-defense and a way of life. The oldest known form of kickboxing, Muay Thai is the primary building black of all other forms of kickboxing. It is the national sport of Thailand and is one of the most popular sports in the world today. Photos by Janet Ni

Extremely disciplined, powerful martial art where strength is built in low stances and powerful blocks, Kung Fu served as the basis for many later forms of martial arts.

A generic term for the various kick/punch arts which originated in Okinawa and Japan, Karate is a martial art of unarmed self-defense in which directed blows of the hands or feet are delivered with special shouts from a poised stance.

Judo is based on the ancient Japanese martial art called Ju Jitsu. It is not only concerned with attack and defense techniques but the physical conditioning and total health that could be attained from its practice. The art of suppleness or flexibility, Ju Jitsu does not use strength against strength but rather uses the opponent’s strength and force of attack as a weapon against him. source: http://www.usgyms.net/martial%20arts%20types.htm


the roar | people | 17

friday, oct. 28, 2011

HANNAH SMITH and SKYLAR ROBERTS now presenting...

Two striving stars pursue their dreams, shine through singing BY ELENA EDWARDS

opinions editor

With lights illuminating the open stage and a wave of excited screams filling the room, a star grabs the microphone and prepares to give a performance to be remembered. This is stardom, a dream among many during childhood, yet, as years pass, a dream that often fades. For some individuals, however, this scenario is more than a dream. It’s a future goal that they hope to make their reality. With fame and a career of performance as their ultimate goal, some students have set their minds on becoming professional singers. “In ten years, if things go as planned, I’ll be on a stage with a sold out crowd in front of me,” Junior Skylar Roberts said of his future plans to be a professional singer. “I want to be an established musician and be well known enough that I can go on tour, but I don’t want to be one of those huge musicians that are a total sell out with everything. That sounds really hipster, but I don’t want to be everybody’s obsession. I want to be popular, I want to make enough money to get by, and I want the fame, but I don’t want ridiculous amounts of it.” For sophomore Hannah Smith, her dream leads her straight into the heart of country music itself: Nashville, Tennessee. “I want to be a country music recording artist,” Smith said. “When I graduate, I want to move to Nashville, record a demo CD, try to get my name out there to the public and maybe release an album.” Both Roberts and Smith recognized their love for singing in their pre-teens, and both have pursued singing in their own unique ways. “I grew up singing in the church choir every year, and I always thought it would be so cool to get solos,” Smith said. “Now I perform at as many places as I can find. I’ve

performed at open mike nights, my church festival and the talent show last year.” Roberts, who was inspired to become a professional singer after watching David Cooke win American Idol in 2008, has searched for stardom through television. “[It started when] I got an email advertising auditions for the TV show X-Factor,” Roberts said. “I was fifteen, and I lived in Morocco at the time. But I came back just in time for auditions, and one thing just led to another, and I decided to do it. I feel like that’s why I came back, so that I could experience that.” Although Roberts did not receive the opportunity to move onto the next level of auditions, he continues to pursue singing with untainted passion and perseverance. “I totally messed up my audition. I started out really strong and then messed up on the chorus, but the guy said if I come back next year, I’ll definitely make it,” Roberts said. Roberts and Smith have both taken steps to get their name out to the public through the internet. “I’ve posted about 12 videos of me singing on Youtube,” Smith said. “I noticed that when I get on Youtube, I’ll find people’s covers and some of them are really good, so I’ll go to their page and I get attached to the artist even if they’re not well known. That inspired me to post my own videos on Youtube, because I thought it would be cool if other people could find my page.” Roberts and Smith both agree that music is a way for them to express their emotions in a less confrontational manner. “What I love about music is that you can really pour your soul into it without being completely open,” Roberts said. “For instance, you can write a song that’s vaguely about somebody and you can still sing your heart out like you’re singing right at that person, but nobody would know it.”

