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SUMMER GUIDE

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011

SUMMER GUIDE 2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS Safe Boating..........................................................................Page 4 How to Enliven Your Outdoor Entertaining ..........................Page 5 Cruising Remains an Affordable Vacation ..............................Page 6 Make You Family Camping Trip a Success ............................ Page 7 July Calendar of Events..........................................................Page 8 Tips for a Festive 4th of July Party ......................................Page 12 Backyard Barbecue Safety....................................................Page 13 Kids Outdoor Fun................................................................Page 14 How to Improve Air Quality ................................................Page 15 Fighting Insects the Eco-Friendly Way ................................Page 17 Keeping Pets Comfy in Warm Weather................................Page 20 August Calendar of Events ..................................................Page 23 Reducing Cooling Costs ......................................................Page 27 Regional Calendar of Events ................................................Page 28 Protection from Pool Chemicals ..........................................Page 32 Perennials are a Gardener’s Friend ......................................Page 33 How to Survive the Summer Heat ......................................Page 35


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SUMMER GUIDE

SAFE BOATING Saves E ve ry year, recreational boaters take to the waterways to soak up some sun and have fun on the wa t e r. Too often, however, recreational boating trips turn t ra g i c, resulting in injury or even death. According to the United States Coast Guard, in 2009 there were more than 4,700 recreational boating accidents. Those accidents invo l ved nearly 750 deaths. Perhaps most telling, only 14 percent of those deaths occurred on boats where the operator had received boating safety instruction. The importance of precautionary measures when boating is immeasurable, and boaters should heed the following safety advice whenever taking to the water, be it in the ocean or on a nearby lake or river. ❂ Enroll in a boating skills course. Technology is forever advancing, and boating technology is not immune. Those new to boating should take a safety course before the sailing season begins. Even veteran sailors would be wise to take a boating skills and safety course at least every few years. This can help refresh their memory and keep boaters abreast of the latest technology. Volunteer organizations, including the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, U. S. Powe r Squadron, and others sponsor many courses, and many state boating agencies also p r ovide classes. To learn more, visit www.uscgboating.org. ❂ Be mindful of the weather. Driving in bad weather can be dangerous, but boating in bad weather can prove fatal. Be especially mindful of the weather when planning a boating trip. The National Weather Service provides daily boating reports as well as forecasts for the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and the Gulf of Mexico. Sailors should consult these reports before leaving the dock. ❂ Make sure all boat passengers know how to swim. Surviving a capsized boat is never easy, but it's nearly impossible for passengers who don't know how to swim. Make sure all passengers know how to swim before heading out to sea. If it's been awhile since you have taken to the water, refresh your memory with a swimming course and

Lives make sure passengers are physically capable of swimming. ❂ Do not consume alcohol while operating a boat. The USCG notes that alcohol is the leading contri bu ting factor in fatal boating accidents. Sixteen percent of boating deaths listed alcohol use as the leading contributor. Just because you're on the water does not mean laws no longer apply. It's illegal to operate a boat under the influence of alcohol, not to mention considerably unsafe. Passengers might not know the first thing about operating a boat, so skippers must maintain their sobriety in the case of an accident or a mechanical problem. ❂ Stock up on life jackets. One size does not fit all when it comes to life jackets. Adult-sized life jackets, for example, will not work for children. A child's life jacket should fit snugly and not allow the child's chin or ears to slip through. Test all life jackets for wear and buoyancy at least once per year, and discard any life jackets that are waterslogged, leaky or faded. Keep extra life jackets aboard just to be safe. ❂ P rotect yo u rself and passenge rs from carbon monoxide. Exposure to CO is possible inside and outside the boat. Install a CO detector on the boat and maintain it properly, including checking it before sailing season begins to make sure it's still functioning properly. It's especially important to protect yourself and your passengers from CO, as the symptoms of CO exposure are similar to those of seasickness and alcohol intoxication. But prolonged exposure to low concentrations of CO or quick exposure to high concentrations can be fatal. ❂ Don't allow swimmers near the boat's exhaust pipe. Part of the fun of sailing is allowing passengers to take a dip or a swim when the boat has stopped mov i n g . However, never let swimmers swim or wade near the engine's exhaust pipe. Exhaust from a boat's engine can be a deadly source of CO. Keep swimmers in sight at all times. To learn more about boating safety, visit www.uscgboating.org.

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How To Enliven Your Outdoor Entertaining Outdoor get-togethers typically make for memorable affairs. Be it a picnic in the park, a backyard barbecue or a tailgate in the parking lot at the big game, fresh air always seems to add more fun to the festivities. As fun as such soirees can be, hosts and guests alike know there's no limit to the fun that can be had when getting together with friends and family for some outdoor revelry. Hosts hoping to enliven their outdoor entertaining can employ the following tips and let the good times roll! ☛ Take the indoors outside. Hosting a party indoors certainly has its advantages, not the least of which is the host of amenities a home's interior boasts that the backyard and the local beach simply can't offer. The Best of Times Bar & Entertainment Center (www.bestoftimesusa.com) enables hosts to set up a bar for guests within minutes. Easily set up anywhere in less than five minutes, this patented, professional-quality bar enables hosts to bring the fun of the family bar outdoors. Designed to fit in the width of a parking s p a c e, the Best of Times Bar & Entertainment Center won't take up much space, leaving precious room for the all-

important Wiffle ball games and backyard badminton battles. Each L-shaped unit features four padded barstools, an optional side table and a UV protected umbrella that won't fade in the sun. Made with durable countertops, each bar includes a bar-level shelf, ample storage and a drop-in waterproof cooler that keeps as many as 18 cans or bottles icy cold. ☛ Make it a musical affair. Music often sets the tone for a party, whether that party takes place inside or outside. Hosts should choose music that lightens the mood and encourages guests to relax. When hosting a backyard barbecue, encourage guests to bring their own instruments and, if any friends or family members are in a band, invite the band over to perform. Though public parks and beaches might frown on loud music, bring an acoustic guitar along and keep things low key. If the party is aligned with a specific holiday like Independence Day, be sure to include some patriotic tunes in the evening's playlist. ☛ Give the festivities a theme. Hosts can set their soiree apart from other gatherings by choosing a theme for their next outdoor

party. Easily customized with interchangeable image wraps to match any decor, The Best of Times Bar & Entertainment Center can fit right in with any party theme. When hosting a themed party, encourage guests to get in the spirit of things by wearing theme-appropriate attire. For instance, when hosting a summertime luau, dress up the Bar & Entertainment Center with a beachside tiki decor and encourage guests to wear their favorite Hawaiian shirts. ☛ Become the talk of the tailgate. Few activities are as fun as the pregame tailgate in the parking lot before the big game. Veteran sports fans know a good tailgate is more than just a place to gather before the game. A tailgate is a great opportunity to meet fellow fans and express your love for the team. The Best of Times Bar & Entertainment Center takes that one step further for football fans determined to show just how much they love their favorite team. Fans can now celebrate the exploits of their favorite gridiron greats by decorating their portable bar and entertainment center with any of 32 custom NFLdesigns. What's more, the entire system fits in a wheeled bag that's easy to transport, ensuring everyone can

When the weather warms up, party hosts can easily transform their patio into party central.

still fit in the car and catch the big game in person. Once your tailgate becomes the talk of the parking lot, consider adding additional barstools for all those new friends as well as the side table, which makes a great place to prepare and display all that delicious BBQ. ☛ Set up for safety. While outdoor gatherings are all about fun, hosts should always remember to keep the safety of their guests in mind. Encourage guests to choose designated drivers and be sure to have the phone numbers of local taxi companies nearby in case any guests need a lift home at the end of a fun night.


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SUMMER GUIDE

Cruising Remains an Affordable Vacation What's an all-inclusive vacation that enables individuals to see many sights without having to step too far from their comfortable quarters? Cruising, of course. Individuals on fixed incomes, such as couples just starting out in life, students and seniors often find that cruising is the ideal vacation for many reasons. Cost is often one of the top reasons for taking a cruise. Although the average cruise may be roughly $2,000 per couple, that cost encompasses most activities, accommodations, food and beverages (outside of alcohol) and plenty of onboard entertainment. It may be difficult to find a similar scope of activities for that price in another vacation. Vacation trends indicate that roughly 34 million passengers take a cruise holiday each year, spending upwards of $60 billion annually. A large number of cruise vacationers are seniors. Why do seniors find cruising so enticing? Here are a number of reasons. • Costs known in advance: Unlike other vacations that require pay-as-you-go, cruisers typically know about all costs in advance of their trip. This means they can budget exactly what is needed for the cruise. • Flexible pricing: Individuals have a wide selection of rooms to choose from, which can vary greatly in cost. Staterooms with

balconies or suites may be at the top of the budget, while interior rooms that don't offer an outside view will be the cheapest. • Convenience: U n l i ke some vacations, cruising only requires packing and unpacking twice with the possibilities of visiting multiple ports of call. Plus, it's less likely luggage will be lost on a cruise than it is when traveling by air. • Safety: Everything is self-contained on a cruise -- it's a floating mini-city. Medical care, security, food, shopping, dining, and the like are available in safe locations. For travelers who are wary of ve n t u ring into strange areas, cruising offers peace of mind. • Known itinerary: For vacationers who just want to unpack and relax without having to plan their entire vacation, cruising is ideal. Cruise directors can help vacationers pack their schedule or fly by the seat of their pants without a schedule. • Variety of food: Instead of having to choose among restaurants or facing unfamiliar flavors when vacationing, cruisers can simply take their pick from an abundance of popular foods -- many of which are all-youcan-eat. • Easier travel: Depending on a country's specific regulations, some international cruisers are not required to carry a passport,

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 | METRO NEWS SERVICE

which saves on additional travel costs. Plus, travelers simply arrive at the terminal and set sail instead of having to catch taxis, buses and the like to make a flight. • Social experience: Because many cruisers are thrown together at dinnertime or come upon each other poolside, it's easy to Flexible pricing and convenience are two of the most attractive aspects of booking a cruise..

strike up friendships with like-minded travelers. Cruising remains one of the more popular vacation options for seniors and many others. With cruises occurring all around the world most of the year, it's possible to visit a port of call that interests just about anyone.


