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Thayer MAGAZINE Covering Events from

Summer / Fall 2020

better together

WE'RE ALL SMILING BEHIND THESE MASKS

WE ARE ALL TIGERS

HOPE over fear

^

sTAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY Be well

WE  NURSES & DOCTORS

NO JUSTICE NO PEACE

^

thank you all essential workers!

here for one Another

1877

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End Meeting

CRISES & COMMUNITY

ADDRESSING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC AND RACIAL JUSTICE IN 2020 & BEYOND

THE MISSION OF THAYER ACADEMY IS TO INSPIRE A DIVERSE COMMUNITY OF STUDENTS TO MORAL, INTELLECTUAL, AESTHETIC, AND PHYSICAL EXCELLENCE SO THAT EACH MAY RISE TO HONORABLE ACHIEVEMENT AND CONTRIBUTE TO THE COMMON GOOD.


Thayer

HEAD OF SCHOOL Ted Koskores ’70 P ’10, ’13

P U B L I S H E D

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

& COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER Joanna Skoler Gilman ’86 P ’25, ’27

B I A N N U A L LY

magazine@thayer.org

Craig Salters ’86 P ’24

CHIEF MARKETING

MAGAZINE

PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHERS John F. Grant, Chris Bernstein

PRINCIPAL EDITORS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, LAYOUT & DESIGN Paul W. Kahn

Joanna Skoler Gilman ’86 P ’25, ’27

CHIEF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER

Melissa Tuthill Forger ’92 P ’25 DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Julie Burke-Blanchard ’93, Heidi Brown, Tara Corcoran ’88 P ’19, Kelly Hines P ’18, ’19, Stefanie Hollister, Tina Lim, Tiffany Macauley, John Murphy, Billy O'Dwyer ’09, Brad Peterson ’11, Lesley Leibowitz Snyder ’93 P ’23, ’25, ’28 Rachael Rouvales Vassalotti ’79 P ’07, ’11, ’12

PRINCIPAL WRITER

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Craig Salters ’86 P ’24

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SUPPLEMENTAL WRITERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS & IMAGES Rebecca Delaney; Paul W. Kahn; Adobe Stock; Depositphotos.com

A Bird's Eye View of Campus

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An aerial view of campus shows some of the temporary additions to Thayer's campus to accommodate in-school learning, with four modular units at the Middle School (1-4); a large tent on the softball field (5); and the former St. Francis of Assisi School a few blocks away on Washington Street (see inset below).

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READ THAYER MAGAZINE ONLINE: Scan this QR code to view this issue of Thayer Magazine online at ISSUU. To view all past magazine issues, visit:

ON THE COVER

We're all used to waving hello (or goodbye) on our Zoom screens in this new world of ours. This issue features Thayer alums, students, and faculty who have made a difference during these past 10 months.

www.thayer.org/magazine Using QR Codes with your mobile device

THAYER ACADEMY 2020-2021 BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Open your mobile phone camera

Tap the banner that pops up

Aim your phone at QR Code

BOARD OFFICERS

BOARD MEMBERS

Michael Joe P ’17, ’20, Chair

Danya Abrams Sr. P ’20

Joseph Farmer

Donavan Brown ’01

Kevin Gill P ’1 1, ’1 3, ’22

Maureen Pace P ’19, ’21

James Cashman ’73

Jennifer Havlicek P ’18, ’21, ’21

Allison Kent Trumbull ’00

Melissa Bayer Tearney P ’14, Vice Chair Leigh King Schwartz P ’21, Secretary

Elaine DeLuca P ’20, ’21, Treasurer Julaine McInnis, Assistant Treasurer Thayer Academy CFOO

P ’19, ’21

James Coughlin P ’24, ’26

Kathy Horgan P ’20

Guy Daniello P ’22

Greg Lally ’92 P ’22, ’26

Rob DeMarco ’86 P ’19, ’21

Brenda Lyons P ’12, ’14, ’18

Sean Doherty P ’19, ’20

Brendan McDonough ’87

Thayer Academy | 745 Washington Street | Braintree, MA 02184

Michael McNally P ’22, ’24, ’27

P ’23

Ex officio as President of the Alumni Board

Ted Koskores ’70

P ’10, ’13, Head of School

P ’18, ’22

Send correspondence to: magazine@thayer.org


F RO M T H E H E A D O F SC H O O L

Ted Koskores ’70 P ’10, ’13 Dear Thayer Community, Like all issues of the Thayer Magazine, this one documents the remarkable breadth of activities that color our interactions here on campus and draw upon the energies of our alumni in the broader culture. This particular issue, however, depicts our continuing passage during especially remarkable times and captures the important ways our communal bonds have enabled us to draw from the best versions of ourselves in the face of even the most difficult challenges. Steeped in an enduring school culture that calls each of us to Contribute to the Common Good, our community understands that we can only be true to ourselves by supporting each other. Indeed, our mission shines vividly as a guiding light of conscience and purpose, as we understand our responsibilities to one another and embrace each other as companions. This issue makes manifest those values. Clearly at the forefront of the challenges we faced were COVID-19 and our national reckoning over racial injustice. Both impacted deeply the way we interacted with one another in time, space, and thought. As various pieces in the Magazine make plain, a host of traditional annual events and “normal” school routines took on a new character due to COVID-19

-- sometimes taxing our patience and always tapping into our reservoirs of resolve and creativity. Similarly, the responsibility to understand how we could repair the wounds of racism and move forward with energy and high purpose promoted honest and difficult discussions and resulted in sharper clarity and direction as we look to do better and be better in the future. These same forces affected our alumni, and even a brief glance through the Magazine reveals significant steps our graduates took to contribute to a society rocked by threats to its physical and civic well-being. As a small part of a national culture that aspires to create a more perfect union, our own community’s commitment to serve the Common Good mirrors our nation’s aspirations to draw upon our highest ideals of companionship and justice as we face the myriad challenges that life offers. I was proud of how well our students, parents and guardians, faculty, staff, and alumni responded to these challenges; and I am prouder still to know that we remain committed to the ongoing work that lies ahead and to strengthening the bonds that define us as a caring community. Sincerely,

Ted Koskores ’70 P ’10, ’13 HEAD OF SCHOOL, THAYER ACADEMY

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


THE MISSION OF THAYER ACADEMY IS TO INSPIRE A DIVERSE COMMUNITY OF STUDENTS TO MORAL, INTELLECTUAL, AESTHETIC, AND PHYSICAL EXCELLENCE SO THAT EACH MAY RISE TO HONORABLE ACHIEVEMENT AND CONTRIBUTE TO THE COMMON GOOD.

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


TA B L E O F CO N T E N TS

Letter from the Head of School

Ted Koskores ’70 P ’10, ’13

Table of Contents

Around Campus

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- Introducing New Middle School Director Galen Hamann - Faculty Notes - TATV Story - Antiracism Gallery Walk - Academy News & Highlights Timeline - New Head of School Announced - New Faculty & Staff for 2020-21 - Leaning into DEI Work with Lawrence Alexander

Our experience was not defined by COVID-19. It was defined by each other, and all of the moments, small and large, that we were able to share at Thayer together. - Caitlin Caulfield ’20 from her Commencement speech

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C RIS E S & C O M M un ITY

17 A Job Well Done - Thayer Nurses 18 Words from the Community on Racial Justice 19 Words from the Community on the Pandemic 20-21 Renee Ingram ’95 - African American Heritage Sites App 22-24 Nancy Fitzpatrick ’79, Sam Friedman ’09 & Anna (Friedman) Silva ’11 - Care in the Time of COVID-19 48 Mike Mignosa ’89 P ’22, ’25 52-53 Kendra King ’02

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Yearbook Pickups Virtual Year-End Celebrations Commencement Class of 2020 College Matriculations Senior Profiles from the Class of 2020

25-33 26 27 28-29 30-31 32-33

Thayer Athletics

34-37

Thayer Arts

38-43

Alumni House News & Notes

44-45

Class Notes

46-56

Southworth Society Giving

57

- Class of 2020 NCAA Student-Athletes - Thayer Athletics during COVID-19 - Athletics Photo Gallery

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34-35 36 36-37

Photography Class Selects In the Zoom Where it Happened - MS Theater The Art of Teaching Art in the Time of COVID-19 Student Art Director's Note on The Crucible Good Job Preview

38 39 40 40-41 42 43

- AlegrÍa De La Cruz ’93 Conversation - Introducing ThayerNetwork

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50, 51

Thayer Weddings & Babies

www.thayer.org/annualreport

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9-16 The Past 10 Months - Words & Pictures

End of the Year

The 2019-20 Thayer Academy Annual Report of Giving is affixed to the inside back cover of this issue. You can also access the Annual Report online at:

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Remembering Lillian Cooper Stone ’39

In Memoriam

The Final Word

- Tuesday, January 19, 2021

"Human" - poem translated from French by Aidan Rooney

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


AROUND CAMPUS

Welcome Aboard!

New Middle School Director Galen Hamann dives right into Thayer's community

STARTING A NEW JOB IS NEVER EASY, but Middle School Director Galen Rebecca McNemar Hamann could be forgiven if she sometimes viewed her learning curve as more of a vertical line. Hamann began her tenure this past summer as the Academy crafted its comprehensive response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a response which included policy decisions such as in-person, remote, or hybrid learning as well as important details like delivering lunches, obtaining library materials, and keeping activities and clubs humming. On top of those concerns, the Middle School joined the Upper School in reexamining the experiences of Black students and all students of color in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement and a renewed national focus on racial equity and justice. Unprecedented challenges, indeed, but Hamann sees them as reminders of how crucial Thayer and its teachers are as the Academy supports students at this critical moment. “My most important takeaway is that Thayer is a community that cares about people and wanted to welcome me despite COVID-19 restrictions,” said Hamann, who had served as Assistant Head of School at Virginia Beach Friends School before coming to the Academy. “People left gifts on my porch and reached out with welcoming notes.”

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

| by Craig Salters ’86 P ’24

Hamann, a firm believer in the power of face-to-face conversations, acknowledged that the need for physical distancing has made getting to know the community more difficult, but she added how impressed she is with the Middle School faculty and staff for keeping that community so vibrant. “They have been amazing,” said Hamann. “They are nurturing their students, providing support remotely even after extra-help hours are over, sharing with me how things have been done in the past, and teaching extra classes.” And that, she noted, is in addition to cleaning rooms, setting up new technology, troubleshooting said technology, switching rooms, and handing out lunches. “Some days are hard, but even on those days, they have supported each other and been there for their students to share their passion for the subjects they teach,” said Hamann. The teachers are not the only group to impress Hamann during this pandemic. “The students have also risen to the new challenges presented by COVID-19 — eager to show up each day, willing to do their part to keep others safe, and still thanking teachers at the end of each class, whether it’s in person or remote,” she said.


AROUND CAMPUS

Faculty Notes

Galen Hamann B.A. - EARLHAM COLLEGE M.ED. - ST. JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY M.DIV. - HARVARD UNIVERSITY A BOARD-CERTIFIED HEALTHCARE CHAPLAIN, GALEN AND HER WIFE, JAYME, HAVE THREE YOUNG CHILDREN: A SON, JACKSON, AND TWIN GIRLS, MAYA AND MADELEINE.

The students have not only welcomed Hamann but also new middle schoolers, as was seen when the Girls in Action group recently chose to decorate the 5th and 6th grade modulars. Hamann has one short-term goal: keep the community safe. Explaining further, she said safety is essential for teachers and students to be at their best during this time of masks and physical distancing. In the long term, Hamann will work to support a successful renovation of the Middle School, ensure life-giving affinity groups for students, enable more interdisciplinary projects, and build upon the school’s design thinking and project-based learning programs. Hamann also expressed thanks for a faculty and an administration committed to the diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) work that needs to take place at Thayer. “This summer, in conversations about race, what I learned was that we have work to do to see the biases, microaggressions, and missed opportunities. And that since this is a community that cares about one another, members of the Thayer community will put in time even when they are hurt or angry because the Thayer community matters to students, parents, and alums, and Thayer students matter to the faculty, staff, and administration.”

A Father’s Kaddish was recently screened at both the Toronto Jewish Film Festival and the Boston Jewish Film festival. The short documentary film chronicles how longtime Pottery Instructor Steven Branfman P ’00, ’02 navigated through his grief after the 2005 passing of his son, Jared Branfman ’00, at the age of 23 after a battle with cancer. The film stems from Branfman’s 2015 pottery exhibition of the same name which displayed the chawans (Japanese-style tea bowls) thrown by Branfman for one year straight as part of his personal (and his family’s) healing process. In Judaism, “kaddish” is described as “a prayer of mourning said for a parent, sibling, spouse, or child upon their death. It is said every day for a year and then on the anniversary on the Hebrew calendar of the death.”

Thayer Academy Middle School Art Faculty Destiny Palmer had a busy summer beautifying the public spaces of both Medford and Newton, and more than a few people took notice. Two articles — one in The ARTery (WBUR’s arts & culture team) and another for Wicked Local Medford — showcased both Palmer and Amanda Beard Garcia, two artists commissioned by the Medford Arts Council to create mini-murals on utility boxes throughout the city. Both articles make note of Palmer’s use of dynamic colors in her work. They also discuss the artist’s focus on “the histories of women in my community, their resilience, independence, and excellence” and her desire “to work with a community to reclaim space.” A third article in The Boston Globe details Palmer’s efforts to create a public mural in Newton entitled “Reflecting Inward.”

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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AROUND CAMPUS

JUNIORS AND SENIORS RECENTLY EXPLORED THE HISTORY OF RACE AND RACISM IN AMERICA, PRE-CIVIL WAR, AS THEY WALKED THROUGH A CLASS EXHIBIT IN THAYER ART GALLERY.

Gallery Walk Examines the Roots of Racism in America by Craig Salters ’86 P ’24 As part of Thayer's "Antiracism and Social Justice" course, Academy juniors and seniors recently viewed photos on race and racism in America as they walked through a class exhibit in Thayer Art Gallery. A photo (captured by drone) from Episode 1 of TATV, a segment called Equity vs. Equality - which was used as a tool for students to discuss the difference between the two terms to help define those concepts for our community.

The gallery walk featured moments in American history before the Civil War highlighting such topics as the the transatlantic slave trade, slave patrols, and the infamous Dred Scott decision of 1857. There were also writings from a variety of significant figures including Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Banneker, and Phillis Wheatley.

Ready for Prime Time by Craig Salters ’86 P ’24

All juniors and seniors viewed the gallery of posters before responding via sticky-note comments. Students explored, among other topics, both defenses and criticisms of slavery; the quest for and denial of citizenship;

While the phrase “I want my TATV” (ask your parents) is yet to be bandied about along Hobart Avenue, it’s safe to say that both the activity and its offerings are a big hit at the Middle School. TATV — short for “Thayer Academy Television” — is a student-led community media project under the supervision and encouragement of Faculty Advisors Emmett Knox ’04 and Marie Jimenez. There, Middle School students collaborate with faculty to create short sketches whose purpose is to “entertain, inform, and inspire.” TATV episodes air weekly on Thursday mornings as part of the community’s announcements. Example sketches include a lesson on equity, a reminder about handwashing (in this time of COVID-19), and even a rap battle between Santa Claus and the Grinch. In addition to having fun and helping to bring the Middle School together during a period of physical distancing, students in TATV learn the skills of the production process including writing, editing, acting, and filming. www.thayer.org/TATV

the driving force behind slave uprisings; and the roots and lasting impact of racism and violence. Upper School History Faculty Matt Dunne and Antiracism and Social Justice teacher Erica Archabal P ’27 created the gallery walk by combining Dunne's historical work with an article written by Ibram X. Kendi. "We wanted kids to get a sense of a range of voices talking about issues of race and racism,” said Dunne, who was quick to credit the encouragement of Middle School History Faculty Danny Seymour and the editorial support of Archabal. "We wanted to provide a look at the historical roots of those issues.” Another goal, said Dunne, was to demonstrate how the issues of today have long histories. "The place of Black Americans in the nation has been an intense topic of discussion from the beginning,” he said. Courses such as this are part of an antiracism education initiative, which is itself one facet of Thayer Academy's Strategic Plan for Racial Equity and Justice. The initiative states that the Academy "must consider additional ways through our curriculum, professional development, and parent involvement to provide a more comprehensive depiction of the American experience and bias.”

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


SPRING / SUMMER / FALL 2020

TA

AROUND CAMPUS

TIMELINE

MAR

APR

MAY

ThayerConnect, the Academy's distance learning program, launches for all students

Chris Fortunato Named as Thayer's Ninth Head of School

26 Thayer seniors inducted into Cum Laude Society

The Thayer Academy Board of Trustees named Chris Fortunato to serve as the Academy's ninth Head of School commencing July 2021.

Thayer computer science students qualify for ACSL all-star contest

Chris was formerly the Head of School of Blair Academy in Blairstown, NJ. He and his wife Erin have two young children, Matt and Katie. His interests include tennis, coaching, and creative writing as well as music composition/ theatrical production.

2020 yearbook pickup day becomes a drivethru celebration for the Class of 2020 (See p. 26)

JUN

Recognition Day and Last Chapel honorees feted virtually online (See p. 27)

Chris Fortunato B.A. - HARVARD UNIVERSITY J.D. - HARVARD LAW SCHOOL MSW - BOSTON UNIVERSITY

Commencement postponed; Conferral Day celebrates the Class of 2020 (See p. 27)

JUL

AUG

Alum Jocelle Marius ’16 receives Y-Work award from Yale University

Thayer shares its Strategic Plan for Racial Equity & Justice. (See thayer.org/ racialequityandjustice)

New Faculty & Staff

Socially distanced new faculty members for the 2020-21 academic year: (From L-R): Katie Currie, Javonna Corbin, Alea Stokes, Galen Hamann, Ivan Shiu, John Crampton, Claire Gordon '13, and Clarque Brown.

(New Faculty Members Not Pictured): David Dodge, Destiny Palmer, & Matt Dunne

Commencement for the Class of 2020 is finally held on campus with limited guests (See p. 28)

SEP

NOV

JAN

With new temporary facilities (see page 1) and protocols in place, Thayer begins school in person following safety guidelines for social distancing

Voice magazine wins NESPA honors

Thayer Academy tolls its bell 40 times in memory of the over 400,000 lives lost because of the pandemic (See p. 71)

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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Curricular Reforms Reflect a Focus on Antiracism

AROUND CAMPUS

by Craig Salters ’86 P ’24

Lawrence Alexander Consultant for DEI Efforts

PRACTICE LEADER - CARNEY SANDOE & ASSOCIATES

Alexander: "Lean In" to DEI Work by Craig Salters ’86 P ’24

Lawrence Alexander, Thayer Academy's consultant for ongoing diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts, covered much ground in a recent Zoom webinar sponsored by the Thayer Academy Parent Association (TAPA). During the hour-long meeting, Alexander debunked a few myths about DEI work, defined important terms such as "equity" and "cultural competency,” and urged Thayer families to begin their work toward racial justice at whatever point in that journey they happen to be. Above all else, Alexander asked parents and guardians to "lean in" to Thayer Academy's Strategic Plan for Racial Equity and Justice, a framework developed with community input. With such lean-in, Alexander said, a strategic plan can prove "a guiding light for everyone in the community.” But without it, he warned, that same plan becomes "a spam folder of good intentions.” "The strategic plan is not the end of the work; it's the beginning of the work,” said Alexander, who serves as the lead search consultant for Carney Sandoe & Associates' Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion practice. Dispelling a common misconception, Alexander explained that, in and of itself, diversity isn't all that meaningful, at one level existing merely as a number or statistic. The real meaning, he said, is how a community creates that diversity. "Diversity is the fruit, but equity, inclusion, justice, and belonging are the elements at the root,” he told participants. "No root, no fruit.”

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

Alexander also emphasized that DEI work is everyone's work because it benefits the entire community. "Ultimately, cultural competency and preparation to lead and succeed in a globally diverse society is an aspiration for all families at Thayer Academy,” he said. "DEI is not just good for families and students of color. It's actually most beneficial for white students and white families at Thayer Academy.” Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Director of International Student Enrollment Jenn Welch moderated the virtual event along with TAPA Vice President Martha McNally P ’22, ’24, ’27, who offered the TAPA welcome and facilitated the evening's question-andanswer session. A man of energy and positivity, Alexander embraced the opportunities all Thayer families have to "raise children who will live lives of consequence.” However, he did offer a warning to those who might see DEI work as peripheral to the Academy's mission. "This work is consequential, this work is everyone's work, and this work will fall to our children if we don't do it,” he said. To view Thayer Academy's Strategic Plan for Racial Equity and Justice, please go to: www.thayer.org/racialequityandjustice On this page you can also view a recording of the Oct. 22 webinar.

