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The

Boat Company Fall 2002

FAREWELL TO THE M/V OBSERVER Retiring our flagship

CANADIAN DENTIST GIVES EAGLE NEW BEAK Returning to the wild

ALASKAN FISHING INDUSTRY Caught in a downward spiral

FROM OUR GUESTS

Photo Credit: Norie Matsumoto

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Notes and Comments by Michael McIntosh President, McIntosh Foundation and The Boat Company

Notwithstanding (or maybe

On a more upbeat note, we are

because of) the terrorism issue,

momentarily expecting a grant

we had another good season in

from the Home Depot Company

Southeast Alaska exposing a full

to study the feasibility of mixing

compliment of new and repeat

fish waste with sawmill waste to

guests to the beauties of the area.

create a garden fertilizer product

Michael McIntosh

(bagged compost).The U.S. We have decided to retire the

Forest Service has done some

Corporate Office The Boat Company c/o The McIntosh Foundation 1730 M Street NW, Suite 204 Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 338-8055 phone (202) 234-0745 fax www.theboatcompany.com

OBSERVER (see article later in

preliminary work on this project

this edition).

with promising results and this

Conservation Programs and Reservations The Boat Company 19623 Viking Ave NW Paulsbo, WA 98370-8399 (360) 697-4242 phone (360) 697-5454 fax email: kathy@theboatcompany.com

The Boat Company can be reached at:

Staff:

Michael McIntosh, President Mark McIntosh, Vice President Hunter McIntosh, Editor & Marketing Manager Barbara McIntosh, Managing Attorney Bob Vey, Comptroller Kathy Nissley, Reservations Manager Debbie Wells Renee Travelstead

grant will further that effort. Wooden-hulled boats cost three to four times as much to maintain

Commercial fishing is the largest

in tip top condition as vessels

economic engine in Southeast

made of other materials (metal/

Alaska and due to the growth

fiberglass) and with her limited

of aquaculture (fish farms) it is

capacity of 12 people, the

in trouble.

OBSERVER has never been able to break even (operating losses

If ways can be found to turn fish

underwritten by The McIntosh

waste (currently an economic

Foundation). Reluctantly we

cost) into a benefit, it would

concluded we had no alternative

be a tremendous boon to

but to find her a kinder and

Alaskan fishermen.

gentler home.

Board of Directors:

Michael McIntosh Winsome McIntosh Mark McIntosh Hunter McIntosh Colin McIntosh

Don’t forget to check us out on the Internet! For more updated information, schedules, quotes and more, visit our Web site at www.theboatcompany.com

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Observer

Farewell to the M/V OBSERVER

I

t is with some sadness

develop a community of advocates

that we announce the

for the protection and sound

“retirement” of our

management of federal lands

flagship, the OBSERVER,

in Alaska, our country’s

from service with the Boat

last frontier.

Company. She is a grand lady that inspired us to establish

We found the OBSERVER in a

and grow the company into

sad state of affairs in Mexico

the premier water-based

in 1979, tethered to a dock,

wilderness travel experience

never at sea, and owned by an

of Southeast Alaska.

independent oil company that was using the vessel to “entertain”

A wooden-hulled Navy ship

its asphalt contractors! She had

designed for harbor mine-sweep

“good bones”, a sturdy, safe

operations, the OBSERVER was

wooden hull, a strong, reliable

built in Antioch, California and

Hamilton diesel engine, and a

launched in 1942. She was

wonderful profile that looked

assigned to her homeport of

like it belonged in Alaskan waters.

San Francisco until taken out of

We fell in love with her and

service in 1945. The McIntosh

purchased (some might say

Foundation, after preliminary

rescued) her to launch the

work on Alaskan forestry issues

“Alaskan Project.”

starting in the early 1970’s, decided to establish an

After a year of conversion and

educational program centered

rehabilitation work, we launched

around the Tongass National

our first year of Alaskan tours

Forest and encourage community

in 1981. Early guests included

leaders from the “lower 48”

elected officials, journalists,

to experience the beauty and

foundation trustees, environmental

majesty of this special part of

organizations and community

Alaska. The theory behind such

leaders from the lower 48.

an approach was to educate and

In 1980 President Jimmy Carter

The Boat Company

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“She had ‘good bones’, a sturdy, safe wooden hull, a strong, reliable Hamilton diesel engine and a wonderful profile that looked like it belonged in Alaskan waters.”