Smith agrees and has grown to rely on music to help her through hard times. “I love singing because it’s a good way to convey emotions that you can’t always say through words,” Smith said. “When I was thirteen I was going through a hard time in my life, and music really got me through that, and I think that it just kind of stuck with me since then. It’s been hard not knowing if I’ll end up being able to sing for my career because there’s always the possibility that it won’t work out, but I know that I can always keep writing songs, and I feel like that can get me through anything.” Roberts believes that no matter the hardships he may face, he can achieve his dream through hard work and a positive attitude. “If things don’t work out, I would just keep going with it and would take the Lady Gaga routine. I would keep running with it until I made it somewhere,” Roberts said. “No matter what, you just keep going for it.”

Sophomore Hannah Smith plays her guitar and sings after school. Listen to Hannah’s music by visiting youtube.com/csskatergirl and follow her on Twitter at @hnnhsmith95. PHOTO BY DANA BRANHAM

Junior Skylar Roberts strikes a pose on stage similar to his audition for X-Factor. Visit Skylar on Twitter at @theawkgoodbye, or http:// soundcloud.com/theawkwardgoodbye. PHOTO BY DANA BRANHAM


18 | health

& rec | the roar

on the road again

friday, oct. 28, 2011

New teen drivers face unforeseen challenges, dangers while driving by Rachel Kagle, sports editor With more than 4,000 teen deaths in car accidents each year, sitting behind the steering wheel should not be taken lightly. “Generally, teens think they’re Superman,” said driver’s education instructor Lucious Clemmons. “They don’t think things will happen to them.” In cases such as hydroplaning, blowouts and accidents caused by weather conditions, driving skills are often irrelevant. This summer, juniors Marcus Orzabal and Clare McDougall were involved in a car accident after hydroplaning. Orzabal, sixteen at the time, was driving. “It wasn’t a lack of skill of driving that caused this crash,” McDougall said. “It was just natural forces, so you’ve got to be careful all the time.” Hydroplaning occurs when the roads are wet, and the vehicle’s tires lose traction, causing a loss of control. “As we were making the left turn out of Layne’s and we were straightening out, the back end of the car started to swing off to the right, and we started swinging back and forth. Then we went off the curb, rolled one time and then quarter rolled into a ditch,” Orzabal said. “At first, I started to move the steering wheel back and forth and that made it even worse, and I didn’t have my foot on the gas anymore, but I started stepping on the brake and that didn’t help at all either.” Drivers are at a higher risk of hydroplaning after it has not rained for long periods of time. “When it hasn’t rained in a while, all of the oils go up to the top of the road,” McDougall said. “It won’t be your fault, but it could always happen.”

Driver’s education courses, such as the one offered at Consol, teach skills that drivers will always need. “First, we teach them the rules and regulations,” Clemmons said. “Then we teach them safety precautions and about distractions, coordination and observation.” Often, drivers are involved in car accidents before realizing the true importance of observation and paying attention. “[Accidents] make you really aware,” Clemmons said. “They make you really observe everything.” Clemmons makes sure to explain the importance of paying attention to his students. “They’re always going to face things like distractions,” Clemmons said. “They need to pay attention. Being observant is the most important thing.” Not paying attention has become a huge problem, especially among teen drivers. “The largest mistake we see with teens is not focusing on one thing and that is driving,” Allstate Agent Sam Kuver said. “There are a lot of things that come into play like texting, talking on the phone, putting on makeup or not obeying traffic laws that get most teens in trouble.” Even in wrecks caused by natural forces rather than faults of the driver, a lesson is learned. “I take turns a lot more slowly now,” Orzabal said. “And [as a passenger], I watch what [the driver] is doing and how fast they’re driving.” Overall, by being observant and taking driver’s education seriously, students can become safer drivers. “Just watch everything that you come into contact with,” Clemmons said. “Be aware of everything.”

shifting into gear Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among 15- to 20-yearolds.

16-year-olds have higher crash rates than drivers of any other age.