Implemented this fall, the Academy’s “Antiracism and Social Justice” course is a requirement for all Upper School students and has four distinct goals: to foster a deeper understanding of the historical roots of racism; to promote a deeper understanding of the current racial landscape; to help students develop an antiracist mindset; and to teach students how best to apply practical antiracist skills. The course is part of schoolwide antiracism education efforts which also include: a focused and informed discussion of the Black Lives Matter movement in all social studies classes; a commitment to strengthen the presence of the African American experience in American History courses at both the Upper and Middle School levels; a yearlong curriculum diversity audit conducted by department heads; and cultural competency training of faculty, staff, administration, and board members. This antiracism education initiative is one of five spokes of the recently adopted Strategic Plan for Racial Equity and Justice. The other four are: transparency, accountability, representation, and school cultural expectations. The full plan, which is available on the Academy’s website, reflects Thayer’s renewed commitment “to embrace the opportunity to be better and do better at a pivotal moment in our school’s and in our nation’s history.”


CRISES &

COMMUNITY

THE PAST 10 MONTHS

WORDS & PHOTOS FROM THAYER'S COMMUNITY...

PHOTO: LEILA CHAPMAN ’21

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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CRISES &

COMMUNITY From an abrupt end to inperson instruction in March with the start of the COVID-19 crisis; to a reimagining of end-of-year celebrations at the Middle and Upper Schools; to renewed cries for genuine justice, a need for national reckoning in light of continued tragedy and protests; to a shift in curriculum and logistics with the start of a new academic year amidst a worldwide

FROM THE YEARBOOK PICKUP - MAY 2020

pandemic; to learning to navigate in a world where conversation and dialogue are increasingly critical skills:

here is a gallery in words and photographs that encapsulates the past 10 months from the point of view of our Thayer community. ATHLETICS WERE DIFFERENT BUT CONTINUED IN SOME FASHION DURING 2020 - SEE P. 38

PHOTO: MARVIN MUSIIME-KAMALI ’22

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

PHOTO: CLAIRE MCCARTHY ’22

OPEN UP TO SEE MORE

WORDS & PHOTOS


FROM THE STUDENT-LED VIGIL - JUNE 2020

I want you to know that you are valued, you are appreciated, you are respected, and you are loved. We stand with you, and we support you. U S D I R E C T O R H IG H L EY T HOM P S O N P ’ 2 0 , ’ 2 3 , A D D R E S SI N G S T U D E N T S O F C O L O R D U R I N G H I S V I RT UA L L A ST C HA P E L A D D R E S S I N J U N E

PHOTO: JACKSON REARDON ’21

PHOTO FROM A BLM MARCH IN MARSHFIELD | NICKI PARDO PHOTOGRAPHY

WORDS & PHOTOS

OPEN UP TO SEE MORE

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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RETROSPECTIVE

Years from now, our children will look back and think about us in our moment in history and what we chose to do in this time. Be someone who future Thayer tigers will be proud of; someone who will make those future students say, 'look at the work they put in to make my life here at school better.' Be kind, be inclusive, be actively antiracist. Wear a mask, social distance so that we can continue to come to school, and keep each other safe. Let our current situation teach you the value that each day holds, and, finally, be well. Take care of yourself and others, lift each other up, and be your best self.

AN ALL-TOO-FAMILIAR SITE: REMOTE CLASSES VIA ZOOM

DREW BENNETT '21, STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRESIDENT DURING HIS CONVOCATION ADDRESS, SEPT 2020

Though obviously in-person learning is the ideal, the remote days have given students and teachers alike more freedom during the work day - everyone saves time and gains some sleep if they’re not commuting. There’s more time for extra help. Zoom is a really useful tool for hosting meetings. I hope we figure out a way to keep some remote days in our repertoire once things return to normal. - ALLYNN LODGE UPPER SCHOOL FACULTY

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


Thayer Academy

Please Help Us Stop the Spread! Stay 6 feet apart. Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Cover a cough or sneeze. Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. Disinfect surfaces. Stay home when sick.

NEW CLASSROOM SPACE AT THE FORMER ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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OF COURSE THE YEAR 2020 INCLUDED AN UNEXPECTED SNOWSTORM ON HALLOWEEN, MAKING THE PHOTOSHOOT EXTRA UNUSUAL

In the spring, we didn't know what this fall was going to look like. So we had to start early, investigating different ways to kind of crack this nut. Because we had the constraints that were put out there by the CDC and the public health departments, but we didn't know exactly how that would work. We had to completely change the way that we're operating. - JIM MACVARISH P '11 - UPPER SCHOOL FACULTY

I think we're getting to a point as a community where the conversation is happening, and we're putting language to what is happening in this society, regarding discrimination and the disproportionate marginalization of black students. - BRANDON ODOM '04 - ASSISTANT DEAN OF STUDENTS, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS

AERIAL SHOT OF COMMENCEMENT, SHOWING THE GRID-LINED FIELD

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


RETROSPECTIVE

I am incredibly grateful for the opportunity to teach in the live format every day. Having a few students be remote challenged me to use more technology in the classroom and utilize several tools that I have never used before (PearDeck, Loom, Flipgrid, etc.). It also challenged me to think about different ways of creating an inclusive classroom (particularly for those remote students). Lastly, I am incredibly thankful for the community I work in because all of our families have done their best to act responsibly and help keep this community SOCIALLY DISTANCED ASSEMBLY WATCHING IN THE HALE THEATER

safe. I am also indebted to my colleagues who have all helped each other to persevere

MS FACULTY DESTINY PALMER PRESENTING ON MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVERSITY DAY

through these challenging times and continue to offer a top-notch education to our students. - JON BUTLER P '25, '28 MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE FACULTY, ON TEACHING DURING A PANDEMIC

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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RETROSPECTIVE

2020, what a year. It almost feels unbelievable when I recount the events. My favorite and most moving memory from this year, hands down, was the community vigil last May. I was overwhelmed listening to students share their stories with almost 400 community members present and supporting one another. After a tumultuous COVID-19 TESTING AT THAYER PRIOR TO THE START OF THE NEW YEAR

spring navigating the unexpected of Covid-19, transitioning to virtual learning and witnessing the deep, ongoing racial injustices in the world -- and in our own community -- we needed to be together. One thing I felt during that time was that even though we were apart, we were certainly not alone. During my 11 years at Thayer, I have never felt so connected to this special place and it's a moment I will never forget. And maybe, in a strange way, 2020 was meant to happen? Maybe it was the wake-

TWO OF THE MODULAR UNITS INSTALLED AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL THIS YEAR

up call we needed to re-evaluate our own actions, the actions - or inactions - of others, and open our eyes widely to the injustices happening in our society. Maybe this is what we needed as a community to move faster towards positive change - to impact and improve the experiences of younger students to come. Perhaps 2020 served as a much needed disruption, to force us to re-examine and rebuild. JENN WELCH, DIRECTOR OF DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION, ON THE PAST YEAR

AT LAST: NURSE KATHY CUNNINGHAM P '07, '10 RECEIVES THE VACCINE IN JANUARY

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


A JOB WELL DONE

CRISES &

COMMUNITY

by Joanna Skoler Gilman ’86 P ’25, ’27

A

At a time when a global pandemic has created both uncertainty and the need to act quickly yet responsibly, we rely on those closest to us, and with the most expertise, to guide our response. For the Thayer community, that’s our Health Office. Both school nurses — Director of Health Services Kathy Cunningham RN, MSN P '07, '10 and Nancy Burgess RN P '08, '11 — work tirelessly to protect

the health and safety of our campus and our community. Together, and with the assistance of the Athletic Trainers, our Health Services team coordinates protocols with local and state agencies, tracks the health of our community, ensures timely sharing of critical information, and oversees COVID-19 testing. They will administer COVID-19 vaccines to the faculty and staff during Phase 2 of vaccination program. They even managed to organize blood drives on Thayer’s campus to help others in need during this difficult time. This December, the team was joined by Nurse Staci O’Brien BSN, RN, who comes to Thayer from Massachusetts General Hospital, to further support our efforts to keep our community healthy. The Academy is grateful for their expertise, kindness, and patience during these past months and confident of their leadership in the months ahead.

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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PERSPECTIVES

Being able to attend a BLM protest in Brockton helped show me the strength of black people all across the country. I was happy to see that protests that have gone on around the world were also happening in our neighborhood. For us, we had our mayor come and speak, and that showed the strong connection between the community organizers and leaders of the city.

- Myles Wilson ’21

While I was at the protest, I felt angry but empowered, being surrounded by others who feel so strongly about the same thing … I want those who didn’t attend protests to understand that people are taking time out of their days to stand up for something that they strongly believe in and want to inspire others to do the same.

- Kaleigh Walker ’19 ATTENDED A BLM PROTEST WITH HER 89-YEAR-OLD GRANDMOTHER

I'm passionate about equity, social justice, and for black people occupying spaces equally. There is always room for diversity and inclusion. I am passionate about people understanding why it's important to have diversity in certain rooms and for young people to really understand the importance of that. Especially when I think back to my days at Thayer, when I was in the Middle School, I was one of two black students in the entire class. Recently, over the summer and after hearing from different black students — hearing some of the pain and things that we and they went through — I’m really motivated to change that narrative for people that look like me. To young people of color, I would say: be curious, do all the things that you're interested in. Oftentimes it's easy to be pigeon-holed and allow others to put you in a specific lane, but if you have interests, pursue them and be your authentic self and don’t let anyone disrupt that.

- Jasmine Hicks ’95

YOUTH LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR, TRUTH INITIATIVE

COMMUNITY THOUGHTS IN RESPONSE TO RaCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES I felt frustrated, thinking ’this is something people have been doing for years, generations really, and yet we’re still standing out here.’ Although I felt all this before going to the protest, being around so many people with such a single-minded intention brought these feelings into sharp focus. It revitalized my resolve and made it clear that I can’t just support the BLM movement; I need to be a part of it.

- Adam Pearson ’13 THAYER FACULTY

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


CRISES &

COMMUNITY

community thoughtS IN RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC Patients would come in, and they were really sick … people who didn’t even get to say goodbye to their family because families weren’t allowed to come into the hospitals. Often, there just wasn’t time to call their families and have them do a FaceTime chat and say goodbye. So that was really hard, along with just the amount of deaths. As an ER nurse, you do see a lot of tragedy, and you do see a lot of deaths, but it was overwhelming with the amount you saw on a daily basis. The other part that was difficult was at home. I have a son who is 13, and I would come home and couldn't hug my kid. I wasn't able to interact with him; I wasn’t even in the same room as he was for a couple of months. I would just come home from work, change my clothes before in my garage, and then I would just have to isolate - go straight to my room. That was hard, having to separate myself from my son and my family, to try to protect them from me.

I love Thayer. But when I was at Thayer … I mean, there is a school that has a lot of affluence as well, right? You see that, and you think THAT is what is going to make you happy. And that's just not true at all. Purpose will make you happy, and helping people will make you happy. COVID-19 is terrible. Nobody wants that stuff around … over 400,000 people have passed away in this country, including my grandfather … It should have never happened. Period. It's crazy what is going on! BUT … let me just put that aside for one second to say … what COVID-19 has done with these times is slow everybody down.

And yet … I still would recommend this job to anyone thinking about getting into healthcare. It’s so rewarding, it’s so exciting, it’s so fulfilling, and it’s so humbling. I wouldn’t change it for anything.

The side effect of it has been: it does make you think, and it does make you slow down, and it does make you realize what's important. Nothing is promised. Things have changed, but I think some things have changed for the better … and I hope they don't go back to what they were before.

- Rhonda Dragone ’95

- Maurice Philogene ’93

EMERGENCY ROOM NURSE

See also:

SENIOR EXECUTIVE, RETIRED AIR FORCE LT.COL., SPECIAL AGENT

Class Notes by Mike Mignosa '89 P '22, '25 (PAGE 48) and Kendra King '02 (PAGE 52)

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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Tour de force

Alumna's app puts African American history on the map

By Rebecca Delaney by Paul W. Kahn

i

If you could take a tour of the important places in the life of Renée Ingram ‘73, you might start at Camp Thayer in the 1960s. There, as a girl, the Founder and current President of the African American Heritage Preservation Foundation enjoyed learning archery and experimenting in the science lab. She later returned to campus as a student beginning in her junior year of high school. “It was a great educational experience, one that to this day I look upon fondly,” says Ingram. If you pause here at Thayer Academy, you will see a number of influences that affected Ingram’s future path in research, writing, documentation, and telling untold stories. “There were so many teachers that stood out, but Ms. Grace Bernen P ‘71, my English teacher, challenged my writing skills,” says Ingram. “Ms. Bernen has been a great influence in my life, and I owe much to her challenging me to be the best.”

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

Ingram’s strong writing skills have been put to good use. She has published two books — In View of the Great Want of Labor: A Legislative History of African American Conscription in the Confederacy and a pictorial history of Buckingham County, Virginia — as well as biographical sketches for The African American National Biography (AANB) and African American Architects: A Biographical Dictionary, 1865-1945. She has also written several articles for various publications, including African American Archaeology.

She recalls working with one small business owned by an Italian immigrant.

But we get ahead of ourselves. Let’s head up the Southeast Expressway and stop at Northeastern University, where Ingram attended college. While at Northeastern, she worked in the co-op program with the US Department of Transportation Systems Center. She stayed on after graduation, working in the Procurement Division, where she helped small and minority businesses apply for federal contracts.

Ingram earned her MBA from the University of Denver and worked in the nascent cable television industry before returning to Washington, D.C., in 1987, where she was employed as a budget analyst with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB). There, she eventually worked her way up to become the youngest person appointed to the position of Vice President and Treasurer in the history of the corporation. Former Thayer Headmaster Peter Benelli P ‘75, ‘80, ‘81 GP ‘09 wrote Ingram a letter of congratulations

“We found an opportunity for this firm, and it won the competitive bid. This gentleman was so overwhelmed when he came to my office. He broke down and cried as he had never received a federal government contract and had tried for so many years,” says Ingram. “This was most rewarding, and it gave me the desire to assist other firms so that they could expand and compete on a larger scale.”


when she got the job, a letter which she framed and hung in her new office. “We kept in touch over the years,” says Ingram. “I had the highest respect for him.”

robust app that can be used as a teaching tool,” she says. “We are working to get all ages involved and collaborate with educators and art museums to expand its reach.”

While at CPB, Ingram worked with several national nonprofits, and when her family’s cemetery in Virginia was threatened by the state’s plan to expand a highway, she jumped into action. Dating back to 1853, the cemetery was the first free African American privately held cemetery to be placed on the Virginia and US historical registers in the country. Ingram worked with the Virginia State Highway Department to realign their highway plans so that it would not disinter any burials, and the idea for the African American Heritage Preservation Foundation was born.

Today Ingram works as a consultant specializing in financial management, internal audits, and government certification

The foundation is now an all-volunteer 501(c)3 organization which provides preservation, maintenance, and awareness of endangered or little-known African American historical sites. It also helps other nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and educational institutions address preservation issues. Today in Washington, D.C., the historic sites are shuttered, the schools are remote, and the would-be tourists have stayed home because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the shutdown, Ingram saw an opportunity to bring to life an idea the foundation had been mulling for years: a mobile app featuring more than 1,500 African American sites located throughout the United States and Territories that include heritage trails, military sites, museums, National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, endangered historic sites, and other historic places which focus on the rich contributions of African Americans to our nation’s history. “The onset of the pandemic provided the time to develop a strategy and implementation plan for the mobile app,” says Ingram. “With vast improvements in technology, I was able to cull information from various websites and search engines to consolidate these findings into the African American Sites mobile app.” Many of the sites listed on the app are closed due to COVID-19, but Ingram sees this as the perfect opportunity for students (and anyone interested in African American history) to explore from anywhere there’s a WiFi connection. “This is a

This is a robust app that can be used a teaching tool for small and minority businesses while also running the foundation and continuing to develop the app. As if that weren’t enough, she just kicked off a grant program to enable the restoration of endangered African American historic properties and rehabilitate, protect, and foster economic development of these sites within their respective communities.

CRISES &

COMMUNITY

The African American Heritage Sites app will guide you through more than 800 African American national historic landmarks, museums, trails and other African American historic places throughout the United States and territories.

It may seem like a lot, but Ingram insists she wouldn’t have it any other way. “My passion is the heritage foundation,” she says.

RENEE INGRAM FROM THAYER'S 1973 BLACK & ORANGE YEARBOOK. HER FITTING YEARBOOK QUOTE: "THE GREAT ESSENTIALS OF HAPPINESS ARE SOMETHING TO DO, SOMETHING TO LOVE, AND SOMETHING TO HOPE FOR."

The African American Heritage Sites app can be downloaded from the App Store or Google Play

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

21


The Friedman Family, from left: David Friedman P ’09, ’11; Anna (Friedman) Silva ’11, RN, BSN; Nancy Fitzpatrick ’79, P ’09, ’11, RN, BSN, MSN; and Dr. Sam Friedman ’09.

Nancy Fitzpatrick ’79, P ’09, ’11, RN, BSN, MSN, is a critical care nurse at the MICU at Tufts Medical Center.

CARE IN THE TIME OF COVID-19 Heartbreak and hope on the frontlines of a worldwide pandemic By Craig Salters ’86 P ’24

A

A pulmonary and critical care fellow at Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston, South Carolina, Sam Friedman ’09, MD, first heard about COVID-19 in January of 2020. “A colleague was talking about this novel coronavirus discovered in China, and I remember initially not being concerned because I had diagnosed a patient the day before with a pneumonia caused by a different strain of coronavirus, a mild outpatient condition,” said Sam. “In the coming weeks I learned more about how virulent this virus was, and we thought it would be an epidemic similar to SARS in the early 2000s.”

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

Anna Friedman Silva ’11, RN, BSN, a critical care nurse in the Neuro ICU (Intensive Care Unit) at Massachusetts General Hospital and Sam’s sister, first heard of COVID-19 as the novel coronavirus began to surge in Wuhan, China.

Medical Center, she was familiar with coronavirus, as some of her patients would have this screened in their viral panel when they were first admitted with respiratory issues, but began hearing about “a new type of coronavirus out there named ’19” in late February 2020.

“My husband’s coworker is actually from Wuhan, and we were hearing through her what it was like in China with mandated stay-at-home orders,” said Anna. “Never did I think we would experience that here in the United States.”

“It was quickly realized that we may be getting some of these patients, and the talk of what PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) we needed to wear became a big topic of conversation on the unit,” Nancy said.

And as for Sam and Anna’s mother, Nancy Fitzpatrick ’79, P ’09, ’11, RN, BSN, MSN, a critical care nurse in the MICU (Medical Intensive Care Unit) at Tufts

Of course, COVID-19 and its effects — from death and debilitating illness to quarantines, stay-at-home orders, and national lockdowns — are


CRISES &

COMMUNITY

known to everyone now, the result of a worldwide pandemic entering a new phase with the recent introduction of several new vaccines. But for the Friedman family, whose Thayer roots run deep, dealing with COVID-19 in 2020 was most definitely a family affair. For starters, Sam actually contracted COVID-19 in early June of 2020, a time when the first wave was just ending in Charleston. “I was lucky and had a mild illness, with full recovery,” he said. Nancy works solely in the MICU, where any critically ill COVID-19 patients would go, so she was, and is, directly affected by the pandemic. Last spring, the Tufts MICU opened and staffed a COVID-19 ICU of 15 beds where she and her colleagues provided direct care. It gave her an opportunity to learn much about the disease process. “Basically, any treatment plan for these patients is managed by their nurse,” she said. “These patients were very complex, and in the peak of their critical illness, were being supported by ventilators, multiple intravenous medications titrated via pumps at the bedside, dialysis machines, and electronic monitoring devices, to name a few.” While low census numbers closed that unit in late summer, the hospital recently reopened the unit to deal with the most recent surge. During that first surge, Anna was able to work in her home unit as MGH’s Neuro ICU transformed itself into a 22-bed COVID-19 ICU. She provided

direct care along with “helpers,” who were typically general care nurses in the surgery department or other areas who were seeing decreased demand due to the cancellation of elective surgeries. At first, Anna acknowledged, it was overwhelming. “We were incredibly busy, with little time to eat lunch or go to the bathroom,” she said. “A typical patient was intubated on the ventilator, highly sedated, and often medically paralyzed. The patients were so unstable they required an RN at the bedside most of the shift.”

Anna (Friedman) Silva ’11, RN, BSN is a critical care nurse in the Neuro ICU at Massachusetts General Hospital.