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Make your family camping trip a success Family vacations are a tradition for millions of families across the globe. Such vacations have declined in number over the last several years, when many families were forced to cut expenses in the midst of a struggling economy.

which gear is necessary for the trip, and families might want to avoid campgrounds that are frequented by rain. Adults might be able to cope with a rainstorm or two, but such conditions may make everyone miserable.

Though the economy has gradually begun to rebound, families with fresh memories are still reticent to commit to costly vacations. One of the more affordable and familyfriendly vacation options is camping. Families get the chance to experience some of nature's most idyllic settings at a fraction of the cost of expensive resort vacations. But before venturing out in the great outdoors, a family should consider the following tips to ensure their camping vacation is a swimming success.

★ Find an activity-friendly campground. When looking for a campground, look for one that boasts a lot of activities. Adults might enjoy the simple relaxation of camping, but kids will likely need more to do. Look for a campground that can offer activities the children will like, such as hiking, kayaking, rafting, or even mountain biking.

★ Research the weather. Before choosing a campsite, get a firm grasp of what to expect from Mother Nature while you're there. Research weather patterns and how much the weather can vary during the time of year when you will be vacationing. Does the weather fluctuate significantly during the daytime and nighttime hours? Is rain likely or u n l i kely? Weather conditions will dictate

★ Determine who you are as campers. Not all campers enjoy the rustic life of camping. Some need to combine camping with the amenities of modern life, including running water and toilets that flush. Campers should be honest with themselves in regards to their needs in amenities when researching campgrounds. If you and your family will need a shower, consider renting an RV for the trip or choose a campground with access i ble showers and restrooms. Veteran campers might scoff at such amenities, but families would likely prefer some combina-

tion of roughing it in the wild and modern day living. ★ Get the right gear. Entry to many campgrounds is free or nearly free. However, camping gear could cost money. The good thing about camping gear is it's reusable. If this year's camping trip is a success, then next year's trip won't cost nearly as much. Visit a local camping store and explain your situation, including what you hope to get out of the camping trip and where you'll be heading. An associate should be able to help you find the right gear for your trip, including a tent, lights, a water filter, cooking materials, and inflatable mattresses. The materials needed for a successful camping trip are many, but again these materials are reusable and can last a lifetime if families choose the right gear. ★ Stock up on the essentials. Once you have purchased the right gear, don't forget to stock up on the other essentials. Pa rticularly during the wa rmer months, campgrounds can be very hot and insects abound. Be sure to bring adequate amounts of sunscreen and bug spray and apply each liberally every day. Even if the sky is over-

A family-friendly campground with plenty of activities for kids to have fun and make new friends often makes the ideal location for a family camping trip.

cast, apply sunscreen to avoid painful sunburn. Other essentials include toilet paper (bring more than you expect to use), bottled water, plates and utensils, and garbage bags. Be sure to bring extra garbage bags to avoid littering in the campground. ★ Don't forget to have fun. Families should emphasize having fun when visiting the campground. Because camping is not a resort-style vacation, it's up to Mom and Dad to entertain the kids. Bring along a guitar for a campfire sing-a-long, and pack a few board games the family can enjoy under the stars at night. If a nearby park is known for being especially family-friendly, consider it as a campsite. Kids might meet fe l l ow campers their own age and make some new friends.


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JULY CALENDAR FRIDAY, JULY 1 Music ■ Mike Cavalier | 9 p.m., The Cellar, Market Street, Corning. Activities ■ “Old Cookie Shop” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ 21st Annual Antique Tractors and Engines Working for the Muscular Dystrophy Association | 7 a.m., State Route 14, between Montour Falls and Millport. Displays, parade, auction, food, music, kids’ activities. 535-2261. ■ Summer Used Book Sale | 9 a.m.noon, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Cusick Room, 555 St. Joseph’s Blvd., Elmira.

SUMMER GUIDE Proceeds to benefit the hospital. 7377819. ■ Yard and Bake Sale | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Oliver House Museum, 107 Chapel St., Penn Yan. 536-7318. ■ EastSide Market | 3-6 p.m., Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa. Kids’ activities ■ Worldwide Trivia Challenge | 3:305 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Teens and tweens. 936-3713.

SATURDAY, JULY 2 Activities ■ “Old Cookie Shop” | See July 1st. ■ 21st Annual Antique Tractors and Engines Working for the Muscular Dystrophy Association | See July 1st Kids’ activities ■ Family Movie Matinee: “Gnomeo and Juliet” | 12:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Free. 936-

3713, Ext. 503.

SUNDAY, JULY 3 Music ■ Distilled | 4-8 p.m., Captain Bill’s patio, 1 N. Franklin St., Watkins Glen. ■ Bruce Holler | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, 9301 County Route 76, Hammondsport. Activities ■ 21st Annual Antique Tractors and Engines Working for the Muscular Dystrophy Association | See July 1st

MONDAY, JULY 4 Music ■ KapEye | 2-6 p.m., Switzerland Inn, 14109 Keuka Village Road, Hammondsport. Activities ■ Fourth of July Fireworks | Dusk, Corning Memorial Stadium, Corning. ■ 68th annual Fly-In, Drive-In Breakfast | 6-11:30 a.m., Penn Yan Airport, 2487 Old Bath Road, Penn Yan. $8, children $4. www.pennyanflyingclub.com

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 TUESDAY, JULY 5 Music ■ Hepcats Big Band | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ Farmers’ market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats. Kids’ Activities ■ Dancing Around the World | 6:307:30 p.m., Big Flats Library, 21 Canal St., Big Flats. 562-3300.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 6 Music ■ Dr. Colin Marcus | 6:30 p.m., Bethany Village, 3005 Watkins Road, Horseheads. Free, bring a lawn chair. ■ Twin Tiers Idol | 7 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. Free, public welcome. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com Kids’ activities ■ Little Gather: Glenn Colton America the Beautiful Sing-Along | 11 a.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. Free, public welcome. 438-5113.


SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 THURSDAY, JULY 7 Music ■ Lakota | 7-9 p.m., Centerway Square, Corning. ■ Steve Southworth and the Rock-ABilly Rays | 7 p.m., Teal Park, H’heads. Activities ■ “True Tales” Tour | 5:30-7 p.m., Centennial Sculpture, East Market Street, Corning. $5. Not recommended for children. www.truetalestour.com ■ Farmers’ Market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Riverfront Centennial Park, Corning. www.gafferdistrict.com ■ Wisner Market | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Winser Park, Elmira. www.elmiradowntown.com Kids’ activities ■ Moreland the Magician | 1 p.m., Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Sponsored by the Southeast Steuben County Library.

FRIDAY, JULY 8 Music ■ Mike Cavalier | 7 p.m., Club 57, Seneca Road North, Hornell.

SUMMER GUIDE

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Kids’ activities ■ Teen Cooking Club | 3:30-5:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Teens and tweens. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503. Activities ■ “Run to the Roundhouse Nellie” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ EastSide Market | 3-6 p.m., Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa.

Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ Village Block Party | 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Church and McCoy Streets, Savona. Games, food, prizes, petting zoo. Kids’ activities ■ Teen Screen: “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules” | 12:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Free. 936-3713, Ext. 503.

Music ■ Alice Detrick | 6:30 p.m., Bethany Village, 3005 Watkins Road, Horseheads. Free, bring a lawn chair. ■ Twin Tiers Idol | 7 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. Free, public welcome. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com ■ Brothers Grateful | 8:30-11:30 p.m., The Hot End, 101 Prescott Ave., Elmira Heights.

SUNDAY, JULY 10

THURSDAY, JULY 14

SATURDAY, JULY 9

TUESDAY, JULY 12

Music ■ Dirty Sanchez | 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m., Victory Lane Lounge, Glen Motor Inn, 3380 State Route 14, Watkins Glenn. Activities ■ “Run to the Roundhouse Nellie” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour

Music ■ Matt Cross | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, 9301 County Route 76, Hammondsport.

Music ■ Joe Cavallaro’s Dixieland Jazz Band | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ Farmers’ market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats.

Music ■ George Kaye Band | 7 p.m., Teal Park, Horseheads. Activities ■ Farmers’ market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Riverfront Centennial Park, Corning. www.gafferdistrict.com ■ Wisner Market | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Winser Park, Elmira. www.elmiradowntown.com

See events daily at: www.the-leader.com


PAGE 10 FRIDAY, JULY 15 Music ■ Casey Max and James Warren | 7 p.m., Harvest Cafe, 224 W. Main St., Montour Falls. 535-8986. Activities ■ “The Perils of Priscilla” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ Finger Lakes Wine Festival | 6:309:30 p.m., Watkins Glen International, 2790 County Route 16, Watkins Glen. $10-15. www.flwinefest.com ■ EastSide Market | 3-6 p.m., Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa.

SATURDAY, JULY 16 Music ■ Jay Unger and Molly Mason | 7 p.m., Keuka College, Norton Chapel, Keuka Park. $20. (315) 536-7318.

SUMMER GUIDE Activities ■ Finger Lakes Wine Festival | 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Watkins Glen International, 2790 County Route 16, Watkins Glen. $15-45. www.flwinefest.com Food ■ Chicken Barbecue | 11 a.m., North Corning Volunteer Fire Department, 3344 Baker St. Ext., Corning. $8, half dinner $6. For reservations, 962-3778.