16-year-olds are three times more likely to die in a motor vehicle crash than the average of all drivers. 63% of teenage passenger deaths in 2008 occurred in vehicles driven by another teenager. Source: http://www.rmiia.org/auto/teens/

PHOTO BY DANA BRANHAM


the roar | sports | 19

friday, oct. 28, 2011

IN THE LONG RUN Cross country runner gains mental, physical strength by kendra spaw, executive editor

PHOTOS BY RACHEL KAGLE

Beads of sweat trickled down her face. She did her best to control her breathing that stung with every intake. Through the daze and exhaustion she couldn’t recall what placement she had, but she didn’t care. She had made it to state, and that’s all that mattered. She finally saw her mother at the finish line and almost collapsed at the finishing mark. Tears now replaced the sweat as they began to fill her eyes and run off her cheeks. Overwhelmed with joy and fatigue, Karis Jochen forced a smile, for she had just received fifth in state cross country meet as a sophomore in 2010. “I was giving the race my all,” Jochen said. “[I thought] everything I had worked for this season, this is it.” Jochen, a junior, has been one of Con� sol’s top runners since she started as a fresh� man, but she didn’t always enjoy the sport. “[In 7th grade] I didn’t like running at all,” Jochen said. “I just wasn’t very excited about it.” When she started high school, she began to enjoy and appreciate the sport, and her coach Rodney Wellmann could see that. “Her big leap was the summer between her freshman and sophomore year,” ����� Well� mann said. “She really dedicated herself to running and hit June and July hard with a lot of mileage.” Now that Jochen had established a love for running, she can explain why. “I enjoy pushing myself and seeing what kind of limits I can push my body,” Jochen said. “I get a sense of freedom from being able to run fast.” Although cross country isn’t all about being fast, it has become a helpful tool she can use in her everyday life, she said.

“[Cross country] is definitely a mentality sport,” Jochen said. “You can’t be just physically strong. You have to be men� tally strong.” The mental work of running isn’t only applied during the race. Jochen said she must apply it to her numerous hours of prac� tice. “You want to train hard to reach your full potential, but there is a line between training your hardest and over training and hurting yourself,” Jochen said. Jochen understands first hand the pain there is when not able to train like preferred due to injuries. She suffered from separate injuries last track season, and she wasn’t able to run as she had planned, she said. So that she does not repeat last year’s injuries, Jochen makes sure that she gets a lot of sleep and recovery and eats properly for energy, she said. It was hard on Jochen last track season when she was unable to run, she said.         “The feeling you get from trying to push your body, it does hurt, but it’s such a great feeling to know that you can do this,” Jochen said. Jochen recently won the Nike South In� vitational in The Woodlands with an excel� lent time of 17:55 for 5000m (approximately 3.1 miles) race.  The meet was a preview of a national-qualifying meet later in the season and featured many top runners from Texas and surrounding states. She has developed an admiration for the sport and believes the pain it brings is what makes it challenging. “[Cross country] is a hard sport because you’re pushing your body as far as it can go,” Jochen said.  Jochen is continually pushing herself to

succeed in cross country and academics. “I do as much [homework] as I can to a certain point, then I go to bed and wake up early to do it before practice,” Jochen said. Jochen’s determination to strive in ev� erything she does has impressed her coach. “She is so driven, even in academics,” Wellmann said. “I don’t think I’ve ever had a girl with such intrinsic motivation.” She balances all her running training, as well as very hard courses, and has continued to be successful in both. “My parents don’t put any pressure on me at all, and they are always happy with the best that I can do,” Jochen said. “They encourage me to have fun with it.” Jochen’s parents have always been her top supporter in anything she chooses to participate in, and in a close second is her coach. “My coach is a great influence and super encouraging and helps a lot,” Jochen said. Wellmann finds that coaching Jochen isn’t hard at all. “She is easy to coach because you know you’re going to get 110%,” Wellmann said. “She is going to do it to the best of her abil� ity.” Through all the advice and support Jochen receives, she learns the most from cross country itself. “It has taught me to try and be humble and to appreciate that everyone is so gifted with different abilities,” Jochen said. Jochen has created a philosophy for herself to use with running or any task. “I don’t mind not being the best but I want to be the best I can be,” Jochen said. “As long as you work hard and do your best, it’s an accomplishment.”