“It was frightening at the beginning,” said Anna, “but over time became our ‘new normal.’” Similar to his sister and mother, Sam was thrown directly into the heart of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“As a pulmonary fellow,” he explained, “I spend most of my time in the Medical Intensive Care Unit, which is the primary ICU for advanced COVID-19 patients. My additional time outside the ICU involves caring for other patients in the hospital with respiratory illnesses, which includes all COVID-19 patients.” A nurse who worked in New York City in the late 1980s during the AIDS epidemic, Nancy sees similarities to that era, including a fear of the unknown, but emphasizes they are by no means identical. For Anna, this is the first significant outbreak she has seen in her nearly five years of nursing. And Sam, noting that there is no “typical” COVID-19 patient, wants people to understand the distinctive (and extremely dangerous) aspects of this virus. “COVID-19 has been a true shock to the healthcare system, unique because of its combination of infectivity and high mortality,” he said. “We see a similar respiratory illness (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, or ARDS) from influenza each year, but the difference is that we can often predict the type of patient who will become severely ill from the flu. For the most part, COVID-19 has no rules and does not discriminate.” “We like to think we practice in an advanced, enlightened time in medicine with no more mysteries, but this pandemic has humbled everyone involved in the healthcare system.” The Friedmans share one voice when they emphasize how important communication is at a time when

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

23


patients — and families — are dealing with so much fear and isolation. Anna is grateful for the positive role technology, in the form of Zoom and FaceTime, is playing during the pandemic. Sam urges full transparency — “Saying ’I don’t know’ is much better than silence,” he said — at a time when the medical field doesn’t have all the answers. And Nancy tries to never forget the emotional component of her job. “Patients, upon admission to the ICU, do look so frightened, so I try to alleviate their fears as best I can with knowledge and humor, if appropriate,” she said. “Their fear can be heartbreaking at times.” The trio also expressed gratitude for the tremendous support the public has given first responders, be that by wearing masks, working and learning remotely, donating PPE, or other actions. Other expressions of thanks were more specific: Anna, to her husband, Jimmy, and their new kitten, Norman; Sam,

to his fiancee, Julie; and Nancy to her husband, David Friedman P ’09, ’11, who owns InstaBrite Mobile Washing and has done yeoman’s work supporting both his family and healthcare workers in general. He has often provided lunches for Nancy, Anna, and their coworkers and once did likewise for Sam in Charleston via online food delivery services. Nancy said her time at Thayer gravitated toward math classes, science classes, and helping people, which then led to a BSN in Nursing from Skidmore College and an MSN in Critical Care Nursing from Columbia University. Anna remembers her Academy field hockey team which earned both ISL and New England championships, but she also remembers a school that taught her time management skills she still uses today. After Thayer, she earned her BSN at Northeastern University. And Sam, who started Thayer in the sixth grade, remembers dedicated

faculty, a great blend of the sciences and the humanities, and fellow students who became lifelong friends. He received his BA in Molecular Biology from Vanderbilt University and his MD from Emory University School of Medicine. He is now completing a fellowship in Pulmonary & Critical Care from MUSC after completing his internship and residency in Internal Medicine there as well. An ACL injury in high school led Anna to consider a career as a physical therapist, an interest which later morphed into nursing. Sam, who remembers poring over Gray’s Anatomy even as an elementary school student, can’t remember a time when he didn’t want to be a doctor, but he swears that dream did not originate with his mother. “I think a lot of physicians are driven to the career by their parents,” Sam said, “but I specifically remember my mom saying she wanted me to be an engineer.”

F R O M T H AY E R ' S 1 9 7 9 B L A C K & OR ANGE YEARB O OK, NANCY'S S E N I O R PA G E Q U O T E D A S O N G LY R I C F R O M DA N F O G E L B U R G T HAT S P E A K S P R E S C I E N T LY T O HER LIFE'S WORK AND VISION: ONCE IN A VISION I CAME ON SOME WOODS AND STOOD AT A FORK IN THE ROAD NANCY FITZPATRICK CLASS OF 1979

MY CHOICES WERE CLEAR YET I FROZE WITH THE FEAR OF NOT KNOWING WHICH WAY TO GO. ONE ROAD WAS SIMPLE ACCEPTANCE OF LIFE THE OTHER ROAD OFFERED SWEET PEACE. WHEN I MADE MY DECISION MY VISION BECAME MY RELEASE.

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

SAM FRIEDMAN

ANNA FRIEDMAN

CLASS OF 2009

CLASS OF 2011

WRESTLING, CROSS

FIELD HOCKEY, SKI TEAM

COUNTRY (VARSIT Y

(VARSIT Y CAPTAIN),

CAPTAIN), CREW,

TALC, TOUR GUIDE,

UGAND-AID, CONCERT

HONOR ROLL

CHOIR, HIGH HONOR ROLL


End of the Year

Yearbook Pickup

P. 26

Recognition Day / Last Chapel / Conferral Day P. 27

Commencement

College Matriculation

P. 28

FOR THE CLASS OF 2020

PETER KIP '20 WALKS PAST THE CLASS OF 2020 BANNER ON THE CFA ON

P. 30

Senior Profiles

P. 32 FROM THE CLASS OF 2020

THE WAY TO THE YEAR'S LATER-THAN-USUAL COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

25


3

6

4

7

5

8

1 2

Yearbook Pickups

26

A simple logistical challenge turned into a heartfelt tribute last June. The question of how to distribute Thayer yearbooks became a serendipitous way to fete the 131 seniors from the Class of 2020. When seniors arrived at Thayer to drive through and pick up their yearbooks, they were met with cheering faculty and staff along the winding pathway through campus and given gifts (yard signs, poster-sized versions of the "Senior 2020" banner, and other tokens of love and appreciation).

1

Elena Gosalvez '20 receiving the love from faculty and staff during the drive-through

2

Ciara Sage '20 receives a yard sign from Murph outside of Cahall while perched atop her car for the slow procession of seniors

3

Thayer Faculty Jessica Stokes thanks her senior students

4

Librarians Janet Langer and Stephanie Leggett Rando '88 P '18, '20 cheer on passing seniors

5

Faculty member Melinda Reuter greets seniors with pompoms, paws, and a (masked) smile!

6

Thayer faculty (and Yearbook head) Gloria Blanco P '04, '05. '08, '11 gives a senior a yearbook

7

A heartfelt sign for Head of School Ted Koskores '70 P '10, '13

8

Noah Downing '20 shows his appreciation

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


Virtual Year-End Celebrations

thayer.org/recognitionday2020

thayer.org/202EOY

thayer.org/202EOY

thayer.org/202EOY

Watch Recognition Day Playlist (5 videos) THAYER.ORG/RECOGNITIONDAY2020

End of the Year

thayer.org/202EOY

thayer.org/202EOY

Watch Class of 2020 End of Year Playlist (5 videos) THAYER.ORG/2020EOY

The 2020 school year ended like no other — with students, faculty, and families having to gather virtually rather than in person to celebrate the accomplishments of Thayer Upper and Middle School students. Yet the spring of 2020 also afforded new opportunities to bring people from all over the world into traditionally smaller celebrations — and with Zoom and video recordings, the year-end events became undoubtedly the most-attended ever. From the top scholar speech of Michelle Le '24 to the annual slideshow of memories for the Class of 2024 to catching a shorts-wearing Carson Smith in one of his last duties as Middle School Director to a virtual reading of the names of each of the 8th grade graduates (with accompanying baby photos), there was still a real sense of happiness and celebration as hundreds watched live via Zoom. Last Chapel 2020 was a simple recorded message from Upper School Director Highley Thompson P '20, '23, one where he recognized the many award winners from all grades, celebrated faculty and staff benchmarks, and honored retiring faculty members. He also took time, on behalf of the school, to powerfully acknowledge solidarity with Thayer's students of color. Conferral Day 2020 afforded Head of School Ted Koskores '70 P '10, '13 the opportunity to virtually bestow diplomas to graduates on the date Commencement was supposed to take place; while a virtual celebration of the graduates took on video form with photos. Use the QR codes above to find the playlist for Thayer Middle School's Recognition Day ceremony (and tribute videos to the 8th grade class) as well as the playlist for all the Upper School's year-end ceremonies and honorings.

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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End of the Year

Commencement

T H A Y E R ' S 1 4 3 R D C O M M E N C E M E N T | J U LY 3 1 , 2 0 2 0

US Director Highley Thompson with his son, Garner ’20

Danya Abrams Jr. ’20 with his parents, Deanna and Thayer Trustee Danya Abrams Sr.

Parent and family guests socially distanced on the Main Lawn

Zihyu (Alan) Xu ’20 points to his assigned spot prior to Commencement

“You were the ones who led the way...” “I present to you, after a 54-day wait, the great Class of 2020,” Upper School Director Highley Thompson P ’20, ’23 announced at the end of the Academy's 143rd Commencement exercises. The belated ceremony was held July 31 on a campus front lawn especially plotted for the occasion as a physically distant but socially intimate grid.  lthough Thayer seniors had already graduated after receiving A their diplomas during this spring's virtual Conferral Day, COVID-19 concerns postponed traditional Commencement to the summer. The event itself observed conservative safety requirements including masks, physical distancing, and a limit of two guests per graduate. In his welcoming remarks, Head of School Ted Koskores ’70 P ’10, ’13 acknowledged this “most unique” graduation event while thanking the entire Thayer community for its perseverance and cohesion during a difficult time. 28

He singled out the Class of 2020 for its display of character. “You were the ones who led the way,” said Koskores, who also noted the dedication of the Class of 2020 Walkway (from the Teardrop to the CFA) in honor of the graduates.  oskores cited other Academy classes which had graduated K during times of uncertainty — World War I, the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, the Great Depression, and World War II, to name a few — and said the Class of 2020 would rise to the occasion in similar fashion. “We have faith in you,” he told the graduates. “Like many of those who came before you, we trust that you will apply resolve and moral and civic purpose to meet the challenges of our age and move this nation — and our world — forward in ways that affirm the commitment to act in support of the health and rights of all who inhabit the world.”


SENIOR SPEAKER CAITLIN CAULFIELD ’20

VALEDICTORIAN GARNER THOMPSON ’20

COMMENCEMENT PRIZES 2020 NANCY DINATALE TAYLOR AWARD KENDALL ROLAND THAYER ACADEMY OUTSTANDING MALE ATHLETE AWARD JACK SCHNEIDER THE MAUREEN E. BUCKEN GIRLS ATHLETIC AWARD MEGHAN WEBB THE THOMAS J. BERRY III AWARD BRAD CAMPBELL, MADDIE FARRELL

1

I am so incredibly proud of the people you have become and look forward to hearing how you change the world in your own ways. FACULTY SPEAKER AMANDA TAYLOR

GILBERT A. BOOTH AWARD TYLER KNIGHTLY, MOLLY KING WARD S. DONNER AWARD ALLY DEEGAN, TOMMY GAFFEY JR.

PHOEBE LEE HOSMER FOREIGN LANGUAGE PRIZES MICHAEL NESSRALLA, GARNER THOMPSON, CAMRYN MCCRYSTAL LEIGHTON S. TOWER HISTORY PRIZE JACKSON HUMPHREYS, SAM GARBER LOUISE E. SAUL AWARD FOR ENGLISH YIJIAO "SANANCA" SHEN, OLIVIA O'CONNOR

I cannot express in words how grateful I am to have had you by my side for these last seven years.

CHARLES R. MANGAT-RAI PRIZE FOR COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AUSTIN BENNETT, ALLY DEEGAN, ANNABEL DOHERTY, GARNER THOMPSON HELEN ALDEN BREEN DRAMATICS AWARD KENDALL BRYANT, LOGAN CLANCY E. IONE LOCKWOOD MUSIC AWARD THOMAS BRIGGS, KARINA KILBURN, EMMETT WILMOT

THE JOHN M. RODOCANACHI ART PRIZE JULIA GUIDONE, ERIKA PLANTE NATHANIEL AUGUSTINE THAYER SCHOLARSHIP ERIKA PLANTE, ZHIYU "ALAN" XU JOTHAM B. SEWELL PRIZE GARNER THOMPSON THE WALTER AND PRUDENCE ABELL DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD JACKSON HUMPHREYS, AIMEE MATOS, ERIKA PLANTE HEAD OF SCHOOL AWARD CAITLIN CAULFIELD

MAURICE R. SEYMOUR PRIZE FOR MATHEMATICS YIJIAO "SANANCA" SHEN

- UPPER SCHOOL DIRECTOR HIGHLEY THOMPSON P ’20, ’23

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Seniors 2020 College Matriculation

Thayer Academy's

Class of 2020 College Matriculation

State-by-State 4 40 Massachusetts

7

Rhode Island

3

Ohio

2

Florida

16 New York

4

California

3

Maine

2

South Carolina

11 Connecticut

4

Washington, D.C.

3

Maryland

2

Tennessee

8

North Carolina

3

Colorado

3

New Hampshire

1

Missouri

2

Gap Year

7

Pennsylvania

3

Louisiana

3

Virginia

1

United Kingdom

2

Junior Hockey

Danya E. Abrams Jr. Sophie A. Antone Katerina M. Babanikas Colby M. Belmarsh George A. Bennett Ryan D. Bogar Mary Clare Boselli Jordan A. Brewster Payton E. Bridge Thomas C. Briggs Madeleine P. Broderick Kendall E. Bryant Brennan W. Burke Bradford M. Campbell Megan Campbell Jaylen G. Cardoso Giana H. Carrozza Grace G. Casey Emily S. Cataldo Caitlin M. Caulfield Alex R. Chaisson Anna K. Chau Logan Clancy Sadie O. Compson Ava Cornforth Alanna G. Curtis Cheyne J. Daniels Kadyn A. Darrow Allison C. Deegan Madison G. DeLuca Padraigh Desmond Annabel C. Doherty Kaitlin Donovan

30

Dickinson College Hamilton College Connecticut College American University Stanford University Assumption University University of San Diego Providence College Regis College Abbey Road Institute, London Providence College Belmont University Loyola University Boston College Syracuse University Kenyon College Emerson College High Point University Hobart William Smith Colleges Tulane University Bentley University Temple University Boston Conservatory at Berklee Miami University - Oxford Hobart William Smith Colleges University of Richmond University of North Carolina Wilmington Emerson College Amherst College Villanova University Gap Year University of Southern California Clark University

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

Noah C. Downing Danny J. El Abboud Colin C. Fallon Madeleine E. Farrell Gavin T. Fitzpatrick Molly F. Fitzpatrick Thomas C. Gaffey Jr. Samuel T. Garber Thomas C. Gill Samuel Goldenberg Elena F. Gosalvez Gabriella S. Grattan Julia M. Guidone Jacob M. Gula Mary E. Henderson Mason R. Hennessey Caroline M. Horgan Jackson D. Humphreys Benjamin P. Hussey Terah Jean Stefanie K. Joe Allison Joyce Alivia W. Kelly Drew T. Kelly Karina A. Kilburn Elise Kilmartin Jessie M. King Molly King Peter F. Kip Tyler B. Knightly Sydney N. Langenhagen Adam Lazowski Olivia L. Lenaghan

Hartwick College Wake Forest University Hobart William Smith Colleges College of the Holy Cross Junior Hockey Fordham University University of North Carolina Bates College Fairfield University St. Lawrence University Northeastern University Trinity College Syracuse University St. Lawrence University George Washington University Salve Regina University College of the Holy Cross William and Mary Northeastern University Bentley University Villanova University Providence College University of New Hampshire Babson College University of Colorado Fairfield University Northeastern University Trinity College Union College Amherst College Wake Forest University Boston University Babson College


3 40

16 11

7 3

3

3

7

3 1

4 8

THAYER ACADEMICS: COLLEGE MATRICULATION | CLASS OF 2020

3

2 2

3 2

Hongyue Lin Griffin J. Lincoln Audrey Linell Jenna E. Ludvigsen Christian J. Luther Mac C. MacKay Cameron Mannion Laura D. Marcus Aimee M. Matos Madison J. McCaffery Megan McCormack Camryn McCrystal Colin McGinn Stefanie A. McGrath John McKenna Kristyn L. Moran Kevin Moriarty Rivers A. Morris Michael P. Nessralla Nicole J. Nessralla Christina A. Nwokeji Megan C. O'Brien Olivia H. O'Connor OluwagbemiSola A. Osinubi Hannah B. Pauly Nadia Pena Cruz Persia Pena Cruz Colin J. Plante Erika M. Plante Isabel N. Potter Eva A. Rando Anthony J. Ratti

Georgetown University Clemson University Bucknell University Boston University LIM College New York University Junior Hockey Elon University Northeastern University Saint Anselm College Colby College Wesleyan University University of Massachusetts - Amherst Clemson University Elon University Connecticut College Nichols College SUNY College at Plattsburgh Northeastern University Stonehill College University of Massachusetts - Amherst Fairfield University Yale University Loyola University Miami University-Oxford Wentworth Institute of Technology Wentworth Institute of Technology University of Maine Hamilton College Boston College Louisiana State University Belmont University

Kaspar W. Relaford Henry Richard Kendall L. Roland James F. Rooney Jr. Joshua Rothman Isaac C. Sadhwani Luke G. Sadhwani Ciara L. Sage Neve Sannella Matthew T. Scapicchio Jack Schneider Gavin Schwandt Yijiao Shen Robert H. Sheridan Austin C. Smith Ryan A. St. Clair Grant M. St. Jean Charlotte Struzziero Jessica J. Stutzman Thomas R. Swaney III Alison A. Swierczynski Matthew G. Thompson John R. Thorbahn Miles T. Treichel Sophia Ubertalli Charlie E. Wahlberg Cameron F. Walker Kara Walser Meghan E. Webb Claire R. Weber Emmett J. Wilmot Zhiyu Xu

Tulane University Pace University Bucknell University Suffolk University Lafayette College Northeastern University Colorado College Boston College University of Tampa Tufts University Trinity College Providence College Washington University Endicott College University of Colorado Salve Regina University Providence College College of the Holy Cross Union College American University Northeastern University Princeton University Northeastern University University of Massachusetts - Amherst Northeastern University Loyola University Maryland Boston College Wake Forest University Connecticut College Saint Anselm College Berklee College of Music University of Southern California Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

31


Seniors 2020 Senior Profiles

Aimee Matos ’20 OMEGA (Vice President); Mock Trial Captain; Global Scholar; TAOOTD (Thayer Academy Outfits of The Day) Blogger; Voice Magazine Editor; Dance; Theater; Varsity Gymnastics (Captain); Cum Laude Society Hometown: Holbrook Attending: Northeastern University

faculty at Thayer are 100% committed “ The to and passionate about their students. The

teachers care about their students’ emotional well-being and cheer us on in or outside of the classroom. You can find them in the audience of the school musical or on the sidelines of the soccer field. Thayer’s teachers are exceptional, and I’m blessed to have built long-lasting friendships with many of them.

Tommy Gaffey ’20 Varsity Cross Country (four-time All ISL, four-time All NEPSTA); Varsity Track & Field (two-time All ISL, two-time All NEPSTA); SALSA (Students Advocating Life without Substance Abuse) (President); Student Government Representative; Benelli Writing Center (BWC) Writing Fellow; Black & Orange Yearbook Staff; Global Scholar Hometown: Scituate Attending: University of North Carolina

“ Thayer is unique because athletes can be artists, intellectuals can be performers, and all students have the ability to be a part of different facets of the school. I’ve constantly been surprised by how involved students are here. It’s truly an environment that fosters growth in versatility.

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


See more senior profiles at: www.thayer.org/studentprofiles

Emmett Wilmot ’20 Jazz Combo, Bass; Bassist for multiple active bands Hometown: Hingham Attending: Berklee College of Music

has a good blend of many of “ Thayer the things that I was interested in. I

was able to pursue all of the subjects that I was interested in academically while also playing bass for multiple combos and taking lessons during the school day.

Olivia O’Connor ’20 BWC Fellow; Lead Tour Guide; Theater; Dance; Track and Field; Voice Magazine; Global Scholar; Cum Laude Society Hometown: Braintree Attending: Yale University

faculty is what really makes Thayer unique. It’s “The unbelievable how much teachers care about their

students — not only in terms of their academic journeys but also in terms of their journeys as people. I’ve had so many teachers during my Thayer career who’ve inspired and impacted me in huge ways.

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

33


Athletics TIGERS IN THE NCAA

NCAA Student-Athletes from the Class of 2020 These 29 Thayer student-athletes will be playing NCAA sports around the country this year.