SUNDAY, JULY 17 Music ■ KapEye | 2-5 p.m., Village Marina, 2 Seneca Harbor, Watkins Glen. ■ PJ Elliot | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, 9301 County Route 76, Hammondsport.

TUESDAY, JULY 19 Activities ■ Farmers’ Market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats.

Music ■ Sgro Brothers | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20 Music ■ Backtalk Band | 6:30 p.m., Bethany Village, 3005 Watkins Road, Horseheads. Free, bring a lawn chair. ■ Twin Tiers Idol | 7 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. Free, public welcome. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 Riverfront Centennial Park, Corning. www.gafferdistrict.com ■ Wisner Market | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Winser Park, Elmira. www.elmiradowntown.com Kids’ activities ■ Theatreworks USA | 1 p.m., Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Sponsored by the Southeast Steuben Cty Library.

FRIDAY, JULY 22

Music ■ The Hepcats | 7-9 p.m., Centerway Square, Corning. ■ Joe Cavallaro’s Dixieland Band | 7 p.m., Teal Park, Horseheads.

Music ■ KapEye and Peao | 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Switzerland Inn, 1237 Keuka Village Road, Wayne. ■ KapEye | 7-10 p.m., New Sarassin’s on the Lake, 301 Lake St., Penn Yan. ■ Mike Cavalier | 10 p.m., Brady’s Pub, 248 W. Water St., Elmira.

Activities ■ “True Tales” Tour | 5:30-7 p.m., Centennial Sculpture, East Market Street, Corning. $5. Not recommended for children. www.truetalestour.com ■ Farmers’ Market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m.,

Activities ■ “DK Molar the Devious Dentist” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com

THURSDAY, JULY 21


SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 ■ EastSide Market | 3-6 p.m., Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa.

SUNDAY, JULY 24 Music ■ Mike Cavalier | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, 9301 County Route 76, Hammondsport.

SUMMER GUIDE TUESDAY, JULY 26 Music ■ The Musicmakers Big Band | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ Farmers’ Market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27

Kids’ Activities ■ Vacation Bible School | Registration 6:15 - 7:00pm. Elmwood Ave. Baptist Church, 230 Elmwood Avenue, Elmira Heights. School runs nightly 7/25-7/29 from 6:15-8:30pm. Grades K-8. Freewill offering taken each night. Call for details: 607-733-2506.

Music ■ Music Makers Big Band | 6:30 p.m., Bethany Village, 3005 Watkins Road, Horseheads. Free, bring a lawn chair. ■ Twin Tiers Idol | 7 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. Free, public welcome. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com

MONDAY, JULY 25

THURSDAY, JULY 28

Music ■ Twin Tiers Idol | 7 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. Free, public welcome. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com

Music ■ Stone Temple Pilots | 7:30 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. $45 advance, $50 door. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com

■ Willy Davis and the Classics | 7 p.m., Teal Park, Horseheads. Activities ■ “True Tales” tour | 5:30-7 p.m., Centennial Sculpture, East Market Street, Corning. $5. Not recommended for children. www.truetalestour.com ■ Farmers’ Market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Riverfront Centennial Park, Corning. www.gafferdistrict.com ■ Wisner Market | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Winser Park, Elmira. www.elmiradowntown.com Kids’ Activities ■ Madcap Puppets | 1 p.m., Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Sponsored by the Southeast Steuben County Library.

FRIDAY, JULY 29 Activities ■ “Run to the Roundhouse Nellie” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com

PAGE 11 ■ EastSide Market | 3-6 p.m., Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa.

SATURDAY, JULY 30 Music ■ Joe’s Garage, Blake, The Magnetics, Dakota | 3-9 p.m., Centerway Square, Corning. ■ Distilled | 6-9 p.m., Captain Bill’s cruise, 1 N. Franklin St., Watkins Glen. ■ Jim Stafford | 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m., Victory Lane Lounge, Glen Motor Inn, 3380 State Route 14, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ “Run to the Roundhouse Nellie” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com

SUNDAY, JULY 31 Music ■ Bruce Holler | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, Cty Rte 76, H’port.


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Tips for a festive 4 To Americans, Independence Day is a meaningful holiday and often the centerpiece of summertime festivities. Commonly referred to as the 4th of July, the holiday celebrates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, in which the colonies officially declared their independence from Great Britain. Among the more patriotic days on the American calendar, the 4th of July is also among the most festive. Fireworks displays occur across the country, and backyard barbecues commonly begin in the afternoon and last well into the night. Party hosts who want to ensure their 4th of July parties go off without a hitch can consider the following tips. ★ Coordinate the party with the local fireworks display. Nearly every community has some type of fireworks display. As a result, neighboring towns often agree to spread the events out so not all the disp l ays occur on the same night. Communities might host their displays on the 3rd or 4th of July, and hosts should determine which night their community will be offering their show. Because fireworks shows are such a big part of the holiday, individuals might want to host their party the night of their town's festivities. This enables guests to enjoy the display from the backyard or walk to a nearby open field to enjoy the display. For hosts who are tailoring their party around the local fireworks show, be sure the guests arrive early enough so everyone can enjoy some barbecue

TH

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OF JULY PARTY

before the show begins because hosts won't want to be hovering over the grill when the show starts. ★ Have something for everyone. Independence Day festivities are for people of all ages, so hosts should have something for everyo n e. Adults may appreciate a cold beer to accompany their hamburgers and fireworks, but be sure to have plenty of other cold beverages on hand as well. Stock up on soda, ice water and other popular non-alcoholic beverages like lemonade and iced tea. Temperatures on the 4th of July are usually pretty warm, so hosts should buy more than they think they might need, as guests will be looking to stay cool and hydrated throughout the party. When inviting guests, ask if anyone has any particular food allergies or dietary restrictions. Plenty of delicious vegetable dishes can be cooked right on the grill for vegetarian guests, and foods like fish might be more suitable for guests with preexisting health conditions who should not eat red meat. ★ Decorate. Just because the party is liable to take place outdoors doesn't mean hosts can't decorate. The 4th of July is all about the red, white and blue, so be sure to display the American flag and decorate in the colors of the U.S.A. Purchase Independence Day cups and plates, and encourage guests to wear red, white and blue to the party. Visit the local party store and purchase some

red, white and blue balloons. Even the food can be decora t e d . Instead of making regular cookies, make American flag cookies complete with red, white and blue coloring, and do the same with the cupcake s. Bartenders can even use food coloring to make the drinks red, white or blue. ★ Host a fireworks display. Fireworks are illegal in many states, so hosts should consult the authorities as to the local fireworks laws before hosting their own party. If fireworks are legal, enlist the help of friends and host your own small show. Keep the neighbors in mind when hosting a private fireworks show, and always keep children away from the fireworks. If fireworks are illegal in your state, it's

still possible to host a fireworks show. Rent a big screen television for the occasion and take it out to the backyard. Once the sun sets, turn on a televised fireworks event (the Macy's-sponsored New York City fireworks show is very popular among viewers, as is the display that takes place in Boston) and encourage guests to sit down on the ground and enjoy the show just as they would if they were in attendance. The show can be just as entertaining, and guests will likely appreciate that they don't have to sit in endless traffic once the display has ended. The 4th of July is one of the most festive days on America's calendar. With a few simple tips, hosts can ensure a magical night for family and friends


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Safety in the sun: Make your

B A C K YARD BARBECUE as safe as it is fun Few summer traditions are as beloved as the backyard barbecue. Typically laid b a ck get-togethers with family and friends, backyard barbecues are synonymous with warm weather and the relaxed atmosphere that such weather promotes. But even the best backyard barbecue comes with some level of risk. Cooking over an open flame will never be riskf r e e, but there are steps barbecue enthusiasts can take to make their next summer soiree that much safer. ✓ Check for leaks. Due to their ease of use and convenience, propane grills have grown in popularity over the years. However, proponents of propane grills should inspect the propane tank as well as its hoses for leaks, cracks and corrosion. Any of those problems has the potential to be very dangerous, so address any issues before guests arrive. If guests are on their way already, simply visit the local hardware store and purchase a new tank or replace the damaged one. If the hoses are damaged, buy a charcoal grill to fill-in for the propane grill during the party. Charcoal grills are much less expensive than propane grills, and it might be a good idea for households that frequently host guests during grilling season to have a backup grill anyway. ✓ Make the grill area a nonsmoking section. Some guests will want to smoke, and since the party's outdoors, this shouldn't be an issue. However, protect the food and reduce the risk of injury by insisting the area surrounding the grill is a nonsmoking section. ✓ Dress in tighter clothing. The party's grillmaster should not we a r loose clothing. Loose-fitting clothing, particularly long sleeves, can dip into

the grill and potentially catch on fire. Avoid this risk by wearing tighter clothing that doesn't hang off the body. ✓ Be certain all briquettes are extinguished. For those who prefer a charcoal grill, once the cooking has been completed be careful to extinguish all briquettes. If briquettes are discarded before they are full extinguished, they could easily spark a fire. Many a garbage can, and considerably more, has been lost to briquettes that were discarded before they were fully extinguished. As a safety measure, pour water over briquettes and never discard any briquettes that are still hot. ✓ Never move the grill indoors. If an unexpected summer rain storm arrives on the night of the party, the grill should stay outside while the guests move indoors. A grill, whether it's propane or charcoal, should never be used indoors because of the risk of fire and carbon monoxide poisoning. ✓ Keep kids and pets clear. It's easy for kids and pets to suffer burns when around the grill. Kids might not be tall enough to see what's on the grill and, to make up for that, will grab the grill with their bare hands and push themselves up. This is almost certain to lead to burns. Pets don't know any better and are likely to get burned or even tip the grill over if they're allowed near it. ✓ Don't be liberal with the lighter fluid. When grilling on a charcoal grill, it's not always easy to get the fire started. As a result, many people look to lighter fluid to help speed the process along. While this can work, it's important to note that not much lighter fluid is necessary, and fluid should never be applied after the coals have lit.


