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Spring Guide

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Events & Entertainment Home Improvement Lawn & Garden Outdoor Activities Shopping Solutions Travel & Camping


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2011 SPRING GUIDE

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011


SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011

2011 SPRING GUIDE

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Protect Your Patio From Metro News Service Wear and Tear

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atios are typically the go-to spot for warm weather outdoor meals. Whether hosting friends or simply enjoying a relaxing meal under the evening sky, homeowners tend to spend as much time as possible on the patio once the weather warms up. Because it's such a high-traffic area, the patio should be protected from wear and tear. Wear and tear on the patio can result from Mother Nature or be a byproduct of all those spring and summer evenings spent relaxing outdoors. Fortunately, there are a

handful of ways homeowners can keep their patios looking pristine through the summer party season. ★ Stain the concrete. Staining concrete protects it from natural elements, which can cause the color of a patio to peel or flake. Concrete stain penetrates deep and infuses the concrete with a permanent color that's less likely to fall victim to the elements. Stains are generally solid-color stains or acid stains. Solid-color stains, as their name suggests, provide a more even and solid look, while acid stains provide a more marbl e - l i ke

Summer can be rough on patios and patio furniture. Homeowners can take several steps to protect their patios from wear and tear.


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2011 SPRING GUIDE a p p e a ra n c e. While neither are likely to fade or peel quickly, over time an additional coat or stain might need to be applied to counter natural factors like sunlight. ★ Cover the furniture. Patio furniture can vary significantly in price and quality. Homeowners who picked up a few plastic chairs at the nearby grocery store might not feel furniture covers are worth the investment. For those with more expensive patio furniture, durable furniture covers that can withstand year-round weather are a sound investment. Waterproof and heatresistant fabric is ideal, as the furniture will be vulnerable to spring rains, summer showers and high temperatures during the summer party season. Covers should also fit snugly around the furniture to provide optimal protection. ★ Consider retractable awnings. Retractable awnings might cost a little money, but they can also pay homeowners back over the long haul. First and foremost, retractable awnings protect patio from sunlight and ultraviolet rays

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 in hot weather. A retra c t a bl e awning can also protect friends and family members should an u n expected summer showe r appear or keep them safe from sunburns during summer afternoons when the UV index is high. When placed near a window, retractable awnings can lowe r energy bills. Such awnings can keep sunlight and ultraviolet rays from entering the home. This lowers the temperature indoors, which reduces reliance on air conditioning units to maintain a comfortable temperature. These awnings can also extend the life of furniture, which tends to fade when placed inside windows that get heavy sun exposure. ★ Plant trees. An eco-friendly way to maintain and add to a patio's aesthetic appeal is to plant trees around the patio. Trees can protect the patio from sunlight and ultraviolet radiation while providing some shade for friends and fa m i l y members who want to spend some quality time outdoors on hot afternoons. In addition, trees can create a serene setting to a patio, adding to its relaxing nature.


2011 SPRING GUIDE

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011

Calendar of Events SUNDAY, MAY 1 Activities ■ Friends of the Southeast Steuben County Library book sale | Noon-5 p.m., East Corning Fire Department, State Route 352, Corning. All Week Long. ■ “Camelot” | 2 p.m., Corning Community College Science Amphithetre, 1 Academic Drive, Corning. Presented by the Muse of Fire Theatre. $10, students and seniors $5. 962-9448. ■ Walk MS | 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. walk, Corning Painted Post East High School, Cantigny Street, Corning. Register, (800) 344-4867 ■ Skeet and 5-Stand | 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Painted Post Field and Stream, 320 Beartown Road, Painted Post. 962-8632, www.ppfs.org ■ “The Jungle Book” | 2:30 p.m., Family Life, 7634 Campbell Creek Road, Bath. Presented by Family Life Youtheatre. $10, students $8, children $5. (800) 9279083, www.fln.org ■ Team trivia | 7-10 p.m., Sarrasin’s on the Lake, 301 Lake St., Penn Yan.

■ Mother’s Day Make-It, Take-It | 1-3 p.m., Michael’s, 845 County Route 64, Big Flats. Free. 739-2084. FOOD ■ Breakfast buffet | 9 a.m.-noon, John P. Eaton American Legion Post, 8 River Road, Corning. $7. Eggs and omelets made to order. ■ Chicken barbecue | Noon, Addison Eagles Club, State Route 417 West, Addison. $8, chicken only $5. 359-2355.

MONDAY, MAY 2 Music ■ Karaoke with DJ Jason K | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave., Elmira. 732-4286. Activities ■ Trap League | 3 p.m., Corning Fish and Game Club, Hornby Road, Corning. ■ Team trivia | 7-9 p.m., Cap’n Morgan’s, Bridge Street, Corning. 9621616. ■ Duplicate bridge | 12:30 p. m . , Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane. 9628000.

■ Bingo | 5:30 p.m., Bath Fire Station, 50 E. Morris St., Bath. ■ Bingo | 5 p.m. doors open, 6:30 p.m. games, Horseheads Elks Lodge, 6 Prospect Hill Road, Horseheads. Public welcome. ■ Bridge | 1:30-4 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, 476 Maple St., Big Flats. 562-8443. ■ Bridge | 7-9 p.m., West Elmira L i b ra ry, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Register, 733-0541. ■ Penny social | 6 p.m., Perkinsville Fire Department, 1900 Main St., Perkinsville. Kids’ activities ■ “Music and More” | 3:30-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 9363713, Ext. 503. ■ Baby Lapsit | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., H o r s e h e a d s. Ages 0-18 months. 7394581. ■ Pajama storytime | 6:15 p.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. 733-0541. All ages. Classes and lectures

■ “Introduction to Windows 7” | 2-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning.

PAGE 5 Register, 936-3731, Ext. 502.

TUESDAY, MAY 3 Music

■ Bluegrass open mic jamboree | 6 p.m., Sound Works Cafe, 1020 Center St., Horseheads. 795-0323. Activities

■ Euchre | 7 p.m., Marconi Lodge, 26 W. Pulteney St., Corning. 937-5273. ■ Anusara Yoga film screening | 6-8 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 937-3713, Ext. 502. ■ Ballroom dancing | 10 a.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane. 962-8000. ■ Trivia night | 8-10 p.m., The Site, Bridge Street, Corning. 962-7088. ■ Skeet | 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Painted Post Field and Stream, 320 Beartown Road, Painted Post. 962-8632, www.ppfs.org ■ Free pool | 7-9 p.m., The Endzone, South Hamilton Street, Painted Post. ■ Trivia with DJ Bulldog Smith | 8-10 p.m., Applebee’s, 3149 Silverback Lane, Painted Post. 937-3318. ■ Duplicate bridge | 7-9 p.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Register, 733-0541. ■ Pong tournament | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sand Dollar Saloon & Grill, 1321 College Ave., Elmira. $2-5 per team. 732-4286.