ATHLETICS Emily Cataldo

Payton Bridge

Ryan Bogar

Soccer

Regis College

Lacrosse

Hockey

Jaylen Cardoso

Hobart & William Smith Colleges

Football

Assumption College

Kenyon College

Ava Cornforth Hockey

Hobart & William Smith Colleges

Ally Deegan

Soccer & Track Amherst College

Thomas Gaffey Jr. Track

University of North Carolina

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

Tripp Gill

Tennis Fairfield University

Annabel Doherty Track

University of Southern California

Noah Downing

Basketball Hartwick College

Jacob Gula Gabby Grattan

Soccer & Track Trinity College

Football St. Lawrence University


Terah Jean

Alivia Kelly

Football Bentley University

Tyler Knightly

Molly King

Soccer

University of New Hampshire

Swimming

Field Hockey

Amherst College

Trinity College

Olivia Lenaghan

Adam Lazowski

Maddy McCaffery

Lacrosse Babson College

Tennis

Hockey

Soccer

Kevin Moriarty

Baseball Nichols College

Football

Wesleyan University

Rivers Morris

Basketball

Salve Regina University

Track

Baseball

Bucknell University

University of Maine

SUNY Plattsburgh

Ryan St. Clair

Kendall Roland

Colin Plante

Hockey

Connecticut College

Jack Schneider

Hockey

St. Anselm College

Boston University

Kristyn Moran

Camryn McCrystal

Jack Thorbahn Baseball Northeastern University

Claire Weber

Hockey

St. Anselm College

Trinity College

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

35


Athletics 2020 HIGHLIGHTS

2

1

3

4

Thayer Athletics in the Pandemic by Thayer Athletics Director Rick Foresteire P '19, '21

Athletics at Thayer during COVID-19 have proven difficult waters

Sports Center for all Middle School sports — in addition to

to navigate, but we’ve been so impressed by the cooperation and

Upper School basketball and hockey — has worked extremely

enthusiasm of our players and coaches. Thayer’s goal has always

well. Upper School wrestling practices take place in Alumni Gym,

been to provide the safest and best athletic experience possible

swimming practices are going well at Blue Hills Regional Technical

under both state and ISL guidelines. Although we certainly wish

School, skiing has begun its season, and gymnastics squads are

more scrimmages had been possible this fall, the overall spirit and

practicing at Joan’s Olympic Gym in Braintree. Our strength &

enthusiasm of our student-athletes was outstanding, as were that

conditioning program is also up and running four days per week.

season’s participation numbers. Once again, a sincere thanks goes out to our student-athletes and The winter sports season has also started at a cautious pace, but

coaches. We hope to remain healthy and continue with a produc-

we’re looking forward to moving into scrimmage play. Participa-

tive and rewarding winter season.

tion numbers are once again quite strong, and use of the Thayer

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


Athletics 2020 HIGHLIGHTS

5

1

2

3

4

Cross Country practice continues with Chloe Clifford ’22 training on campus. Thayer's girls varsity volleyball team poses for their team photo in Memorial Gym. (BACK ROW L-R): Coach Jazna Stannard, Gianna Quatromoni '22, Emma Dahl '23, Claire Fideli '23, Annelise Reinhard '24, Olivia Walker '23, Alenka Cetkovic '23, Assistant Coach Amanda Taylor. (FRONT ROW L-R): Ava Deibel '23, Cassie Davidson '21, Jacqueline O'Leary '21, Megan Bowen '21, Sophie Butner '21 Soccer players Owen Sharpe ’23 and Clement Scotts ’24 take part in an intersquad scrimmage at Thayer. Caitlin Fitzgerald ’22 clears a hurdle during practice as coach Jeff Browne P ’04, ’05 looks on.

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Mikaila Kitchen ’21 advances the ball during a soccer scrimmage. Elizabeth Gill ’22 and Lilly Arends ’21 attack the ball during a field hockey scrimmage. Mia McLean ’22 stretches prior to a practice run. Quarterback Conor Meehan ’23 prepares to throw the football during a scrimmage. Thayer's girls soccer team maintaining social distancing in their team photo.

10 Wide receiver Jaaden Simpkins ’23

runs through drills during football practice.

8

9

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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Arts Upper School Performances

2 1

Selected Shots from Thayer's Upper School Photography Class STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHERS FROM MS. PARDO'S CLASS CAPTURE MOMENTS THAT REFLECT THE TIMES.

3

5

4

AN ASSIGNMENT ASKED STUDENTS TO CAPTURE WORDS/PHRASES LIKE "STRESSED," "FRAZZLED," OR "SOCIAL DISTANCING" THROUGH A CAMERA LENS.

38

1

"Social Distancing" - Lily Sidman ’21

4

"Social Distancing" - Healy O'Donnell ’21

2

"Stressed" - Caroline Fisher ’21

5

"Frazzled" - Liam Carey ’23

3

"Stressed" - Lydia Loucas ’21

6

"Stressed" - Andy Collins ’21

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

6


Arts Middle School Performances

In the Zoom Where It Happened

Virtual Drama Proves Frightening…and Enlightening by Tara Corcoran '88, P '19 When the pandemic started, I had no idea how I would continue to teach online or bring a production to life through these media. I just knew that the kids needed to perform and they had the desire and courage to take a risk to make it happen. Luckily, drama is a creative field that is built on people collaborating to figure out how to make things — and that’s what we’re doing. I looked for help at every turn. I had the idea, but I could not have done it without the help of my cast, tech department, colleagues, online resources, administration, and parents.

For our Middle School performers, there was that one week, back in March of last year, when everything shifted. One moment everyone was at school, going to class and hanging out with friends, getting ready to put on our winter play production…and then suddenly we were at home, social distancing and trying to figure out online learning. The shows we were working on would never go up, and our spring show was certainly going to get canceled as well. The loss was really difficult for everyone, but we held on to the hope that we could get back on stage in the fall.

a sense of community knowing we were all working on the same goal: to perform any way we could.

By the beginning of September, as the pandemic went on, our hopes for returning to the stage faded. Among the many losses this school year was the chance for students to shine on stage in the annual fall theater production. This hit the 8th graders especially hard because they knew their time at the Middle School was coming to an end.

I have leaned on tech-savvy students to lead the charge in this new remote territory. There’s a real creative opportunity in the midst of trying to figure out how to meet this challenge. I think that’s how we’re all approaching it with our students, and the students are in front of us on this.

We spent a few days mourning the loss of our shows due to COVID-19, but in the end we knew we needed to move on. The students were adamant: they wanted to do something. We got to work brainstorming ways that theater could be effectively conducted online and shared with parents/guardians and our community. The cast decided to turn misfortune into opportunity and chose to rehearse and perform the fall production and Greek Myth plays via Zoom. Now those performances will live on — online. The students rehearsed for a few months until they were ready to record. It wasn't the big performance we'd envisioned on stage, with parents and classmates there, but we still felt

I have learned so much and been inspired by other drama teachers who have been willing to help and share resources through social media. This sharing of information was unprecedented. Not many of us have utilized online learning or taught online, and trying something new can be extremely intimidating, especially a full-scale production. This shared information was the lifeline I needed.

This production truly took a village to create, and I will never forget the experience I shared with my cast. I am so proud of what we created, but what I will remember most is a conversation I had with one of my students. I was sharing some of my thoughts, struggles, and anxieties about how the play would come out after the final edit was finished. He looked at me and said, “Don't worry about all of that stuff. We care more about working on the play together and spending time together. We were able to take back what we lost last year, and that's what is important. We were able to be a cast again”

Teaching and learning in the time of a global pandemic has been terrifying and exciting and awful all rolled into one as everyone navigates all the challenges presented while attempting to create their shows and continue their classes. However, I believe this has been a teachable moment.

That conversation was such a wonderful reminder about what is important, and that is the sense of community theater creates. It's always a bonus to share the play with the community, but that can't compare to the family you create when you work on a shared experience. We reclaimed that experience this fall through technology, persistence, creativity, and a little (a lot of ) help from our friends.

Sometimes you have to play the cards you're dealt. We needed to come up with a plan B, figure out how to be more adaptive and flexible so we could accomplish our goal. My students were looking at me for direction and guidance to get through a tough situation. I knew they would follow my lead and how important my attitude was in getting us through.

VIRTUAL GREEK MYTHOLOGY SKITS VIRTUAL

GREEK

MYTHOLOGY

THIS IS A TEST PLAY

SKITS NAME:

PROMETHEUS & PANDORA

THE &

Narrator: Aash Joga Narrator: Amaro Harrington Narrator: Alex Kaye Narrator: Ryan Sloan Zeus: Caeden Mullin Epimetheus: Compton Jones Prometheus: William Bunn Pandora: Sidney Schneider Hephaestus: Manny Chikwendu Hercules: George Caldroney

P L AYS CAST ARTEMIS & NIOB E Narrator: Dillon Driscoll Narrator: Kristianna Masiello Narrator: Reese McNally Narrator: Zoe Rudolph Artemis: Ryleigh Flaherty-Clapham Zeus: Cavan Finnerty Leto: Quinn Walsh Actaeon: Brandon Kwok Apollo: Seamus Healy

Niobe: Katie McCarthy

HERMES

Narrator: Compton Jones Narrator: Manny Chikwendu Narrator: Quentin Brown Narrator: Jeffrey Lan Hera: Aash Joga Ilithyia: Katie Cedrone Iris: Idalyn Chong Leto: Sarah Woods Poseidon: Aarav Vaghela

MS. COREY

ARIAD NE

ATHENA

Narrator: Sidney Schneider Narrator: Caeden Mullin Narrator: Katie Cedrone Narrator: James Shahied Daedalus: Tristan Sheehan Theseus: Jeffrey Lan King Minos: Ryan Sloan Ariadne: Alex Kaye Dionysus: George Caldroney Athenian: Quentin Brown

Narrator: Rhys Amontea Narrator: Jackson Quealy Narrator: Casey Lukens Narrator: Gavin Young Zeus: Kaden Taylor Metis: Halle Schofield Hephaestus: James Sullivan Arachne: Maya Bobrov Athena: Cam Lazer Poseidon: Edgar Burman

MR. TOUSSAINT

MR. LIEBSCH

1. 2.

A A

B B

C C

D D

E E

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B B

C C

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reminds you, only 60 minutes remain to complete this oh-soimportant predictor of

Directed by Tara Corcoran ’88 P’19 Stage Manager: Dillon Driscoll Production Editing Marie Jimenez and Emmet Knox

your future. But you didn’t get the review sheets, the teacher doesn’t like you and your classmates are blatantly cheating.

VIRTUAL PRESENTATION DIRECTED

VIEW THE 2020-21 MIDDLE SCHOOL PRODUCTIONS OF GREEK MYTHS AND THIS IS A TEST ONLINE:

Stephen Gregg

SYNOPSIS:

Narrator: Maya Bobrov Narrator: Mallory Harold Narrator: Casey Lukens Narrator: Jack McDonough Ariadne: Cam Lazer Dionysus: James Sullivan Dodonus: Jackson Quealy Zeus: Kaden Taylor Hermes: Teddy Gilman Semele: Cara McDonnell Hera: Ella Wegner Pirate: Rhys Amontea Pirate: Drew Jaspon Pirate: Gavin Young Pirate: Halle Schofield

LETO

This is a Test

November X, 2020

WRITTEN BY:

D IONYSUS

D EMETER & PERSEPHONE Narrator: Brandon Kwok Narrator: William Wallace Narrator: Hudson Krasinski Narrator: Ali Shannon Hades: Charlie Holmes Triptolemus: Quinn Walsh Persephone: Reese McNally Metaneirus: Kristianna Masiello Zeus: Jack Warren Demeter: Austin Archabal Iris: Zoe Rudolph

DATE:

Narrator: Maya Bobrov Narrator: Taylor Jaspon Narrator: Ella Wegner Narrator: Drew Jaspon Maia: Mallory Harold Zeus: Jack McDonough Apollo: Edgar Burman Hera: Cara McDonnell Hermes: Teddy Gilman

BY

TA R A

Time passes and the voices in your head remind you that though you are having trouble with the test, your personal life is

C O R C O R A N '88 P '19

far, far worse. Then you

SPECIAL THANKS

The good news—it’s an

reach the essay question. GALEN HAMANN JA K E D E SI LVA MARIE JIMENEZ PAU L K A H N E M M E T T K NOX C R A IG S A LT E R S & C L A I R E M C CA RT H Y P '83, '88 GP '02, '06, '19

opinion essay. The bad news—it’s in Chinese.

T EST Cast:

Cast:

Alice: Abby Concannon Louis: Jack McDonough Evan: Compton Jones Teacher: Edgar Burman Pat: Cam Lazer Chris: Jeffrey Lan Mother: Ann Marie Zukauskas Chorus 1: Jeffrey Lan, Katie Cedrone, Sidney Schneider Chorus 2: Kaden Taylor, Kristianna Masiello, Ella Wegner Chorus 3: Aashrita Joga, Cara McDonnell, Alex Kaye Chorus 4: James Sullivan, Hadley Butler, Maya Bobrov Chorus 5: Kaden Taylor, Compton Jones, Seamus Healy

Alice: Stefania Blackwell Louis: Dylan Butler Evan: Christian Murphy Teacher: Scarlett McMahon Pat: Brendan Brosnan Chris: Brian Pickel Mother: Rose Cairo Chorus 1: Julia Yezukevich, Charlie Gilman, Luke Driscoll Chorus 2: Catherine Woods, Jess Case, Emma Hernandez Chorus 3: Mary Kelleher, Brendan Brosnan, Abby Butner Chorus 4: Ella Aiello, Dylan Butler, Brian Pickel Chorus 5: Julia Yezukevich, Christian Murphy, Catherine Woods

And things aren’t going to get better! SPECIAL

GA L E N H A MANN

MAR I E J I MENEZ

EMMETT KNOX

CL AI R E MCCARTH Y

THANKS

JA KE D E S I LVA

PAU L KAH N

CR AI G SALTER S

P '83 , '88 G P '0 2, '0 6, '1 9

thayer.org/TATV/dramas

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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Arts Upper School Performances

The Art of Teaching Art in the Time of COVID-19 by Karen Koskores P '10, '13

As a teacher, I have always tried to hold to the notion that I am a facilitator and resource for my students’ individual, creative aspirations. During this period of so many difficult issues affecting their lives, I have continued to hold true to that approach. If students want to explore their feelings about social or societal matters, they are encouraged to do so and are free to explore creative ways of giving a visual voice to those topics.

Teaching any subject at this time of dealing with so many demanding issues has been challenging for all teachers, but it has presented some particular challenges for the teaching of art. Students generally have their current artwork in the classroom and also have access to a wide variety of materials here at school. The switch from in-person to remote poses the difficulty of not having access to their work or necessary materials when at home.

Often, however, students also wish to use their time in creative pursuits to take some relief from the challenging issues that they have been confronted with in so many aspects of their young lives. They see their art as an escape or a pursuit of some ideal or personal version of beauty or self-expression. I often quote a Thayer alumna, Megan Greeley '12, who entered the art room and declared, “This is my sanctuary!” And so, I continue to offer the art room as a sanctuary for the creative aspirations that students wish to explore.

To that end, students are encouraged to work on independent projects and to use the myriad resources that are available online to create opportunities for creativity. It also allows them to address subject matters that are perhaps more personal to them and to create in an environment that is less public and perhaps less intimidating. I have recently encouraged a number of more advanced students to consider taking on the challenge of completing a self-portrait, an age-old challenge for artists throughout history.

In the Freshman Arts classes, we complete a number of observational drawings that are all about “learning to see” and looking carefully with the emphasis on patience, careful observation, and drawing “only what you see and not what you assume is there.” It is a lesson that I strongly believe is applicable to so many other areas of their lives.

Art, in so many ways, has always been a mirror of the culture around it and continues to be so in our program. Most of all, I hope art courses afford a moment of joy for students at a time that can use more of them!

CAITLIN HAYES ’21

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

SARAH NAAMAA ’21

CAROLINE BROOKS ’22


JULIA PICKEL ’22

LEILA CHAPMAN ’21

MADISON RICHMAN ’23

ALENKA CETKOVIC ’23

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

41


Arts Upper School Performances

Director's Note from The Crucible

Upper School Drama Director Kelly Hines P '18, '19 penned this note for the Spring 2020 play The Crucible - a "radio" drama adapted from the Miller play. Guided by stories of courage, rebellion, and integrity, theater allows students to use their voices, practice empathy, experience leadership, and develop the skills to create the world they wish to inhabit. This masterwork by playwright Arthur Miller lays bare the consequences when a love of power overwhelms truth to create turmoil and chaos. Our students — and all of us who crave peace, equality, and freedom from fear in our society — can take this cautionary tale and remember that we all have the power to elevate or destroy our neighbors with our words and actions. Today, when so many hearts are heavy as our country faces tremendous fear and uncertainty, we turn again to shared stories to bring us together. A crucible is a vessel in which metal is melted at high temperature so that it may emerge as something new. As our nation experiences transformation, Thayer’s theater artists will continue to lead the way, sharing stories and connecting us to the best within our shared humanity. We also hope this production encourages our listeners to use their voices to speak against injustice and understand the dangers of silence and complicity.

Experience

The Crucible Radio Drama

thayer.org/TACrucible Listen with headphones for the fullest experience.

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


Arts Upper School Performances

Telling Inspiring Stories on a Virtual Stage Upper School Works Collectively to Create a Multimedia Good Job Honoring Thayer Faculty, Alumni, Parents, and Friends by Kelly Hines P '18, '19

Teaching theater and vocal music in a pandemic, like everything else, involved radical shifts in method and material. Theater is about connection, contact, and full range of expression, yet COVID-19 required us to innovate and translate theatrical performance into new forms. This fall, to allow for maximum safety in the continually evolving pandemic, we chose to deep-dive into a verbatim theater style: our students reached out to Thayer faculty, alumni, parents/guardians, and friends to share stories of how those individuals contributed to the common good in 2020, then embodied their experiences through dramatic monologues. Instead of the songs and dances of Newsies on stage this fall (now slated for Fall 2022), our multimedia project Good Job was inspired by the work of Anna Deavere Smith, activist, actor, and playwright, who famously interviews and portrays a wide range of characters in her one-person show. While we so missed the camaraderie of the rehearsal space, this project gave students an opportunity to look beyond themselves and see the pandemic through the eyes of another person. They used their unique gifts to contribute to our community. It was humbling and uplifting.

Contributing to the Common Good A MULTIMEDIA STAGE PLAY IN THREE ACTS

After a summer of unrest and the wider implications that this social justice reckoning had on us here at Thayer and beyond, we all returned committed to helping our students, these emerging activists for a better world, learn to use their voices and examine the ways that they can use art to express their feelings and the realities of the wider world. Our stage continues to be an evolving space where artists both tell their stories and learn to better listen to the voices, diverse viewpoints, and experiences of others.

View Thayer's Production:

Good Job

thayer.org/TAGoodJob

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

43


Alumni House NEWS & NOTES

Alumni House News & Notes

Alumna Highlights Equity in Time of Pandemic, Climate Crisis

Alegría De La Cruz '93 led a conversation with some familiar former faculty members | by Craig Salters '86 P '24 Racial injustice. Economic hardships. COVID-19. Climate change. No, Alegría De La Cruz ’93 didn’t shy away from difficult topics during her Oct. 21 online conversation with the Thayer community hosted by Alumni House and moderated by former History Faculty Norma Atkinson GP ’07, ’11, ’16 and former English Faculty Jim King P ’01, ’04, ’06. But De La Cruz, an attorney who recently became director of Equity for Sonoma County, California, reminded participants why such hard discussions need to take place.

“At the core of all these conversations,” she said, “is the love we have for this (Thayer) community and for what it means for these kids to go on, to do, and to be who they are.” De La Cruz discussed how Sonoma County is working to embed equity in its response to both a series of unrelenting wildfires and the coronavirus outbreak, two events which disproportionately affect underserved communities in a region better known as “Wine Country.” The daughter of United Farm Workers (UFW) organizers who crisscrossed California and other states and worked with the

Alegría De La Cruz ’93 during a Zoom conversation led by former English Faculty Jim King P ’01, ’04, ’06 and former History Faculty Norma Atkinson GP ’07, ’11, ’16.

likes of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, De La Cruz also discussed her personal story. She included her early years living with the migrant workers whom her family sought to organize as well as the somewhat circuitous route she took to a home in Milton and an independent school like Thayer.

underway as the nation heeds pressing calls for racial justice even as it battles a worldwide pandemic and climate change. “That’s the question of our time,” she said. “How do we do better now that we know better?”