Continued from page 3 signed into law the National

close, we discovered a growing

to give her the loving care and

Interests Lands Conservation

“alumni” of OBSERVER friends

less stressful lifestyle she so

Act (ANILCA). This legislation

who kept her staterooms full as

deserves. We will miss her.

established the “roadmap” for

they repeated their journeys and

She is part of our history. She

management of all federal lands

brought their families and friends

has been a member of our

in the state. From that “business

back to experience the Alaskan

Foundation family for over 20

plan” has sprung a more sound

waters. As demand continued to

years. We will look to find her

and deliberate plan for public

increase, we sought and found a

a good home with a loving

and government use of the land.

second vessel, the LISERON, in

family and follow her illustrious

1989 and built a third, the MIST

career into the 21st century.

We choose to think that the

COVE, in 1996.

presence of the OBSERVER

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The Boat Company

throughout the 80s helped in

Because of her small size and

some small part to support that

limited range, the OBSERVER

outcome.Thinking that this

would be better served with a

project would then come to a

new owner who can continue


Canadian dentist gives eagle new beak,

waives bill

C

algary, Alberta – A bald eagle that was left for dead

The director of the preserve nursed the 18-pound (8-kilogram) bird

after its beak was shot off is alive and tearing its prey

back to health, but the soft, remaining nub of its bill prevented it from

to shreds again thanks to a Canadian dentist who

eating anything but small morsels. Andrews formed a plaster impression

fashioned an artificial bill out of acrylic denture material.

of the remaining beak and took it to a dental technician, who made a replica out of orthodontic acrylic, the same material used to make

Now Dr. Brian Andrews is working to improve on the prototype,

some false teeth and mouth guards for hockey players. He stained the

which is pinned to the tiny bit of beak left after the gunshot, so the

device yellow, to make it look realistic.The bird took to it immediately.

4 and 1/2-year-old bird of prey can one day return to the wild. “He’s tearing at his prey. When we first put it on, he gave us this nice, "Because this is new ground for us, and I’m new at this, we expect to

great big yawn and squawk, and we were quite thrilled that it stayed

make three or four or five or even a dozen until we get it right,”

together,” Andrews said. The eagle can eat an entire fish, although

Andrews said last week from his dental practice in Nanaimo, British

concerns remain about food becoming lodged between the artificial

Columbia. “As a matter of fact, tomorrow I’m going up to fit the Mark II model, and we hope to make it even more successful.” He based the design, complete with breathing holes, on a picture of an eagle on a recent cover of National Geographic magazine as well as a dried beak specimen.The director of the Vancouver Island wildlife preserve where the eagle is being cared for has named it Brian in the 62-year-old dentist’s honor.

beak and the skull, prompting the need for improved models.

“I’m fond of wildlife. I’m a carver and I make duck decoys as a hobby. I figured: I can carve wooden beaks, maybe I can make a plastic one for this guy.”

Andrews is doing all the work free of charge. “I’m fond of wildlife. I’m a carver and I make duck decoys as a hobby. I figured: I can carve wooden beaks, maybe I can make a plastic one for this guy," he said.

Two people found the injured bird on the roadside two months ago near the town of Tofino on the western coast of the island. Wildlife officials determined it had been shot out of a low tree limb that day with a high-powered rifle. It is not known why the eagle was targeted. “It’s not an unusual occurrence out here. We’ve got quite a number of eagles, and we have birds with legs gone and wings gone,” Andrews said. “While we’ve been treating Brian there’s been three others brought in with gunshot injuries.”

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Fishing Industry THE ALASKAN FISHING INDUSTRY

is caught in a downward economic spiral not of its own making by Michael McIntosh

F

irst and foremost of its formidable problems is the farm

In the meantime, commercial fishermen are facing the prospect that

fish industry (aquaculture). In the space of just a few years,

farm-raised Halibut will take away their market as has farm-raised Salmon.

farm-raised Salmon’s share of the world market has risen from less than 5% to over 55%. And it is still growing.

Notwithstanding the fact that we may, from time to time, compete with commercial fishermen for a share of the resource, we are not

This past year, Alaska fisherman caught 84 million Pink Salmon (one of

without our sympathies/ empathies for them.Theirs is a rugged way

five Pacific Salmon species) most of which is canned. Half of that total

of life with many fine individuals (including one incredibly scruffy looking

came from Southeast Alaska. But because the price paid to fisherman

fellow I once met who turned out to have a Harvard Law Degree).

plummeted to 10¢ a pound or less, 100 Seiners, more than 1/4 of

Besides, I worked on a boat attached to a family-owned Southeast

Southeast Alaska’s Seiner fleet, sat out the season.