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2011 SPRING GUIDE ■ Free pool | 7-10 p.m., The Beam House, North Buffalo Street, Elkland, Pa. (814) 258-5608. Kids’ activities

■ “Baby Bookworms” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 6 weeks-18 months. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Chicken Little Storytime” | 10:3011 a.m., Southeast Steuben County L i b ra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Toddlers. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Absolute Otaku Angels | 4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Anime-manga group for teens. 936-3713, mcconnells@stls.org ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Ages 3-5. 776-4613. ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 3-5. 739-4581. ■ Toddler storytime | 10:30 a.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Ages 18 months-3 years. 733-0541. Clubs

■ Town of Corning Senior Citizens | 5:30 p.m., South Corning Town Hall, Elm Street, Corning. All seniors ages 55 and older are invited. Bring a dish to pass and table setting. 936-8950. ■ Corning Area Retired Teachers | 11:30 a.m., Radisson Hotel, Denison Parkway, Corning. All area retired teachers welcome. 523-8008. ■ Chorus of the Southern Finger Lakes | 7-9 p.m., East High School, Cantigny Street, Corning. 962-1062 or 243-5520. ■ Painted Post Barbershoppers | 7 p.m., First Presbyterian United Methodist Church, 201 N. Hamilton St., Painted Post. 562-3533. An a cappella men’s chorus. New singers welcome. ■ Wine Country Toastmasters | 7-8:30 p.m., Steuben County Health Care Facility, 7009 Rumsey St. Ext., Bath. 7767813, (585) 728-9167, 324-7094. www.toastmasters.org ■ Needle crafts circle | 6-8 p.m., Fred and Harriett Taylor Memorial Library, 21 William St., Hammondsport. 569-2045. ■ Crystal Chords | 7-9:30 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 1034 W. Broad St., Horseheads. An a cappella women's barbershop chorus. N ew singers we lcome. 962-4238. ■ C h e mu n g - S chuyler Cadet Squadron of Civil Air Patrol | 7-9 p.m., Wings of Eagles Discovery Center, Big Flats. 776-6735. Classes and lectures ■ “Benjamin Pa t t e rson: L i fe and Times of a Patriot” | 7-8 p.m., United Methodist-First Presbyterian Church, 201

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 N. Hamilton St., Painted Post. Free, public we l c o m e. Sponsored by the CorningPainted Post Historical Society. ■ Broadband Experience Internet class | 1:30-7:30 p.m., Hornby Town Hall, Hornby Road, Hornby. 936-3713, Ext. 502.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4 Music ■ Open mic with Manny Q | 9:30 p.m.12:30 a.m., East End Pub, 88 Steuben Street, Corning. ■ Karaoke with DJ Jake | 9 p.m., The Glory Hole, Market Street, Corning. ■ Karaoke | 7-10 p.m., New Sarrasin’s on the Lake, 301 Lake St., Penn Yan. ■ Pat Kane | 8-11 p.m., Horigan’s Pub, Second Street, Elmira. ■ Jazz and chicken | 7-9 p.m., Green Pastures, Madison Avenue, Elmira. ■ Rock N’ Country night | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave., Elmira. 732-4286. Activities ■ Bingo | 5 p.m., North Corning Fire Department, Winfield Street, Corning. ■ Trap and skeet practice | 12-6 p.m., Corning Fish and Game Club, Hornby Road, Corning. ■ Trivia night | 8-10 p.m., The Site, Bridge Street, Corning. 962-7088. ■ Pinochle | 12:30 p.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane. 962-8000. ■ Skeet and 5-Stand | 5-9 p.m., Painted Post Field and Stream, 320 Beartown Road, Painted Post. 962-8632. ■ Weekly chess club | noon, Steele Memorial Library, 101 E. Church St., Elmira. All ages. 733-9173. ■ Pong | 7-10 p.m., The Beam House, North Buffalo Street, Elkland, Pa. (814) 258-5608. Kids’ activities ■ Tanglewood Nature Center program | 4-5 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Little Red Hen’s Friends Storytime” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Preschoolers. 9363713, Ext. 503. Food ■ Spaghetti dinner | 5-7 p.m., Eagles Club, State Route 417, Addison. 3592355. Clubs ■ Adult creative writer’s group | 4-6 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 9363713, Ext. 502. ■ Southside Neighborhood Watch Wards 3 and 4 | 6:30-7:30 p.m., Carter Elementary School library, State Street, Corning. 542-3194.


2011 SPRING GUIDE

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 Classes and lectures ■ BE:Lab | Noon-4 p.m., Campbell Town Hall, Main Street, Campbell. 9363713, Ext. 502. ■ Project Learning Tree workshop | 4-7 p.m., Vernon E. Wightman Primary School, 216 Maple Heights, Bath. Register, 535-9790. ■ “Tai Chi for Wellness” | 3:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., Sts. Peter and Paul Parish Center, 161 High Street, Elmira. $6. Register, 733-6541, Ext. 425, www.stjosephs.org

THURSDAY, MAY 5 Music ■ Corning Community College Select Vocal Ensemble and Student Recitals | 12:30-1:30 p.m., Corning Commu n i t y College Learning Center room R004, 1 Academic Dri ve, Corning. Pa rt of the Midday Concert Series. Free, public welcome. 962-9298. ■ Over/under dance party with Wink 106 | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Lando’s, Bridge Street, Corning. ■ Karaoke and open mic | 8 p.m., Harvest Cafe, 224 W. Main St., Montour Falls. Activities ■ Craft group | 12:30 p.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane, Corning. 9628000. ■ Craft group | 1-3 p.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. 7330541. ■ Trivia night | 9 p.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave. , Elmira. $1. Register, 732-4286. ■ Artist demonstration | 3-4 p.m., 7-8 p.m., Community Arts of Elmira, 413 Lake St., Elmira . Fr e e, public we l c o m e. Registration suggested, 426-2012. Kids’ activities ■ Torn Page young adult writers’ group | 7-8:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Blankets, Books, and Slippers Story Time” | 7-7:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Dress in pajamas. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Toddler storytime | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 18 months to 3 years. 739-4581. ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30 a.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Ages 3-5. 733-0541. Food ■ Thursday lunch | 11 a.m.-2 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion Post 746, 8 River Road, Corning. $5. Takeouts available. 654-7735. Classes and lectures

■ Computer class | 6-7:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Free. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 502. ■ “Creating an Effective Resume” | 1-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Bring a recordable CD or flash drive. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 502. ■ “With Bullets Singing All Around Me” | 7 p.m., Chemung Valley History Museum, 415 E. Water St., Elmira. Part of The Blue and the Gray Civil War Lecture Series. 734-4167. Religion ■ National Day of Prayer Observance | Noon, Schuyler County Court h o u s e, Franklin Street, Watkins Glen. Father Paul Bonacci officiating. 546-2624.