Boys

Girls Top Runners: Junior Karis Jochen Freshman Kelsie Warren Sophomore Harmoni Whittenton

cross country

Upcoming Meets: Nov. 5: Region II Championship in Arlington Nov. 12: State Championship in Round Rock

Junior Karis Jochen competes in the Nike South Invitational’s cross country competition on Oct. 8. After placing first, Jochen is now ranked 24th in the nation, according to Dyestat. com. PHOTO BY JOHN JOCHEN

Top Runners: Senior Patrick Alexshonis Junior Gus Roman Senior Leonel Drukker

Upcoming Meets: Nov. 5: Region II Championship in Arlington Nov. 12: State Championship in Round Rock

Senior Leonel Drukker:

“Practice gives us a good chance to bond and improve our running skills.”


20 | sports | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

ace of the game

Tennis team captain serves as role model

making a racket varsity tennis

by Janet Ni, staff reporter

A greenish-yellow ball whips through the air and is followed by a loud pop; the ball flies back in the other direction. The player twirls his racket in his hands, knowing that another practice under the Texas sun will result in a drastic sock tan. Training and conditioning fill his weeks and along with his hard work comes crazy bus rides to tournaments and lasting friendships. This is Tiger tennis for senior Landan Quartemont, team captain of varsity tennis. “Basically I’m supposed to pump up the team for matches and be a responsible leader,”

Quartemont said. Team captains are essentially elected by the team members themselves. Coaches only become involved in the decision in the case of a tie. “Everybody looks up to him, and he’s also a really good role model,” Coach Stephen Mercer said. The team captain is not required to be the best player. The position has more to do with his or her leadership qualities and how that player represents the team, Mercer added. Quartemont joined tennis after his involvement in gymnastics his freshman year. When the gymnasium closed down, he then found himself with more free time than usual, so he decided to bid his extra time farewell and join Tiger tennis his sophomore year. Tennis has proved itself stressful to Quartemont by adding extra responsibilities to school and extracurriculars. “Classes definitely have become more difficult because of tennis,” Quartemont said. “Sometimes I’ll get home late from tournaments, and I won’t have any time to study,” However, it seems that playing tennis has been time well spent. Quartemont believes that all the hours he has put into the sport have also made him a more tactful player, he said. “Tennis is a very strategic sport. It’s not necessarily how [well] you play. It’s how smart you can play,” Quartemont said. “Single matches are especially stressful and have helped with being able to concentrate and stay focused.” On top of improving as a player, Quartemont has also benefited greatly from his position as team captain. Having experience in being able to act as leader of the team has been very rewarding, he said. Quartemont has additionally formed lasting bonds with his fellow tennis players. “I would say that a few have become very close friends of mine,” he said. Quartemont also added that his coaches have greatly helped him improve as a player. “[My coaches have] definitely encouraged and supported me and helped me focus on my goals.” Mercer commended Quartemont’s overall character as a person and a player. “Landan is one of those kids who can pretty much do whatever he sets his mind to,” Mercer said. Senior Landan Quartemont practices on Oct. “Whatever he wants to do as far as college and careers, 20. Quartemont began Tiger Tennis his sophohe’s the type to make it happen.”