Alaska cannery, and I hope that what has happened to east coast fishermen doesn’t happen to them.

World-wide, the farm fish industry is a huge enterprise of over $100 billion. Most of the Shrimp we eat is farm raised. And the number of species the aquaculture industry “grows” is increasing. One of the latest is Halibut. Halibut is one of the few fish whose priceper-pound has not plummeted. It is also one of the most important commercial species in Southeast Alaska. Recently the Northern Pacific Fisheries Management Council, which regulates that fishery, decided to allocate to Southeast Alaska commercial fisherman 87% of the allowable catch, 12% to the charter industry (fishing lodges, day-boat charters, folks like us, etc.) and 1% for subsistence and others. Further, within the charter allocation, the Council decided to set up an IFQ (individual fishing quota) program and assigned quotas to those individuals/businesses an amount equal to their 1997/1998 catches. Many feel this is unfair and the probability, at this point, is that the whole program will be challenged.

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2003 Southeast Alaska, Mist Cove Trip # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Dates May 17 - May 23 May 25 - May 30 May 31 - June 6 June 7 - June 13 June 14 - June 20 June 21 - June 28 June 29 - July 6 July 7 - July 13 July 14 - July 21 July 24 - July 31 August 1 - August 7 August 8 - August 14 August 15 - August 22 August 23 - August 30 August 31 - September 9 September 8 - September 13

Boarding Ketchikan Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Ketchikan Juneau Sitka Ketchikan Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka

Disembarking Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Ketchikan Juneau Sitka Ketchikan Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau

Trip Length 7 days 6 days 7 days 7 days 7 days 8 days 8 days 7 days 8 days 8 days 7 days 7 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 6 days

2003 Southeast Alaska, Liseron Trip # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Dates May 19 - May 26 May 28 - June 4 June 5 - June 12 June 14 - June 21 June 23 - June 28 June 29 - July 5 July 6 - July 13 July 14 - July 19 July 20 - July 25 July 27 - August 2 August 3 - August 8 August 9 - August 15 August 16 - August 22 August 23 - August 29 August 30 - September 6 September 8 - September 13

Boarding Sitka Ketchikan Juneau Ketchikan Sitka Juneau Ketchikan Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau

Disembarking Ketchikan Juneau Ketchikan Sitka Juneau Ketchikan Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka

Trip Length 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 6 days 7 days 8 days 6 days 6 days 7days 6 days 7 days 7 days 7 days 8 days 6 days

The Boat Company

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2004 Southeast Alaska, Liseron Trip # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Dates May 15 - May 22 May 22 - May 29 May 29 - June 5 June 5 - June 12 June 12 - June 19 June 19 - June 26 June 16 - July 3 July 3 - July 10 July 10 - July 17 July 17 - July 24 July 24 - July 31 July 31 - August 7 August 7 - August 14 August 14 - August 21 August 21 - August 28 August 28 - September 4 September 4 - September 11

Boarding Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Sitka

Disembarking Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Juneau

Trip Length 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days

2004 Southeast Alaska, Liseron Trip # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Dates May 15 - May 22 May 22 - May 29 May 29 - June 5 June 5 - June 12 June 12 - June 19 June 19 - June 26 June 16 - July 3 July 3 - July 10 July 10 - July 17 July 17 - July 24 July 24 - July 31 July 31 - August 7 August 7 - August 14 August 14 - August 21 August 21 - August 28 August 28 - September 5 September 4 - September 12

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The Boat Company

Boarding Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Sitka

Disembarking Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Sitka Juneau Juneau

Trip Length 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 9 days 8 days


2003/2004 Costa Rica & Panama, Mist Cove Trip # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Dates November 29 - December 6 December 6 - December 13 December 13 - December 20 December 20 - December 30 December 30 - Januray 9 January 9 - January 17 January 17 - January 24 January 24 - January 31 January 31 - February 7 February 7 - February 14 February 14 - February 21 February 21 - February 28 February 28 - March 6 March 6 - March 13 March 13 - March 20 March 20 - March 27

Trip Route Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica - Panama Panama - Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica Costa Rica

Trip Length 8 days 8 days 8 days 11 days 11 days 9 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days 8 days

The Boat Company

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“ “ Guest Quotes

“‘Yes It’s me and I’m in looove again,’ as Chubby Checker so joyoulsy crooned - this time, it’s Alaska! That state continues to astound us with its beauty and seemingly endless opportunities for exploration and adventure.”