FRIDAY, MAY 6 Music ■ Mike Cavalier | 9 p.m., The Cellar, Market Street, Corning. ■ Tiger Muskies | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., East End Pub, 88 Steuben Street, Corning. ■ Karaoke Pitcher Party | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Lando’s, 41 Bridge St., Corning. ■ Charlie Keefover | 6-9 p.m., Tony R’s, Market Street, Corning. ■ U-Sing Karaoke with Jason | 9 p.m.1 a.m., Sit-N-Bull Pub, Village Square, Painted Post. ■ Sam Pallet | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Main Grill, Main Street, Addison. ■ DJ | 8 p.m.-1 a.m., Tiki Bar, 3425 Salt Point Road, Watkins Glen. ■ Japanese Drugstore | 9 p.m., Log Cabin, State Route 415, Campbell. ■ Buford and Dave | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., M a l o n ey ’s Pub, 57 Pulteney St., Hammondsport. ■ DJ Jason K | 8 p.m.-1 a.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave., Elmira. Dress code. 732-4286. ■ Karaoke | 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Beam House, North Buffalo Street, Elkland, Pa. (814) 258-5608. Activities ■ Exhibit reception | 5-7:30 p.m., West End Gallery, 12 W. Market St., Corning. “Quiet places” by Tom Gardner. Free, public welcome. 936-2011. ■ 43rd annual Student Art Show | 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. 937-5371, publicprograms@cmog.org ■ Bingo | 5:30 p.m. doors open, 6:45 p.m. games, Gibson Fire Department, 3 College Ave., Corning. Proceeds to benefit Spectrum Winterguard. 527-8138, www.baronsbingo.org ■ Free pool | 7-9 p.m., The Endzone, South Hamilton Street, Painted Post. ■ Rummage and bake sale | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, 3 W. Washington St., Bath. Proceeds to benefit church missions.

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2011 SPRING GUIDE ■ 20th annual Jack Lisi Youth Awards | 6:30 p.m., St. Mary’s Church, O’Malley Hall, 36 E. Morris St., Bath. $25. Register, 324-0808, 664-2249, 776-2121, 9363507. ■ Bridge | 1-3 p.m., West Elmira L i b ra ry, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Register, 733-0541. ■ Grow e rs Market | 3-6 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 30 E. Wellsboro St., Mansfield, Pa. Kids’ activities ■ Drawing class with Tom Fox | 3:305:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Cuddle Up | 10:30-11 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Children under 3. 776-4613. Food ■ Fish fry | 11 a.m.-3 p.m., 4-7 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion Post, 8 R i ver Road, Corning. $5-10. Ta ke o u t s available. 654-7735. ■ Fish Fry | 4-7 p.m., Marconi Lodge, 26 W. Pulteney St., Corning. Includes bread, coleslaw, dessert. $10. 937-5273. ■ Spaghetti dinner | 4:30-7 p.m., Calvin U. Smith School, 3414 Stanton St., Riverside. $7, children 2 and under $4, families $20. Proceeds to benefit Kids Adventure Club. 937-3201. ■ Fish fry | 5-7 p.m., Addison Eagles Club, State Route 417, Addison. 3592355. ■ Pyrohy sale | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., St. Nicholas Ukrainian Church Annex, East McCanns Boulevard, Elmira Heights. Call to order, 734-2232. Classes and lectures ■ “Internet Safety” | 1-2 p.m., “Introduction to Skype” | 2:30-3:30 Southeast Steuben County library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 502. ■ Wood Marquetry | 9 a.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane. 962-8000. ■ “Energy Flow” | 9 a.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane. Ages 55 and up. 962-8000. ■ Carl and Fanny Fribolin lecture | 6:30 p.m., Keuka College, Norton Chapel, Keuka. Presenter Mark Halperin.

SATURDAY, MAY 7 Activities ■ Fund for Women grant brunch | 9:30-11:30 a.m., Radisson Hotel, Denison Parkway, Corning. $36. Register, 7346412. ■ Pot and plant sale | 8 a.m.-noon, 171 Cedar Arts Center, Dra ke House lawn, 155 Cedar St., Corning. ■ 43rd annual Student Art Show | 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. 937-5371, pub-

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 licprograms@cmog.org ■ Free pool | Noon-4 p.m., Village Inn, 413 Park Ave., South Corning. ■ 3rd annual Paws and Pairings | 6-9 p.m., Watson Homestead, Dry Run Road, Painted Post. $50. Proceeds to benefit the Finger Lakes SPCA. 776+3039. ■ Victorian Tea | 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Brick Tavern Museum, State Route 14, Montour Falls. $15, children 5-10 $8, under 5 free. Register, 535-9741. ■ Rummage and bake sale | 9 a.m.noon, Centenary United Methodist Church, 3 W. Washington St., Bath. Proceeds to benefit church missions. ■ Scrapbooking Make-It, Take-It | 10 a.m.-noon, Michael’s, 845 County Route 64, Big Flats. Free. 739-2084. ■ Sixth annual Walk a Mile in My Shoes | 11 a.m., Eldridge Park, Elmira. Register, www.walkamile.net ■ Mother’s day tea | 1 p.m., Chemung Valley History Museum, 415 E. Water St., Elmira. $12. Register, 734-4167. Kids’ activities ■ Family Movie Matinee: “Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” | 12:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Painted Post dance | 7-11 p.m., First P r e s by t e rian Church, Hamilton Street, Painted Post. Live music, refreshments. Ages 21 and older. 973-2095. ■ Saturday Stories ‘n More | 10-11 a.m., Fred and Harriett Taylor Memorial Library, 21 William St., Hammondsport. Ages 3-7. 569-2045. ■ Fa m i ly storytime | 9:30 a.m., Montour Falls Library, 406 E. Main St., Montour Falls. 535-7489. ■ Teen Cafe | 7-10 p.m., Chemung County YMCA, 425 Pennsylvania Ave., Elmira. $3. High school ID required. ■ Animal Mothers | 2:30-3:30 p.m., Tanglewood Nature Center, 443 Coleman Ave., Elmira . Fr e e, public we l c o m e. www.tanglewoodnaturecenter.com Food ■ Mother’s Day Smorgasbord | 4-6:30 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, Lake Street, Hammondsport. $7.50, children 612 $3. Takeouts available. ■ Spaghetti dinner | 5-7 p.m., Burdett Presbyterian Church, 3995 Church St., Burdett. $6, families $20. Takeouts available. Clubs ■ Chemung Valley Fiber Arts Guild | 1-4 p.m., Bethany Lutheran Church, 254 S. Walnut St., Elmira. 734-6342. Classes and lectures ■ “Victory” | 9 a.m.-noon, Sew Pieceful, 5541 County Route 125, Campbell. 583-4968. ■ Birdwalk | 7 a.m., Ted Markham Nature Center, Mossy Bank Park, Bath.


SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011

2011 SPRING GUIDE

Return of the Rain Barrell GateHouse News Service

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mazing how good ideas of the past are forgotten, then rediscovered. The rain barrel is back. My gra n d father had one. It gathered his roof water and stored it for dry times. His was the simplest model. He dipped out the water with his sprinkling can. In his time, everybody collected ra i n wa t e r. City water was too ex p e n s i ve to waste outdoors. Rainwater naturally was free. Some things never change. My gr e a t - gra n d father, being Swiss-German, took it further. He built a brick cistern in his garden and funneled roof water to it. Then he emptied it with a hand pump. These days, ra i n water has become a liability. Some communities are charging to dump into storm sewers. This, in no small part, contributes to the rain-barrel revolution. The simplest is a 50-gallon trash container with a hole cut in the lid for the downspout. Next up is adding a spigot and hose at the bottom. Total cost: Less than $25. I have two of these, collecting water off our porch roof and off my gardening shed. The non-handy can buy neatlooking collector barrels for about $100. That’s just the start. I’m in love with Algreen. They make 50- and 65-gallon plastic barrels that look like terra cotta. Here’s the kicker. There’s space on top for container plants. Cost: $99 to $150. Rain barrels are useless in winter and need to be stored in the

Jim Hillibish writes about food, gardening and computers for GateHouse News Service. Contact him at jim.hillibish@cantonrep.com. garage. That leaves you with a cut downspout. Rain diverters are the answer. For $35, the AquaSaver places a collapsible hose on your waterspout and directs the flow to a barrel. You can turn it off, and the water then goes wherever it did before you installed the barrel. Fiskars, for $40, offers the flow diverter including a heavy-duty collector. It includes a removable filter to catch debris and adapts to fit most rectangular dow nspouts. The barrels take some maintenance. No. 1 is to remember to use the water. Otherwise, it eventually grows algae. Also, the barrel must be closed at top or you’ll breed mosquitoes. In some communities, you’ll get a discount on the storm-water tax if you install a collection system. Increasingly, garden centers are stocking rain barrels and d i ve rt e r s. T h ey are available online, but shipping barrels can be costly.

