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Bloomington South Optimist Newspaper

Maggie Hopkins Staff Writer

ELI STIDD When she’s not on DragonVale, teacher Susie Shelton uses her new iPad for reading online editions of newspapers and accessing articles for her AP class.

Technology:

Is cheer a real sport? Pg 4,5

During class at the beginning of this year, students in one of Susie Shelton’s language classes were interrupted by an alert coming from Shelton’s new iPad. She uses this device for a personal hobby of hers: playing on the app, DragonVale. “Yes, I will be outed as a DragonVale lover,” said Shelton. “I actually just got a blue moon dragon! It’s pretty exciting.” In this app, you can raise dragons and create your own dragon parks. The alert during class was to let her know that one of her dragons was done hatching. Although Shelton is yet to find any good ways to incorporate using this new device into her teaching, her and other teachers in the school corporation are in the process of learning how to do so. This year at South, and at all other MCCSC schools, iPads have been introduced into the curriculum by giving one to each teacher. Not only do classrooms now have Smartboard’s in them, but also iPads to be used for lessons and teaching. For MCCSC teachers, receiving iPads is just the first step. “The plan we put out about a year ago to the school board is a project that will eventually end up with every student having their own iPad to use in school,” said MCCSC Coordinator for Instructional Technology, Terry Daugherty. By next August, half of all MCCSC high schools should have carts of iPads to use in class. This program of integrating carts of iPads into classrooms will continue to grow

Changing

for the next three to three-and-a-half years, at which point the vision is that all students would have their own personal iPad for school use. “One of the main goals was to give teachers the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the iPad before students have them in the classroom,” said Seth Pizzo, the technology coordinator at South. “Teachers need some time to become comfortable with the technology and make some preliminary plans for integrating the technology into their curriculum.” According to Pizzo, South is scheduled to receive between 10 to 12 classroom sets of iPads this coming Jan. There are no exact plans yet for which classrooms will be getting the sets.

“The long-term goal is to continue to add iPads until there are enough to issue one to each student,” said Pizzo. There are many educational apps and programs that can be used on iPads that have the potential to make school more meaningful and engaging for students. Teachers have already been using their devices in different ways that suit their classroom needs. “Right now, I mainly use it for communications and e-mail so I don’t have to be stuck at my desk,” said South chemistry and Physics teacher, Cara McClincy. “It works great for taking attendance.” McClincy also uses her iPad to access the online edition of her textbooks instead of carrying around the heavy paper See iPad Invasion Pg. 6

public education over time

1890

The Horn Book*

1850

Chalk and slate

1890

Pencil

The Horn Book was a piece of wood enscribed with the alphabet and religous verses. Students practiced writing by copying the text onto pieces of paper.

1930

1950

Overhead projectors

Handheld calculator

1980

Plato computer

2010

Apple iPad

Images for this infographic came from Eudemic


Optimist Issue #1