At one point De La Cruz addressed the “soul searching” currently

Check out all of our recorded virtual Thayer community events at:

Save

the Date:

www.thayer.org//virtualevents

Founder's Day: A Day of Giving Scheduled for Monday, March 8, 2021

www.thayer.org/foundersday

If you are interested in hosting an alumni event (even a virtual one!), please contact Rachael Rouvales Vassalotti ’79 P ’07, ’11, ’12, Associate Director of Development, at 781.664.2504 or rvassalotti@thayer.org.

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


We are excited to announce the launch of ThayerNetwork, our very own networking community.

This platform will allow you to connect with fellow alumni who have similar interests, careers, and locations; promote your business; search for job opportunities; and join a mentoring program.

Sign up today at ThayerNetwork.com

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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Alumni THAYER CLASS NOTES

Class Notes CLASS OF

Many generations of Thayer wrestling were present at the 2020 Graves Kelsey Wrestling Tournament, including current and former coaches Greg Wilson, Marc Rando, Joice Souza de Silva, and Bill Earle. See the class note for Greg Wilson ’80 on page 47 for a complete list of those pictured in the photo.

1953 Barbara Stuetzer Lauterbach ’53 Barbara shares, "I am writing a food column for a local newspaper. It's fun!" CLASS OF

1958 Martha Reardon Bewick ’58 Martha shared with classmates that the big ’58 news is the book launch of Elinor Gale's first novel, The Emancipation of Emily Rosenbloom. “I have a copy and thoroughly enjoyed it. It's delightful, fun, and feisty, and Emily, engaged in complex life relationships, is a totally lovable character. She even experiences her 40th high school reunion near Boston, where the school colors are black and orange! The very positive reviews on the book cover include an excellent one from Kathie Malley-Morrison!” CLASS OF

1964 Paul Yovino ’64 Portals is Paul Yovino's debut novel of historical literary fiction. It brings to life the critical days between the assassination

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

ALL THE LATEST NEWS FROM THE THAYER COMMUNITY

of President John F. Kennedy on Friday, November 22, 1963, and The Gulf of Tonkin incident on Sunday, August 2, 1964 — days that precipitated the United States’ entry into the war in Vietnam. The story is revealed in a flashback as the protagonist, David Catalane, returns to King Ridge Academy for his 50th reunion. As he stands in the quadrangle, memories flood back as a gift or a curse: coming of age in the early 1960s, nothing seemed impossible. It was the time of “The New Frontier.” It was the time of tail fins and jet travel's infancy. It was a time of endless possibilities. We were going to the moon “and do the other things” as the young president's vigor took the country with him. The journey of adolescent enthusiasm and innocence knew no bounds until reality's hand struck down all those hopes and joys on November 22, 1963. Vigor died on a street in Dallas. Nothing would be the same again. Adolescent innocence became jaded awareness as the characters travel through portals to a less secure future. Portals by PJ Yovino is now available on Amazon and Kindle.

CLASS OF

1966 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

55th

Reunion Year!

Warren Pierce ’66 Warren Pierce shared news from the class: Tony Rando organized a virtual fundraiser (with real money) for the Weymouth Food Pantry in the spring; Lis Tarlow hosting about 20 of us in a Zoom meeting - old dogs learning new tricks? Ann Hoffman Scott (who is still working!), Lorraine and Bill McGrath, Kevin Tedeschi, and I failed to make it to Ann's sister's place in Nice, France, for the First Annual Ad Hoc Bored International Meeting. We are planning again for April 2021. Ann Scott Monroe and Bonnie Goldman Denher both lost their mothers this year, an amazing feat of longevity, and hopefully both Bonnie and Scott inherited that gene. Betsey Sylvester Blakeslee moved from West Point to Colorado when her husband Don retired (again) from the military. Renny MacKay moved to Maine (to escape the Massachusetts weather, I believe), and Kevin Tedeschi winters in St Barths for the same reason.


1970 Laura Shea ’70 Laura's latest novel, Murder in the Wings, has been published. This is the third book in her Erica Duncan Mystery Series.

CLASS OF

1973 Renee Ingram ’73 See the profile of Renee and her work championing the African American Heritage Sites app as an educational tool and more on page 20.

third year in a row! We won for our work with Diageo, and it was another banner year for "HUB" as we were nominated in seven of the 10 categories!" Paul Singarella ’76 Paul is pleased to share that he recently connected with former music teacher George Butler. George turned 93 on May 4, 2020. He lives in a log cabin on Lake Mascoma. He is still in touch with alum Jay Goulart ’75 as well as many others. George lost his beloved wife, Donna, two years ago. He has rich memories of Thayer Academy and all the students whose lives he influenced, I can tell you, in a most positive way. If anyone wishes to write to him, please reach out to Alumni House as George would love to hear from you!

2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

40th

Reunion Year!

D. Gregory Wilson ’80 P ’06, ’21 At the 2020 Graves-Kelsey Wrestling Tournament, Greg's son, Ethan, placed second in the 126 weight class. From left: Coach Greg Wilson ’80 P ’06, ’21; Assistant Coach Joice Souza da Silva; Assistant Coach Marc Rando P ’18, ’20; Will Kourafas ’23; Owen Kourafas; Ethan Wilson ’21; Anthony Frank ’22; Bob Norton ’84; Bill Earle P ’01, Retired Coach, 1976-1992; Jonathan Earle ’01; Sean Mastromatteo ’86 with his children, Max and Mia; Don Badger III ’98; and Paul Badger ’01.

CLASS OF

1978 CLASS OF

CLASS OF

1979 Nancy Fitzpatrick ’79 See the profile of Nancy and her family working in COVID-19 care on page 22. CLASS OF

1976 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

1980

SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 46.

Michael Sheehan ’78 P ’24 Mike's daughter, Catherine, joined Thayer's Upper School as a freshman this fall. Congratulations and welcome!

2020-21

CLASS OF

CLASS NOTES: 1950s-80s

CLASS OF

45th

Reunion Year!

Jack DiRico ’76 P ’18, ’18, ’23 As Executive Vice President/Chief Marketing Officer at Hub Folding Box Company, Jack shares: "I am so proud of our entire Hub team for winning the prestigious Quality Excellence Award "Creativity Through Packaging" for the

Visit thayer.org/reunion for any schedule updates or changes to Reunion 2020-21

1981 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

40th

Reunion Year!

Andrea Martino Coleman ’81 Andrea writes, "Still living in So Cal. My family is spread out across the country. Our son Matthew is a naval officer stationed at Pearl Harbor, and our daughter attends Salve Regina in Newport, RI. Love to see the changes on campus when I drive by and enjoy the many good memories Thayer afforded me.”

CLASS OF

1984 David Giagrando ’84 David has accepted the role of Senior Director of Development at the Greater Boston Food Bank, focusing on corporate giving / engagement / partnerships and special events. He shares, "This organization is so important

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to Boston and the surrounding communities, serving over 500 programs and 70 direct distribution sites and food pantries, addressing food insecurity, and working to end hunger here.”

CLASS OF

CLASS OF

1991

1986 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

35th

2020-21

Reunion Year!

Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

30th

Reunion Year!

CLASS OF

1985 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

Craig Salters ’86 P ’24 Craig's son Harry joined Thayer's Upper School as a freshman this fall. Congratulations and welcome!

35th

Reunion Year!

Bill Berman ’85 On November 6, 2020, Bill was named the head coach of the Archbishop Williams varsity baseball team. He has spent the last five years coaching freshman and junior varsity baseball at Archies, and most recently as the assistant coach of the varsity team. Congrats, Bill! Mark O'Sullivan ’85 Mark is back in Boston and working as a Risk Management Specialist at Lincoln Heritage Life Insurance Company.

CLASS OF

1988 Stephen McCoy Jr. ’88 P ’24 Steve's daughter Grace joined Thayer's Upper School as a freshman this fall. Congratulations and welcome! Kelley Tuthill ’88 Kelley recently accepted the position of Chief Operating Officer at Catholic Charities of Boston. In 2016 she left her position as a reporter at WCVB-TV after more than two decades on the air to take on the role of VP of Communications at Regis College.

Joshua Cohen ’91 P ’24 Josh's company shares, "Northwestern Mutual honored Canton-based Financial Advisor Joshua A. Cohen for his commitment and drive to help families and businesses plan for and achieve financial security. As part of this recognition, Josh will be inducted into the company's elite membership, the 2020 Forum Group. Josh is affiliated with The Northwestern Mutual Boston & Rockland offices and resides with his family in Canton. After Thayer, Josh graduated from the University of Miami in 1995. He is still involved in and incredibly passionate about both institutions. Forum award qualifiers represent the top tier of Northwestern Mutual's industry-leading financial representatives; less than five percent of more than 6,000 financial representatives receive this recognition. Josh was recognized at a leadership conference in November, along with other Forum honorees.”

Providing During a Pandemic CLASS OF

1989

48

Mike Mignosa ’89 P ’22, ’25 Co-Owner / President of the Fruit Center Marketplace, on COVID-19 business challenges

There have been a great many challenges for us, like the rest of the world, just trying to navigate — especially during the height of the pandemic — employee and customer safety, and trying to figure out how to do that when really no one knew what this virus was all about and what was the right or wrong thing to do. For about two and a half months, I was working every day, open to close, so I didn’t see my family much at all for that time, so that was challenging and a little bit stressful.

I’m very fortunate that my kids both work in the stores, so it’s actually brought us closer together. They’ve been working more, and we’ve been spending more time together at home like everybody else, so I see them both at home and at work. I see two different sides of both of my children, which has been really nice, and I think that for a lot of families, that has been one of the upsides; it’s brought us closer together, and mostly that’s a good thing. So that’s been a plus for us.

It’s much easier now because I think we have a much better handle on how the virus spreads and what we can do to minimize the spread of the virus, but up until a few months ago, that was a big challenge and a big concern for our staff, our customers, and me.

I grew up in the community I serve, so I feel like I have an obligation to my friends, my family, and my neighbors to do the best I can for them. You know, I’m one of those people who never wants to let anyone down, so I want to make sure that their experience in our stores is as positive as it can be, and we do the best we can to provide for them.

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020


Lesley Leibowitz Snyder ’93 & Joshua Snyder P ’23, ’25, ’28 Lesley and Josh's son, Ben, started Thayer Middle School as a fifth grader this fall. He joins his brothers Drew ’25 and Jack ’23. Congratulations and welcome!

CLASS OF

1996 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

25th

Reunion Year!

CLASS NOTES: 1980s - 1990s

William Stearns IV ’91 P ’23, ’27 Will's daughter Lucy started at Thayer's Middle School as a seventh grader this fall. She joins sister Maddie ’23. Congratulations and welcome!

CLASS OF

CLASS OF

1992 Deidre Kerr ’92 Deidre and her husband, Joaquim "Jack,” are the proud owners of Captain Jack’s Charter Fishing located in Boston. www. captainjackscharterfishing.com Gregory Lally ’92 P ’22, ’26 Greg's son Ryan started at Thayer's Middle School as a seventh grader this fall. He joins his sister Caroline ’22. Congratulations and welcome! Michael Sheehan ’92 P ’27 Michael's son Tristan joined Thayer's Middle School as a sixth grader this fall. Congratulations and welcome!

1994 Jonathan Slawsby ’94 Congratulations to Jonathan for starting a new position as CEO at The Madison Food Companies. Anni McDonough Zukauskas ’94 P ’28 Anni's daughter, Anne Marie, joined Thayer Middle School as a fifth grader this fall. Congratulations and welcome!

CLASS OF

1995 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

25th

Reunion Year!

CLASS OF

1993 Alegría De La Cruz ’93 Alegría spoke at a Thayer virtual alumni event this past October. See pg. 44. She also spoke at Thayer Middle School's MLK Jr. Breakfast on January 13.

Christopher Sullivan ’95 P ’27 Chris's son James started at Thayer's Middle School as a seventh grader this fall. Congratulations and welcome! Michael Mottau ’96 Seamans Media, publisher of New England Hockey Journal and other specialized sports content, is proud to announce the debut of its new podcast, New England Hockey Journal’s "The Rink Shrinks,” featuring former pro players Mike Mottau ’96 and Brian Yandle. Listeners will get honesty, humor, insight, and direction from Mottau and Yandle along with their special guests in the hockey industry who will share the lessons and outrageous stories they’ve come across in the sport.

CLASS OF

Rhonda Dragone ’95 Rhonda serves as an ER nurse at Carney Hospital. Read her thoughts on her work there during the COVID-19 crisis on page 19.

Maurice Philogene ’93 Maurice, a senior executive for Accenture, is currently in Beirut, Lebanon, helping out with that city following the August explosion. Read his thoughts on living with purpose during the pandemic on page 19. Maurice also spoke at the Middle School's MLK Jr. Breakfast on January 13.

Jeffrey Gulko ’95 Jeff shares that he is working as a Media Strategist in Public Relations with Xlear and they recently released information reported in Business Wire saying that "new studies, led by renowned authority on respiratory diseases, conclude Xlear nasal spray is an effective and replicable means to deactivate SARS-CoV-2 … to an undetectable amount of infectious virus.”

Jodi McCoy Schofield ’93 P 25, ’27 Jodi's daughters Sydney ’25 and Halle ’27 joined Thayer's Middle School this fall. Congratulations and welcome!

Ross Stafford ’95 Ross and his wife, Charmaine, celebrated the birth of their daughter Maya Taylor Stafford, born on January 31, 2020. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 51.

Visit thayer.org/reunion for any schedule updates or changes to Reunion 2020-21

1997 Heidi Schonland Reid ’97 Congratulations to Heidi for starting a new position as Senior Manager, Business Development Operations at Consigli Construction Company.

SAVE THE DATE! 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

A Reunion Event twice as nice! Join us for a combined 2020-21 Reunion Celebration for Classes ending in 0, 1, 5, and 6!

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Alumni WEDDINGS & BABIES

1

3

5

Thayer Weddings

Mike Jones ’03 & Sophie Browne Jones ’04 (P. 53)

Karl Desmond ’06 & Genevieve Olson Desmond ’08 (P. 54)

Julia Henken ’09 (P. 54)

2

Christopher Howard ’06 (P. 54)

4

Nazy Kerr Krygier ’07

5

Evonne Royston Harrison ’04 (P. 53)

(P. 54)

2

Kevin Signorelli ’06

5

Hope Bresnahan ’08 (P. 54)

5

Emma Reilly Hill ’13 (P. 55)

Newlywed? Share the good news with your fellow Thayer alums! Please email your high-resolution photo to: magazine@thayer.org

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

(P. 54)


Welcoming the newest members of the Thayer community!

August Ernest Amendola

Vincent Frank Foster

Emily Katherine Gredell

BORN: May 27, 2020 Chelsea (Rader) ’07 & Nate Amendola

BORN: February 21, 2020 Chelsea (Tallarico) ’07 & Jon Foster

BORN: September 7, 2020 Hillary (Roth) ’05 & Lucas Gredell

Hadley Lerner BORN: October 7, 2019 Meggie & John Lerner ’07

Maya Taylor Stafford BORN: October 7, 2019 Charmaine & Ross Stafford ’05

CLASS NOTES: WEDDINGS & BABIES & 2010s

Thayer Babies

Ronan Parker Tangerini

BORN: June 9, 2020 Allie (Anderson) ’07 & Emilio Tangerini

New Parent?

Share the good news with your fellow Thayer alums!

Tucker Brooks Timmins

Email us your newborn’s full name and date of birth - and be sure to include a high-res (300 dpi or higher) photo to Thayer Magazine at: magazine@thayer.org

BORN: May 27, 2020 Kristen (Mullen) ’07 & Brian Timmins

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

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CLASS OF

1998 Amir Abdullah ’98 Amir, also known as DJ Amir, the CEO & Founder of 180 Proof Records out of Brooklyn, NY, has been working on a special project for several years.

Ryan Cox ’98 P ’26, ’28 Ryan's son Charlie started at Thayer's Middle School as a fifth grader this fall. He joins his sister Emma ’26. Congratulations and welcome!

CLASS OF

2000 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

With the help of family, friends, and music lovers across the globe, Amir was able to surpass his goal of raising $8,000 via Kickstarter to turn his dream into a reality; a record presented by Strata Records titled ’The Sound of Detroit' - Reimagined by Jazzanova.

20th

Reunion Year!

Allison Kent Trumbull ’00 Allison is currently employed as the Head of U.S. Legal and Compliance at the Arabesque Group, a global financial technology company.

A THAYER FAMILY / FACULTY OCCASION! THAYER ALUM AND FACULTY MEMBERS SOPHIE BROWNE JONES '04 AND MIKE JONES '03 WERE MARRIED IN AUGUST.

CLASS OF

2002 Making a Difference

For Kendra King ’02, treating coronavirus patients requires both care and caring by Craig Salters '86 P '24

After securing the licensing rights to the Strata catalog, Amir began working with Jazzanova, a DJ/producer collective based in Berlin, Germany, to choose the best tracks that best represented Strata for an album in contemporary format. Since raising the necessary funds, Amir and Jazzanova will recontextualize 11 tracks from the catalog using a live band comprised of 10 musicians and producers starting on January 5, 2021. To hear more about ’The Sound of Detroit' - Reimagined by Jazzanova, visit: WWW.KICKSTARTER.COM/PROJECTS/ DJAMIR70/STRATA-RECORDS-THE-SOUND-OFDETROIT-REIMAGINED-BY-JAZZANOVA .

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Thayer Magazine Magazine /// /// Winter 2020 Thayer Summer/ /Spring / Fall 2020

Certified Physician Assistant Kendra King ‘02 has seen the worst that COVID-19 has to offer and the best that the medical profession has to offer, sometimes in the same 15-hour shift.

KENDRA KING '02 - FROM THE FIRST DAY SHE WORE A WHITE COAT IN PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT SCHOOL

King, who works on the general surgery team at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, joined one of the hospital’s newly formed COVID-19 teams when the virus first emerged. Since then she and fellow team members have handled cases both on the inpatient and ICU floors. They’ve “masked up” with PPE (personal protective equipment), made rounds, performed exams and bedside procedures, revised protocols, administered promising trial medications, dealt with complications and associated symptoms, intubated patients with ventilators, and responded to “code blue” situations where patients were struggling to survive.

King and colleagues have also held patients’ hands, updated family and friends, arranged for video chats or interpreters when necessary, and, in the worst cases, told distraught and grieving individuals that they could not see their loved ones for the last time. “This was one of the most emotionally draining parts of the job,” said King. “It was heartbreaking.” King has seen many young, otherwise healthy patients suffer strokes directly related to COVID-19. One young man was intubated for more than one month only to wake up to learn that both of his parents had died from the virus and that he would have cardiac and pulmonary issues for the rest of his life. One young woman had to learn of a terminal cancer diagnosis without the benefit of family members.


Among other guests were alums Emma Browne ’05 (sister of the bride) and Jarquis Jones ’05 (brother of the groom). The Joneses were married on August 23, 2020, at their new home in West Bridgewater among close family and friends.

2003 Michael Jones ’03 See Sophie Browne Jones ’04

SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 50 CLASS OF

2004 Sophie Browne Jones ’04 Sophie married high school sweetheart Mike Jones ’03 on August 23, 2020. Both Mike and Sophie currently work at Thayer as coaches and teachers, as does Sophie's father, Jeff Browne P ’04, ’05 -Thayer's Upper School Arts Department Head, Ensemble music teacher, and girls varsity head track coach; along with Sophie's mother, Barbara Browne P ’04, ’05, Upper School English faculty and the Academy’s office manager of Plant & Facilities. (SEE PHOTO TO THE LEFT)

“Her husband begged me to hug her for him since he couldn’t be there,” said King. “I sat there for an hour, holding her hand and answering any questions I could to help ease her pain.” For King, who graduated Colby College with a bachelor’s degree in Biology (neuroscience concentration) and earned her master’s degree in Health Science from the Physician Assistant Program at Quinnipiac University, wearing a mask is not a question of politics but of science … and courtesy. “This all really boils down to compassion for others,” she said. “Wear a mask! Do it to protect not only yourself but your neighbors, your family, your co-workers, the elderly woman you pass at the grocery store, the immunocompromised neighbor who lives in your building. Stay safe to protect those around you.” King summarized the recent vaccine breakthroughs in one

Amy Lussier ’04 Amy started a new position as Chief Financial Officer at eMaxx Assurance Group of Companies of Peabody. Evonne Royston Harrison ’04 Evonne married her college sweetheart Sebastian Harrison on July 26, 2019, in Warrenton, NC.

CLASS OF

2005 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

15th

Reunion Year!

CLASS NOTES: 1990s-2000s

CLASS OF

Hillary Roth Gredell ’05 Hillary and her husband, Lucas, welcomed a beautiful baby girl, Emily Katherine Gredell, into the world on September 7, 2020. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 51.

SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 50.

word — “hope” — and then described Brigham and Women’s “Operation Hope,” in which those patients who’ve beaten COVID-19 are wheeled out of the hospital to the song “Walking on Sunshine” by Katrina and the Waves and cheered by B&W doctors, nurses, and staff. “It’s amazing to see them heading home to loved ones,” said King, “and it gives us healthcare workers a few moments of happiness during a dark time.” A former three-season athlete and a founder of the Winter Wars tradition, King’s roots to Thayer run deep. Her mother Libby is the former director of Parent and Alumni Programs, and her brothers Logan and Malin graduated in 2005 and 2007, respectively. King also taught and coached at Thayer from 2007 until 2009 and currently serves on the alumni board. “Thayer provides its students with a safe space to try new things, push the limits, get out

Michaela Robbins ’05 Michaela and her husband, Dave Robbins, were featured in People’s Human Interest section telling their incredible story of their fate-filled journey that led to the adoption of their son, Noah. of their comfort zones, and learn how to be a contributing member of society,” she said. King is no stranger to getting out of her comfort zones. She spent roughly 10 years in the adventure travel business teaching scuba diving on the Great Barrier Reef, teaching snowboarding in the Rocky Mountains, leading hiking expeditions along the Inca Trail, and teaching outdoor survival skills. But while she wouldn’t trade those experiences for the world, King said she feels truly fortunate to be where she is now.

“For one Pittsburgh couple, the journey to parenthood was a difficult one. But in the end, they found their “one-in-alifetime” kid — a 5-year-old who is medically fragile and has inspired them to encourage other parents to open their hearts to children with special needs.” To read more about Michaela and Dave’s story, visit: TINYURL.COM/ROBBINSTACLASSNOTE

“I want to make a difference in someone’s life and be challenged on a daily basis,” King said. “While working during COVID-19 is definitely a very difficult time to start out in a new career in the medical field, I’m so proud to be able to help my community, be on the front lines, and really help during this immense time of need.”

Visit thayer.org/reunion for any schedule updates or changes to Reunion 2020-21

Thayer Magazine Magazine /// /// Winter 2020 Thayer Summer/ /Spring / Fall 2020

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CLASS OF

2006 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

15th

Reunion Year!

Karl Desmond ’06 See Genevieve Olson Desmond ’08 Mathieu Frechette ’06 Mathieu has started a new position as Advisor Consultant at New York Life Investments. Christopher Howard ’06 Chris was married to Amy Pearson on September 21, 2019, at Sesuit Harbor in Dennis. His Best Man was Robert Melchionda ’05 with groomsman Benjamin MacNeil ’05. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 50.

Kevin Signorelli ’06 Kevin and Sara Moore were married in Deer Valley, Utah, on October 10, 2020. Kevin's brother Michael ’08, Mat Frechette ’06, and best man, Marty Courage ’06, were his groomsmen! SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 50.

CLASS OF

2007 Chelsea Rader Amendola ’07 Congratulations to the very happy parents, Chelsea and Nate. August Ernest Amendola was born on May 27, 2020, at 8.1 pounds and 20.5 inches! SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 51.

Chelsea Tallarico Foster ’07 Chelsea and her husband, Jon, welcomed Vincent Frank Foster to their family on February 21, 2020. He weighed 7 pounds, 13 ounces. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 51.

Shanaz Kerr Krygier ’07 Nazy was married to Sean Krygier at Chamard Vineyards in Clinton, CT, in late August. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 50.

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

John Lerner ’07 John and his wife, Meggie Hickey, welcomed their precious baby, Hadley Lerner, to the world on October 7, 2019. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 51.

Kristen Vassalotti Slusarz ’07 Congratulations to Kristen on her new position as US Channel Marketing Manager & GTM Marketing Manager for Honeywell. Alexandra Anderson Tangerini ’07 Allie and her husband, Emilio, welcomed Ronan Parker Tangerini, born at 7.7 pounds and 20.5 inches on June 9, 2020, in Boston. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 51.

Christine Healy ’09 Christine has joined Compass Real Estate, working with the Maguire Group to market listings as a Real Estate Agent. She is still managing Craft'd Company, the marketing and events firm she founded to work specifically with the local craft breweries in New England. Julia Henken ’09 Julia married Richard Kelly on December 29, 2019, at the Boston Public Library. Two of her former classmates, Anna Blanken ’09 and Sean Fleming ’09, were in the bridal party, and Julia's brother, Sam Henken ’12, officiated the service. SEE PHOTO BELOW AND ON PAGE 50.

Kristen Mullen Timmins ’07 Kristen and her husband, Brian, and big brother Hunter Ames (age 2) welcomed baby boy number 2 on May 27, 2020. Tucker Brooks weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces and was 22 inches long. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 51. CLASS OF

2008 Hope Bresnahan ’08 Hope married Agbi Bajrushi on June 13, 2020, in an intimate backyard ceremony with immediate family at her mother's home in Milton.

CLASS OF

20 10

SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 50.

Genevieve Olson Desmond ’08 Julia married Karl Desmond ’06 on July 11, 2020, in a small intimate ceremony in her mother's backyard in Quincy. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 50.

CLASS OF

2009 Sam Friedman ’09

See profile on Sam and the Friedman family on pg. 22.

2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

10th

Reunion Year!

Steven Burak ’10 In June, Steven was promoted to the position of CWOM Customer Success at Turbonomic enterprise software company that "develops AI-powered Application Resource Management (ARM), and simultaneously optimizes application performance, compliance, and cost in real time.”


20 11 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

10th

Reunion Year!

Anna (Friedman) Silva ’11

See profile on Anna and the Friedman family on pg. 22.

Shane Cote ’11 Congratulations to Shane and his wife, Ellen, as they welcomed their son Julien to this world on November 4, 2020. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 51.

CLASS OF

2012 Erin Carberry ’12 Erin got engaged to her fiance Robert Hall on March 13, 2020. Their wedding date is June 12, 2021. SEE PHOTO BELOW

Samantha Lyons ’12 Sammi ran the Boston Marathon virtually this September as a member of Team BMC. Alec MacKinnon ’12 In May, Alec started a new position as a Business Analyst at Autodesk, a software corporation that makes software services for the architecture, engineering, construction, manufacturing, media, education, and entertainment industries. Matthew Parent ’12 Matt started a new position as Commercial Credit Analyst at People's United Bank, N. A.

CLASS OF

2013 Emma Reilly Hill ’13 Emma married Jake Hill on October 9, 2020, in Hingham. SEE PHOTO ON PAGE 50.

CLASS OF

2014 Dylan McManus ’14 Dylan started a new position as Contracts Associate at Bottomline Technologies. Jordan Cavaco ’12 Congratulations to Jordan on graduating the State Police Academy and then being sworn into the Massachusetts State Police on May 6, 2020. Adrian Dunne ’12 Adrian started a new position as a Customer Service Representative at Wyatt Investment Research.

Timothy Mills ’14 Tim graduated from the United States Military Academy West Point in 2018 and then completed his aviation training at Fort Rucker in Alabama. He is now First Lieutenant Timothy Mills, serving in Ansbach, Germany, as a pilot of a CH47 Chinook helicopter.

Visit thayer.org/reunion for any schedule updates or changes to Reunion 2020-21

CLASS OF

20 15 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

5th

Reunion Year!

CLASS NOTES: 2000s-2020s

Shruti Kumar ’12 Shruti was engaged to Nandu Mohan in September 2020.

CLASS OF

Olivia Mavromates ’15 Olivia has started a new position as Social Media Associate at W2O Group.

CLASS OF

20 16 2020-21 Classes ending in 0, 1, 5 & 6! | May 7 - 8

5th

Reunion Year!

Ned Cramer ’16 In May, Ned started a new position as a Software Engineer in Rotational Program at Rapid7. This company provides IT security data and analytics software and services that help organizations reduce the risk of a breach, detect and respond to attacks, and build effective IT security programs. Holland Doyle ’16 Holly was inducted into the Bates Scholar-Athlete Society, an organization which honors graduating seniors who have achieved a grade point average of 3.5 or who have received special nomination from the faculty for outstanding achievement in their junior and senior years and have participated in a varsity sport for a minimum of three years. Kiley Graham ’16 In June, Kiley started a new position as an Inside Sales Representative at Dell EMC, which sells data storage, information security, virtualization, analytics, cloud computing, and other products and services that enable organizations to store, manage, protect, and analyze data.

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Jocelle Marius ’16 Congratulations and best wishes to Jocelle for her exceptional recognition from Yale University. Jocelle received the Y-Work Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Student Employees. Jocelle, who graduated from Yale in May 2020 with a double major in Cognitive Science and Economics, had been a member of the FAS Dean's Office staff since 2017. Aaron Prentice ’16 This spring, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame (NFF) selected Aaron as a member of the 2020 NFF Hampshire Honor Society for his accomplishments on the football field and in the classroom. Aaron is a statistics major and linebacker at Carleton College. In the 2019 season, he appeared in all 10 games for the Knights and had 93 tackles, including a career-high-tying 30 stops.

CLASS OF

2019 Moses Flowers ’19 Moses was the starting point guard for the men's basketball team in his freshman year at the University of Hartford. Averaging 10.4 points per game last winter, he was named the University of Hartford Athletics Male Newcomer of the Year.

CLASS OF

2020

THE

SOUTHWORTH SOCIETY

PL A N N E D

G IV IN G

AT

T H AY E R

ACA D E M Y

We invite you to consider planned giving as a means to supporting Thayer while creating a personal and meaningful legacy. Planned gifts can often provide valuable tax benefits and, in

Tyler Knightly ’20 Congratulations to Tyler, who was selected as The Patriot Ledger All-Scholastic Boys Swimmer of the Year. Meghan Webb ’20 Congratulations to Meg on being selected as a recipient of the Massachusetts Hockey Sportsmanship Award.

some cases, income for life to the donor. Whether you use cash or other assets, such as real estate, artwork, or stock, the benefits of funding a planned gift can be significant. By including Thayer in your estate plans, you can help strengthen Thayer while preserving your existing assets. Individuals who make

CLASS OF

2018

a planned gift to Thayer are welcomed as members of The Southworth Society. Planned gifts

Lauren Bennett ’18 Lauren was named by George Washington University "Colonial of the Week" in September in recognition of her efforts on the school's rowing team. She recently began her new role as Student-Athlete Advisory Committee President, helping lead her fellow student-athletes through the 2020-21 school year. Additionally, she has taken part in numerous campus committees, serving as the voice of the student-athlete. Lauren is a criminal justice major at the GWU in Washington, D.C. Nina Swett ’18 Nina was a camp counselor at Mass Audubon's Wildwood Camp. She was featured in their spring magazine.

can be tailored to the unique circumstances of each donor, and some typical options include bequests, charitable trusts, annuities, or a life insurance policy with Thayer as the beneficiary.

Attention, Alums! Know fellow Thayer alumni who are doing something interesting or amazing? Do you know of someone who continues to live out our motto by inspiring others to excellence or by their many contributions to the common good? Let us know so that we can feature them in these pages!

CONTACT US! magazine@thayer.org

To find out more about how you can benefit from including a planned gift to Thayer in your financial planning, contact Melissa Tuthill Forger ’92 P ’25, Director of Development, at 781.664.2501 or mforger@thayer.org or Rachael Rouvales Vassalotti ’79 P ’07, ’11, ’12, Associate Director of Development, at 781.664.2504 or rvassalotti@thayer.org.

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A LOYALTY SPANNING DECADES LILLIAN COOPER STONE ’39

REMEMBERED AS AN INSPIRING ROLE MODEL By Craig Salters ’86 P ’24

Generosity of spirit and a thirst for

and the rights of others. The parents

In 2009, on the occasion of her 70th

learning were hallmarks of the life of

proudly watched as Martha became

reunion, the Thayer Academy Alumni

Lillian Cooper Stone ’39, who passed

a prominent civil rights attorney and

Association presented Stone with its

away recently at the age of 99.

Dace became a psychotherapist and

Alumni Loyalty Award for her devotion

public health advocate.

to the Academy and its current

Stone also possessed the quality of

students.

loyalty — to family, to friends, to the

Dace’s unexpected death in 2001

causes she believed in, and to Thayer

brought grief, but it also brought a

“A loyal alumnus is a person who

Academy, a campus where she first

commitment to channel that grief in

identifies with the mission of the

arrived as a postgraduate from Quincy

a positive way. Shortly thereafter, the

Academy and who supports that

High School in the fall of 1938. A

Stones underwrote Thayer Academy

mission in every way, not out of

member of the Academy’s Southworth

programs to teach a new generation

obligation, but out of love,” reads

Society, Stone included Thayer in her

of students the values of personal

the text of that 2009 award. “Lillian

estate plans to continue her support of

liberty, respect for the individual, and

Cooper Stone is such a person, and we

the school’s mission.

social justice. One year they brought I

are proud to honor her today.”

Promised I Would Tell, based on the life Stone, of Hyannis Port, formerly of

of Holocaust survivor Sonia Schreiber

The Southworth Society provides

Braintree, was the beloved wife of the

Weitz, to Thayer’s campus. Another

an opportunity for those who wish

late Elihu “Al” Stone for 65 years. She

year they brought a group to campus

to support Thayer Academy to do

attended Boston University before

to perform a piece which dealt openly

so through various planned giving

marrying her husband and joining him

and honestly with eating disorders.

methods. The society is named in

in his Hyannis-based antiques business.

Yet another year they brought in

honor of Stacy Baxter Southworth, the

She was the proud mother of Martha

Theatre Espresso, which presented an

Academy’s headmaster from 1920 until

Stone ’66 and the late Frances “Dace”

interactive performance based upon

1948. Membership in the society is

Stone ’70.

the travails of the Little Rock Nine. In

open to all donors who inform Thayer

addition, because of the Stones’ efforts,

of a planned gift such as, but not

The Stones — whose West Street

Upper School and Middle School

limited to, bequests, a charitable trust,

home in Braintree was a gathering

students participated for several years

annuities, or a life insurance policy

spot for Martha, Dace, and their

in the Boston-based Discovering Justice

with Thayer as the beneficiary.

Academy classmates — taught both of

program.

their daughters to value social justice

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57


In Memoriam Former Faculty & Staff Margery (Gerry) Schneider Clement

ENGLISH & THEATER TEACHER

Gerry Schneider of Falmouth died on April 2, 2020, of pancreatic cancer at home and surrounded by family. She was born in Portland on Oct. 25, 1929, the daughter of Guido Joseph and Elsie Sellier Arzonico of Yarmouth. She graduated in the Waynflete Class of 1947, among friends who have remained close throughout her life. She received a B.A. from Smith College in 1951 and a few years later went on to earn an M.A. in English and Drama and then a Master of Letters in Theater at Middlebury College. Gerry initially held a variety of jobs: at the New York Public Library, then on a Norwegian freighter, and as the first supervisor of the new Children’s Playroom at Maine Medical Center. She was formerly married to the late Frederick B. Webster and to the late Bennett B. Schneider IV. Gerry was always a voracious reader, and she eventually followed her passion for literature into her first job teaching English at Yarmouth High School and then at High Mowing School in New Hampshire. The bulk of her teaching career, however, was the many rewarding years she spent teaching English and theater at Thayer Academy with time also spent directing theater courses and plays at Phillips Andover Academy in Massachusetts. She finished teaching with one year at her alma mater, Waynflete, after her marriage to her beloved husband. After Gerry's teaching years came her enjoyable paralegal years, searching real estate titles for the Verrill Dana Law Firm and Atlantic Title Company. She also became a member of Portland Stage Company's Board of

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Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

Trustees. Prompted by a lifelong dislike of prejudice and bigotry, she joined the Maine Speakout Project and worked tirelessly for gay rights. She eventually became a board member and traveled Maine and elsewhere delivering talks based on personal experiences. A highlight of this time came the day she marched with Maine Speakout the length of New York City's 5th Avenue on the city's Gay Pride day, flanked on one side by her son, Ben, and on the other by her daughter, Sally, and baby grandson, Theo. While constantly delighted by the humorous aspects of life, the inequities were never far from Gerry's mind. She is predeceased by her son, Frederick Jeffries Webster. She is survived by her husband, Bruce P. Clement; her two children, Sally C. Webster of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Bennett B. Schneider V of Los Angeles; her stepchildren, David W. Clement (Tara), Timothy G. Clement (Cathy), Joel P. Clement, and Margaret B. Clement; her grandson, Theo D. Tarrega, and her step-grandchildren, Jonathan and Matthew Clement and Samuel and Noah Clement.

John E. Cosgrove Jr. FACULTY & COACH

John (Jack), age 85, of Sharon, passed away March 27, 2020 at Wingate of Norton. Born in Boston on August 8, 1934, he was the son of the late John and Margaret M. (Maguire) Cosgrove. He was raised in Norton and graduated from Norton High School with the Class of 1952. Following his graduation, Jack enlisted in the United States Army during the Korean War.

Jack’s year-round passion for coaching eventually led to a career change. Athletics became his calling, and he worked at both Thayer Academy in Braintree and for the Sharon Recreation Department as its athletic director. Through these year-round experiences, he was able to impact hundreds of young men and women through their pursuit of excellence in sports. Jack influenced and inspired a great number of these talented studentathletes who went on to very successful college careers and lifelong achievements. Jack was very fortunate to have many volunteers throughout the years who were instrumental in helping him achieve his success. In 2018 the original Sharon High School Football Field was named in honor of Jack for his dedication to the sport of football and the young men and women that he coached and mentored in Sharon for six decades. In addition, a scholarship was created in his name to be awarded annually to an outstanding senior male and female college-bound student-athlete who are high achievers and active participants in service activities in the community of Sharon. Beloved husband of Anne L. (O’Leary) Cosgrove. Loving father of John W. Cosgrove and his wife, Marilyn, of Bangor, Maine, Michael E. Cosgrove and his wife, Kathy, of South Easton, Jill A. Cosgrove of Sharon, Ellen T. Cosgrove Cuneo and her husband, James, of Norton, Jeffrey T. Cosgrove and his partner, Wayne Pina, of Brockton, and the late Kristen M. Cosgrove. Cherished grandfather of Jeri, Matthew, Carly, Sydni, Jenna, Lissa, Nicole, Sean, Jamie, Lindsey, James, and Jack and great grandfather of Rylan, Braiden, and Carter.


GIRLS TENNIS COACH

Shyla, 78, of Braintree, passed away June 3, 2020. Shyla was born in Maine and was a graduate of Sanford High School, playing basketball and tennis. Shyla continued her love of sports and was a member of the Hingham Outdoor Tennis Club, a member of the Wollaston Golf Club, and a coach of the Thayer Academy girls tennis team. Shyla was an executive with Settles Glass Companies and the first woman president of the Neighborhood Club in Quincy. She had a passion for charitable work and sat on the board of the Marge Crispin Center in Braintree as well as helping many other charitable organizations. Shyla's exceptional ability to socialize and rally people played a vital part in the building of the new Braintree Public Library. Shyla’s first love was always her husband and family which included her many grandchildren to whom she was known as Meme. Shyla is survived by her husband, Richard C. Settles ’51 of Braintree; her daughter and spouse Michelle and Joseph Weidenhamer of Illinois; sons Scott D'Orval of New Hampshire and Mary and Robert D'Orval of Cohasset; her brother Fredrick Bates of Maine: her grandchildren Amy Ohlson, Shyla Robinson, Jonathan Robinson, and Bryan D'Orval. Shyla will be greatly missed by all fortunate to cross her path.

William Smith

sons Sean, Neil, Brendan, and close buddy, Colin Flanagan. Bill was popular and well-liked by his friends in Naples including the nursing staff and therapists at Solaris Healthcare, especially his designated therapist, Ashley. They will miss him dearly.

1939 Lillian Cooper Stone

Lillian, age 99, of Hyannis Port, formerly of Braintree. Beloved wife of 65 years of the late Elihu Stone. Proud mother of Martha Stone ’66 and the late Frances Stone ’70. Adored grandmother of Emily Williams and her husband Marvin Williams, and Anna Reeve. Loving great grandmother of Amaya and Deven Williams. Devoted aunt to Rowena Dery, Anita Weinblatt, Naomi Luban, and Joe Cooper. Lillian lived life to the fullest until the eve of her 100th birthday. She was an inspiring role model for her family and her friends and will be remembered for her generosity of spirit and her thirst for learning. Lillian graduated from Thayer Academy in 1939 and was honored in 2009 at her 70th reunion with the Thayer Academy Alumni Association’s Loyalty Award for her dedication to supporting today's students with the Discovering Justice-Frances Stone Lecture Series. See an appreciation of Lillian and her generosity on page 57.