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2011 SPRING GUIDE

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SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011

Check it Out...

9 AREAS TO INSPECT FOR WINTER DAMAGE

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After a punishing winter of high wind and heavy snow, spring is a great time to inspect key parts of your home inside and out. Find potential problems now, and you could get them under control before April showers bring more damage. “Winter intrudes on your living space,” s ays Don Vandervo rt, home improvement ex p e rt at HomeTips.com. He offered these tips for homeowners eager to get ready for warmer weather and block more of nature’s unwanted advances.

tation from the house. Keep wood mulch away from the foundation because it can be an invitation to termites. Remove stormwindows and stormdoor panels, and put up the screens. If your screen has a small hole, patch it. Replace screens with large holes.

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CLEAN GUTTERS Remove leaves and debris from gutters and downspouts. Be sure gutters are attached to the h o u s e, and that dow n s p o u t s drain away from the foundation.

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CAULK WINDOWS REPLACE SCREENS Inspect caulking along Clean and cut back vege- windows. If it became damaged

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2011 SPRING GUIDE

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 during the winter, scrape it out and replace it.

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Close up your

CHANGE BATTERIES furnace and Put new batteries in INSPECT AIR s m o ke and carbonmonox i d e fireplace Metro News Service CONDITIONER detectors. Press the test buttons When you’re reasonably sure Before turning on your air to be sure they work.Make sure conditioner, change its filter. your fire extinguisher hasn’t you won’t need them anymore, you can close off your fireplace Clean the outdoor compressor or expired. and put your furnace to rest. have the compressor professionally inspected and cleaned. CUT BACK For furnaces LANDSCAPE Remove the old filter, vacuum I INSTALL Clean and cut back vegetation the filter compartment, then THERMOSTAT fromthe house. Keep woodmulch replace with a new one. If you don’t already have one, away fromthe foundation Vacuum dust from the outside spring is a fine time to install a because it can be an invitation to of the furnace and its surp r o grammable thermostat. Your termites. roundings. air conditioner use less energy. For wood-burning fireplaces WASH DECK Make sure any fire is comCHECK SUMP PUMP Clean decks, being sure to pletely out and the ashes are Check for any water dam- remove debris from between age around the base of your boards. Make sure sprinklers are cold. Clean the fireplace and home. Be sure your sump pump in good working order and not shut the damper. Well-fitted glass doors in front of the fireis in good working order, and use sprinkling the house. place can make a big difference it to remove any water.

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in keeping the cool air in when you’re air-conditioning your home. For gas-burning fireplaces Use caution. It is critical to leave the damper at least partially open at all times because these fireplaces produce carbon monoxide. Consult your owner’s manual.


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Spring River Swimming:

2011 SPRING GUIDE

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011

Remember to keep Safety First! Metro News Service Rivers can prove a refreshing place in which to cool off. Many people flock to rivers to escape the summertime heat. Though rivers can be an enticing place to cool off, care and caution should be used when venturing into a river. ✔ Water moves more quickly through a shallow, narrow river. Individuals should test the velocity of the water by throwing in a stick or a leaf and seeing how fast it is moving. Avoid any currents that are beyond a swimmer's abilities. ✔ Spring river swimming can be risky. The rivers are at a higher level because of rain and snow

run-off. They also may contain hidden debris that can be dangerous. ✔ Swim with a buddy, so that if something should happen, he or she can alert for help. ✔ River water may be especially cold, which can impede one's ability to swim easily. Even though the air temperature is hot, keep in mind the water temperature may still be chilly. ✔ Keep an eye out for boaters, fishermen, and other water enthusiasts. It's easier for swimmers to see them than for them to see the swimmer.


SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011

2011 SPRING GUIDE

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Butterflies: A Spring SpectacleMetro News Service Few harbingers of spring are more spectacular to look at than the variety of butterflies that take to the skies after they emerge from chrysalis. Although it is widely known that butterflies and moths go through a metamorphosis to turn into their finished forms, many are unaware just how many steps it takes for a butterfly to be ready to fly. 1. A butterfly begins its life as an egg, which a female butterfly lays on a particular plant that the species of butterfly prefers to eat.

This is called a host plant. Butterflies are ve ry particular about the type of plant that they eat. Certain species will only eat one type of plant or closely related varieties. 2. When a butterfly hatches from the egg, it is called a larva, or a first instar caterpillar. The insect is very small and does nothing but eat from the host plant. 3. Caterpillars are vo ra c i o u s eaters, and they grow very quickly. The trouble is that their skin cannot grow. A new, larger skin

Butterflies undergo an amazing transformation into the delicate, winged creature that graces spring days.


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2011 SPRING GUIDE must be formed. To do this the caterpillar must molt its old skin so that the new, larger skin can emerge. As it eats, a caterpillar will go through a few stages depending on the species. It may become a second, third, fourth, and fifth instar caterpillar. 4. A caterpillar that has molted several times may look very different from its initial larval form. It will be much larger and may have different colors and features. 5. During the final molt, the discarded skin will become part of the chrysalis that will house the caterpillar as it pupates. The caterpillar spins a silk girdle that attaches it to a particular location, either on a tree branch or a plant stem. 6. Contrary to popular belief, butterflies are not fo rmed in cocoons. Their pupa is called a chrysalis. Only some varieties of moths tra n s form inside of a cocoon. In the chry s a l i s, the caterpillar is undergoing a rapid t ra n s fo rmation. The chew i n g mouthparts are turning into the sucking mouthparts of a butterfly. Wings and antennae are also forming. The pupa stage is not merely a hibernation for the caterpillar. It is a time of very active growth.

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 7. About 10 to 14 days later the butterfly will emerge from the chrysalis. Upon doing so the wings will be wet and small. The butterfly then pumps fluids through the wings to expand them. It also needs to get used to flying. A recently hatched butterfly is very vulnera ble until its wings are ready and dry. 8. An adult butterfly eats nectar and reproduces to begin the life cycle anew. Relatively speaking, a butterfly has a short life span. Some species live only a few days. Others may live up to a year. This can make viewing a spectacularly hued butterfly in a spring garden even more poignant for the observer. More than 700 species of butterflies are found in North America. In order to attract them to the back yard, homeow n e r s can plant wildlife that nurtures all stages of the metamorphosis. Adult butterflies looking for nectar will seek out plants in the sunlight; rarely do they feed in the shade. Plants should have red, yellow, orange, pink, or purple bl o s s o m s. Flat-topped or clustered flowers are preferred, as are short flower tubes that enable the butterfly's proboscis to fit in easily.


SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011

2011 SPRING GUIDE BY KAREN CAFFARINI GateHouse News Service

GET ON TOP OF

ROOf DAMAGE

If wind and snow hurt your home, spring is the time to check it out he winds and snowfalls of 2011 may have left a swath of damaged roofs in their wa ke, even if there are no telltale signs of leakage on a home’s interior walls and ceiling. Your roof could have a one-time leak, caused strictly by the blowing snow, says TomBollnow, senior director of technical services for the National Roofing C o n t ractors Association in Rosemont, Ill. Other damage could have been caused by ice damming, which occurs when snow melts and ice builds up on the roof. The good news is, many repairs in these cases are simple, such as sealing a damaged area, pro-

T

vided the roofing shingles aren’t too old (more than 15 or 20 years) and the damage hasn’t gone untended for too long. Bollnow recommends wa i t i n g until spring to check for roof damage, when the threat of snow is over and the ground is firmer. One way to help prevent winter winds from wreaking havoc on your roof is to properly maintain it b e fore a blizzard bl ows in. Bollnow says maintenance should be done late in the fall, after all the leaves and debris from trees has fallen. “Clean debris such as seedlings and limbs from the roof and gutters. Make sure the downspouts are open,” he says.

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Here are some more tips: ✔

Bollnow recommends keeping good records of snow events. “It will help a lot because sometimes we can’t see any damage right away,” he says. ✔ You might be able to check the roof by using a pair of binoculars from across the street. If you need to get on the roof, only do so if you are comfortable with a ladder; otherwise, Bollnow recommends hiring a professional roofer. Make sure the ground is not wet and soggy, which could make the ladder slip. ✔ C h e ck gutters and dow nspouts for ice damage. ✔ Look at the accessories, such as the metal around the chimney and vent covers, to see if roofing shingles are bunched up around them, a sign that water could be getting in, he says. ✔ Look for worn and cracked

roofing materials that show signs of buckling; they may need to be repaired or replaced, Bollnow says. ✔ Check corner areas on the roof, such as by dormers, the chimney, skylights and vents, for signs of wear and loose materials. These areas will let water in the house if damaged, Bollnow says. ✔ If you have a roofer do the inspection and/or provide the wo rk , m a ke sure he or she is licensed and has a permit in the community to do business, that they are insured and have references, according to NRCA recommendations. Bollnow says you might want to see if the company has an office building, although he adds some good roofing contractors work out of their homes.


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Did You Know??? Potatoes are enjoyed world-over and make a versatile addition to a ny meal. Though many consumers purchase their potatoes at the local grocery store, potatoes can be easily grown in the home garden, too. Potatoes prefer a slightly acidic soil and full sun and will produce best in a loose, moisture-retentive soil. It is possible to get good potato yields in less-than-perfect soil, however. Home gardeners can begin planting potatoes in early spring, when the soil is able to be worked. Plants will not begin to grow until the soil temperature is at least 45 F. Plant only certified seed potatoes, which are available at most quality nurseries and garden centers. They are

less likely to have disease than a potato you picked up at the supermarket and tried to establish. Small seed potatoes can be planted as-is. Larger seed potatoes should be cut into pieces that contain at least one or two "eyes." Placing the seed potatoes in a warm location can entice them to bud and speed up thesprouting process once planted.


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CRACKING UP

BY MELISSA ERICKSON | GateHouse News Service

If your driveway or sidewalk is beginning to crumble, here are some tips on making the fix

■ Sooner or later most driveways and sidewalks will need repairs, especially in spring. ■ “During the winter months, the freeze-thaw cycles that can occur lift walkways and driveways and ice can form in expansion joints, actually pulling the material apart,” explained Lou Manfredini, Ace Hardware’s national home expert. ■ Also to blame can be ice-melt products. ■ “Particularly, rock salt can really break apart the top layer of concrete and cause additional damage,” he said. ■ Fortunately, these common problems are not often serious and can usually be fixed relatively easily.

WHEN TO DIY From a do-it-yourself homeowner point-of-view, the best way to deal with driveway cracks is to avoid them in the first place. Seal your driveway once a year. If you see cra cks forming, fill them immediately before the condition worsens.


SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 H o m e owners can fix smaller cracks themselve s, Manfredini said: “If the surface is asphalt, cra cks can either be repaired with a driveway tar in a caulk tube or a pre-mixed concrete patch.” With either material, it’s important to clean the cracks of any loose material and ensure they are dry before applying patching material. If you’re tackling the job yourself, be sure to read any safety precautions on the products you’re using. Some basic tools you’re likely to need include goggles and glove s, a hammer, broom, wire brush, screwdriver, pointed trowel and air compressor.

2011 SPRING GUIDE really depends on your level of comfort, Manfredini said. “Cracks are easy. Holes can take a little more work, but homeowners can do some of this themselves. “The trick with patching holes is to get enough material in there to stand up to the abuse the surface receives. It starts with actually making the hole bigger and deeper.”

WHO’S RESPONSIBLE?

Well-maintained sidewa l k s bring benefits to homeow n e r s and neighborhoods, such as increased property va l u e s, reduced crime, enhanced sense of community and improve d WHEN TO GET HELP health for people who walk. When to call in a professional But when the sidewalk falls into

disrepair, who is responsibl e ? While everyone uses your sidewalk, some cities assign responsibility for sidewalk upkeep to the adjacent homeowner. “It’s a local issue, and residents should contact their local public works department,” said Doug Hecox, a p u blic affairs officer with the Federal Highway Administration. In many cities funding is available to rebuild sidewalks, with the worst sidewalks receiving priority.Municipalities sometimes offer to share the cost of sidewalk

PAGE 21 repair with homeowners. Call your public works department or city hall for information. Insurance companies like to limit their liability in a lawsuit resulting from a damaged sidewalk, so they may provide financial assistance.


PAGE 22 MONDAY, MAY 9 Music ■ Karaoke with DJ Jason K | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave., Elmira. 732-4286. Activities ■ 43rd annual Student Art Show | 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. 937-5371, publicprograms@cmog.org ■ Trap League | 3 p.m., Corning Fish and Game Club, Hornby Road, Corning. ■ Team trivia | 7-9 p.m., Cap’n Morgan’s, Bridge Street, Corning. 9621616. ■ Duplicate bridge | 12:30 p.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane. 9628000. ■ Bingo | 5 p.m. doors open, 6:30 p.m. g a m e s, Horseheads Elks Lodge, 6 Prospect Hill Road, Horseheads. Public welcome. ■ Bridge | 1:30-4 p.m., Big Flats Community Center, 476 Maple St., Big Flats. 562-8443. ■ Bridge | 7-9 p.m., West Elmira L i b ra ry, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira . Register, 733-0541. Kids’ activities ■ “Music and More” | 3:30-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry,

2011 SPRING GUIDE Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 9363713, Ext. 503. ■ Baby Lapsit | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., H o r s e h e a d s. Ages 0-18 months. 7394581. ■ Pajama storytime | 6:15 p.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. 733-0541. All ages. Food ■ Wings and Things | 5-7 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion Post 746, 8 River Road, Corning. Takeouts available. 6547735.

