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Volume II/Fall November 2011

Calling all writers! Email us at: thespectrum.cob@gmail.com

COLLEGE STEPS UP MOULD FIGHT ❚ by Ava Turnquest Managing Editor

O

fficials have launched an aggressive campaign to reduce mould levels in several buildings at the Oakes Field campus. Ninety per cent of the mould infestation at COB has the potential to become toxic if left unchecked, according to Physical Plant. Mould sightings are a source of discontent for faculty, staff and students, all of whom claim the infestation is much larger than the college has let on. Based on independent expert findings, officials say present levels are unharmful and most health concerns are a psychological response to mould's "gruesome" appearance. Prestonia Wallace, assistant director Physical Plant, said that the department will not be able to completely eradicate the fungus until

Staff and students claim infestation taking over Oakes Field campus

tion will clear up." Due to the report, Ms Wallace said the college has been working feverishly to ensure affected buildings are treated and thoroughly cleaned. Ms Wallace said mould can be found at the Portia Smith building, T-Block, A-Block and G-Block. Administration was alerted in May, when infestations were discovered on a routine Physical Plant walkabout, Ms Wallace said. Prior to this year, the college addressed mold sightings on an individual basis to treat and remove the affected area. However, Ms Wallace said this year the college enlisted a full inspection of the entire Oakesfield campus. "We did an entire sweep," Ms Wallace said. "It is safe to go in to all areas [on campus]. Most of the mould is not in classrooms, there is

structural repairs are made to several buildings on campus. "We had an independent company come in, and [according to their report] up to 90 per cent of the mould was said to be harmful [type]," Ms Wallace said. "It's not harmful at this stage but it has to be addressed before it becomes harmful." Ms Wallace said: "[Mould] comes about from moisture, poorly circulated air and a lack of light. It breeds through the A/C system. "We are in the process of making a listing of all affected areas. We have some structural leaks, once SEE page 8 those are repaired the mould situa-

COB/ Lamech Johnson

students voice concerns at general assembly

❚ by Stephen Hanna Features Editor

SOME 200 students attended the Student General Assembly hosted last monhth. The assembly, hosted by the College of the Bahamas Union of Students, comes after it was alleged Campus Security used excessive force on a student (see story page 3). The forum at the College's Performing Arts Centre sought to give students a forum to have their concerns heard by college administration, who were represented by Colyn Major, Vice President of Stu-

What’s INSIDE:

dent Affairs; Wellington Francis, Director, Security Services; Dr. Berthamae Walker, Deputy College Librarian. Students were afforded two hours to speak directly to college officials, who were chastised for not effectively managing "student-administrative"relations. Amidst the tumultuous din of students' laughter, burst of applause and screams of frustration there was a reoccurring concern; security on campus. COB/ Jasper Haeward

SEE page 8

Pictured above are ceilings in the Michael H Eldon building. COB/ Lamech Johnson

Commencement in December? A new cafeteria? President Betsy Vogel-Boze answers these questions and more.

SECURITY VS. STUDENTS

Page 3 Did you know? Page 3

Ask the Carib Page 4

Flooding Photos Page 9

Page 6


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The Spectrum- November 2011

FaCulty adVIsor

Lottis Shearer-Knowles, SCCA The Spectrum is published monthly during the fall and spring semesters.

s-3 art Block CHMI Media room 147 the College of the Bahamas tEam oakes Field Campus tel: (242) 302-4483; Fax (242) 302-4539 Email: thespectrum.cob@gmail.com Facebook: /thespectrumCoB

Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . ava turnquest, Media Journalism Production Manager . . . . . . Jasper Haeward, Media Journalism Features Editor . . . . . . . . . . . stephen Hanna, English Language sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . .simba French, Media Journalism

OCT-NOV Calendar s Study AbroAd ApplicAtionS deadline is october 28th at 4pm. Applications should be submitted to the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations in the Oakesfield Plaza next to Chapter One. s Violence SympoSium November 3rd at 9:30am in the oakesfield campus Performing arts Centre. Faculty of the College will present across a range of topics related to violence in the Bahamas. s HonorS conVocAtion November 11th, 11am to 1pm in the Performing arts Centre in the a-Block. Dean’s & President’s List students will be recognized. s GrAduAtion ApplicAtionS deadline for spring 2012 is January 31, Summer 2012- May 31. Late forms may be deferred to the following semester. s internAtionAl Free HuG dAy November 17th, 2011 s AidS FoundAtion Fun run/WAlk November 26th, 2011. To register, or if you would like to purchase a World AIDS Day t-shirt, contact Brenda Bonimy; Office of External Affairs, 302 4304 or bbonimy@cob.edu.bs

lE tt E r s T O

T H E

E D I T O R

Letters to the Editor are encouraged. Please type and send to The Spectrum, College of The Bahamas , c/o Student Publications Board, S-3 Art Block, Oakes Field Campus, or email spectrum @cob.edu.bs. Length should not exceed 350 words. All letters must be signed and include contact information for verification, such as exact COB registration name. The Spectrum has the right to withhold any submission from publication and will not consider more than two letters from the same individual on one topic. The Spectrum reserves the right to edit all letters and submissions for content, clarity and length.