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Kids' outdoor fun... Good for Them and Good for Nature The warm weather is tailor made for children who want to enjoy some fun in the sun. As the kids get ready for summer, parents can find activities that are fun and beneficial to the environment. Consider the activities that fill warm days: Pool parties, water balloon tosses, bicycle riding, and afternoons spent on a swing set are just a few ideas that come to mind. Small changes can add up to big benefits for the planet. ★ Bye, bye balloons: What's more fun that getting sprayed with cold water on a hot day? Instead of purchasing disposable latex balloons that will end up in the trash after the first pop, look for reusable absorbent balls that can be dipped into a bucket and then tossed to a partner. When he or she catches the ball, splashes of water will fly out. ★ Pool vs. sprinkler: Sure it's fun running through an icy-cold sprinkler, but leaving a sprinkler running for a while is a waste of water. Plus, it can drown surrounding plants and other landscaping items. Instead, take a dip in the pool or fill up a child-sized pool and later use the water to give a drink to potted plants. ★ Go safe with swing sets: Safety is often the name of the game when erecting a

swing set in the yard. It's a good idea to surround the ground surface with a material that will cushion falls. There are mulches and rubber pellets for this purpose, but these may be treated with chemicals and not be good for the environment. See if a local lumberyard or building supply store can drop sand in the area. It's all-natural and can be a good shock absorber. ★ Recycle toys: While on the subject of swing sets and play materials, check out consignment shops or tag sales for gently used play items rather than brand new toys. Or initiate a toy swap in the neighborhood where once a year neighbors swap toys with one another so the kids have something "new"to play with. ★ Jump on a bike: Bicycles remain one of the greenest modes of transportation. Children clamoring for a new bike this season may be pleasantly surprised at how well a used bike or a hand-me-down may ride and look. Sometimes all it takes is a little elbow grease to tune up a tired bike. ★ Enjoy nature: Instead of plastic toys and electronics, kids with creative imaginations can turn items outdoors into nice play props. Twigs can serve as dueling swords

while rocks and leaves can be piled to make an impromptu fort or home base. Kids may enjoy themselves exploring parks and caves right in their own neighborhoods. Just be

sure to stress the "carry in, carry out policy" whenever enjoying nature. That means not to leave trash behind and to disturb natural wildlife the least amount as possible. Sprinklers are refreshing, but they can waste water. A better idea is to take a dip in a pool, or a lake, or stream to cool off.


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How to improve air quality in your home

Canadians live in anticipation for wa rm weather and sunshine. Yet, some summer days can be difficult to enjoy when overtaken by smog and humidity, especially for those who suffer from asthma, allergies or other sensitivities. When summer temperatures soar, homeowners tend to seek refuge in their homes by closing the windows and relishing the airconditioned space. Believe it or not, a retreat indoors may not alleviate symptoms or offer much comfort if the air from outside is invading the home. Home occupants are not protected from outdoor allergens and humidity unless these seasonal preparations have been checked off the to-do list:

Seal it tight. Use an insulation/air barrier to seal up cracks and penetrations that allow hot air to invade the living space, carrying with it unwanted airborne irritants. Spray foam is an effe c t i ve option because it's sprayed on as a liquid and then expands to seal every nook and cranny so that no air can pass through. Spray foam makes it easy to get a tight fit around wall openings, such as windows, electrical/cable service entry points, and light fixtures. Some spray foam p r o d u c t s, such as the ones offered by Icynene, are air barriers. Icynene also offers a 100 percent water-blown product, making it an even healthier option for homeowners. Ventilate right. Once the leaky areas have been sprayed and sealed, homeow n e r s should check with their insulation contractor to see what changes they might want to make to their HVAC system to improve efficiency and ventilation. This may be achieved through downsizing their system, introducing a ventilation system, or installing a HEPA filter. Sealing tight and ventilating right are the two most critical steps to breathing healthy indoor air, no matter what the quality of the air outside may be.

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How to FIGHT INSECTS the eco-friendly way Enjoying the outdoors when the weather is pleasant can become bothersome if biting insects are part of the equation. However, not everyone wants to rely on chemical repellents to keep bugs at bay. There are some greener options that may be adequate for most daily situations.

Biting Insects Mosquitoes, biting flies and other insects can be a nuisance when the weather warms. Though many bites create a mild reaction that subsides after a few days, some insects are harbingers of serious diseases. Malaria and West Nile virus are just two of the many maladies that can be hiding inside of the common mosquito. According to Mosquito.org, only female mosquitoes feed on blood and bite their victims. The males feed on plant juices and nectar. Females need blood to feed their eggs and reproduce. When a mosquito bites, she injects chemicals to prevent blood from clotting and reduce pain. Afterward, however, these same chemicals can cause topical irritation. Like mosquitoes, female tabanids, or horse and deer flies, also bite. Most prefer

warm seasons and the warmth of daytime, but some species are most active at dawn or dusk. Tabanids bite deep and hard, potentially causing a lot of irritation. Especially in early summer, swarms of small black flies can make life difficult for those who venture outdoors. Again, females of this species bite, but males may hang around and swarm when a female is nearby. Black flies need running water to feed larvae, so they differ in this respect from mosquitoes and other insects that grow from larvae in sitting water. Biting occurs during the day and may intensify before a thunderstorm.

Repelling Insects The standard bug repellent is one that contains the product DEET. It was originally developed in 1946 for military use, but some have questioned its safety. The EPA says it has been associated with seizures in children, but this claim hasn't been fully substantiated. Still, many people prefer to look elsewhere for their repellents, preferring natural products. There are oils that can be extracted from different plants and herbs that pro-

vide short-term protection against many biting insects. Citronella is one of the more effective natural repellents. It has been used for more than 50 years as an insect repellent and as an animal repellent. The oil is taken from dried, cultivated grasses. Pure citronella is most effective against bugs, more so than the synthetic varieties used in many candles. Citronella is safe for human use and produces no threat to the environment when used correctly. It is generally applied to the skin and may cause mild irritation if used in abundance. Because some people find the smell of citronella off-putting, it can be mixed with lemongrass oil to minimize the smell. Lemongrass may also be another natural insect repellent. Rosemary and cedar can also be tried as insect repellents. These are two other aromas that bugs find offensive. Individuals who spend time in the yard may want to plant rosemary nearby in garden beds to help repel insects in that respect. Rosemary is also multifunctional, as it is commonly used in cooking. Other safe items to try as insect repellents include:

• Sage • Mint • Neem Oil

• Bay Leaves • Eucalyptus • Cloves

Individuals can ex p e riment with these herbs and oils to produce a product that works for their repellent needs.

Skip the bug zapper. Some natural products are effective at repelling pesky insects.


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KEEP PETS COMFY in warm weather Men and women anticipate the arrival of warmer weather in the same way children look forward to Christmas morning. With a snowier-than-usual winter and chilly start to the spring in many regions, summertime sun and heat might be more coveted than ever before. While many individuals have been counting down the days until 85-degree weather, pets may not have been sharing the same enthusiasm. The hot weather can bring discomfort to our four-legged friends. It's widely known that keeping a dog chained up outdoors in the sun and heat is cruel, as is keeping him locked in a car while running errands. However, there are many other factors that come into play regarding keeping pets cool and comfortable when the mercury rises. Unlike humans, pets cannot simply shed layers of clothes to cool down. Nor do they have the communication skills to tell people to turn up the air conditioning. It's up to pet parents to be in tune with their pets' needs and provide what they require. In order to keep pets content when the weather is warm, consider these suggestions.

OUTDOORS ✓ Cool down. Have a source of water for pets to use to cool down. This may be a retired baby pool, a misting hose, even a damp towel that can be used to rub over a pet's coat. Be sure this water source doesn't pose a drowning threat (i.e., don't leave a pool of water around young children or puppies). ✓ Offer shade.The shade can reduce t e m p e ratures by seve ral degr e e s. When spending considerable time outdoors, have a shady spot to which both people and pets can retire. If a pet is an outside animal, be sure there is a covered area that will offer generous shade. ✓ Provide cold water to drink. Pets can become dehydrated and suffer from heatstroke just like humans can. Some animals will avoid a bowl of water if it has heated from being outside. Be sure to regularly refresh water bowls so that animals have cool, refreshing water to drink. ✓ Watch for hot feet. A person who has walked barefoot across hot pavement knows just how painful it can be. Although the pads of dogs' feet are thicker than human skin, they are sensitive as well. Too much walking across hot surfaces can burn the pads. Check regularly for redness and gauge your pet's comfort level while walking. If he is

limping or showing distress, it's time to cut the walk short. ✓ Prickly foes. Seeds from foxtails and other grasses tend to be barbed and sticky. Cats and dogs may inhale these seeds or have them lodge in their paws and coats. If a pet seems to be under duress after being outdoors, grass lawns and burrs could be the culprit. Seek assistance from a veterinarian.

INDOORS ✓ Keep it cool. Don't turn off the air conditioning simply because you won't be home. If it's incredibly hot indoors, pets will become uncomfortable. Keep a ventilation source available, such as an open window, turnedon ceiling fan or leave the A/C set to low. ✓ Leave water out. An indoor water bowl is a necessity, too. Check before leaving the house that there is plenty of water available to all pets. ✓ O f fer comfo rt. Summertime often comes with loud thunderstorms, motorcycles passing by or fireworks. These loud noises can startle pets. Routinely check on animals to be sure they aren't frightened or doing damage to the house from being scared. If you will be out, have a neighbor check on the pet. A radio left on or a television can help mask the summer sounds and soothe a scared pet. ✓ Groom the pet. Talk with a groomer to decide on a cut that's comfortable for the pet. While many people assume shaving off all fur is the best option, fur actually insulates an animal. Removing it all can put the pet at risk for sunburn.

