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Best NYC Emering Artists 2016

CAFUNÉ

did she produce her own (third) album Heroes, and animate the video for its title track, she also co-hosts events that empower other women artists. Musically, Campbell’s Caribbean soul touches a bit of everything—hip-hop, EDM, punk, anthemic pop—which combined is a sound entirely her own. (Jason Grimste)

Janita

A line like “Surrender to what is real”—from Janita’s “Beautiful You Are”—might seem precocious if not couched in atmospherics which contest its sense of reality. The singer/songwriter hails from Helsinki, making English her second language, though you’d never know it by the elegant whispers and wails throughout the newest LP. (Brian Chidester)

Ryn Weaver

Amongst those that would assess the viral web smash “OctaHate,” the verdict is clear: Weaver is either the next pop superstar or an example of official art at its nadir. Either way, the song’s overlydramatic, plastic production has moxie and shows that a song about happiness can still be cogent, rather than sappy or wispy. (Paolo De Gregorio)

ELECTRONIC 6

Born Cages

This band’s 2015 single is titled “I Just Want the Truth, Baby.” Well, as Jack Nicholson said in A Few Good Men: “You can’t handle the truth!”

Beat Music/ Mark Giuliana

Nadus

We’re gonna give it to you anyway. The blending of Edward Sharpe-ish beatnik anthems with sleek techno production may as yet yield you a crossover hit, dudes. (Brian Chidester)

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Buscabulla

Hard to believe it’s been two years since Kitsuné, the Buscabulla EP produced by Devonte Hynes. What to do whilst tapping our fingers, waiting for the next one? Answer: play those same four sexually-tinged synth tunes for unfamiliar ears and see if sparks fly. Been known to have that effect. (Brian Chidester)

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CAFUNÉ

Sedona Schat and Noah Yoo’s music exists in a perpetual spring (as in the season), making 2015-16, with its warm summer and mild winter, their year indeed. Breezy melodies are complemented by peppy, electro/dance arrangements. Single “Warm Body” found lots of love on the internet, as did new EP: Love Songs for Other People. (Paolo De Gregorio)

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Evvy

Evvy is yet another NYC-based synthpop solo act that’s finding online love (as in, fans). Her self-titled debut EP, released in mid-2014, features breezy melodies, easy listening production values, and lyrics about young love and heartbreak. (Paolo De Gregorio)

Beat Music/ Mark Giuliana

A recent experiment by musicians Guiliana, Tim

Janita

Photo: Paul Jung

Lefebvre, Jeff Babko, and Troy Zeigler, Beat Music’s thirty-song LP is a wonder of eclecticism. Songs like “Flaw and Order” show serious fetishism for ‘70s incidental music, making the case that it was not just overlooked, but needs perpetuating. (Brian Chidester)

Elliot Moss

For some songwriters, good melody is simply not enough. Compelled by complex sequences and original sounds, the twentysomething Elliot Moss fits that description. Sound design easily takes as much precedence as lyrics, chords, structure. Lone LP Highspeeds drifts through the abstraction with apparent ease. (Paolo De Gregorio)

Informant

Dance music needn’t always be bright and fun, as Informant will show you. Heavy electronics, percussive synth tracks, and an overall ambiguity work to make the body move without consent. It is a conflicted experience, though one that’s difficult to ignore—and could be said to be generational of sentiment. (JP Basileo)

King Neptune

Why does ambient music seem ever on the verge of one era to the next? The Germans have a word for this: zeitwende. Conversely, ambient music has never been just one thing or one period. King Neptune are now and their soothing piano and introspective drones combine to entrance. More meditation than relaxation. (JP Basileo)

Paris Monster

Photo: Elizabeth Lauren West

Profile for The Deli Mag

The Deli NYC #46 - Best of NYC 2016: Acid Dad, Donna Missal, Honduras  

Featuring an article about the renewed radicalism in NYC music, and a list of 100+ of the best emerging NYC based artists.

The Deli NYC #46 - Best of NYC 2016: Acid Dad, Donna Missal, Honduras  

Featuring an article about the renewed radicalism in NYC music, and a list of 100+ of the best emerging NYC based artists.

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