Graphic Designers! Looking for an opportunity to expand your portfolio? We need YOU! Email your name and contact information to: Production Manager Jasper Haeward thespectrum.cob@gmail.com ALSO: Send any samples of your work that you’d like us to see.

Editorials The Secret Lives of Sheep ❚ by Stephen Hanna Features Editor

Ignoring my obvious prejudices against people from Freeport, it is a little known fact that I'm a Nassau boy, born and raised. Indeed, my faux-city heritage has omitted so many things that Family Islanders hold as “common knowledge”. For instance, one of my close friends started dating a sheep farmer’s daughter from a Long Island - how long could it be, I've never seen it? It’s not often I get to interact with country folk without the fear of legal entrapment, so I couldn’t wait to ask all the burning questions that I've always had about the interesting animals. My first question was pretty basic. “Under what circumstances is it appropriate to castrate a sheep?" I asked. The unsuspecting girl informed me that sheep’s are castrated several months prior to its consumption, because this somehow fattens the poor animal. I was puzzled. How does the loss of one’s genitalia make one fat? Maybe when they cut off the sheep's testicles not only does it save energy from not ever performing coitus again, but the poor ram goes into a horrible state of depression. Every night the tortured beast slumps down in front of his television and watches syndicated LifeTime episodes of Will & Grace till 3am, while crying over a tub of Häagen-Daz ice cream. Through his choked sobs, the sheep would probably mumble something like, "why won't you call me. I can totally see you over in Farmer O'Brien's field but were not talking… and as bad as I want to, I realize that you need

your space so…I'll give you your space." Damn, I miss her. Don’t get me wrong, the ram could very well be crying over another he sheep; Long Island is a progressive island. I'd like to believe that they'd accept a sheep - or goat for that matter - with an alternative life style. In my mind, Long Islanders would begrudge livestock just because the creature watches Twilight and has a poster of Wendy Williams in his bathroom. Just to be clear, that is what makes you gay, right; B-Movies and day-time television? The scenario begs a million other questions. Did the ram chose to be gay or was he born that way? After all, the mutilated animal wasn't born fatty and delicious, they cut his nuts off for that. Then comes the true burning question, which is tenderer: the hind quarters of homosexual sheep or that of heterosexual sheep? By this time, my friend's girlfriend had left the room. I tried to explain that none of this really matters as I am a vegetarian, but it was too late. I’m not really a vegetarian anyway, just didn't want to offend any gay sheep. It is a known fact that if you want to get anywhere in the wool industry you have to be friends with a couple sheep/goat lovers. I really wished that I hadn't pissed her off I still haven’t found out how political sheep are? How do they feel about the accusatory comparisons from the Wikipedia Marxist? In this Obama Era do the other sheep have a problem with black sheep? Due to inappropriate use of the phrase “sheep tongue”, the editor has omitted the last sentence of this editorial.


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The Spectrum- November 2011

SECURITY ACCUSED OF ASSAULT

❚ by Brittney Ambrister Contributing Writer

removed out of the library because a security officer said he was being disruptive. AN investigation has been launched into alThe altercation, which occured on October legations that security officers assaulted a stu- 4, became physical after Fowler was escorted dent at the library last month. out of the library. John Fowler, 18, a sophomore student, was Anastasia Forbes, counsellor at the College of the Bahamas, said: “I saw two security guards holding Fowler, so I made several appeals for them to let him go. “They probably saw me as an interference because they did not acknowledge me. Then a swarm of them came and hold him down while hitting him and he became outraged. I tried to diffuse the situation.” The altercation was videotaped by a student who was present at the scene. The video footage showed two security guards holding Fowler by his pants while he was trying to leave. In the footage, six security guards surrounded Fowler while two of them struck him in his back. Ms Forbes said: “The security officers need to be taught how to deal with conflicts. MajorCOB/ Stephen Hanna

A security officer going about his daily tasks.

SEE page 8

Student Email Upgraded STUDENT email received a significant up- new email account. grade this month. The college launched its To Access the Student Email: new server October 17. Accessible through Go to www.cob.edu.bs COB’s website, the upgrade will give students In the navigation on the left, under Log-on 10GB of email storage, increased from 20MB to: select WebMail: Students (Figure 1). per student. There is also an easier deletion example:jedoe123@cobmail.cob.edu.bs process and increased reliability, according to Your password remains the same. Click ‘Sign in’. The time-zone for The Bahamas is -5 GMT Eastern Time (US & Canada). Please ensure that your settings match those in Figure 2. Once settings are changed, click OK. The Microsoft Outlook Web App page will appear, providing access to your email.

Figure 1

administrators. The biggest change is the email address. Students will keep their usernames and passwords, but the domain has been switched to cobmail.edu.bs, instead of cob.edu.bs. Students can contact the technical support desk at 302-4588 or email ithelpdesk@cob.edu.bs. Below are instructions for access to your

Figure 2

Mould Madness

“...and knowing is half the battle.” -G.I. Joe

Top 10 Facts about Mould 1. there are more than 100,000 species of mould. Most types that are routinely found are not hazardous to healthy individuals. But too much exposure or certain types of mould could cause allergic reactions, asthma, rashes, respiratory complaints or other types of mold related illness. 2. there is no practical way to eliminate all mould and mould spores indoors. the way to control indoor mould growth is to control moisture. 3. If mould is a problem at home or in school, clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture. 4. Fix the water leak to prevent mould growth. 5. reduce indoor humidity (to 30%-60% ) to decrease mould growth. 6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mould growth. 7. Clean mould off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. absorbent materials like ceiling tiles, plasterboard or wood, may need to be replaced. 8. Prevent condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, pipes, exterior walls, roof or floors) by adding insulation. 9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting. 10. Moulds can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. there are moulds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet and foods.