OTHER TIPS ☛ Walk dogs early in the morning and in early evening so that the jaunts take place when the weather is cooler. ☛ If you'll be taking a dog along on a hike during wa rm we a t h e r, be sure to pack enough water for both of you. ☛ Consider the use of dog booties to protect pads from hot pavement. ☛ Dogs may not be allowed on beaches during the summer tourist season. Check ahead before planning a seaside adventure. ☛ Warm weather helps parasites multiply. Don't keep food left out or it may attract bugs and become spoiled. ☛ Check with a vet about medications that can ward off ticks and fleas, which tend to be in full force during warm weather. For more summertime health tips for a pet, consult with your pet’s veterinarian.


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SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 TUESDAY, AUG. 2 Music ■ Dave Paugh | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ Farmers’ Market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats. Classes and lectures ■ Studio Faculty Presentation | 7:30 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, The Studio Lecture Room, 1 Museum Way, Corning. George Kennard, Jim Byrnes, Nikki O’Neill, Frances Federer. Free, public welcome. 483-5100.

SUMMER GUIDE THURSDAY, AUG. 4 Music ■ Reunion | 7-9 p.m., Centerway Square, Corning. ■ Dave Paugh | 6:30 p.m., Teal Park, Horseheads. Activities ■ “True Tales” tour | 5:30-7 p.m., Centennial Sculpture, East Market Street, Corning. $5. Not recommended for children. www.truetalestour.com ■ Farmers’ Market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Riverfront Centennial Park, Corning. www.gafferdistrict.com ■ Wisner Market | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Winser Park, Elmira. www.elmiradowntown.com

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 3 Music ■ Barley Boys with Dean Goble | 6:30 p.m., Bethany Village, 3005 Watkins Road, Horseheads. Free, bring a lawn chair. ■ Meat Loaf | 7:30 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. $39.50-54.50. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com

Kids’ activities ■ Didgeridoo Down Under | 1 p.m., Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Sponsored by the Southeast Steuben County Library. ■ Aussie Funk Jam workshop | 4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza,

Corning. Teens and tweens. Register, 936-3713.

FRIDAY, AUG. 5 Activities ■ “DK Molar the Devious Dentist” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ EastSide Market | 3-6 p.m., Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa. Food ■ Smorgasbord | 4:30 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 35 Lake St., Hammondsport.

SATURDAY, AUG. 6 Activities ■ “DK Molar the Devious Dentist” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com

PAGE 23 Kids’ activities ■ Family Movie Matinee: “Gulliver’s Travels” | 12:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Free. 9363713, Ext. 503.

SUNDAY, AUG. 7 Music ■ Distilled | 1-4 p.m., Village Marina, 2 Seneca Harbor, Watkins Glen. n Mike Cavalier | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, 9301 County Route 76, Hammondsport. Activities ■ 2nd annual All Saints Parish Men’s Softball Classic | 5 p.m., Corning Little League Field, Denison Park, Corning. Free, donations accepted. www.aspsoftball.com

TUESDAY, AUG. 9 Music ■ Bob Melnyk’s Polka Magic Band | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen.


PAGE 24 Activities ■ Farmers’ market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 10 Music ■ Joey Cavallaro’s Dixieland Band | 6:30 p.m., Bethany Village, 3005 Watkins Road, Horseheads. Free, bring a lawn chair.

SUMMER GUIDE www.gafferdistrict.com ■ Wisner Market | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Winser Park, Elmira. Kids’ activities ■ Doc Possum End of Summer Dance Party | 1 p.m., Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Sponsored by the Southeast Steuben County Library.

FRIDAY, AUG. 12 THURSDAY, AUG. 11 Music ■ Bob Melnic’s Polka Magic | 6:30 p.m., Teal Park, Horseheads. Activities ■ Race Fever | 5-9 p.m., Bridge Street, Corning. www.gafferdistrict.com ■ “True Tales” tour | 5:30-7 p.m., Centennial Sculpture, East Market Street, Corning. $5. Not recommended for children. www.truetalestour.com through Sept. ■ Farmers’ market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Riverfront Centennial Park, Corning.

Music ■ Distilled | 6-9 p.m., Captain Bill’s patio, 1 N. Franklin St., Watkins Glen. ■ KapEye | 5-8 p.m., Village Marina, 2 Seneca Harbor, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ “Run to the Roundhouse Nellie” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa.

Kids’ activities ■ Teen Cooking Club | 3:30-5:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Teens and tweens. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503.

SATURDAY, AUG. 13 Kids’ activities ■ Teen Screen: “Sucker Punch” | 12:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Free. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Teen Cafe | 7-10 p.m., Chemung County YMCA, 425 Pennsylvania Ave., Elmira. $3. High school ID required.

SUNDAY, AUG. 14 Music ■ PJ Elliott | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, 9301 County Route 76, Hammondsport. Activities ■ “Run to the Roundhouse Nellie” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com

TUESDAY, AUG. 16 Music ■ Ageless Jazz Band | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ Farmers’ Market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats. Classes and lectures ■ Studio faculty presentation | 7:30 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, The Studio Lecture Room, 1 Museum Way, Corning. Josh Simpson, Gabriele Kustner. Free, public welcome. 4835100.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 17 Classes and lectures ■ “Living Healthy Steuben” | 1-3:30 p.m., Hornell Senior Center, Broadway Mall, Hornell. 776-9467, Ext. 226.


SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 THURSDAY, AUG. 18 Music ■ The Boots | 6:30 p.m., Teal Park, Horseheads. Activities ■ “True Tales” tour | 5:30-7 p.m., Centennial Sculpture, East Market Street, Corning. $5. Not recommended for children. www.truetalestour.com through Sept. ■ Farmers’ Market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Riverfront Centennial Park, Corning. www.gafferdistrict.com ■ Wisner Market | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Winser Park, Elmira. www.elmiradowntown.com

FRIDAY, AUG. 19 Music ■ Patrick Johnson | 8 p.m., Harvest Cafe, 224 W. Main St., Montour Falls. 535-8986.

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■ KapEye and Peao | 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Switzerland Inn, 1237 Keuka Village Road, Wayne.

Festival | 3-11 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. $8 advance, $10 door. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com

Activities ■ “Old Cookie Shop” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ EastSide Market | 3-6 p.m., Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa.

Food ■ Chicken barbecue | 11 a.m., North Corning Volunteer Fire Department, 3344 Baker St. Ext., Corning. $8, half dinner $6. For reservations, 962-3778.

SATURDAY, AUG. 20

TUESDAY, AUG. 23

SUNDAY, AUG. 21 Music ■ Brett Beardslee | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, 9301 County Route 76, Hammondsport.

Music ■ Brothers Grateful | 3-4 p.m., Horigan’s, 365 Davis St., Elmira.

Music ■ Alderhollow Country Band | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen.

Activities ■ “Old Cookie Shop” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ Southern Tier Celtic Potato

Activities ■ Farmers’ market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats.

THURSDAY, AUG. 25 Music

■ Vinyl Roots | 7-9 p.m., Centerway Square, Corning. Activities ■ “True Tales” tour | 5:30-7 p.m., Centennial Sculpture, East Market Street, Corning. $5. Not recommended for children. www.truetalestour.com through Sept. ■ Farmers’ market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Riverfront Centennial Park, Corning. www.gafferdistrict.com ■ Wisner Market | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Winser Park, Elmira. www.elmiradowntown.com

FRIDAY, AUG. 26 Music ■ Distilled | 6-9 p.m., Holmes Plate, 54 W. Market St., Corning. ■ KapEye and Peao | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Maloney’s Pub, 57 Pulteney St., Hammondsport. Activities ■ “The Perils of Priscilla” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, chil-


PAGE 26 dren under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ EastSide Market | 3-6 p.m., Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. ■ Growers Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa.

SATURDAY, AUG. 27 Music ■ The Machine | 8 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. $17 advance, $20 door. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com Activities ■ “The Perils of Priscilla” | 7-10 p.m., Old Havana Courthouse Theatre, 408 W. Main St., Montour Falls. $10, children under 12 $8. www.oldhavanatheatre.com

SUMMER GUIDE ■ Chemung River cleanup | 8:30 a.m.-noon, Grove Street Boat Launch, Grove Street, Elmira. Sponsored by the Friends of the Chemung River Watershed. Kids’ activities ■ Saturday Stories ‘n More | 10-11 a.m., Fred and Harriett Taylor Memorial Library, 21 William St., Hammondsport. Ages 3-7. 569-2045. ■ Family storytime | 9:30 a.m., Montour Falls Library, 406 E. Main St., Montour Falls. 535-7489. ■ Teen Cafe | 7-10 p.m., Chemung County YMCA, 425 Pennsylvania Ave., Elmira. $3. High school ID required.

SUNDAY, AUG. 28 Music ■ Bruce Holler | 12:30-4:30 p.m., Blue Heron Cafe, 9301 County Route 76, Hammondsport. ■ Blake Shelton with Aaron Lewis | 7:30 p.m., Tag’s, State Route 352, Big Flats. $37.50-$54.50. (800) 650-TAGS, tagstickets.com

MONDAY, AUG. 29 Kids’ activities ■ Baby Lapsit | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 0-18 months. 739-4581.

TUESDAY, AUG. 30 Music ■ Andy Stobie and the Greater Finger Lakes Jazz Orchestra | 7-9 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ Farmers’ market | 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, Maple Street, Big Flats. Kids’ activities ■ Cheerobics | 1-2:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Presented by the FAST Program and the YMCA. Teens and tweens. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Baby Bookworms” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 6 weeks-18 months. 9363713, Ext. 503. ■ Absolute Otaku Angels | 4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Anime-manga group for teens. 9363713, mcconnells@stls.org ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Ages 3-5. 776-4613. ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 3-5. 739-4581.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 31 Kids’ activities ■ “Little Red Hen’s Friends Storytime” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Preschoolers. 936-3713, Ext. 503. Classes and lectures ■ “Living Healthy Steuben” | 1-3:30 p.m., Hornell Senior Center, Broadway Mall, Hornell. 776-9467, Ext. 226.