Senior Kristina Raphael returns a serve on Oct. 20. Raphael is the top female player on varsity. PHOTO BY JANET NI

Overall Team Record: 11-8 Past Events: Oct. 11: won 16-3 vs. Bryan Oct. 18: lost 2-17 vs. Montgomery Oct. 21: lost 2-17 vs. Klein Next Meet: Today and Tomorrow: Region II Team Tourney in Tyler

more year and now serves as team captain. PHOTO BY RACHEL KAGLE

Freshman Schedule

tennis

Statistics Junior Varsity

Overall Team Record: 3-2

Overall Team Record: 0-2

Past Event: Belton junior varsity tournament

Next Meet: Nov. 1: Harker Heights Tourney in Harker Heights

Next Meet: Nov. 3: Harker Heights Tourney in Harker Heights

Sanathan Iyer:

“Tennis is fun, especially the tournaments. It’s always fun to hang out with friends. Tennis is just an enjoyable sport.”


friday, oct. 28, 2011

Kings of the Swings

the roar | sports | 21

Boys golf team looks to upcoming season as opportunity for success Epic

BY LAURA EVERETT

photography editor

The course goes silent, as the golfer positions the tee. The spectators’ eyes follow the player’s every move, watching as the club swings back and forcefully draws forward to strike the ball. The boys golf team has a promising season ahead of them, especially after last year, when the team did not advance past the district tournament as they had for the previous seven years, senior T.J. McGrath said. “[Last year’s loss] definitely motivated everybody,” McGrath said. “We have a really good chance of making it to state this year.” The team used this motivation during this year’s first tournament in Fort Worth. The varsity team placed tenth out of 52 teams, and the junior varsity team finished fourth from 20 teams, Coach Justin McKown said. Consol’s season continued as they hosted a tournament at the Pebble Creek Golf course on Oct. 14 and 15. Consol placed third out of the 13 teams that attended the event. Max Miller’s score of 150 earned him the fourth

place medalist. While the Pebble Creek tournament gave Consol somewhat of a home course advantage, McKown said that they did not necessarily prepare for this tournament differently. “I am not real big on doing things different, especially with golf, because if you get them out of their routines sometimes, it can hurt more than it helps,” McKown said. “Now, that being said, we [do] have different game plans for different courses, as far as preparing to go play.” Part of the overall game plan involves conquering the notion that golf is a purely individual sport. “[A difficult task is] getting the kids to realize that even though golf is an individual sport, it is also a team sport,” McKown said. “Golf is weird because you’re playing by yourself, but what you do counts for the team.” McKown places a certain level of importance on drills that not only hone the skills needed to succeed on the course, but also to improve the team’s unity. “I’ll split them up, and we’ll do putting drills as a team,” McKown said. “You can’t go home until everybody on your team makes this putt. And then they start realizing that we need this guy to make this putt.”

Senior Woody Wu takes a swing at the Pebble Creek Golf Course on Oct. 15. Wu ranked 38th individually at the Tiger classic tournament. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT Senior TJ McGrath tees off during the golf tournament at Pebble Creek Golf Course on Oct 15. “When I play in high school, it is definitely team-oriented,” McGrath said. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT Junior Andrew Gehring waits to hit the ball. Gehring shot a low round of 83 on day one in the Tiger classic tournament on Oct. 15. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

Results 34th Annual Tiger Classic Tournament Senior Russell Corbelli sets up for the putt during the tournament on Oct. 15. Corbelli has played for the Tiger golf team since his freshman year. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

October 15, 2011

A&M Maroon Tigers: 3rd place A&M White Tigers: 12th place

Junior Andrew Gehring lines up the ball on the green. “I picked golf because my dad and brothers play golf and you can play golf the rest of your life,” Gehring said. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT


22 | entertainment | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Local food trucks offer various cuisine experiences around town Cake Junkie Cruiser

There was a small line outside the Cake Junkie food truck, the Cake Junkie Cruiser, but judging by the pleasant smell coming from inside, it would be well worth the short wait. As the people ahead of me ordered, I studied the menu posted on the outside of the truck. There were a number of different cupcakes available for purchase, and I was happy to see they had more than just the traditional chocolate and vanilla type flavors. Though they did have both of these, among them I found Pink Champagne, Red Velvet, Chocolate Raspberry, Lemon and Banana Pudding, to name a few.