Facts courtesy of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York City Health Department.

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THE STATE OF THE LIBRARY ❚ by Jasper Haeward Production Manager

THE Harry C Moore Library has been the center stage of numerous upsets between students and security staff, according to officials. Hundreds of students gather around the interior and exterior of the new structure every day, the majority of them socializing and, some of them, taunting the security guards. Senior Supervisor of Security, Talmadge Bethel, said: “The handbook stipulates that students can be suspended for being loud and making unnecessary noise in the library.” Bethel said many of the involved students do not realize the seriousness of their actions. “Every day, my staff brings me the names and ID copies of over 20 students for the SEE page 8

COB/ Stephen Hanna

A student following security procedures while entering the Harry C. Moore LIbrary


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The Spectrum- November 2011

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’m in my 3rd year here at COB and although there have been a number of improvements since I began, there are just as much faults. One of the biggest issues for me is the whole flooding thing. I understand that Nassau is a low lying area on the whole but does the college campus really have to look like Pinewood every time it rains? This is beginningto get really sickening for me. I’m a young lady who likes to be comfortable in slippers at school. But if everywhere I go is flooded I end up with my feet looking like I’ve been playing in the mud or my legs splattered in mud. And this walkway that started over a semester ago seems to be getting done piece by piece every three weeks. Please tell me, oh Carib, what am I to do? -Unhappy Junior

Dear Unhappy Junior, I understand your distress. I too get my legs wet when it rains to due my light wardrobe. But do you know that as a student you have a voice? What you should do is contact your COBUS representative, (there is one for each Major), and let them know your concern. I’m sure that as soon as students come together to voice our opinions, then we will start to see proper alleviation of this problem. And another thing, you should try and invest in a pair of sneakers because slippers won’t cut it all the time. I hope you don’t drive because that’s the first thing they tell you on the driving test. No SLIPPERS! -----------------I’ve had it about up to my neck with the harassment I receive from these security guards. Every time I go and come in this campus they want ID. Even when I go to McDonald’s or Wendy’s and return they ask me for it as if I didn’t have to walk pass them to

send your questions to: thecobcarib@gmail.com exit. They see us everyday! Our faces should be recognizable some kind of how. Help me Carib. Signed, Feeling like a criminal Dear Feeling like a criminal, Your concern is that of so many but I would have you to know that COB has in the past had many cases of outsiders coming in and harassing/assaulting/robbing students. This whole ID presentation at the gate is only a security measure to help protect you. The least you can do in appreciation is cooperate and have your ID easily accessible when time to present. Which do you prefer; being harassed by robbers or being asked to present an ID you paid for? Come on now, let’s be grateful. N.B. It is also part of the College policy for students and employees to have their identification visible at all times on campus, Security has authority to not only refuse you entrance but also escort you off campus if you refuse to show your identification. -----------HELP! Parking is ridiculous here. I find it nearly impossible to park around 10am or worse for 6pm classes. Several times I had to park my car outside the gate on the side of Tucker Road. What if someone was to break in or steal my car? COB has no responsibility fordamage to my vehicle, or so the sign says. What am I to do? Yours truly, Driving student Dear Driving Student, This is a problem that many had since the library took the space of the old parking lot. I understand that as well be-

cause I can never find anywhere to park my horse but this is an issue the Executive Board of The College is currently working on they just need everyone to be as patient as possible. Also if you park next to the gate on Tucker Road the security is right there within their proximity, so I highly doubt you’re going to have a problem. Of course if you want to make the situation a bit easier, try coming to school earlier to find a good parking space. -----------This library situation is ridiculous. The second floor is too loud at times. I like to see the librarian lady telling the kids to be quiet but why should she? We are all college students. When since did this turn into the National High School of the Bahamas? Sincerely, 20 Somthin' Year Old Dear 20 Somthin' Year Old, I totally agree with you. This is not a high school and students should know that the library is for QUIET study. What you should do whenever it gets intolerably loud is find the nearest security to control the noise. I’m sure they would be more than happy to escort those students to the nearest exit. Another thing you can do is tell all of your peers the meaning of having a quiet library. We all have to do our part and stop blaming the college for things that we can fix. --------I’m having guy problems. My boyfriend doesn’t seem to understand that I have to study for tests and other things while I’m in college. He keeps telling me how I don’t pay any attention to him while I’m in school. I

think I love him too much to leave him though. What should I do? Yours truly, Confused freshman Dear Confused Freshman, Don’t be a fool. If your boyfriend can’t understand that you have a goal of get-

ting a degree. Leave him. Easy fix. I always say college and relationships don’t mix. A lot of persons find their life partners here, you can always find another one who can understand what your trying to do and won’t distract you from that goal. Not saying that this is any of my busi-

ness but you should really consider what your future is like without an education with him or with an education and without your boyfriend. I’m no love doctor. I’m a realist. You came here to get an education. So do just that.