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SUMMER GUIDE

REDUCING

Tips for cooling costs this summer Once the first wave of summer heat arrives, homeowners everywhere look to the air conditioner to help survive the summer swoon. Though few things are as refreshing as a cold room on a hot afternoon, relying too heavily on the air conditioner is a recipe for a high utility bill, something not all people can readily afford. Reducing summer cooling costs does not mean families must grin and bear it the next time a heat wave arrives. Instead, homeowners can take several steps to reduce cooling costs while staying comfortable through the dog days of summer. ☛ Embrace the warm summer breeze. Once that first hot day arrives and the air conditioner is turned on for the first time, many households simply leave the A/C on for the rest of summer. This is not only wasteful, but in many cases, it's unnecessary as well. If the air outside is pleasant and a warm breeze is blowing, turn the A/C off, open the windows and invite that warm summer air in. During summer the temperatures may fluctuate, and it can be a welcome respite to relax in a room with a warm breeze instead of the constant hum of the air conditioner. ☛ Protect the home from the sun. Many times a home's interior heats up because there's nothing outside to shield it from hot rays. Landscape features like shade trees add aesthetic appeal to a property and can be planted to keep sun from beating down on the home during hot afternoons. Awnings and window coverings also make great allies in protecting a home from blazing summer sun, and none of these alternatives will cause the energy bill to increase. ☛ Clean or replace filters. If an A/C unit's filters are dirty or old, this makes it

harder for the unit to cool the room. As a result, people inside the home then increase the power on the unit to cool the room more quickly or effectively. However, if an A/C unit isn't cooling the room on a lower setting, it's probably because the filter needs to be cleaned. Cleaning the filter is easy and takes just a few minutes. If the filter is beyond repair, replace it. ☛ Make sure the doors and windows are shut. When the A/C is running, all doors and windows should remain closed. Open doors and windows only make it harder to keep a room cool, and turning up the A/C is not the answer. ☛ Have the units inspected. Heating ventilation and air conditioning units should be inspected by a qualified HVAC technician. Technicians can determine if a unit will operate at peak capacity or struggle through the summer, costing homeowners money as the summer carries on.

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Simple ways to ease the 'ouch' Sunblock -- and its adequate reapplication -- is one of the single most effective ways to prevent sunburn and a host of sun-related maladies. Despite the warnings of skin cancer and ailments related to the sun, people succumb to sunburn year after year. The results can be quite painful. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, getting sunburned even once can make a person more likely to get skin cancer. Though it can be that simple to increase risk for skin cancer, there's actually quite a lot going on behind the scenes when a person gets a sunburn. The very outer layer of the epidermis, or the outsidemost skin, is made up of dead skin cells. Directly below them are living skin cells that can be damaged when ultraviolet light from the sun penetrates these living cells and eventually kills them off. Once the body senses the dead cells, the immune system springs into action. White blood cells are sent to the area to repair damage, which involves increased blood flow. This blood flow makes the skin red and wa rm. Furthermore, the damaged skin cells send out chemical messengers that activate pain receptors. This is why sunburned skin is red, warm and painful.

There are different remedies for alleviating the pain associated with sunburn. While there are some over-the-counter analgesics that will temporarily numb pain, some of the best treatments are simple and natural. ✓ Cool water baths and brief showers can reduce the temperature of the skin. ✓ Aloe gels often soothe and cool. It is b e l i eved that aloe has anti-inflammatory properties. ✓ Some people say that white vinegar can reduce pain and inflammation when sprayed on the affected area or used in compresses. ✓ Sunburned skin is often dry and chapped. A moisturizer, such as cocoa butter, can help minimize irritation. ✓ It's important to remain hydrated because damaged skin may not be as effective in locking moisture inside. P l u s, the body needs food and water to fuel the repair of sunburned skin. The best remedy for sunburn is to avoid it at all costs. We a ring sunblock, a widebrimmed hat, UV-protection clothing, and sunglasses and avoiding the sun during peak hours are ways to remain comfortable and healthy.


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REGIONAL CALENDAR ADDISON

BIG FLATS

Twin Rivers CB Campground 359-2547, 359-4437 ■ July 2 | July 4 Celebration ■ Aug. 6-7 | 48th annual Jamboree

Tag’s www.tagstickets.com ■ June 29 | Twin Tiers Idol, 7 p.m. ■ July 6 | Twin Tiers Idol, 7 p.m. ■ July 13 | Twin Tiers Idol, 7 p.m. ■ July 20 | Twin Tiers Idol, 7 p.m. ■ July 25 | Twin Tiers Idol, 7 p.m. ■ July 27 | Twin Tiers Idol, 7 p.m. ■ July 28 | Stone Temple Pilots, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 31 | Lynyrd Skynyrd and ZZ Top, 8 p.m. ■ Aug. 3 | Meat Loaf, 7:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 20 | Celtic Potato Festival, 3-11 p.m.

ALBANY Times Union Center www.timesunioncenter-albany.com or (518) 487-2000 ■ July 16 | Keith Urban, 7:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 28 | American Idol Live, 7 p.m. ■ Sept. 9 | The Monkees, 7:30 p.m. ■ Sept. 28- Oct. 2 | Cirque Du Soleil ■ Nov. 27 | Andre Rieu, 6 p.m. Palace Theatre www.palacealbany.com or (518) 4761000 ■ June 29 | Englebert Humperdinck, 7 p.m. ■ July 10 | Denis Leary, 7 p.m.

CANANDAIGUA Constellation Brands Marvin Sands Performing Arts Center www.cmacevents.com or (800) 7453000 ■ July 7 | Yes and Styx, 7 p.m. ■ July 9 | The Music of John Williams, 7:30

p.m. ■ July 26 | Furthur, 7 p.m. ■ July 27 | Kid Cudi, 8 p.m. ■ Aug. 3 | Girl Talk, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 6 | OAR, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 9 | Bob Dylan, 8 p.m. ■ Aug. 13 | Guster, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 20 | Tony Bennett, 8 p.m.

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 ■ July 4 | Corning Memorial Stadium, 8:30 p.m. ■ July 14 | Woodbrook, Elmira, 7 p.m. ■ July 20 | Canisteo, 6:30-8:30 p.m. ■ July 27 | Savona Village Park, 6-8 p.m. ■ Aug. 6 | Watkins Glen parade, noon

DARIEN CENTER CORNING Centerway Square www.gafferdistrict.com ■ June 24 | Vinny Cavallaro, noon-1 p.m. ■ June 27 | Bill Groome, noon-1 p.m. ■ June 28 | Ukuleles, noon-1 p.m. ■ July 7 | Lakota, 7-9 p.m. ■ July 9 | Meads Creek, 12:30 p.m. ■ July 21 | The Hepcats, 7-9 p.m. ■ July 30 | Joe’s Garage, Blake, The Magnetics, Dakota, 3-9 p.m. ■ Aug. 4 | Reunion, 7-9 p.m. ■ Aug. 25 | Vinyl Roots, 7-9 p.m. Corning Area Community Concert Band www.corningcommunityband.org or 962-7252 ■ June 29 | Bath Park, 6-8 p.m. ■ July 2 | Hammondsport parade, 6 p.m.

Darien Lake Performing Arts Center darienlakepac.org ■ July 8 | Sugarland, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 12 | Vans Warped Tour, noon ■ July 13 | Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 22 | Motley Crue, Poison, New York Dolls, 7 p.m. ■ July 23 | Brad Paisley, 4 p.m. ■ July 24 | Lil Wayne, 7 p.m. ■ July 26 | Disturbed and Godsmack, 6 p.m. ■ July 29 | Goo Goo Dolls, Michelle Branch, Parachute, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 9 | Selena Gomez, 6:30 p.m.

ELMIRA Clemens Center www.clemenscenter.com or 734-8191 ■ July 9-10 | New York State Tournament of


SUMMER GUIDE

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 Dance ■ Oct. 4-5 | “My Fair Lady” ■ Nov. 18-19 | “Peter Pan” ■ Jan. 17-18, 2012 | “In the Heights” ■ March 13-14, 2012 | “South Pacific” ■ May 1-2, 2012 | “Young Frankenstein”

ENDICOTT Endicott Performing Arts Center www.endicottarts.com or 785-8903 ■ July 7-10 | “Little Red Riding Hood and the Three Little Pigs” ■ July 15 | Puzzled Players Comedy Improv ■ July 30-31 | “Cinderella” ■ Aug. 11-21 | “The Best of Disney” ■ Sept. 16-25 | “Aida” ■ Oct. 28-30 | “The Factory ” ■ Nov. 11-20 | “Annie”

GENEVA Smith Opera House www.thesmith.org or (866) 355-LIVE ■ July 21-24 | “Into the Woods” ■ July 29-31 | Bill Cunningham New York ■ Aug. 5-6 | “La Cenerentola,” 8 p.m. ■ Aug. 11-14 | “Youth” ■ Sept. 16 | Galactic Cowboy Orchestra, 7:30 p.m.

■ Sept. 24 | “The Mikado,”7:30 p.m. ■ Oct. 19 | “Sylvester and the Magic Pebble,” 10 a.m., 7 p.m. Stonecutters at Belhurst www.belhurst.com or (315) 781-0201 Located on Route 14. All shows free. ■ June 25 | Delta Mikes Blues BAnd, 7-11 p.m.

