Page 17

the roar | snapshots | 17

friday, may 13, 2011

uilding

Ag Mechanics students combine nowledge : construction talents to build house

By Preksha Chowdhary, assistant editor Students in Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Fabrication, Advanced Agricultural Mechanics and Problems and Solutions in Agricultural Mechanics classes have created a fully functional lake house hammering nails, placing boards and erecting walls for six weeks to meet the request and order of a customer from Lake Limestone. “The customer came to us with the idea that he wanted a cabin to put on his lake lot, told me the dimensions and [the project] jumpstarted,” said John Templeton, Agricultural Mechanics teacher and Project Supervisor. The lake house has been through the framing and roofing stage and has yet to undergo electrical and plumbing settings. The Ag department started on the project with a budget of $6,000 provided by the customer for construction materials and is currently at $8,000 in expenses to account for further modifications. “Getting a job done brings me a sense of accomplishment and it helps relieve stress,” sophomore Jordan Wren said. These students have had safety tests throughout the school year and have demonstrated proper use of tools and understanding of terminology. “There’s really no room for error because if one of those kids makes a mistake, they can hurt themselves or hurt somebody else,” Templeton said. “Not only do you have to pay attention to what’s going on with the project but you also have to be concerned with everyone’s safety.” A large part of the Agricultural Mechanics students plan on going into a field related to construction or engineering. Senior Cole Sustaire works on the house throughout second, third and fourth periods and after school, if needed. He said that he plans on becoming a mechanical engineer and has already gained basic comprehension of houses and building materials and developed an interest in construction by living on a farm and learning from his father. Templeton has had the opportunity to work with some of these students for more than one year. Working on the house for hours a day helped create a special bond between him and his students. “I hope they grasp the basic skills I get asked to teach kids,” Templeton said. “Simple things like doing what’s asked of you, completing a task, asking questions if need be, working and meeting time constraints and basically just being a good overall employee.”

Ag Mechanics teacher John Templeton assists sophomores Britnee Bailey and Matt Wilson in measuring the cuts for the exterior walls of the house. Templeton said his goal is to teach students the correct techniques of construction, as well as spark their interest in the subject. PHOTO BY ELIZABETH CRISP

Junior Cody McCoy and sophomore Ryan Williams assist their classmates in installing a window onto the house. The class has completed the foundation and roofing stages of the build and have begun work on plumbing and electricity. PHOTO BY PREKSHA CHOWDHARY

Sophomore Andrew Chambers and junior Gayla Gregory work together to cut metal panels for the exterior walls. The students have had safety tests throughout the year to demonstrate proper technique and usage of the tools. PHOTO BY PREKSHA CHOWDHARY

Sophomore Dominic Simmons drills the final screws to install the structural support of the window. It took the students four weeks to complete the exterior stage of the house. PHOTO BY PREKSHA CHOWDHARY

Ag Mechanics teacher John Templeton and sophomore Andrew Chambers mark the correct measurements for the R-panels of the house. Through this project, Templeton said he has built a close relationship with all of his students. PHOTO BY PREKSHA CHOWDHARY

Ag Mechanics teacher John Templeton checks the final measurements of a window before sophomore Jordan Wren places metal panels on the exterior walls. Templeton said students are encouraged to take leadership roles within the project. PHOTO BY PREKSHA CHOWDHARY

Vol. 16 Issue 6  
Vol. 16 Issue 6  

The last issue of the Roar for the 2010-2011 school year, including senior pages.

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