TUESDAY, MAY 10 Music ■ Bluegrass open mic jamboree | 6 p.m., Sound Works Cafe, 1020 Center St., Horseheads. 795-0323. Activities ■ 43rd Annual Student Art Show | 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. 937-5371, publicprograms@cmog.org ■ Sit N Knit | 1-3 p.m., Wooly Minded, 103 W. Market Street. Free. Bring a project. 973-2885, www.woolyminded.com. ■ Euchre | 7 p.m., Marconi Lodge, 26 W. Pulteney St., Corning. 937-5273.

■ Ballroom dancing | 10 a.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane. 962-8000. ■ Trivia night | 8-10 p.m., The Site, Bridge Street, Corning. 962-7088. ■ Skeet | 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Painted Post Field and Stream, 320 Beartown Road, Painted Post. 962-8632, www.ppfs.org ■ Free pool | 7-9 p.m., The Endzone, South Hamilton Street, Painted Post. ■ Trivia with DJ Bulldog Smith | 8-10 p.m., Applebee’s, 3149 Silverback Lane, Painted Post. 937-3318. ■ Duplicate bridge | 7-9 p.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Register, 733-0541. ■ Pong tournament | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave., Elmira. $2-5 per team. 7324286. ■ Free pool | 7-10 p.m., The Beam House, North Buffalo Street, Elkland, Pa. (814) 258-5608. Kids’ activities ■ “Baby Bookworms” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 6 weeks-18 months. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Chicken Little Storytime” | 10:3011 a.m., Southeast Steuben County L i b ra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Toddlers. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Absolute Otaku Angels | 4 p.m.,

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Anime-manga group for teens. 936-3713, mcconnells@stls.org ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Ages 3-5. 776-4613. ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 3-5. 739-4581. ■ Toddler storytime | 10:30 a.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Ages 18 months-3 years. 733-0541.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 11 Music ■ Open mic with Driven | 9:30 p.m.12:30 a.m., East End Pub, 88 Steuben Street, Corning. ■ Karaoke with DJ Jake | 9 p.m., The Glory Hole, Market Street, Corning. ■ Karaoke | 7-10 p.m., New Sarrasin’s on the Lake, 301 Lake St., Penn Yan. ■ Pat Kane | 8-11 p.m., Horigan’s Pub, Second Street, Elmira. ■ Jazz and chicken | 7-9 p.m., Green Pastures, Madison Avenue, Elmira. ■ Rock N’ Country night | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave., Elmira. 732-4286. Activities ■ 43rd Annual Student Art Show | 9


SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 a.m.-5 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. 937-5371, publicprograms@cmog.org ■ Bingo | 5 p.m., North Corning Fire Department, Winfield Street, Corning. ■ Trivia night | 8-10 p.m., The Site, Bridge Street, Corning. 962-7088. ■ Pinochle | 12:30 p.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane. 962-8000. ■ Skeet and 5-Stand | 5-9 p.m., Painted Post Field and Stream, 320 Beartown Road, Painted Post. 962-8632, www.ppfs.org ■ Senior Citizen Day | 1-3 p.m., Brick Tavern Museum, State Route 14, Montour Falls. Music and refresh. Free. 535-9741. ■ Weekly chess club | noon, Steele Memorial Library, 101 E. Church St., Elmira. All ages. 733-9173. ■ Pong | 7-10 p.m., The Beam House, North Buffalo Street, Elkland, Pa. (814) 258-5608. Kids’ activities ■ “Little Red Hen’s Friends Storytime” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. P r e s c h o o l e r s. 936-3713, Ext. 503. Food ■ Wings and Things | 4-7 p.m., Marconi Lodge, 26 W. Pulteney St., Corning.

2011 SPRING GUIDE ■ Spaghetti dinner | 5-7 p.m., Addison Eagles Club, State Route 417, Addison. 359-2355.

THURSDAY, MAY 12 Music ■ Corning Community College Vocal and Instrumental Pe r forming Ensembles | 12:30-1:30 p.m., Corning Community College Learning Center room R004, 1 Academic Drive, Corning. Part of the Midday Concert Series. Free, public welcome. 962-9298. ■ Over/under dance party with Wink 106 | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Lando’s, Bridge Street, Corning. ■ Karaoke and open mic | 8 p.m., Harvest Cafe, 224 W. Main St., Montour Falls. ■ Open mic jam with Ripple | 6-9 p.m., Papa Dale’s, 2325 State Route 352, Big Flats. Activities ■ Craft group | 12:30 p.m., Corning Senior Center, 1 Park Lane, Corning. 9628000. ■ Craft group | 1-3 p.m., W. Elmira Library, W. Water St., Elmira. 733-0541. ■ Trivia night | 9 p.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave. , Elmira. $1. Register, 732-4286.

■ Artist demonstration | 3-4 p.m., 7-8 p.m., Community Arts of Elmira, 413 Lake St., Elmira . Fr e e, public we l c o m e. Registration suggested, 426-2012. Kids’ activities ■ “Blankets, Books, and Slippers Story Time” | 7-7:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Dress in pajamas. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ To ddler storytime | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 18 months to 3 years. 739-4581. ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30 a.m., West Elmira Library, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Ages 3-5. 733-0541.

FRIDAY, MAY 13 Music ■ Karaoke Pitcher Party | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Lando’s, 41 Bridge St., Corning. ■ Charlie Keefover | 6-9 p.m., Tony R’s, Market Street, Corning. ■ U-Sing Karaoke with Jason | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sit-N-Bull Pub, Village Square, Painted Post. ■ Driven | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., East End Pub, 88 Steuben Street, Corning. ■ Japanese Drugstore | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Main Grill, Main Street, Addison. ■ DJ | 8 p.m.-1 a.m., Tiki Bar, 3425 Salt

PAGE 23 Point Road, Watkins Glen. ■ Cross Eyed Cats | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., M a l o n ey ’s Pub, 57 Pulteney St., Hammondsport. ■ Mike Cavalier | 7 p.m., Club 57, Seneca Road North, Hornell. ■ L u cky Ducks | 9 p.m.-midnight, Patrick’s, 303 College Ave., Elmira. ■ DJ Jason K | 8 p.m.-1 a.m., Sand Dollar Saloon and Grill, 1321 College Ave., Elmira. Dress code. 732-4286. ■ Karaoke | 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Beam House, North Buffalo Street, Elkland, Pa. (814) 258-5608. Activities ■ Friday Free Film: “Stranger Than Fiction” | 7 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. ■ Bingo | 5:30 p.m. doors open, 6:45 p.m. games, Gibson Fire Department, 3 College Ave., Corning. Proceeds to benefit Spectrum Winterguard. 527-8138, www.baronsbingo.org ■ Free pool | 7-9 p.m., The Endzone, South Hamilton Street, Painted Post. ■ Community dance | 7:30-11:30 p.m, Addison Community Center, Community Dri ve, Addison. Dinner, door prize s, 50/50. $10. 458-5281. ■ Bridge | 1-3 p.m., West Elmira L i b ra ry, 1231 W. Water St., Elmira. Register, 733-0541.