Bill & Romney Bath hurst, Highlands, NC LISERON, ‘02

“The boat is fantastic, a great tribute to those who built her and maintain her in absolutely top condition, the Tongass is wonderful, but above all, the crew are individually and collectively a tribute to the McIntosh Foundation, its programs and ideals.”

Peter & Jennifer Brock,Woodstock,VT LISERON, ‘02

“It was truly an unforgettable – and memorable week. The crew was wonderful – and took great care of us – enlightening us on the wonders of Alaska – as well as some of the problems.” e, MD Riggs, Baltimor ith Fa & k 2 an Fr MIST COVE, ‘0

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“It is difficult to put into words how much we all enjoyed the trip. I can come up with some adjectives such as ‘Fabulous,’ ‘Extraordinary,’ ‘Outstanding,’ ‘Exceptional,’ etc. It far exceeded our expectations to say the least. The crew were just beyond accommodating and pampering. They were fun and bright and met our every need.” d, SC ton Hea il H , s e ld a VE, ‘02 eorgia K MIST CO Paul & G

“Our trip on the Liseron in Alaska’s Inside Passage far exceeded our expectations – truly a vacation of a lifetime. For starters, the boat had warm and cozy accommodations, with the best dining room in Alaska as far as homemade delicacies, menu selections and preparation plus an ever changing view and table settings each meal. The crew were really marvelous, talented, intelligent, hard working and always there to make the trip special for each and every guest.” Dick & Bette Pe terson, Br yn M awr, PA LISERON, ‘02

from the giant beauty and splendor of the Tongass, to the grace and beauty of the Liseron, to the captain and crew of the ship, to the camaraderie of our fellow passengers.”

Photo Credit: Betsey S. Michel

“The experience was unforgettable

George & Doris Hidy, Placitas, NM LISERON, ‘02 The Boat Company

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Recipes From Alaskan Waters HALIBUT PICCATA • • • • • • •

1 garlic clove, minced 1/2 cup dry white wine 3 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons capers, drained 1 1/2 pounds halibut, steaks or fillets 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2-cup Parmesan cheese, grated

In a small frying pan coated with cooking spray, stir-fry garlic over medium-high heat until limp, about 2 minutes. Add wine, lemon juice and capers. Boil, uncovered, over high heat until reduced to 1/2 cup, 3 to 4 minutes; keep sauce warm. Rub fish with oil, sprinkle with pepper and arrange in a single layer in a 12” x 17” broiler pan. Broil about 3 inches from heat for 3 minutes.Turn fish over, sprinkle with cheese and broil until opaque but still moist looking in center of thickest part (cut to test), about 3 minutes longer.Transfer to serving platter or individual plates and pour sauce over fish.

CHINESE HALIBUT Yield: 4 servings • • • • • • • • •

4 large halibut steaks, 1/2 pound each 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh ginger 6 tablespoons finely chopped scallions 2 tablespoons light soy sauce 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce 2 tablespoon Chinese rice wine or dry sherry 1 tablespoon Chinese sesame oil 1 1/2 tablespoon minced fresh coriander 1/2-cup Parmesan cheese, grated

Lay the halibut steaks on a platter. Puree the marinade ingredients in a blender and spread it evenly over the halibut steaks.Allow marinating for 2 hours in the refrigerator or 1 hour at room temperature. Approximately 40 minutes before you are ready to cook, make a charcoal fire and, when the coals are ash white, grill the halibut steaks for 5 to 8 minutes on each side, depending on their thickness. Garnish with the chopped coriander and serve immediately.

Don’t forget to check us out on the Internet!

Do we have your correct address? If not, please fill out the form below and mail us your new address.

For more updated information, schedules, quotes and more, visit our Web site at www.theboatcompany.com

Name: ______________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________ City/State/Zip: ________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________________________ E-Mail: ______________________________________________ Mail to:The Boat Company, 1730 M Street, NW, Suite 204,Washington D.C. 20036 or call (202) 338-8055. 12

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BC_newsletter.Fall2002