Along with the cupcakes, there was a small selection of Cake Bites, which had an equally impressive diverse selection of flavors. Each eye-catching dessert I bought was placed in a small take-out box for me quickly and neatly. The same man I ordered from frosted the cupcakes and smiled cheerfully while answering my questions about what he thought was the prettiest cupcake. Budget wise, the Jumbo Cupcakes are well worth the $3.25. Both the Lemon and the Pink Champagne cupcakes were light, fluffy and in short tasted like happiness. The frosting, having been freshly applied, not only made the cupcakes attractive in their bright colors and swirly shape, but they also had a distinct flavor, that unlike some desserts, didn’t leave an overpowering sugary aftertaste. Besides

this, each cupcake was roughly the size of a large apple, making it satisfactory enough to split with a friend. My only real disagreement with this food truck of delight was that the Cake Bites did seem a bit overpriced and though good, they were not nearly as extraordinary as the cupcakes. I have to say, though, $2.25 for a bite is a little too much, though the Italian Cream did have inviting sprinkles and the Chocolate Raspberry looked just as tempting. Due to the suitable prices and overall amazing baking, I strongly recommend these cupcakes to anyone wishing to enjoy a unique dessert experience. To find the Cake Junkie Cruiser’s location, go online to http://cakejunkie. com and click on mobile for a weekly schedule, or follow them on Facebook.

Madden’s Street Cuisine

Having never had the opportunity to eat Madden’s casual gourmet cuisine, whether at the restaurant itself in downtown Bryan or via its roving food truck, it was with great interest I visited the vehicle with an empty stomach and several assistants. The employee who took our orders was extremely helpful in recommending dishes and reciting that day’s specials. Every entrée on the menu costs $8. The wonderful thing about Madden’s

is that it serves popular meals including fish and chips, burgers, tacos and wings and puts an interesting (and delicious) spin on them, while wrapping them in easily portable to-go boxes. I had the fish and chips, with the ‘chips’ being sweet potato fries. The fish and chips with jalapeno ketchup and a lime tartar sauce were absolutely delicious. Although the fish itself was fantastic (and I don’t like fish), the fries weren’t nearly as tasty as the chile and cilantro fries, served with the green chile burger. The wings, which another member of my party tasted, had a strange texture and were only fair. Madden’s also offers ice cream, cookies and brownies for dessert.

Because the food was served to us from a truck and there were no places nearby to sit down and eat, we decided to take the food back to my house and eat, at which time it was rather cold, as preparing the food took a rather long time for one of the members of our party. But overall, the Madden’s food truck offers fun, delicious and portable twists on classic foods, and next time you see it, it’s definitely worth a try. For information on when and where the truck will show up, updates about locations are available on petermadden.co, or simply like Madden’s Street Cuisine on Facebook.

Chef Tai Mobile Bistro

I love good food, and I love a unique atmosphere in a restaurant. So naturally, Chef Tai’s food truck has become a favorite of mine. When I first arrived at his Wednesday location, I was enamored with the casual environment Chef Tai’s presented—a food truck sat in the Chase Bank parking lot on that cool Wednesday evening, allowing customers to enjoy the pleasant fall weather. Retro-sounding oldies music was playing on the speakers atop the truck.