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Regional Calendar ALBANY Times Union Center www.timesunioncenteralbany.com or (518) 487-2000 ■ April 30 | Avenged Sevenfold, 7 p.m. ■ May 5-8 | Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus ■ May 21 | ZZ Top and Lynyrd Skynyrd, 7 p.m. ■ June 18 | Michael Buble, 8 p.m. BIG FLATS Tag’s www.tagstickets.com ■ May 20 | Lynyrd Skynyrd and ZZ Top, 8 p.m. ■ June 4 | Hullabaloo Festival, 2 p.m. BINGHAMTON

The Broome County Forum broomeforum.com ■ May 1 | “The Tales of Hoffmann,” 3 p.m. ■ May 15 | Binghamton Philharmonic, 8 p.m. ■ June 3-5 | Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” BUFFALO HSBC Arena www.hsbcarena.com ■ May 28 | New Kids on the Block and the Backstreet Boys, 7:30 p.m. ■ June 3 | Josh Grobin, 8 p.m. ■ June 21 | Taylor Swift, 7 p.m. CANANDAIGUA Constellation Brands Marvin Sands Performing Arts Center www.cmacevents.com or

(800) 745-3000 ■ June 4 | Ray LaMontagne and the Pariah Dogs, 7 p.m. ■ June 9 | Miranda Lambert, 8p.m. CORNING Corning-Painted Post Civic Music Association www.corningcivicmusic.org or (800) 531-3679 All concerts at The Corning Museum of Glass. ■ June 18 | Roseanne Cash, 7:30 p.m. DARIEN CENTER Darien Lake Performing Arts Center darienlakepac.org ■ June 8 | Phish, 7 p.m. ■ June 25 | Tim McGraw, 7 p.m.

ELMIRA Clemens Center www.clemenscenter.com or 734-8191 ■ May 13-14, 19-21 | “Who’s Life is it Anyway?” | 7:30 p.m. ■ May 15 | “Who’s Life is it Anyway?” | 2 p.m. ■ May 24 | Barney, 3 p.m., 6:30 p.m. ■ June 4 | Common Time, 7:30 p.m. NIAGARA FALLS Seneca Niagara www.senecaniagaracasino.com or (877) 873-6322 ■ April 29 | Edwin McCain, 8 p.m. ■ April 30 | David Crosby and Graham Nash, 8 p.m. ■ May 6 | Gary Lewis and the


SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 Playboys, 8 p.m. ■ May 13 | Aziz Ansari, 8 p.m. ■ May 14 | The BoDeans, 8 p.m. ■ May 21 | Judy Collins, 8 p.m. ■ May 27 | The Wailers, 8 p.m. ■ May 28 | Aretha Franklin, 8 p.m. ■ June 4 | Patti Austin, 8 p.m. ROCHESTER Blue Cross Arena www.bluecrossarena.com or (585) 232-1900, (716) 852-5000 ■ June 11 | WWE Raw, 7:30 p.m. TORONTO Air Canada Center www.theaircanadacenter.com ■ April 29 | Stars on Ice, 7:30 p.m. ■ May 8 | Rammstein, 8 p.m. ■ May 14 | Usher, 7 p.m. ■ May 18 | Adele, 8 p.m. ■ May 27 | Kid Rock, 7:30 p.m. ■ June 6-7 | Rihanna, 7:30 p.m. ■ June 11-12 | Glee: In Concert ■ June 28 | Sade, 7:30 p.m.

2011 SPRING GUIDE ■ June 29-30 | Katy Perry, 7:30 pm UNCASVILLE, CONN. Mohegan Sun Arena www.mohegansun.com ■ May 1 | Stone Sour, 6 p.m. ■ May 7 | Bon Jovi, 8 p.m. ■ May 13 | Earth, Wind & Fire, 8 p.m. ■ May 30, June 2 | New Kids on the Block and the Backstreet Boys, 7:30 p.m. ■ June 7 | Glee, 7:30 p.m. ■ June 8 | Miranda Lambert, 7:30 p.m. ■ June 10 | The Monkees, 8 p.m. ■ June 14-15 | Michael Buble, 7:30 p.m. ■ June 23 | Tim Allen, 8 p.m. ■ June 25 | Katy Perry, 7:30 p.m. VERONA Turning Stone Casino Resort (877) 833-SHOW ■ May 6 | Asia, 8 p.m.

■ May 12 | Gary Allen, 8 p.m. ■ May 18 | James Taylor, 8 p.m. ■ May 19 | Little Big Town, 8 p.m. ■ May 24 | Weird Al Yankovic, 8 p.m. ■ June 10 | Frank Stallone, 8 p.m. ■ June 17 | Uncle Kracker, 8 p.m. ■ June 19 | Englebert Humperdinck, 7 p.m. ■ June 27 | Lionel Richie, 8 p.m. WILLIAMSPORT, PA. Community Arts Center www.pct.edu/COMMARTS or (800) 432-9382 ■ May 1 | Williamsport Symphony Orchestra, 3 p.m. ■ May 7 | Tim Wilson, 7:30 p.m. ■ May 12 | “Legally Blonde,” 7:30 p.m. ■ May 19 | Erin Jackson, 8 p.m. ■ May 21 | “Cooking with the Calamari Sisters,” 7:30 p.m. ■ June 5 | Williamsport Civic Ballet, 4 p.m.

PAGE 25 ■ June 7 | Clouds Make Sounds, 7:30 p.m. TICKETS: Ticketmaster ■ Ticketmaster charge by phone: (800) 745-3000. ■ Online: www.ticketmaster.com ■ Area Ticketmaster outlets include The Information Center, Centerway Square, Market Street, Corning and Macy’s at The Arnot Mall, Big Flats. ■ Always contact venue to confirm listings.


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Outdoor Activities

Ideal for Spring Metro News Service Golfers typically can't wait for the first warm day of spring so they can return to the local links and play 18 holes.

O

nce winter has come and gone, adults and children alike are typically anxious to get outside and soak up some spring sun. Few things are as rejuvenating as those first few spring days, when the harsh winter weather is instantly forgotten and the smell of fresh grass is comfort a bl y overwhelming. When saying "so long" to cabin

fever this spring, consider the following outdoor activities that are sure to put a spring in your step.

GOLF Many golf courses re-open in the spring. Though some public courses stay open throughout the winter, the majority of courses do close once the weather becomes too unbeara ble for golfers to endure or too detri-

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011


2011 SPRING GUIDE

SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 mental to the course's landscape. Depending on how harsh the winter was and the forecast for spring, golf courses typically re-open their links as early as the first week of March. Even if your favo rite course doesn't open quickly enough, you can still dust off your swing with a visit to the local driving range.

FISH Many fishermen feel like fishing season never ends, choosing to simply add another layer of clothing when the temperatures drop rather than pack it up and wait till spring. For the hobbyist, however, spring is typically a time to find a favorite fishing hole and get back to business. How successful a fishing trip will be typi-

cally depends on a host of fact o r s, including water temperature. Oftentimes, the local newspaper will list the water temperature of the area's favorite fishing areas. Once nature decides to cooperate, get outside and enjoy the first catch of the season.

CYCLING Perhaps thanks to seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, cycling has gr ow n increasingly popular stateside in the 21st century. Many communities have cycling groups for riders of varying skill levels, and such groups typically hit the pavement once the spring season arrives. When joining a group, be sure to join one that's suited to your skill level. If cycling alone, be patient

at the beginning and don't stray too far. Remember, you'll eventually need to turn around and start pedaling home.