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The Spectrum- November 2011 simply means jeans and a tee. If you love fashion or just like looking good, you should wear presentable clothing! Don’t settle for boring and tasteless attire. Wear something unique and have fun with your wardrobe. Why bother having amazing clothes if you aren’t going to wear them? Choosing a daily outfit can enhance the quality of the time spent on campus. Most students are always subconsciously checking each

CoB Fashion ❚ by Jeroen Saunders Contributing Writer

SOME people think that because you’re in college - and no one is telling you what to wear - you should use the opportunity to wear nothing but sweatpants. It can be argued that sweatpants are easier to put on and more comfy than regular clothes, or that most college kids are hung over every morning and can’t be bothered to change out of their PJ’s to make it to class. The people that fall into this category usually drag themselves to class and immediately fall asleep, snoring loudly enough that they eventually wake themselves up. They probably smell bad, yawn a lot, and generally have no idea what’s going on. At the College of the Bahamas, you have at least one person like this in your class. Someone who feels that just “showing up” is good enough. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying students should spend hours getting ready every morning, or make fashion a number one priority; however, proper grooming is important. First impressions are lasting, and students should always get “dressed up” for class. Even if that

Comics

COB/ Jasper Haeward

other out on campus, but there is rarely any judgment. There is a possibility of criticism but compliments are sometimes handed out too! Everyone at the college dresses according to their individual style and schedule. The fall semester starts with the late summer heat and ends with the early winter's cold. As a result students tend to dress down for the heat SEE page 8

COB/ Jasper Haeward

❚ by Renbert Mortimer Contributing Artist

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Bring your comics to s3 or send them to thespectrum.cob@gmail.com


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FEaturEs

The Spectrum- November 2011

CommenCement: Coming to a DeCember near you! ❚ by Jasper Haeward Production Manager

D

Interview with College of the Bahamas President Betsy Boze

espite the formal use of her hyphenated last name, the president of the College of the Bahamas refers to herself as “Betsy Boze”. The Spectrum sat down with the cheerful and ambitious leader to get the scoop on current projects underway at COB. Students can look forward to new degree offerings, updated programs and a new cafeteria. The college hopes to open “Cool Spot!” – a new cafeteria - this semester. When classes are in session, the eatery will be open from 7am to 7pm Monday through Thursday, 7am to 2pm on Fridays, and 8am to 2pm on Saturdays. President Boze’s enthusiasm about the college and the academic future of all students is underscored by her optimistic personality, extensive portfolio and vast experience. She has lived in seven countries, including the US, before coming to the Bahamas: East and West Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, and Switzerland. At the University of Texas, she worked to develop TeleCampus, their distance learning program and online Masters degree that helped pave the way for distance education.

President Boze said: “This Fall, the college is beginning our second graduate program that is entirely ours, the Masters of Science degree in Reading as well as a Masters in Social Work with Barry University. “We have an extensive and exciting list of baccalaureate and masters degree program that we are developing this year that we expect to begin next year.” Existing programs will also be overhauled as the college works towards its goal to bring baccalaureate programs down to 120 to 124 credit hours. President Boze said: “This Spring we had to turn people away from Commencement, so we are exploring the possibility of reintroducing December Commencement. “Summer and Fall graduates won’t have to wait as long for commencement and graduates will be able to invite their entire family and friends.” At the onset of her post, President Boze said she outlined three initiatives that needed to be completed before the college could become a university. President Boze said each of the goals should be completed this year as the college has been making “excellent progress”.

❚ by Crestwill Farah

model Waris Dire, also participated. Resolutions were created in six key areas: the environment, politics, business, religion, healthcare and the media, and will act as a youth response to conferences such as the UN climate negotiations at Copenhagen Accord. The first day was filled with exploration and adventure despite sixteen hours of travel from Nassau to Philadelphia and then Zurich. The city seemed ergonomically designed to fit the needs of the people around it. Streets for vehicles, with tram tracks, bus lines and cycling lanes all running parallel to each other in

According to President Boze, all programs are scheduled for a comprehensive review, which will improve “the quality of instruction and the value of the degree”. The first group should be completed in December. The College is also forming partnerships with other colleges that we can look at and look up to towards our improvement and bring us closer to the much-sought-after status of the University of the Bahamas. “This will help us assess our needs, as well as how well we are doing, while comparing ourselves against colleges and universities that are similar to us, as well as those we want to be like. In addition to increased accreditation, the college is also working on the constitution of an academic senate. An academic senate serves as the administrative body of a university, and consists of members of the faculty from different units. President Boze explained that a senate would give the faculty a stronger voice in the management of the college. President Boze, a SCUBA Certified diver, said her biggest cultural challenge has been the heavy traffic. In order to cope with leaving

COB/ Tameka Lundy

President Boze

home at 6am, President Boze said she listens to audio books to pass the time. In an effort to make herself more accessible to the campus, President Boze has also opened up her office hours. Students can experience her contagious optimism on the first Friday morning of each month. “With 5,000 students and over 600 faculty and staff, there are a lot more students to meet and a lot of names to learn,” President Boze said. “I encourage students to come by and share with me whatever is on your mind.”