FRENCH TEACHER & WRESTLING COACH

William (Bill) Smith, 83, passed away peacefully on September 9, 2020, in Naples, Florida. He was a graduate of Harvard University and Boston University School of Law. Bill practiced law in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, but his proudest achievements came from his time as championship wrestling coach at Thayer Academy in Braintree, where he was also a popular and beloved teacher of French. Bill will be greatly missed by his soulmate and life partner of over 25 years, Joan Flanagan, as well as his son, J. William Smith, daughter-in-law Becky, and his grandchildren Matthew, Caroline, and Patrick. Also feeling the deep pain of his passing are his sisters, Carol and Wendy from New England, and Joan's

1942 William M. Macdonald

William passed away peacefully on July 8, 2020, hours before his beloved wife, Ann. They couldn't bear to spend a single night apart after 66 years of marriage. Bill is survived by his six adoring daughters and five sons-in-law, Maryann Macdonald of Randolph, Jane and Joe Poirier of Gloucester, Ellen Macdonald and Rich Gagnon of Pelham, NY, Nancy and Steve McDonald of Scituate, Kate and Doug Chapman of Quincy, Betsy and Bill Chapman of Wenham; 10 grandchildren who affectionately nicknamed him "Bull,” Grace and Liam Macdonald-Gagnon,

Katy, Will, Robbie and Charlie McDonald, Emily and Lily Chapman, Jack and Eddie Chapman; his step-granddaughter, Lani (Justin) Heath and their children Maya and Lelia. He was a loving uncle to many nieces and nephews and their families. Born in Milton, he was the youngest son of Jerome and Grace and the brother of Jerome Jr. ’38 and Thomas (Tar) Macdonald ’41. He attended Thayer Academy, College of the Holy Cross, and Boston University Law School. He served in the Navy in World War II as a Communications Officer in the Pacific and then with the Naval Reserve. His career as an attorney spanned 41 years, first practicing law for six years in Quincy, then joining New England Electric System, now National Grid, where he served as General Property Counsel. Bill was active in local government and church associations. Inspired by his "perfect daughter" Maryann born with autism, he became a pioneer in helping found communitybased services, residences, and education for individuals with disabilities and served as pro bono attorney and board member for many organizations. He was an accomplished sailor on school teams and sailed competitively in Indian Class boats with his brothers. Bill will be remembered as a dedicated and attentive husband, father, and grandfather. Many people from all backgrounds consider him the best man they ever met, a surrogate father, brother, or close friend. He was a gentle giant and a truly humble man. At a recent family get-together, he told his family: "I've had a perfect life.”

IN MEMORIAM: 1940s

Shyla Settles

1945 Eleanore Hunt Keenan

Eleanore, age 92, of Scituate and Freedom, NH, passed away peacefully May 16, 2020. Ellie was the beloved wife of 58 years to the late Lawrence C. Keenan. Ellie was born in Brockton to Edward and Catherine (Maxwell) Hunt on September 14, 1927. She was raised in Braintree and graduated from Thayer Academy in 1956 before graduating from Boston University (Sargent College). She became an active member of the university where she played field hockey. Upon graduating from college, Ellie became a Physical Education teacher for 30 years, primarily in the Scituate school

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IN MEMORIAM: 1940s

system. Ellie and her family loved spending time at their vacation home located on Ossipee Lake in Freedom, NH. There, she enjoyed boating and snow skiing with family and friends. Throughout the years Ellie and Larry made many friends at the lake and enjoyed hosting parties and cookouts. Upon retirement, Ellie and Larry did a significant amount of traveling to locations such as Alaska, Hawaii, Spain, Morocco, Mexico, and Ireland; they also took many chartered sailing trips throughout the Caribbean. Later in retirement they wintered in Punta Gorda, Florida, where they connected with friends and enjoyed the warmth of the Florida sun. Ellie had many hobbies of which making Nantucket baskets was her favorite. Ellie was the loving mother of Sandra L. Dooley and her husband Robert of Groveland, and Peter C. Keenan and his wife Michele of Freedom, NH. She was the loving grandmother of Chris and Abby Garland, Brian and Michael Keenan, and her great grandchildren: Greta, Austin, Parker, Hadley, and Cora. Ellie is survived by her siblings Margery Hunt Price ’48 of Hingham, Edward Hunt Jr. of Lynchburg, VA, Robert Hunt ’57 of Berkley, and the late James Hunt ’57 of Bourne.

Elinor Stone Kritzman

Elinor, age 91, of Newton, formerly of Brockton, on March 29, 2020. Beloved wife of the late Julius "Red" Kritzman, MD. Devoted mother of Julia Abbott and her husband Mark Nowak, and Marjorie Benditt and her husband Dan Gerrity. Adored grandmother of Joshua and Katherine Abbott, Sarah and Drew Benditt, and great grandmother of Wesley Abbott. Dear sister of Naomi Stone Cohen ’52 and her husband Saul Cohen. Elinor graduated from the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester and was a professionally trained singer with a gorgeous soprano voice who loved to perform. She also had a passion for gardening and entertaining. Elinor was a wonderful wife, mother, grandmother, and friend. She will be missed by many.

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1946 Philip H. Collins Sr.

Philip, 91, of Manchester, died peacefully March 29, 2020, at his home. He was born in Quincy on March 15, 1929, a son of the late George H. and Bertha (Moora) Collins. He graduated from Thayer Academy in 1946 and Holy Cross in 1950. He served with the 1st Marine Division in Korea for all of 1951 as platoon leader receiving a commendation with a "V" for valor and the Korean medal with four stars. When he returned home, he was an instructor at the Marine Officers School until he retired as a captain in 1958. He spent his career in the leather business at Hamel Leather, left and started his own business, Collins Lea, that later became Collins Johnsen. After he retired from the leather business, he served as a trustee of the Old Portsmouth Hospital and was involved with the sale of the hospital HCA where he remained as one of the trustees for six years. He was a member of the "Red House" for 25 years. He was a member at Abenaqui for 45 years, served on the board, and was the treasurer for two years. Little known fact: he got a hole-in-one on the 9th during a memberguest as treasurer. After that bar bill, there is now hole-in-one insurance at Abenaqui. His was not a low handicap, but he managed to have four holes-in-one and played in the New Hampshire seniors for 25 years. Phil was a good man and had a good full life. He was a loving husband to the late Patricia Ann Collins for 63 years until she passed September 4, 2013. Surviving family members include his children, Philip H Collins Jr. and his wife Joan Collins of North Hampton, Judy Collins and her husband Roger Whitaker, Mary St. Gelais of Hampton, and Daniel Collins and his wife Harper of Lawrenceville N.J.; also survived by 11 grandchildren and five great grandchildren. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by daughter Patricia Collins of Florida and son David Collins of Simpsonville, S.C.

Marie Corsini Petrell

Marie, age 91, of Plymouth, formerly of Braintree, passed away peacefully May 5, 2020, in the comfort of her home. Marie was born in Quincy to the late Dr. T. Vincent and Lena Borgatti Corsini. She was raised in Quincy and was a graduate of Thayer Academy, Class of 1946, and Boston University. She married the love of her life, Arthur R. Fiorini, and lived in Braintree, where they raised their family. She was also the wife of the late John J. Petrell Jr. She was devoted to her family and loved to read, cook, and bake. She spent many winters in Boca Grande, FL, where she loved to gather shark's teeth. She is survived by her daughters and step-daughter, Kathy Fiorini DiGiusto ’71 and her husband Nicholas of Braintree, Lisa Fiorini Venier ’73 of Plymouth and her late husband John, Ellen Fiorini Harger ’75 of Cookeville, TN, and Natalie Petrell Crociati and her husband Robert of Plymouth. She was predeceased by Joan Petrell Trulli. Loving Nana of Jason Harger and his wife Melinda of St. Cloud, FL, Arthur Venier of Braintree, Lisa DiGiusto of Weymouth, and Maryann Venier Bonaparte and her husband Louie of Plymouth. Loving stepgrandmother of Douglas Crociati and his wife Lisa, Dory Crociati Follette and her husband Dwayne of Plymouth, Leslie Trulli Cummings and her husband Dwight of DeWitt, MI, John Trulli and his wife Nancy of Spencerport, NY, and Michelle Trulli of Parrish, FL. Marie is survived by four great-grandchildren and eight step greatgrandchildren. Dear sister of T. Vincent Corsini of Sandwich and the late Russell W. Corsini ’51. Marie is also survived by many nieces and nephews.

1947 Sally Young Yourkewicz

Sally, 90, of Pocasset, passed away on October 23, 2020, at Falmouth Hospital following a long illness. She was the beloved wife of the late Albert W. Yourkewicz, for whom she shared 47 years of marriage. Sally was born on February 7, 1930, in Randolph to the late Martin and Lucille (Sillitoe) Young. She grew up in Randolph and attended Thayer Academy in Braintree. She later went on to receive her associate


1948 William D. Currie '48 William D. "Bill," Currie 91, formerly of Yarmouth, ME, died suddenly July 8, 2020. He was preceded in death by his wife of 67 years, Harriet J. Currie, who passed away April 12, 2020. They had been residents at Covenant Woods - Continuing Life Care Facility in Mechanicsville, VA, since 2012. Bill was born April 27, 1929, in Portland, ME, to parents Helen P. Currie and William O. Currie. The family moved to Quincy in the 1930s where he graduated in 1948 from Thayer Academy in Braintree. Graduating from the University of Maine in 1952, he then served as an officer in the U.S. Army's Adjutant General Corps. Later he earned his MBA degree from Western Michigan University. Bill also had been a member of Wollaston (Rural) Masonic Lodge A.F. & F.M. of

Quincy for over 60 years. Bill’s career at DuPont was in human resources as a senior consultant. During his 36-year service at DuPont, he and Harriet lived in several states as well as in Mexico. They moved to Yarmouth, ME, when Bill retired in 1988. Not known to keep still, he was president of Blueberry Cove Condo Association. Being involved in the alumni association at UMaine was his favorite part of volunteerism. He loved all things UMaine. He was a Black Bear through and through! He participated in several of the alumni associations of UMaine. He served as president of both the UMaine Senior Alumni Council and the Cumberland County Alumni Chapter. He spent much time involved with the Foundation and working on scholarships from his Class of 1952. He served as president of the Class of '52 for several years. Bill was presented with several awards for his dedication and contributions to the University of Maine. It was especially meaningful when the Southern Maine Alumni Chapter named a first-year scholarship in his honor. When they moved to Covenant Woods, Bill became involved in resident activities. He organized a duplicate bridge group that has been very active and outgrown its space a couple of times. Bill was affectionately known as "Mayor" in his assisted living residence. He had served as treasurer of the Residents' Independent Living Council and then as president of the Assisted Living Council. He had an ear to the ground for all things happening and looked out for the concerns of others (staff and residents). He was able to help out Harriet to the very end. He always said that his main job was to take care of his "three girls" (Harriet and daughters). A job very well done! Survivors include: two daughters: Deanne C. Bailey with husband John of Mechanicsville, VA, and Patricia C. Wallace with husband Steve of Wakefield; two granddaughters: Kimberly Bailey of Washington, D.C., and Erin B. Davidson with husband Todd of Richmond, VA. He had one great-grandson, Isaac Davidson.

1949 Barry D. Coletti '49

Barry passed peacefully May 31, 2020. Born November 12, 1931, Barry was a native of the South Shore and a resident of Duxbury since 1973. He graduated from Thayer Academy, Brown University, and the Harvard Graduate School of Design. As a Principal of Coletti Brothers Architects, Barry was responsible for the design of nationally and internationally recognized buildings. Barry was an avid outdoorsman and accomplished dog trainer, competing in and judging AKC Retriever field trials from Maine to North Carolina. His closest friends, family, and strangers alike could at any moment find themselves engaged in one of Barry’s colorful jokes, stories (inevitably ending on the subject of dogs), or even the target of one of his many shrewd, crafty, and complex practical jokes! To be the recipient of one of Barry’s hand-drawn mixed media cartoon sketches was always a delight; whether his choice of substrate came in the form of a napkin, 100% rag cotton watercolor paper, or the back of a business card, the message was received in roaring fashion and never forgotten or discarded. It gave Barry joy and was one of his favorite ways to communicate with those that he cared for. Barry had a deep love of cooking and experimenting in the kitchen as well, scotch in hand, again showing his affection in the form of an elaborate and unforgettable meal, or a treat as simple as a cup of hot cocoa. Barry adored his wife Ginny, her children Chad, Amy, and Mathew Thevenin; his late wife Anne Sutton Coletti; his son Carl (deceased), his wife Laurie Klein-Coletti and daughters Ember Klein-Coletti and Christine Bodnar; his son Joe and his wife Anne; his son Tim, his wife Janet, and their sons Evan and Ian; his son Barry '93, his wife Amanda, and their sons Cameron and Joseph; his loving sister Sylvia Coletti Morgan '55 and brother David (deceased); his nieces, nephews and cousins; his parents Paul and Mary (deceased); and his Golden Retriever companion Ceili.

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

IN MEMORIAM: 1940s

degree from Centenary College in New Jersey. Sally worked for several years as an executive assistant to the Technology Department Head at Randolph High School. Sally was an avid bridge player and enjoyed playing with friends. She also enjoyed being outdoors, especially golfing and tending to her garden. More than anything, Sally loved spending time with her family, especially her beloved dog Teddy, and was a dedicated mother to her three daughters, and of course a devoted dog-mom to Teddy, Tony, Molly, and Henry Pepper. Sally is survived by her daughter Susan Willis and husband Chris of Framingham; daughter Nancy L. Rogers of East Falmouth and daughter Lisa V. Yourkewicz, of Mashpee; grandson Samuel Willis of Framingham; granddaughter Sarah Consolo and husband Travis, of South Portland, ME; granddaughter Ava Vernooy and partner Kyle Bassett, of Sudbury; grandson Anton Vernooy of Hudson; great-grandson Christopher Willis of Braintree; great-grandson William Consolo of South Portland, ME; as well as many nieces, nephews and dear friends. Sally was predeceased by her husband, Albert Yourkewicz, brother Eddy Young '45, sister Dorothy Young Barmakian '43, son-in-law Chip Rogers, and nephew Eddy Young III.

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IN MEMORIAM: 1940s-1950s

60 62

Daniel S. Maloney '49 Daniel, age 92, of Hampton, NH, formerly of Braintree and Winter Haven, FL, passed away peacefully May 21, 2020, at the Portsmouth Regional Hospital after a brief illness. He was born February 3, 1928, in Quincy, the son of the late Daniel A. and Margaret (Leary) Maloney of East Braintree. He was the beloved husband of Alice (Sweezey) Maloney, formerly of Braintree. And he and Alice recently celebrated 66 years of marriage together on February 6. Dan attended Braintree High School and served his country honorably in the United States Army. He later graduated from Thayer Academy and earned both an undergraduate degree and a master’s degree in Education from Springfield College. He continued to enhance his education credentials through studies at Boston University and as a John Hays Fellow at Williams College. Dan was a respected teacher, football and basketball coach, and principal at Richmond High School in Richmond, ME, for many years. He then served as Principal at Winnacunnet High School in Hampton from 1960 to 1968. He was a role model for thousands of young people and earned wide recognition as a progressive and innovative educator. He was most proud that his students stayed in constant contact with him, be it a visit to the house, an invite to a golf tournament, or the casting of a few lines at the fishing camp. As a teacher, coach and principal, Dan devoted his entire adult life to education. In 1968, he joined the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and was assigned the task of determining the need for a commission to evaluate and accredit technical and career schools and colleges. In December of 1970, the Commission on Vocational, Technical, Career Institution was established, and he was appointed as its founding director. In 1992, he was recognized by the Board of Trustees of the New England Institute of Technology with the degree of Doctor of Humane letters, in Honoris Causa. Dan was also an avid golfer, and he and Alice were 30-plus year members of Abenaqui Country Club in Rye, where he once made it to the finals of the club championship. He sat on various golf committees and was most proud of his service as Abenaqui Club President from 1989-1990. He and Alice were also members of Lake Region Country Club

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

and Cypress Woods Country Club of Winter Haven, FL, where they wintered for 23 years. Dan was an avid Boston sports fan and could always be found wearing his Red Sox or Patriots hat, and he especially enjoyed his many Red Sox spring training seasons in Winter Haven. He also loved his time with the boys at their hunting and fishing camp in Benedicta, ME, which he visited at every opportunity over the last 15 years. Steve and Shawn quickly put their dad's carpenter skills to work, insulating the newly built camp, finishing the rough board interior walls, and building a catwalk which attached the upper lofts. He was very proud of the many close friends he made at the Benedicta camp. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by his sister, Margaret Lake. Dan leaves his wife Alice and their three sons, D. Stephen Jr., Shawn Michael, and Kevin Spencer and his companion Gay King, his three grandchildren, two greatgrandchildren, his brother-in-law Bob Lake of Middletown, NY, and his everfaithful "Jake," the German Shorthaired Pointer. He will be greatly missed by all who had the pleasure to have met and spent time with him.

1951 Robert M. Brown

FORMER ALUMNI BOARD MEMBER

Former Alumni Board Member Robert Brown passed away on a beautiful spring day in Newburyport with his daughter by his side and Duke Ellington playing. Robert was born in Boston to Dorothy Gertrude MacNeill and raised in Milton and Weymouth. He was adopted by his stepfather, Raymond Brown, and moved to Hingham, a town that he loved beyond measure. He attended Hingham High School, Thayer Academy, and Northeastern University, graduating with a degree in Finance in 1958. He served in the Marine Reserves and as a Freemason at Old Colony Lodge of Freemasonry and as a lifelong Unitarian Universalist. He also attended Old Ship Church in Hingham with his parents. After graduating, he worked at American Mutual Insurance, finally striking out on his own as an insurance salesman. He married and started a life in Byfield after the birth of his two children, Nancy and Douglas. During this time, he served

as president of the Newbury Baseball League, was an active alum of Thayer and Northeastern, and enjoyed summers at Cedardale in Groveland. As a Thayer alum, Robert was a very dedicated Class Agent, longtime Alumni Board Member, phonathon caller, and Chair of the General's Open Golf Tournament for many years. In 2011, on the 50th anniversay of his graduation from Thayer, he received the Thayer Academy Alumni Association's Alumni Loyalty Award. He loved the game of golf and spent many happy times as team captain, caddying and playing in tournaments. In his later years, Robert moved back to the South Shore and traveled to many places around the world: France, England, Germany, India, Italy, and Austria. He was an avid reader with a keen interest in history, especially World War II, which had a profound effect on him. He also enjoyed art and music, frequenting museums and music venues in Boston, and spent many hours at Cohasset Country Club. Once he moved back to the North Shore, time was spent watching his grandchildren at sporting events, theater performances, and musical performances. He was a fixture at the Newburyport Racquet Club, watching his daughter's practices and matches and offering advice. He attended the First Religious Society of Newburyport and was inducted as a member into St. John's Lodge of Freemasonry in Newburyport earlier this year. A lover of the ocean, he enjoyed drives up the coast with stops for chowder or a frappe, and to watch storms and rough seas. Robert is survived by his two children: daughter Nancy B. Webster and her husband, Rob, of Groveland; and son Douglas R. Brown and his wife, Jennifer, of Fremont, N.H.; as well as four grandchildren: Sophie and Chloe Webster and Kaileigh and Kyle Brown.

James P. Kelleher

James, 88, lifelong resident of Brockton and North Falmouth, passed away April 25, 2020, after a brief illness. Jimmy was born August 17, 1931, in Brockton to the late James and Margaret Kelleher. Jim's elementary education began at St. Patrick's School in Brockton. He was a graduate of Brockton High School and Thayer Academy where he played football and basketball. He graduated from Stonehill College, Class of 1955.


Bridgewater, and was predeceased by his brother Jack and his sister Nancy.

Richard C. Settles

Richard, 87, of Braintree, passed peacefully October 7, 2020. Dick was born in Braintree and was a graduate of Thayer Academy and Boston University. After graduation, Dick served in the Navy, working in Naval Intelligence. He was stationed in England, Japan, and Washington, DC, (at the Pentagon) during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Dick earned the rank of Lieutenant Commander. After leaving the Navy, Dick became the third generation to join the family business as President and CEO of Settles Glass Company. Settles Glass was a fixture for decades in the city of Quincy. Under Dick’s leadership, the company expanded to 25 stores in New England until the sale in 2005. While he was always active in business and the community, his first love was family. He and his wife Shyla also enjoyed golf, tennis, and bridge with their friends locally and in Florida. He now joins his dear wife Shyla, who passed this June. He is survived by: his daughter and spouse Michelle and Joseph Weidenhamer of Illinois; sons Scott Dorval of NH, and Robert and Mary Dorval of Cohasset; his sister Lee Settles Long ’64 and her husband Jon of New Jersey; and his grandchildren, Amy Ohlson, Shyla and Jonathan Robinson, and Bryan Dorval. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.