HORSEHEADS Bethany Village 3005 Watkins Road ■ July 6 | Dr. Colin Marcus, 6:30 p.m. ■ July 13 | Alice Detrick, 6:30 p.m. ■ July 20 | Backtalk, 6:30 p.m. ■ July 27 | Music Makers Big Band, 6:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 3 | Barley Boys with Dean Goble, 6:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 10 | Joey Cavallaro’s Dixieland Band, 6:30 p.m. Teal Park ■ June 30 | Lucky Ducks, 7 p.m. ■ July 7 | Steve Southworth and the Rack-ABilly Rays, 7 p.m. ■ July 14 | George Kaye Band, 7 p.m. ■ July 21 | Joe Cavallaro’s Dixieland Band, 7 p.m.

■ July 28 | Willie Davis & the Classics, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 4 | Dave Paugh, 6:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 11 | Bob Melnic’s Polka Magic, 6:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 18 | The Boots, 6:30 p.m.

ITHACA Bound for Glory Anabel Taylor Hall, Cornell University 844-4535, wvbr.com/bfg ■ June 26 | Rod MacDonald, 8-11 p.m. ■ July 3 | Andrew Calhoun, 8-11 p.m. ■ July 10 | North Water, 8-11 p.m. ■ July 17 | Mac Benford, 8-11 p.m. ■ July 24 | Peter Siegel, 8-11 p.m. ■ July 31 | Frankie Armstrong, 8-11 p.m. Cornell University Summer Concert Series www.sce.cornell.edu/ss/about/events/ index.php ■ June 28 | Ithaca Wind Quintet, Schwartz Center, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 1 | Ikebe Shakedown, Arts Quad, 7 p.m. ■ July 5 | Babik, Schwartz Center, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 8 | Rising Sign, Arts Quad, 7 p.m. ■ July 12 | “HMS Pinafore,” Scwartz Center, 7:30 p.m.

PAGE 29 ■ July 15 | Jay Ungar and Molly Mason, Arts Quad, 7 p.m. ■ July 19 | Joe Crookston, Schwartz Center, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 22 | Balktalk Band, Arts Quad, 7 p.m. ■ July 26 | Vanaver Caravan, Scwartz Center, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 29 | Not From Wisconsin, Arts Quad, 7 p.m. Hangar Theater www.hangartheater.org or 273-8588 ■ June 26-July 10 | “Ragtime” ■ June 30-July 2 | “If You Give A Pig a Pancake” ■ July 1-2 | “Is Ve ry Good Story of Ukrainian Heroism,” 8 p.m., 11 p.m. ■ July 7-9 | “If You Give A Pig a Pancake” ■ July 8 | “In a Little Room,” 1 p.m. ■ July 14-23 | “Ever So Humble” ■ July 21-23 | “Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type” ■ July 22-23 | “Beggar on Horseback,” 8 p.m., 11 p.m. ■ July 28-Aug. 6 | “Gem of the Ocean” ■ Aug. 6 | “Flying Leap,” 7 p.m. Kitchen Theatre Company The Clinton House, 116 N. Cayuga St. www.kitchentheatre.org or 272-0403 ■ July 13-31 | “At A Loss”


SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 30 State Theatre www.stateofithaca.com or 277-8283 ■ July 29-30 | “Thoroughly Modern Millie” ■ Aug. 6 | Steve Earle, 8 p.m. ■ Aug. 26-28 | “Cinderella” ■ Sept. 13 | They Might Be Giants, 7 p.m. ■ Sept. 18 | Garrison Keillor, 8 p.m. ■ Sept. 29 | Gordon Lightfoot, 8 p.m. ■ Oct. 22 | Peter Yarrow, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 8 | Joe Bonamassa, 8 p.m.

KNOXVILLE, PA. Old Country Barn (814) 326-4492 ■ July 8-10 | 21st annual Country Music Weekend

■ July 16 | “Perils of Priscilla,” 7 p.m. ■ July 22 | “DK Molar the Devious Dentist,” 7 p.m. ■ July 23 | “DK Molar the Devious Dentist,” 7 p.m.

NEW YORK CITY Radio City Music Hall www.radiocity.com or (212) 307-7171 ■ June 26-Aug. 14 | Rockette Experience ■ June 23-Sept. 4 | Cirque du Soleil “Zarkana” ■ Nov. 11-Jan. 2, 2012 | “Radio City Christmas Spectacular”

NIAGARA FALLS MONTOUR FALLS Old Havana Courthouse Theatre www.oldhavanatheatre.com ■ July 1 | “Old Cookie Shop,” 7 p.m. ■ July 2 | “Old Cookie Shop,” 7 p.m. ■ July 8 | “Run to the Roundhouse Nellie,” 7 p.m. ■ July 9 | “Run to the Roundhouse Nellie,” 7 p.m. ■ July 15 | “Perils of Priscilla,” 7 p.m.

Seneca Niagara www.senecaniagaracasino.com or (877) 873-6322 ■ July 2 | Dave Mason, 8 p.m. ■ July 9 | Steve Miller Band, 8 p.m. ■ July 18 | Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, 8 p.m. ■ July 22 | Paul Rodgers, 8 p.m. ■ July 23 | John McDermott, 8 p.m. ■ July 29 | Daryl Stuermer Band, 8 p.m. ■ Aug. 6 | Leon Russell (canceled) ■ Aug. 13 | The Association, 8 p.m.

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011

NICHOLS

ROCHESTER

Tioga Downs www.tiogadowns.com ■ July 1 | Pat Benatar, 8 p.m. ■ July 30 | Mike Cavalier, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 12 | Wynonna, 8 p.m. ■ Sept. 1 | Creedence Clearwater Revisited, 8 p.m. ■ Sept. 17 | Sha Na Na, 7 p.m.

Water Street Music Hall www.waterstreetmusic.com or (585) 325-5600 ■ July 5 | Skrillex, 9 p.m. ■ July 6 | Chris Webby, 7 p.m. ■ July 8 | CJ Ramone, 9 p.m. ■ July 8 | Scarlett O’hara, 6:30 p.m. ■ July 9 | Mercia, 6:30 p.m. ■ July 10 | Ace Augustine, 6:30 p.m. ■ July 12 | Spies Like Us, 6:30 p.m.

PENN YAN Finger Lakes Chamber Music Festival www.fingerlakes-music.org or (315) 536-0383 ■ July 3 | Hunt Country Vineyards, Branchport, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 10 | Norton Chapel, Keuka College, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 13 | Penn Yan Courthouse, 6:30 p.m. ■ July 15 | First Baptist Church, Penn Yan, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 23 | Hunt Country Vineyards, Branchport, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 31 | Norton Chapel, Keuka College, 7:30 p.m.

SALAMANCA Seneca Allegany Events Center www.senecaalleganycasino.com or (888) 913-3377 ■ July 2 | Tom Arnold, 7 p.m. ■ July 16 | Melissa Etheridge, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 6 | Big and Rich, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 28 | Ronnie Dunn, 5 p.m.

SARATOGA SPRINGS Saratoga Performing Arts Center www.spac.org ■ June 27 | Peter Gabriel, 8 p.m. ■ July 10 | Def Leppard and Heart, 7:30 p.m.


SUMMER GUIDE

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011 ■ July 19 | Phil Lesh and Bob Weir, 7 p.m. ■ July 20 | Lil Wayne, 7 p.m. ■ July 23 | Motley Crue and Poison, 7 p.m. ■ July 31 | The Goo Goo Dolls, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 7 | OAR, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 9 | Train and Maroon 5, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 10 | Godsmack, 6 p.m. ■ Aug. 20 | Kings of Leon, 7:30 p.m.

SYRACUSE New York State Fair www.nysfair.org ■ Aug. 25 | Maroon 5, 7:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 30 | Journey, 7:30 p.m. ■ Sept. 2 | Lady Antebellum, 7:30 p.m. ■ Sept. 3 | Sugarland, 7:30 p.m.

TORONTO Air Canada Center www.theaircanadacenter.com ■ June 28 | Sade, 7:30 p.m. ■ June 29-30 | Katy Perry, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 15-16 | Taylor Swift, 7 p.m. ■ July 18 | Josh Groban, 7:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 9 | Foo Fighters, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 13-14 | Britney Spears, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 18 | Kenny Chesney, 7 p.m.

■ Sept. 10 | Keith Urban, 7:30 p.m. ■ Sept. 11-12 | Pearl Jam, 7:30 p.m.

■ Aug. 1 | Montgomery Gentry, 8 p.m. ■ Aug. 2 | Dweezil Zappa, 8 p.m. ■ Aug. 7 | Tim Conway, 7 p.m. ■ Aug. 11 | Randy Travis, 8 p.m.

■ Aug. 23 | Alderhollow Country Band, 7-9 p.m. ■ Aug. 30 | Andy Stobie and The Greater Finger Lakes Jazz Orchestra, 7-9 p.m.

WATKINS GLEN

Watkins Glen International superballix.com ■ July 1-3 | Phish

UNCASVILLE, CONN. Mohegan Sun Arena www.mohegansun.com ■ June 23 | Tim Allen, 8 p.m. ■ June 25 | Katy Perry, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 2 | Def Leppard, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 3 | Sade, 8 p.m. ■ July 6 | Soundgarden, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 8 | Denis Leary, 8 p.m. ■ July 9-10 | Keith Urban, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 15 | Motley Crue and Poison, 7:30 p.m. ■ July 22 | Rihanna, 8 p.m. ■ July 23 | Tim Mcgraw, 8 p.m.

VERONA Turning Stone Casino Resort (877) 833-SHOW ■ June 27 | Lionel Richie, 8 p.m. ■ July 8 | Rick Springfield, 8 p.m. ■ July 21 | Eddie Money, 8 p.m. ■ July 22 | Dave Koz, 8 p.m. ■ July 28 | Kiss, 8 p.m. ■ July 30 | George Jones, 8 p.m.