Five Flights & Six Trains Later... Contributing Writer

IN September of this year, I journeyed to Switzerland to represent The Bahamas at the 2011 One Young World Youth Summit. Held in Zurich, the summit brought together 1,300 young adults from 170 countries and was hosted by renowned leaders, including Nobel Peace Laureates Muhammad Yunus and Desmond Tutu. Nobel Prize Nominee Sir Robert “Bob” Geldof, and other renowned celebrities, including fashion designer Donna Karen, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver and super

(l to r) Rep. of Barbados, Crestwill Farah, Rep. of Jamaica at One Young World Youth Summit

a such a harmony that traffic is always at a constant flow with the exception of the occasional street light. The modernity of the city is masked by its old gothic style architecture, which tells the tales of a time long gone. The spirits of the past lingered in the many statues and building facades, allowing tourists to not only marvel at the city’s history, but interact with it. The opening day of the Summit was one filled with emotion and excitement as each country represented at the conference had a selected flag bearer. The large procession drew the attention of by standers, and many persons of different nationalities cheered for their country flag bearers. After a grand tour of the lake and country side, Geldof gave a stirring address. He encouraged young representatives to be challenge the idealsand procedures of older adults to become independent and innovative. The Crown Prince of Norway, Prince Haakon, also spoke to a select group of 40 delegates during a Global Dignity training session. The training sessiong was an unforgettable experience that took SEE page 8


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The Spectrum- November 2011

Did you know?

satisfactory” respectively, which is the grade for noncredit courses. • “AG” or “Aegrotat” is awarded to students who have finished most of a course but because of major illness can not complete it. • The academic requirement for Graduation is

• “BEHAVIOR that violates or shows a disregard for the rights of other members of the academic community and actions that endanger college property or persons on its various campuses” are two types of conditions that seriously breach the Code of Student Conduct within The College’s Handbook. • Translation: Even though students are considered adults and have free reign to exercise their rights, they still have the responsibility to abide by the rules and regulations of The College because an individual’s rights should never infringe on the rights of another person. Instances such as fights are prohibited on campus grounds. • Many students are familiar with symbols of grading such as A, B+ or C. However, what do symbols such as W, V, and S indicate? In reference to the Handbook, “W” – means “Withdrawal” and “reflects a stuCOB/ Jasper Haeward dent’s withdrawal from a course”. “V” is used for Course Exemptions and indicates that: “students must achieve a cumulative GPA when a student is excused from doing a certain of 2.00 and a specialization cumulative (that's course due to “prior knowledge or success in your Major courses) GPA of 2.00 or higher. In an internal examination or personal experi- addition, you must pass all courses in your ence” that would have been the basis of the field of study. Therefore, if one fails a subject, it must be re-taken in order to pass it, to be course. qualified for graduation. • “S” or “U” means a “satisfactory” or “un-

PrOFILE: GLENELLE SCANTLEBury

course, if you are: • Tardy for 25% of the class sessions by the mid-semester break. • Absent for 75% of the class sessions leading up to the mid-semester break.

❚ by Dawn McKenzie Contributing Writer

❚ by Renbert Mortimer COBUS President

Contributing Writer

did not have before, including the Internet Café, which is open twenty-four hours.” The Special Collection department, Ms Scantlebury said, is “the Bahamian Collection,” featuring books regarding Bahamians, written by Bahamians, and Bahamian Biographies. Ms Scantlebury’s hobbies include reading, watching dramas and travelling. She also enjoys various genres of music, including: jazz, RnB, “old school music”, and reggae. Ms Scantlebury goes to Evangelistic Temple, and said that her studies are demanding, and take up most of her time; however, on Sundays; she makes time for her family and church.

Part-Time Job Opportunity Education-based company is seeking to hire enthusiastic, energetic, fun-loving person who loves working with children and has access to transportation. Interested persons may call 3226201 for more details.

PreSidenT’S rePorT

❚ by Betty Sands GLENELLE Scantlebury has been working for The College of The Bahamas for 17 years. Now a senior library assistant in the Special Collections department, she started as a parttime clerk, in 1994, and became a full time employee in 1996. Ms Scantlebury has a degree in Library and Information Science, and is presently studying for her second degree in Management and Accounts in hopes of obtaining a management position in the future. The Harry C. Moore Library, which was officially opened on April 8, has around thirty staff members, and Ms Scantlebury said that the transition from the first library took approximately one month for completion. “I love my job and place of employment,” she said. “What I like about my job is the interaction with patrons. The more I assist them with research, the more knowledge I gain. “Moving into this new building, gives me a feeling of awe, Ms Scantlebury added. “It is nice to know that we have such a beautiful edifice, with different areas that we

• What is the difference between full-time and part-time students? • Full-time students can register for a minimum of 12 credits to a maximum of 18 credits per semester (fall & spring), whereas part-time students may only register for a maximum of 9 credits per semester (fall & spring). • A lecturer can have you evicted from their

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THE College of the Bahamas Union of Students (COBUS) has received many complaints by the college students: the conditions of the T Block, the recent flooding in the H block, T block, CHMI and B block; the lack of customer service by a few members of College administration and the ever-growing concerns with the level of professionalism and respect from the campus security. The Union of Student is not deaf to your concerns and we are continually working to address your issues. We encourage all students to hold us accountable to our promises. Keep us informed and continue to voice your opinions; and together, we can work with the college to find solutions to the issues we are faced with. As we process your comments and complaints, we want to inform the campus that there are proactive networks for your enjoyment and growth. While you are waiting for your ride home, visit the Campus Life Department. There are many clubs and organizations on campus looking for new leadership. Visit the International Relations and Graduates Program office to visit a foreign country. Enhance your natural writing skill with the student government’s e-newsletter, or the newsletter