Ordering my food, then, was a breeze. I chose my staple item—pulled pork—then chose how I wanted it—in a rice bowl. I gave my order and $8 for the entrée to an employee there who was incredibly helpful. She let me try a piece of rib meat, a brussel sprout and tofu combo, and one of her own sweet potato fries while I waited for my food, a waynicer-than-expected gesture. Within a few minutes, my name was called, and I walked up to the truck to reach up and take my order. Excitedly, I opened my food (neatly enclosed in a Styrofoam container) and was delighted to see how delicious it looked. Since there was not actual seating

reviewed by Isabel Drukker

Pink Champagne Cupcake

reviewed byAnne Finch

Madden’s Cheeseburger reviewed by Dana Branham

at outside the food truck, I took my food home to eat. Simply put, it was fantastic. With generous portions of filling and flavorful food, I was pretty much sure of my love for Chef Tai’s. Of course, my meal wasn’t the only fabulous item on the menu. For $8 each, one could buy tacos, a burrito, a baguette sandwich or a rice bowl, filled with either Korean barbeque short rib, pulled pork with sweet chili or caramelized brussel sprouts and tofu. To find Chef Tai’s daily locations, visit www.cheftai.com or like his page on facebook. You won’t be disappointed.

Pulled Pork Tacos


the roar | entertainment | 23

friday, oct. 28, 2011

the

behindthescenes

stars

Theatre production crew makes magic happen by dana branham, features editor

Senior Ben Zimmer adjusts the lights in the auditorium. Zimmer leads the lighting crew in The Tempest and Thoroughly Modern Millie. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

The curtains re-open at the end of the play, and the actors take a bow, smiling giddily. The audience claps and cheers wildly for the actors, maybe the directors and perhaps they clap for the stage manager. But, it’s not only these select few who feel the rush from finishing a performance. As the actors bow, the kid controlling the spotlight beams with delight, and the construction crew admires the set they’ve created. It’s certain that the production requires the help of many people. “Without the stage managers and the crew, there would be no show,” said Bree Yuodsnukis, stage manager for Consol’s production of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. “There would be no lights, no sound, no one to tell [actors] when to go in and come out—[the production] is basically a lot more than the actors.” Stage managers like Yuodsnukis play a very large role in technical theatre. They must know the script and onstage movement by heart, help the actors with lines and cues and keep the proudction running smoothly. Junior Victoria Fazzino is the current stage manager for the upcoming production The Tempest. “A lot of people think it’s boring to be backstage or be writing stuff down, but I really enjoy it,” Fazzino said. Students and teachers alike feel that effects such as lights, sound and costumes add to the overall meaning of a play or musical as much or more than simply the acting. “Just as acting is communication, so is technical theatre,” said Beth Creel, theatre production teacher. “So, when you say a line, you can express that same idea through having specific mood lighting, having a certain song playing, or you can express the characteristics of a character

through the costumes they wear.” Senior Ben Zimmer knows firsthand the effect of lights on a show through his work on various productions. “[Lighting] really adds to the emotion of [a production], and it also makes everything visible,” Zimmer said. Along with lighting, costumes, and the students who work to create them, establish a vital piece of a play or musical. “[A costume] really engages the audience in what’s going on. If we were all to go up there in black costumes, it wouldn’t be interesting to the audience at all,” junior Alyssa Salazar said. “Like, in Thoroughly Modern Millie, we have dancing girls in high heels. And with the flashy colors and outfits, it really portrays the storyline. Technical theatre director Michelle Greene concurs with both Zimmer and Salazar about the importance of costumes and lighting. “Costumes can create symbolism, and they can tell you so much about a character without them ever speaking,” Greene said. “And, the lighting is important because it affects how the audience feels the mood [of the play].” Another valuable part of technical theatre is construction, something senior Jacob Kavanaugh enjoys. “You see [the set] more than the people, so if it’s bad, that’s all you think of the play,” Kavanaugh said. “Our big thing is making everything look professional, because if you don’t, it just looks like any high school student put it together.” While the theatre crew can find themselves busy and maybe even overwhelmed with these many tasks, they agree that it has many social benefits, including friendship and the joy of teamwork. “[Theatre] is definitely like one big team. If it wasn’t for one thing, nothing would work,” Yuodsnukis said. “We’ve learned to work really well together. We’re basically like a family.”