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Lafayette Park ■ June 28 | Ed Clute’s Dixie Five Plus, 7-9 p.m. ■ July 5 | Hepcats Big Band, 7-9 p.m. ■ July 12 | Joe Cavallaro’s Dixieland Jazz Band, 7-9 p.m. ■ July 19 | Sgro Brothers, 7-9 p.m. ■ July 26 | The Musicmakers Big Band, 7-9 p.m. ■ Aug. 2 | Dave Paugh, 7-9 p.m. ■ Aug. 9 | Bob Melnyk’s Polka Magic Band, 7-9 p.m. ■ Aug. 16 | Ageless Jazz Band, 7-9 p.m.

WILLIAMSPORT, PA. Community Arts Center www.pct.edu/COMMARTS or (800) 432-9382 ■ July 29-31 | “Hairspray” ■ Aug. 2 | Ted Nugent, 7:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 26 | Kellie Pickler, 7:30 p.m.

TICKETS: Ticketmaster ■ Ticketmaster charge by phone: (800) 7453000. ■ Online: www.ticketmaster.com ■ Area Ticketmaster outlets include The Information Center, Centerway Square, Market Street, Corning and Macy’s at The Arnot Mall, Big Flats. ■ Always contact venue to confirm listings.


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SUMMER GUIDE

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011

How to PROTECT HAIR & SKIN from pool chemicals A pool can provide a welcome respite from the heat and humidity. Taking a daily dip in a pool is great cardiovascular exercise and can help relieve stress. The chemicals used to keep pool water fresh and clean may wreak havoc on hair and skin, however. Chlorine is one of the most widely used substances for water purification. It is often added to public water supplies to kill off pathogens that have the potential to cause illness. Variations of chlorine are used in pool filtration to ensure the water is clean and safe for swimming. Chlorine reduces bacteria and other contaminants, and may also help keep algae growth under control. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that chlorine kills bacteria such as E. coli in about a minute if it is maintained at proper disinfection levels (1 to 3 parts per million [ppm] free chlorine) and under ideal water conditions (pH at 7.5 or less; temperature at 77 F [25 C] or more) throughout the pool. However, a few germs are moderately (Giardia and Hepatitis A) to highly (Cryptosporidium) chlorine-tolerant. Although chlorine is very good at purifying the water people drink and bathe in, too much of a good thing can prove troublesome. Oftentimes, chlorine -- especially in high amounts -- can affect the hair and skin of people who regularly use pools.

HAIR Chlorinated water that is also high in copper may form a chemical reaction that turns hair green. The chlorine reacts with the copper to form a compound that is green in hue. This can attach to the porous hair shaft and give hair a green tinge. The green is especially obvious in light-colored hair. Chlorine is harsh and caustic, while hair is porous. Dry hair that becomes saturated with chlorine-treated water can eventually have salt crystals locked inside, which leads to breakage. Washing hair directly after swimming may help rinse off external chlorine, but it will not adequately remove chlorine locked inside follicles. Hair may need to be soaked for several minutes in fresh water. Hair that is prone to dryness may become more dry from chlorine. Swimmers can wear a waterproof swimming cap to prevent against chlorine damage. If this option isn't available, soaking hair in fresh water to saturate hair shafts and then applying a barrier, such as conditioner combed through the hair, can help repel some of the chlorinated water and protect

against damage. Hair that has turned green from pool water may need to be treated with special shampoos or strippers to remove the chlorine-copper compounds. Cutting off the green areas may be an easier solution.

SKIN Chlorine is caustic, and high concentrations can burn the skin. Individuals with sensitive skin may be even more susceptible to rashes and burns from chlorinated pools. To prevent skin irritation, keep chlorine levels in pool water as low as possible. Applying a waterproof sunscreen or lotion to the skin prior to swimming may also serve as an additional line of defense. There are commercially made products that are designed specifically for application prior to getting in the pool. Because they are waterproof, they will not wash off in the pool or foul up water. Public pools with a high volume of swimmers tend to have more chlorine in them than backyard pools at private residences. This is evidenced by the strong and often overwhelming aroma of chlorine in the vicinity of the public pool. The effects of chlorine can be seen by the bleaching and wearing away of rope barriers and floats that are constantly in the pool. If this is what is occurring to plastic and vinyl, imagine what is being done to skin and hair. Covering up as much as possible can help protect the skin from the harmful effects of chlorine.

Though popular warm weather hangouts, pools may contain chemicals that can be harmful to hair and skin. Precautions should be taken to avoid harmful side effects that include hair discoloration and burned skin.


SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011

SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 33

PERENNIALS are a gardener's friend Gardening is often seen as an art form to men and women with a green thumb. Once the landscape is designed, homeowners may not want to change much from year to year. That is where perennial plants can be an advantage. Designing a landscape and keeping the garden looking beautiful can take a keen eye. It also may require a lot of time and commitment. If home gardeners have to replant items year after year, gardening can become time-consuming and ex p e n s i ve. Turning to perennial plants and flowers to serve as the anchor for a home garden can make the process easier. Perennials are plants that live indefinitely. In terms of flowering plants, perennials will bloom every year. In essence, they have the staying power of shr ubbery but are more delicate in nature and often appealing to the eye. There are perennials for every season, soil type and sun exposure. Perennials come in a wide variety of blooming flowers or attractive foliage. Chances are if a homeowner wants to add perennials to the garden, there is a variety available that will fit his or her needs.

Once perennials are in place, there is relatively minimal maintenance that is required. The tune-ups that may be needed are some deadheading to promote new and stronger growth and some cleaning up after winter b e fore the new blooming season take s place. Once the early spring season arrives and the ground is not too muddy or rain-soaked, clear out any leaves and debris that have gathered around where perennials are located. Gardeners can also till the mulch or soil in these areas to aerate the planting beds. Using shears, cut down any dead grasses, stems and stalks from spent perennials that overwintered. Remove any dead wood and broken branches. Be careful not to trim spring-blooming shrubs because some flowers bloom on year-old stems and this can cause the plant not to flower. Perennials that aren't flowering as well as they used to or have dead centers may need to be divided to promote stronger growth. This should be done in early spring before the plant blooms or late fall before the winter arrives. Dividing plants and replanting not only grows the garden, but also it is a healthy revitalization for the plant.

Gardeners who prefer to take a laid-back approach to gardening may appreciate the ease with which a beautiful and easy-tomaintain landscape can be created with perennials.

Here are some perennials that can be added to the garden: ❀ lavender ❀ ornamental grasses ❀ asters ❀ chrysanthemums ❀ irises ❀ poppies

❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀

milkweed goldentufts anemones columbines daylilies peonies hostas


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SUMMER GUIDE

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011


SUMMER GUIDE

SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011

How to survive Summer heat waves are an unfortunate part of what many people consider their favorite time of year. Sunny summer days can quickly be spoiled when the mercury rises to heights no one finds comfortable. For those without air conditioning, heat waves can not only be uncomfortable, but they also may be deadly. In 2010, the city of Moscow was hit hard when 11,000 of its residents died due to a remarkable heat wave. Referred to as the Great Russian Heat Wave of 2010, this deadly stretch of heat included 62 consecutive days with above average high temperatures. Such a heat wave is unbearable for anyone, let alone those who don't have air conditioning. Should a particularly daunting heat wave arrive this summer, consider the following suggestions to beat the heat. ☛ Stay downstairs. Cold air descends, so the upper floors of a home will be significantly warmer than downstairs during a heat wave. Whenever possible, stay downstairs if the temperature is hot. If need be, sleep on an air mattress or sleeping bag to ensure a better night's sleep.

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SUMMER HEAT

☛ Watch what you eat. Diets that are h e avy in protein have become the "in" dietary fad among those looking to improve their health. One of the reasons such a diet is effective is because protein boosts metabolism. However, in so doing protein is also increasing metabolic heat and warming the body as a result. During a heat wave, this rise in body temperature can be dangerous. While it's safe to consume protein during a heat wave, don't overdo it. ☛ Circulate air throughout the home. Though it might feel like that old box fan is simply blowing hot air all over the place, when combined with open doors at night it's actually functioning like a crude exhaust system, pushing hot air outdoors and drawing cooler evening air in. Safety concerns understandably make many people wary of leaving their front doors wide open. If possible, install a screen door and keep the front door open until bedtime. In the meantime, open the windows to allow the cool air in during the evening and overnight. Once the sun rises in the morning, close the windows, the blinds and doors to trap the cool air indoors.

Once the air inside is warmer than the air o u t s i d e, open any window s, blinds and doors. ☛ Install a ceiling fan. Ceiling fans are remarkably effective at battling hot, stuffy rooms. Ceiling fans quietly and effectively circulate air, making a room much more c o m fo rt a ble to be in during periods of extreme heat. ☛ Remain hydrated. Remaining hydrated is essential during a heat wave. Men and women should drink more water than usual, and recognize that thirst is often the first indicator of dehydration. Individuals who sweat profusely should consider eating small amounts of food as they consume water. This helps replace the electrolytes lost by sweating. Men and women should also know that alcoholic and caffeinated beverages promote dehydration and should therefore be avoided during a heat wave. ☛ Go to the movies. Don't discount the benefit of seeing a movie during a heat wave. Though the theater might be packed with like-minded theatergoers, a midday movie in an air conditioned theater might still

be more comfortable than sitting at home in a house with no air conditioning. ☛ Turn off the lights and other appliances unless they're being used. Incandescent light bulbs and appliances generate excess heat. If the computer isn't being used, turn it off and keep the lights off until it's absolutely necessary that they be on. ☛ Embrace cold dinners. A cold dinner like homemade sandwiches and salads don't require the use of an oven to enjoy. Keeping the oven off can help keep the interior temperature down.


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SUNDAY | JUNE 26 | 2011


Summer Guide June 26, 2011