Classifieds

$10 for Students $15 for Non-COB Affiliations Call us: (242) 302-4483 thespectrum.cob@gmail.com See Page 2 for Campus Locations found at www.cobusthread.info; or simply join the campus newspaper. Help other students by volunteering as a peer mentor, new student orientation leader or peer tutor. There are so many ways to be active and it begins with just one visit to the offices in the Student Union Building (SUB). We encourage students to join us for International Free Hugs Day, or stay vigilant for the campus pillow fight, Traffic Jams or other events held Thursday 2:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. The Union of Students is not only made up of elected officers, we all are CARIBS. Let us all work together to create a better campus. Follow us on facebook or visit our website cobusbahamas.com. My office is open every day from 8am until 1.30pm and feel free to stop me on campus. This administration believes that listening to and spending time with students are the keys to creating a better college experience.


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The Spectrum- November 2011

students voice their concerns at general assembly

COB/ Jasper Haeward

FROM page 1 Stories of stolen cars from the student parking lot, on campus robberies, unfair expulsions from the library, and accusations of sexual assault/harassment poured in, all culminating with the retelling of an alleged beating of a student earlier that day by College Security. Usain Bailey, a second year Bio/Chem Major, said he was prompted to attend the assebly after he witnessed the skirmish. Bailey said: "There should be a criteria for security guards, not just random people who fit the physical appearance of a security, but some one who has the intellect to know how to manage certain situations.” When asked if the forum had restored his faith in the college's security, Bailey said he was not reassured by the response from the Adminstrative representative panel. "Until I see something done where certain security guards are removed or certain security guards are put on suspension. I’m not gonna be satisfied until I see something drastic happen." Shomekhan Cargill, a third year Small Is-

land Sustainability major, echoed similar sentiments. Cargill said: "I feel that there was a lot of curtailing around, especially from the security officer. There is a lot of promise of ‘we're going to look into it’, but I don't see any concrete or tentative action plans being given to the students." Cargill said he does not place the weight of the College's issue solely on the shoulders of the Administration. Based on his observation of the students at the assembly, he said students need to know more about their rights and obligations at the College. Cargill said: "[Students] shared a lot of opinions and a lot of it is correct but some things I feel they need more substantial evidence on and a more realistic vision on how the Administration can help them." Although the majority of the panel time was spent on security issues, other issues were also brought to Administration's attention. Mia Moss, a third year Accounting major, said her main concern was the frequency certain core classes were offered and how this effects matriculation. Although a seperate issue,

Mia’s expectations reflected the feelings of many students in attendance, who were doubtful of the responses offered by the panel. Like Cargill, Moss admitted that all the blame could not be placed on the Administration members present. She said: "I believe that the panel tried to answer their questions as best as they could, but it was mostly referring us back to the policies, which we should as student read". Despite assurances that student concerns would be reviewed expiditiously, many students were skeptical of potential solutions. Cargill said: "It is what I expected, but I feel that more administration should have been represented at the assembly."

COB/ Jasper Haeward

COLLEGE STEPS UP CAMPUS MOULD FIGHT FROM page 1 some in the T-Block, but basically the mold is in offices and the auditorium." Ms Wallace said: "We regularly shampoo carpets and scrub floors to keep spores down and once an area is treated we remove the affected tiles. In [Portia Smith building], every office on every floor is treated every month. This is much higher than normal but it is done to keep the environment at safe levels. Even though it may look gruesome, we treat and disinfect all surfaces."

Last year, staff at the Portia Smith building were temporarily relocated due to health concerns raised by the Bahamas Public Services Union over the mold infestation. Earlier this year, the college confirmed mould infestation at the $28 million Harry C Moore Library and Information Centre. Ms Wallace explained the infestation was caused by a faulty air conditioning unit, which has since been repaired. Ms Wallace said: "We have persons complaining that they are getting sick but [according to experts] it's just pyschological. You can

treat [mould] and still have dark spots, that doesn't mean the mould is present or alive. It's subconscious, we see the dark spot and think we're getting sick. We had a study done the mould is at unharmful levels." Sheryl Simms, vice president Finance, was not in office at the time of publication, and as a result the full independent report could not be released to the Spectrum. The Department of Environmental Health also conducted an investigation this month; however the findings were not complete at the time of publication.

THE STATE OF THE LIBRARY

FROM page 3 same problem,” Bethel said, “I advise all students to read the handbook to know their rights, to protect themselves.” Late September, there was an incident where a male student was escorted from the library by security guards for disturbing the peace. A few days earlier, security guards cleared the library using the alarms. In respect to the incident that occurred between security staff members and a male student on October 13th, Talmadge said: “These things happen when security and students fail to understand their roles and the policies of the school. Read the handbook, arm yourselves with knowledge, and get your education.” The handbook can be downloaded or read on COB’s website at http://www.cob.edu.bs/DOCS/StudentHandbook2011.pdf.

assault claims FROM page 3 ity of them lack training and it was apparent today because this was really unacceptable.” Renbert Mortimer, president of the College of the Bahamas Union of Students said: “A counsellor was on scene and she asked for the situation to be diffused but securities did not heed that warning. If there was an opportunity to diffuse it and you had a counsellor who was asking for it to stop why that mechanism wasn’t taken place. Additionally if he was escorted out of the library the objective has been completed.” Police officers were called to the campus because of the escalation of the altercation. Director of Security, Wellington Francis said: “If the facts are told and the actions of the securities are contrary to what we are told there will definitely be consequences.”

the spectrum wants you! As we plan for more issues each month, we’re looking to expand our team! Come in to the student office or our advisor’s office, and we’ll be glad to help you out. Our meetings are Thursdays 2 to 4pm in CHMI 147.