JOIN A SPORTS LEAGUE Adults can relive the days of their youth by signing up to play in a local sports league. Such leagues are often ideal for young singles, who can team up with fellow young people to play any number of sports, including softball, beach volleyball, basketball, and even the old standby of ele-

PAGE 27 mentary school, kickball.

RUN Winter can test even the most devoted of runners. For those who simply can't run in the throes of winter, when snow and ice cover the roadways, spring is the first chance to get back outdoors and run in the fresh air. Local road runner clubs are a great opportunity to meet fellow runners or learn of local competitions. When running, be sure to bring along some gear to keep you relatively dry should those inevitable spring showers arrive.


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Spring Not Fun for Allergy Sufferers Metro News Service any embrace the spring thanks to its warm weather and budding flowers and trees. Those with seasonal allergies, however, may not look so favorably on the new season. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation, about 50 million Americans ex p e rience spring allergies. Some may have allergies each and every year. Others may find their allergies are newly discovered. The most common allergy triggers in spring include trees, grasses and weeds.

M

Allergies can evoke a number of symptoms: ☛ itchy eyes ☛ sneezing ☛ congestion ☛ headaches ☛ coughing ☛ runny nose ☛ sore throat ☛ shortness of breath ☛ hives Seve ral of the symptoms of allergies mimic those of the common cold, and allergies are often mistaken for late winter colds. But as time spent outdoors with flowering plants triggers symptoms or inhalation of dust from

Showering immediately after spending ample time outdoors can help wash off any pollen that might have accumulated.


SUNDAY | APRIL 24 | 2011 spring cleaning induces an attack, the allergy culprit may become more apparent. Pollen is one of the main contributors to allergies in the spring. For many people, pollen is seen as an outside invader to the body

2011 SPRING GUIDE and its immune system. When pollen is inhaled or comes in contact with the eyes, the immune system triggers a response to get rid of the foreign substance. Excess mucous buildup and tears may be generated to wash out the pollen. What all of this fluid can mean is sinus pressure, runny nose, watery eyes, and eventually cough or congestion from fluids running down the breathing passages and into the lungs. As the body prepares to fend off pollen invaders, other symptoms may occur. Fatigue, aches and pains and other flu-like symptoms may be present. While battling pollen, the immune system is in full swing and may not be able to fully devote attention to other invaders, like bacteria

and viruses. A person with allergies might be more susceptible to sickness. There really are no cures for common allergies, only methods to manage the symptoms. Individuals with strong allergies to pollen should avoid spending a lot of time outside when pollen counts are especially high or the wind is blowing pollen around. Pollen predictions can be obtained through the local weather report or doing a little investigating online. Here are some other steps to limit tro u bl esome springtime allergies. ☛ Take a shower to wash off pollen from hair and skin after coming indoors. ☛ Launder clothes regularly. ☛ Keep windows and doors closed on high pollen days.

PAGE 29 ☛ Use a HEPA air filter inside of the home. ☛ Do not air-dry clothes, linens or other items outdoors on a clothesline. ☛ Consider using a saline irrigation spray to improve breathing and cleanse the nasal passages of pollen. ☛ Talk with a doctor about the best OTC products available for allergy symptoms. If those are ineffective, prescription medications may work. ☛ Some people find relief from alternative health treatments, such as acupuncture or ear candling. Being proactive about seasonal allergies can mean getting relief earlier or even preventing serious complications in the spring.


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Spring Sales Are a Great Way To Save Shoppers can realize good deals on select items this spring. Many people look forward to spring not only for the pleasant weather, but for the many items that traditionally go on sale this season. Spring is the ideal time to visit area stores and soak up some sunlight and fresh air in the process. Shopping can also provide a respite from the cabin fever that set in during the long winter. For those who love to shop and get a good deal in the process, the spring season can present a host of opportunities for saving a buck or two if you buy the right items. Appliances/Electronics: Shoppers seeking a new stove or refrigerator may want to do their shopping now. The fiscal year for most Japanese small appliance and electronics companies generally ends in March and new models debut in June. T h e r e fo r e, these companies often look to unload older models at a discount before the new ones arrive in summer. Barbecue essentials: Accessori e s, sauces, condim e n t s, and napkins can be snatched up for a deal this time of the year as retailers hope to get a jump on the grilling season. Sneakers: Because many charity wa l k s and runs take place during the warmer weather, sneaker companies & shoe stores may dis-

count items to appeal to the public. In-season fruits: Fruit prices typically dip in spring, as the warmer weather means less need to rely on imported produce from tropical climates. Shop seasonal fruits such as grapefruits, o ra n g e s, pineapples, strawberri e s, bl a ck b e r ri e s, blueberri e s, melons, oranges, and peaches. Consignment: Spring cleaning is big and that means that individuals will be unloading seldomused items. People who love the thrill of finding a thrift-store or consignment shop deal can often fin great bargains in the spring. Yard and garage sales can also be great for shoppers seeking even bigger deals. Winter clearance: Stores that have not yet liquidated winterrelated items may put them on sale at a deep discount just to get rid of things. Stock up on shovels, snow bl owe r s, heavy clothing, coats, and boots now to store away for the end of the year.


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Spring Garden Time Few things are anticipated more in spring than the arrival of new leaves on the trees and budding flowers in the garden. A landscape awash with fresh colors can brighten the spirit and make anyone want to head outdoors. There are many different plants that begin to show their colors in the spring. A number of perennials, annuals and trees begin to flower or show new sprouts come the springtime. Here are some plants that can be planted for springtime enjoyment. ANNUALS: Looking for first signs of color? Look no further than these wonderful annuals. ❋ Alyssum: Starting in April, this cascading bounty of tiny flowers offers a sweet aroma that attracts butterflies. ❋ Dianthus: These vivid flowers also attract butterflies and are often a cottage garden staple. ❋ Gypsophila: Also known as b a by's breath, these delicate flowers can serve as filler in any landscape. Pink and white varieties are available. ❋ Impatiens: One of the bestk n own plants for the garden, these annuals come in scores of colors and can generally tolerate full sun to full shade. ❋ Larkspur: Belonging to the buttercup family, these flowers

Annuals

bloom in shades of white to violet. ❋ Pansy: These flowers are some of the earliest spring bl o o m e r s, arriving alongside spring bulbs like tulips. ❋ Petunias: Petunias put on a show of color through the entire season, making them a popular bedding flower. PERENNIALS: These plants will come back year after year and offer spring shows. ❋ Cherry blossom: The flowers that sprout on cherry trees are some of the first signs of spring. Their pink or white buds are often a spectacle, so much so that towns and cities hold cherry blossom festivals. ❋ Columbine: These beautiful blooms attract butterflies and can be a nice part of a garden bed. ❋ Jacob's ladder: Variegated foliage that is dappled with violetcolored flowers can add a sweet smell and visual interest to the garden. ❋ Primrose: Th ese flowe r s come in a variety of shades, making them versatile in any garden. They also tend to attract butterflies and hummingbirds. ❋ Sweet violet: These fragrant f l owers are edible as well as attractive. These plants can selfplant, so unless a gardener wants them to spread, they should be kept contained.

Perennials

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Spring Guide 2011