PHOTOS BY AMY ZHANG


24 | etcetera | the roar

friday, oct. 28, 2011

Expansion of Book Craze Provides New Hobby for Teens

% Anne Finch, Assistant Editor Although the final movie in the Harry Potter series was released this summer, with the unveiling and upcoming opening of the interactive Harry Potter website Pottermore, the series will undoubtedly continue to maintain its high level of popularity, especially with the zealous fans of the series, nicknamed Potterheads. Pottermore, currently open only to a select amount of beta testers, opens officially on Oct. 28. The site combines a typical online gaming experience with the opportunity to experience every chapter of each book in the series and collect hidden items on the way. Sophomore Liz Burley is one of around a million beta testers who have already received access to the site. “My favorite thing about the website is the JK Rowling exclusive content,” she said. “There are exclusive scenes from the book that she wrote, but didn’t publish and explanations to how things really worked. [Also], there are teacher backgrounds and original manuscripts.” Other Harry Potter fans have also applied for early acceptance, but, owing to the randomness of acceptance emails, have not received access to the site. “I have not yet received my confirmation that I’ve been accepted into Pottermore, and I’m very upset by this,” English teacher Caleb Phillips said. “Students have shown me the ins and outs of the Pottermore website, and I’m very jealous.” However, Phillips added that he still eagerly anticipated the arrival of his own account confirmation, and especially the chance to interact with other Harry Potter fans experiencing the same feelings of excitement

BACKGROUND FROM POTTERMORE WEBSITE

and anticipation. “I think mostly I’m looking forward to interacting with others who share this excitement about Harry Potter,” he said, “and seeing the universality of the novel and connecting with those people even though they’re miles and miles away.” Senior Matt Birmingham also applied for an account that had not been accepted. However, Birmingham said he was also looking forward to additional information written by Rowling. “[Pottermore] has incorporative and extra details from the book that weren’t in the books before that gives you extra things to know about the characters,” he said, before adding that he enjoyed knowing that “she’s not just leaving it at the end of the seventh book, that she’s going to continue the series, that she’s going to try and continue it in some way.” Sophomore and self-proclaimed Potterhead Ivy Lee agreed, stating that her favorite aspect of the elaboration of the series provided by the author is additional character backgrounds. “My favorite part was either [Professor Minerva] McGonagall’s story, or Petunia [Dursley]’s story where you learn about their pasts, because Snape had his justice, and so did Voldemort and Draco, but you never saw that for Petunia, and on Pottermore you finally learn this is how it came to be,” she said. “I would’ve really liked it if it had been in the book, but now I get to see it on Pottermore! Devoted fans such as Burley, Phillips, Lee and Birmingham have loved the series long before the

introduction of the website, and for varying reasons. Birmingham stated that the series has helped him from an early age become a stronger reader. “I think that it’s given me love for reading, because I’ve really noticed that I’ve become a stronger reader because of it, and my imagination has grown because of it,” he said. “ [Reading the novels has] helped me see things when I’m reading materials at school that I wouldn’t see if I wasn’t a stronger reader, and that’s definitely because of my reading Harry Potter.” Although the books have their academic benefits, they also draw upon a number of themes, including bravery, love, forgiveness and friendship. “Harry Potter is not just a book, but it’s taught me so much about life,” Lee said. “If I have a bad day, I can relate to any of these characters. Neville gets bullied, Luna as well, but you can look at [them] and say, ‘even though I’m going through hard times right now, one day it will get better’, and I feel like that’s really, really important.” Burley agreed, adding that one of the aspects of Harry Potter that makes the series so appealing is the strength of the friendships and bravery of the characters, particularly supporting character and underdog of the series Neville Longbottom. “Harry Potter taught me a lot about friendship, and love, and how to overcome adversity, just by whatever’s happening to you,” she stated. “Neville Longbottom is the underdog of life, and he comes out with a sword in a sweater vest and just wins everything.”

The Roar Vol. 17 No. 2  
The Roar Vol. 17 No. 2  

The second issue of the year!

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