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PhOtOS FLOODING!

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The below featured photos were taken at various sites on the Oakes Field Campus on October 4. See the next issue of The Spectrum to get the full story on why the campus floods.

Photography by Jasper Haeward

Acting with Dr. Wisdom ❚ by Jasper Haeward Production Manager

College of the Bahamas Media Department teamed up with Dr. Keith Wisdom, the Director of Cable 12 to bring the first acting workshop to some of the students in Media Journalism. Organized by Hugo Zárate, who also supervised the Short Film Festival earlier this year, the workshop was an incentive to encourage more students to participate in

the school’s film festival. “I would like all students to participate in this,” Zárate said, “With Media Journalism students at the forefront so we can make this into something big.” One of the students, Brittney Ambrister, said: “It was awesome, and I hope Dr Wisdom does another one really soon.” Another workshop is in its planning stages.

Photography by Hugo Zárate


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10 The Spectrum- November 2011 Super Awesome Movie Stuff ❚ by Nathan Rolle Contributing Writer

“I don’t sit in when you do your dirt, I don’t carry a gun, I drive.” - Drive Drive is an artistic action-drama that satisfies the hunger of movie lovers who are tired of the same over-intense action movie with no intriguing story. A Hollywood stunt driver that works as a wheelman finds out that there is a contract out for him after a heist gone wrong. He becomes the hero of a family that he gets attached to and drives to re-pay their debts. Don’t let the title and trailers you may have seen fool you. While drive is an action movie, it is more of an art-house style movie with a few great action sequences throughout. That being said, who wouldn’t love to see a guy’s head get bashed open in slow motion while opera music plays? The main actor Ryan Gosling does a great job, being frightening as a gruesome killer, but modest enough to be a loving guy. You want to applaud when he overcomes over his at-

COB Fashion FROM page 5 and dress up for the cold. Leggings and skinny jeans can be seen all over campus, and this trend has become a staple in the college wardrobe. When juggling projects and materials, the form-fitting bottoms are low-maintenance and much easier to manage than skirts. Ashley Watson, a business major, said: "When the wind is blowing and I'm carrying a hand full of books, a dress is nothing for me to wear."

FEaturEs

tackers and you wish you were as ‘bad ass’ as he is. The drama and pace of the movie is what catches some viewers off guard. It starts with intense action sequences that excite you then slowly coasts you along with the right amount of fun bumps along the way. The action and gore is truly epic and the dramatic parts can be felt rather than just viewed. The plot of the movie isn’t the most original but it is well manipulated into an intricate story. It does not insult your intelligence but trusts that you will grasp key concepts and hidden agendas. Though it isn’t nearly as deeply engaging as Inception, you will find yourself simply enjoying events as they tie into each other. I doubt this film can be topped by the end of this year. You will be hearing about this one for a long time. I give it an 8.5/10. If you have not seen it, see it now. Driver will know if you don’t, and with him its always “Get in, get out, get away”. Tees, jerseys, and cargo pants are standard school gear for an average male student at COB. Skinny jeans are also a growing trend for guys on campus, albeit controversial. Worried that he'd look silly in them, Jason Sands, an art major, said he needed a little inspiration before rocking “skinnies” around campus. After he noticed the style being worn by slender guys in the music scene and even more muscular men, he decided to take the plunge. "I thought it was solid," said Sands, 20, who bought his first pair last year. "It feels very comfortable after a while." Sands now owns nine snug denims and said

they're not as constrictive as they appear. After all, he can still make creative art pieces in them. Another category in the college fashion scene are the athletes, whom you are able to scout all around the college. Wearing team gear sets athletes apart from the student body as there are a variety of clothing for practices, games and campus life. There are also a few Phi Beta Sigma brothers who wear their fraternity colors everyday as a symbol of loyalty. Dressed in blue, these students often wear black boots and jeans, with a fraternity hooded jacket. COB’s “dress code” is based on the theory

that selecting appropriate attire for specific occasions and utilizing socially acceptable behavior are critical factors in the total educational process. Most of the time, a pair of jeans and a basic top are all a student needs. If you want to wear something more interesting, go for it! Express yourself through fashion and show off the clothes you love. Have fun with it and just “do you”! What do you wear to class? What counts “dressing up”, and what doesn’t?

Five Flights & Six Trains Later

Left: Crestwill with the representative from the Arab Emirates; Right: Crestwill and other international representatives at OYW

FROM page 6 place at the Zurich International School. The first three plenary sessions brought in CEOs of multi-national corporations, environmental activists and religious leaders to speak on global business, the environment and interfaith dialogue. Speaking on interfaith relations, I discussed with colleagues that although The Bahamas is considered a traveler’s paradise, we have problems as well. While we cannot compare our problems to the religious wars going on around the world today, we still have issues to address. The philosophy that I adopted was that the religion of another should not matter, instead we should appreciated the similarities and respect the differences. The final day gave birth to many world changing initiatives with non-governmental organisations and projects springing up every-

where. China was working with England, South Africa with The Bahamas, India with Peru, all in hopes of making a difference in the world. Delegates were also able to have some fun after all the hard work by going a to a dance club. After a wonderful experience in Zurich, I journeyed by train to Geneva which was an even more rich experience of Swiss culture. I then spent a day in Konstanz, Germany which boasts breath taking views of a lake at sunset. From Germany, it was back to Zurich and then another train ride to Paris, France. After several amazing days in France, it was time for more gruesome train hours back to Zurich, where I spent one more day and then started my twenty six hour journey home. Five flights and six trains later a journey that would last a life time in memory completed.


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Sports sNAPSHOTS

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1. The Caribs: soccer team.

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2. Spot me! Students flaunt their muscles in last semester’s strongman competition. 3. Take the shot! A referee oversees an intramural basketball game on the Oakesfield campus court.

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COB/ Office of Communications

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4. Who says we don’t have a league? Training for the next season of men’s football. 5. The men’s soccer team going hard in practice. 6. The women’s soccer team: the Lady Caribs

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7. The intramural basketball team with their winnings 8. Intramural women’s softball practice

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The Spectrum- November 2011

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Intramurals in the Air! ❚ by Simba French Sports Editor

COB

MyErs after her record-breaking jump. Image courtesy COB

Featured Athlete: Tamara Myers ❚ by Simba French Sports Editor

J

une 24, 2011 will always be a special day for Tamara Myers. It’s the day she broke the junior triple jump record at Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) Nationals in Grand Bahama. Myers, a member of the College of the Bahamas (COB) track and field team, holds the record at 12.90 meters. Her jump broke the previous record - held by Keythra Richards by .17 metres. “I was happy and overwhelmed with joy,” the second year accounts major said of the new record. Originally from North Andros, Myers said her success is a silver lining compared to last year's disappointment of not making the national team. For those aspiring to achieve Myers’ accolades, the focused athlete said it takes hard work and determination to maintain a career. “I attended the gym on Mondays and Wednesdays and I attended jumping practice Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays,” she said. “I remained committed to my training, drank

my dietary supplements, took my vitamins and remained mentally focused on working hard and jumping far.” In an interview with The Spectrum, she advised younger athletes to stay focused and committed to their goals. She told them to “take it one step at a time, there’s no need to rush” and urged them to prepare themselves mentally and physically because that's what determines a true champion. Her biggest goal is to represent the Bahamas at the Olympics. Myers attributed her success to the widespread support she has received throughout her career. Along with her jumping coaches Peter Pratt and Antonio Saunders, Myers also worked out in the gym with Bradley Cooper at COB. She also gave special mention to Kimberley Rolle, family and friends from Andros, the North Andros High School Seminoles, and COB's track and field team. Myers has been competing for the Bahamas since 2007 when she entered the CARIFTA games in Turks and Caicos. She credits her start in the sport to coach Gonzalo Caine. After her studies at home, Myers hopes to attend the University of Arkansas.

Soccer Update: On October 8th and 9th, the men’s and women’s soccer teams played and lost to Ave Maria, Johnson & Wales, and Florida Memorial. We would like to congratulate both teams for their diligent efforts in the sport.

IT is hoped that more female students will participate in sports events this semester, says Sean Bastian, head of Intramural Sports at COB. The department kicked off its five-on-five basketball tournament at the Oakes Field campus on September 15. Its goal is to provide friendly and competitive activities for college students through sports or recreation. Bastian said this year’s events will remain unchanged. Feature events will include bowling, ultimate board games, co-ed softball, co-ed volleyball and flag football. He said the challenges to the event are securing officials, and inclement weather. “The real challenge is weather, the rain and wind, because all of the outdoor events to be postponed. Trying to find officials for the events is a challenge and I would like for

students with expertise in certain events to volunteer.” To combat the weather elements, Bastian said he longs to hold these events in a recreational gym. “The events held indoor, which would increase the participation from the student body," he said. “Last year went extremely well and female teams were a plus.” One of his long-term goals is to have the teams compete on an international stage with other colleges. “I would also like to see COB's intramural teams compete against other intramural teams in the United States of America." Trophies and medals are given to the winners and runners-up in each event. Interested persons can sign up at Bastian's office in the Wellness Centre, where they can apply to add another event to the intramural scene.

COB/ Sean Bastian

Volleyball Season! upcoming Games: Date

Time Game

Sunday, October 23, 2011

3.30 p.m.

C.O.B. Caribs Technicians

Sunday, October 30, 2011

3.30 p.m.

Cougars vs. C.O.B. Caribs

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 7.30 p.m.

vs. Lady

C.O.B. Caribs vs. Titans

Sunday, November 13, 2011

3.30 p.m.

Cougars vs. C.O.B. Caribs

Sunday, November 20, 2011

3.30 p.m.

C.O.B. Caribs vs. Vixens

Friday, November 25, 2011

7.30 p.m.

C.O.B. Caribs vs. Truckers


The Spectrum- November 2011