Ann Lincoln Wilson

Ann, of Jamestown, RI, passed away July 16, 2020, after a short illness, surrounded by family. Born in Boston on January 19, 1934, she was married to her beloved husband, John (Jack) A. Wilson for 65 years. They were longtime residents of Simsbury, CT, before moving to Jamestown, RI, in 1992. Ann attended Thayer Academy and graduated in 1951. She was a proud member of the DAR and enjoyed traveling, golf, gardening, and entertaining. She never missed a party! Her love of life and devil-may-care attitude has been passed down to her family. One always knew when Ann arrived! Ann was the loving mother of two sons, William Randall (Andrea) of Narragansett, RI, and Robert Knowlton (Lori) of Charleston, SC. She leaves five

grandchildren: Tim (Jamie), Brian, Bill (Pam), Jaclyn, and Lindsay, and one greatgrandchild, Rita Marie. She also leaves her brother William Lincoln (Susan) of Bluff, UT.

IN MEMORIAM: -1950s

After college, he began his teaching career in Galway, New York. He returned to teach at Coyle & Cassidy and Xaverian Brothers High School, where he also coached both basketball and baseball. He continued his career at Southeastern Regional where he retired after more than 30 years of teaching. His entire life was dedicated to educating the students that entered his classroom. Jimmy lived in Brockton with his wife Jean where he was a lifelong member of St. Patrick's Church. In his younger days he enjoyed hanging with his Ward 2 buddies on the corner of Winthrop Street. He exercised every day of his life which kept him going strong. He was a natural athlete and enjoyed his days at the Brockton YMCA where he'd play an intense game of racquetball or handball. He could play the piano by ear and would often entertain at home during holiday parties with a variety of oldies, but goodies. He was an intellectual who could hold a conversation on most any academic topic. Jimmy was never without a novel, newspaper, or magazine in his hand and demanded nothing less than the proper use of the English language. He enjoyed spending summers at his home in North Falmouth. During his retirement, he enjoyed trips to Captiva Island, FL, a good game of golf at D.W. Field Golf Club, going out for a nice dinner, and cheering on all New England teams. His favorite team of all time was Notre Dame football. He had cheered them on since he was a young boy. Throughout each season, during every game, you could find him decorating his den with his beloved Notre Dame gear in the hopes of an Irish victory. Jimmy loved his family, his friends, his Irish roots, and his faith in God. He will be remembered for always being willing to help a friend in need, having a strong work ethic, his ability to tell a story with a gleam in his eye, being a generous tipper, and being a great listener ready with advice. He was a great conversationalist who could keep your attention and make you feel like you were the only person in the room. Jimmy was a truly good Irish gentleman, a treasure to anyone who knew him. He will be missed by so many family members and friends. Jimmy is survived by his loving wife Jean (Sebelia) of 53 years. He was the proud and loving father of Kerri (Kelleher) MacDonald and her husband John of North Easton; the loving grandfather of Johnny, Megan, Elizabeth, and Michael (James), named after his grandfather. He was the brother of Richard M. Kelleher of

1952 Rosalie Nelson Hakansson

Rosalie was born in Brockton January 19, 1935, to C. Raymond Nelson and Ruth L. (Carlberg) Nelson. She was also fortunate to have Margaret (Wall) Nelson as a caring and devoted stepmother after the death of her mother. She was the widow of the late Fred O. Hakansson, whom she married on September 9, 1956. She died approximately an hour after midnight on August 1, 2020, at The Morrison in Whitefield. Also known as "Lee,” she grew up in Easton and Braintree and was a graduate of Thayer Academy and Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH. She had been employed by the Southborough School Department, Fenwal Incorporated, Digital Equipment Corporation, and several other high-tech companies as a senior administrative assistant, executive administrator, and project specialist. Rosalie was a resident of Southborough since 1959 and, with her husband Fred, owned Meadowbrook Farm in Jefferson, NH, for over 58 years. She was a member of the Swedish Ancestry Research Association, Southborough Historical Society, Southborough Library Genealogy Club, and the Southborough Senior Center. When her children were young, she had been active with the Southborough Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts and volunteered in the Southborough schools. Current interests included genealogy, gardening, knitting, and both American and Swedish history. She enjoyed living in an area rich in American history and particularly enjoyed the South Shore and Plymouth areas, and the ocean. Her grandson Cody was a very special joy to her. She is survived by her daughter Cynthia Hakansson of Jefferson, NH; son Mark Hakansson and his wife Wendy of Guildhall, VT; grandson Cody Hakansson of Guildhall, VT; brother Richard E. Nelson ’51 of Florida; sister-in-law Judith Hakansson of Maine; five cousins

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IN MEMORIAM: 1950s-1970s

and many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband Fred, who died in 1998, and her parents.

1954 Francis F. Kingsley Jr.

Francis, trusted accounting advisor for over 50 years to the venture capital community and a beloved Trustee Emeritus of Bentley University, passed away April 9, 2020, after a long illness. Fran devoted his life to being everpresent for his family, friends, clients, and peers. If you had a problem, Fran was always there to help you solve it. Fran grew up in Quincy, the son of Francis F. Kingsley Sr. and Dorothy Newson Kingsley, with his younger brother James Richard "Dick" Kingsley. Lovingly known growing up as "Sonny" to his family, he attended Thayer Academy Class of 1954 and the Bentley College of Accounting and Finance Class of 1961. Fran began his accounting career at Boston Capital Corporation before joining the newly formed TA Associates as their Accounting and Office Manager. The relationships and trust Fran built at TA Associates garnered him the reputation as one of the most well respected advisors to the leaders of the venture capital industry since the 1970s. In 1981, Fran started Kingsley Business Service in order to provide both corporate and personal accounting services. He provided tax preparation services to scores of individuals and focused a tremendous amount of his time in the offices of Burr, Egan, Deleage and Co. for over 20 years, along with their many successor firms for another 20. However, his personal relationships bridged more than half of his life where those clients became friends and those friends became family. Fran married Gail Peters in 1969, and together they raised their children Eric and Sharon in an ever-changing myriad of homes in Southeastern Massachusetts. In Fran's life he amassed 20 addresses and at each of those always a new group of respected friends and many times more and more tax clients. When Eric chose to attend Bentley College in 1988, Fran found a renewed love for his alma mater and became very involved in the Alumni Association. He eventually became president of the Alumni

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Association, sharing his love of Bentley with fellow alumni and current students. In 1995, he began what would become a 24-year tenure as a Trustee. Outside of his passion for work and all things Bentley, Fran's life revolved around his love for his family, in particular his grandchildren. He made a point to attend everything he possibly could, whether it be a sporting event, dance recital, band concert, or graduation. He was truly beloved by all. His son Eric and his wife Kathy, along with their children Zachary and Allison, and his daughter Sharon and her husband Rob (Tatro), along with their children Scott and Rachel, are all left with a large emptiness in their hearts and a noticeable absence of his presence. Fran lit up talking about his family to anyone and everyone who would listen. He took so much pride in being able to see that his legacy would forever go on through his family. For the last 18 years, he worked to transition his business to his daughter, Sharon. He loved watching his son Eric embody his own entrepreneurial spirit in starting his own business. He adored his son-in-law Rob and daughter-in-law Kathy, and was so happy to welcome them to his family. For all of his grandkids, it wasn't a question of whether or not he was available to attend everything important to them, just what time did it start so he could be there an hour early to get the best seat. Most recently, his grandson Scott began attending Bentley University, and Fran could not hide his heartfelt joy to share his love with another generation. Perhaps the most fitting sentiment about Fran is his own quote in the Black & Orange: "A quiet fellow, always so neat. Charming in his manner, he is pleasant to meet.� He embodied that with his entire being, and he will be incredibly missed.

Helene Connell Pike

Helene, formerly of Walpole, died peacefully on August 27, 2020, in Norwood following a lifetime of compassionate service. Born March 16, 1937, in Randolph, the youngest child of John and Helen Connell, Mrs. Pike attended Thayer Academy on a scholarship, graduating in 1954, a member of Thayer's Cum Laude Society. She then proceeded to Jackson College for Women (now part of Tufts University), receiving her baccalaureate in 1958. After starting her career as an English teacher and librarian at Oliver Ames High School in North Easton, Mrs.

Pike worked at Harvard University's International Students Office before relocating to Virginia to work for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. In 1964, she returned to Massachusetts to marry (the late) Gerald E. Pike, son of Andrew and Muriel (Seymour) Pike, on June 20 of that year. The couple first made their home in Wrentham and later Walpole, where they lived together for more than four decades. Their marriage lasted until Gerald's passing in 2013. Throughout the 1970s, Mrs. Pike worked for Morrill Memorial Library in Norwood while raising her children and attending Suffolk University Law School as an evening student, graduating in 1978. She was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar Association that year and began her legal career as an intern and then, following a brief period of private practice, on the attorney staff of the Chief Justice of the Commonwealth's Probate and Family Department. The bulk of Mrs. Pike's career was in service to the Commonwealth as an Assistant Register of the Norfolk County Probate and Family Court in Dedham, where she earned a reputation for professionalism and expertise serving both litigants and her fellow members of the bar with equal dedication and attention for nearly three decades. Mrs. Pike was an avid traveler, birdwatcher, reader, and devotee of art, opera, and classical music. These passions were expressed in frequent visits to museums around the world, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and an enduring commitment to tuning in each week to public radio's Metropolitan Opera broadcasts. Aside from her love of family, Mrs. Pike had a deep and unwavering love of animals, providing a home or safe haven for more than a dozen cats, two dogs, and countless wild birds over the years. Mrs. Pike was predeceased by her husband, Gerald, as well as her sister, Dorothea A. Connell, and brother, John J. Connell. She is survived by her two children, Kristianne E. Pike of West Roxbury and G. Matthew Pike of Fargo, ND, along with numerous nieces and nephews. Her children mourn the loss of a loving mother, who set the finest example of working hard to make the world a better place.


William, 85, of Milton, passed peacefully on November 23, 2020, surrounded by all of his loving children. Bill was raised in Milton on family-owned Pine Gardens where he formed his lifelong love of animals, learning, and the beloved town. Bill was the son of his late parents Ruth Holcomb, Walter and Clara Swan. Bill truly loved to be with his friends and family socializing, and happiest to enjoy a day of golf, playing cards, Scrabble, crosswords, sudoku, and to tell many a bad joke, but always insisting on getting out for a meal – never missing out on a cheeseburger, offering of bacon, or a chance to flirt. Bill attended Milton Public Schools and Thayer Academy before enlisting in the Army and was stationed in Germany from 1955-1957. He went on to earn his Bachelor’s of Science degree from University of Massachusetts-Amherst and worked as an electrical engineer in Massachusetts and New Jersey before settling in Virginia in a military capacity for the Department of Defense, enjoying his long career before retiring to Florida in 2000. After the loss of his second wife Jean in 2017, Bill returned to his native Massachusetts. Always involved and volunteering, Bill was an active member of AA, running and attending meetings. He was a caring man who embraced everyone and endeavored to help others find the sobriety success he had so proudly achieved for over 45 years. He will be remembered as someone who loved life and lived it to the fullest with a smile always in place, enjoying every role he played – brother, husband, father, grandfather, father-in-law, uncle, friend, neighbor, co-worker, and member of the fellowship. Bill will be dearly missed but is now reunited with his late cherished, eldest daughter Carole L. Swan and eldest son William G. Swan, brother Roger Swan, nephews Roger "Steven" Swan and Peter F. Swan, and second wife Jean Swan. Bill is survived by his beloved first wife and mother of his children, Norma Swan, and her husband George Davis of Plymouth. Loving father of his remaining children Susan Swan (Daly) of Plymouth, Liane Minichiello of North Attleborough, David Swan and wife Joy Darby of Nashua, NH, and Lauren "Little Puffa" Swan-Mahoney and husband Terence Mahoney of Attleboro. Proud grandfather "Big Papa" of Ryan, John and Katelyn Minichiello, Alissa Mahoney, Rachel and Rebecca Darby,

Joseph Daly, Jacqueline Daly, and greatgrandson Jaxsen Lewis. Beloved brotherin-law to Catherine "Honey" Swan; uncle to Cathie Briggette, Nancy Keddy, Jane Souza, and Robert Swan; half-brother to Albert, Frank, and Ernie Holcomb. Also survived by his many friends. He will be forever in our hearts.

1955 George B. Cookman

George, of Wakefield,83, died June 6, 2020, at Wingate at Sharon after a period of declining health. The son of Herbert C. and Hester Elizabeth (Billings) Cookman, George was born in Northampton on November 11, 1936. He was a graduate of Thayer Academy and then attended Boston University. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. For most of his working career, George worked in advertising and sales. In more recent years, he was a courier for various companies in the Boston area. Prior to living in Wakefield, George lived many years in Gloucester and Canton. George enjoyed collecting music and audio visual equipment, playing the banjo, and playing harmonica. He liked to cook and always followed world events. He is survived by his two sons, Geoffrey Cookman of Easton, and David Cookman of Canton; his daughter, Elizabeth Andon, and her husband John of Norfolk and four grandchildren: Lindsay, Kailey, James, and William Andon; his wife Bonnie's children, Roy E. Braswell II and Debby Krause; and his former wife, Esther Cookman, of Canton. He was predeceased by his wife of 30 years, Yvonne "Bonnie" Cookman, in 2017.

Anthony N. DiNatale

Anthony, 83, passed away peacefully in Sarasota, FL, on November 19, 2020. Tony was predeceased by his sister, Nancy DiNatale Taylor ’60 and her husband Bob Taylor. Born in Milton in 1937, he attended Thayer Academy and St. Sebastian's High School. He played football at Harvard University and was a graduate of the Class of 1959. Tony thrived in the sports flooring industry, continuing his father's legacy (Tony DiNatale Sr. built the notorious Boston Garden parquet floor). Tony was most well

known for inventing a rubber floor called ChemTurf that was made famous by NC State coach Jim Valvano. Tony relocated to Florida in the 1970s but loved to visit New England during the summer, where he would always beeline to the North End for pepperoni, Ipswich for fried clams, and Montilio's Bakery for rum cake. Tony loved to cook, and everyone begged him for his meat sauce recipe. He had an incredible memory and was a great storyteller about his experiences and travels. Following retirement, Tony pursued many interests, but his passion was studying the markets. He shared his knowledge as a professional trainer and mentor to clients around the world. He is survived by his wife and lifelong friend, Susan, his son Tony III & wife Terri of Ehrhardt, SC, Michael ’80 of Newton, daughters Constance ’81 of Wekiva, FL, and Katherine of Orlando, FL, and his sister Kathryn DiNatale Murphy ’58 and husband Arthur of Milton. Tony was "Nina" to five grandchildren: Paige, Valentine, Parker, Francesca, and Rachelle. He also had many beloved nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends who will all miss him dearly.

IN MEMORIAM: 1970s-1980s

William G. Swan

1956 Alison Gibson Ayer

Alison, a longtime resident of Cohasset, died peacefully on April 21, 2020, at the age of 81. Alison was raised in Milton and was the daughter of Jean and Earl Gibson (former General Manager of Suffolk Downs). While at Thayer, Alison was active in the arts and played tennis and field hockey. After graduation, she continued her education at Wheelock College, graduating with her degree in Early Childhood Education. Alison taught for a short time in the Milton Public Schools system and was a longtime teacher in the Cohasset Public Schools system. In her younger years, she volunteered her time with the MSPCA in Boston, where her love of animals continued throughout her life. She was a devoted mother and teacher who loved nothing more than spending time with her family and six grandchildren. She will be remembered fondly for her easy laugh, strong sense of fashion, and kind and generous disposition. Alison is predeceased by her beloved husband, Alexander "Sandy" Ayer Sr. She

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is also survived by her brother John Gibson and his wife Irina of Shreveport, LA,. as well as her loving children John Ayer and his wife Debby of Sudbury, Alexander "Sandy" Ayer Jr. and his wife Durene of Old Tappan, NJ, and Jillian Bennis and her husband Michael of Hingham. She is also survived by her cherished grandchildren Jennifer, Jackson, Catherine, Sydney, Grace, and Madison.

Alan Zaff

Alan, 82, of North Easton, passed away at home December 11, 2020, due to kidney failure. Alan was born in Boston, the son of Benjamin and Ida (Verner) Zaff. Alan was devoted to his family. He was a loving husband, father, "Papa,” brother-in-law, cousin, friend, and colleague. He delighted in his children's and grandchildren's many talents and achievements. Beloved husband of Alice A. (Tobin) Zaff for 22 years. Alan had an innate ability to make and keep lifelong friends, and had many friends from his early school years, college, and young professional years in Brockton to friends in his neighborhood and current business life. Alan graduated from Thayer Academy in 1956 and attended Boston University and graduated from Siena College. Professionally, he excelled in retail business and later in commercial development. He was president of Mammoth Mart, a discount department store in the 1970s. He later enjoyed years of building and developing commercial real estate at Coffman Realty with his partner of many years, Jeffrey Coffman, and dedicated Coffman Realty colleagues. Alan found solace in nature and loved surf casting in Nantucket, and fishing and sailing in Cape Cod, Florida, and Maine. He was very charitable and supported many important charities. In addition to his loving wife, Alice, he loved and respected his three children: Amy Zaff Thieringer ’80, Adam Zaff and his wife Michelle, and the late David Zaff ’77. Alan cherished his five grandchildren: Mathew, Brooke, and Ben Hatfield and Rachel and Allison Zaff; respected his former wife, Suzanne Coffman Zaff ’56; loved like a sister his dear cousin, Nancy Winograd, and treasured his sister-in-law, Katherine Tobin, brother-in-law, Evan Wallach, former brothers-in-law and their wives, Anna and Jay Coffman ’60, and Jeffrey and Karen Coffman, loving nephews, Eric, Joel, Jonathan, Marc and

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Michael Coffman, many loving cousins and cherished friends.

1956 David L. Fitzgerald

David, 83, of Mashpee, passed away on August 2, 2020, at Falmouth Hospital. He was the beloved husband of Susan E. Fitzgerald, for whom he shared 19 wonderful years of marriage

together. David was born February 26, 1937, at New England Hospital in Boston to the late Dennis L. and Mildred V. (Johnson) Fitzgerald. He was raised in Weymouth, where he attended three years of high school until transferring to Thayer Academy where he finished his senior year. While in high school David was very active and played both football and baseball. He attended Marietta College in Marietta, OH, where he attained a bachelor’s degree. He then continued in his educational pursuits and received a master’s degree from UMass Boston as well as an additional master’s degree from California State University, Dominguez Hills. David was a Major (Retired) in the United States Air Force and served his country proudly in the Vietnam War. He served active duty from 1963 until 1970 where he was a navigator on a C123 and served in the Air Force Reserves 731st and 337 TAS from 1976 through 1988. David was a passionate educator and began his teaching career in Compton, CA. He relocated back to the Boston area where he spent 10 years teaching at Columbia Point in Dorchester. The bulk of his teaching career was spent as an English teacher at Mashpee Middle School from 1983 to 2002. While at Mashpee, David was a beloved fixture to the students, and in addition to the classroom, he was the announcer for all the basketball games and ran the after-school program in the weight room. “Mr. Fitz,” as the students called him, was well liked and well respected and will be greatly missed in the Mashpee community. David was an avid reader, he could dive in to just about anything, and he enjoyed many different genres from McCullough to Plato. He was a sports enthusiast and was a fan of all Boston teams but especially loved watching the beloved Red Sox. No one was a bigger jazz fan than David. He enjoyed all the classics, but Sinatra was

an all-time favorite. He was even personal friends with the great Dave McKenna, a world-renowned jazz pianist. David was also a fan of classic cinema; the vintage classics White Heat and Casablanca were two of his favorites. This renaissance man was also an incredible writer and poet. He wrote many poems for his wife, Susan, that would bring tears to your eyes. But most of all, David adored spending time with his extended family and friends and will be greatly missed by all who had the pleasure of knowing him. In addition to his beloved wife, Susan, David is survived by his children, David Kile Fitzgerald of Marietta, OH, Robert Dennis Fitzgerald of Marietta, OH, and Erin Kathleen Fitzgerald of Washington, WV; his step-children Sean Eagan and wife Peggy of Mashpee, and Brandon Eagan and wife Hilary of Mashpee; his sister Dorothy Fitzgerald; nine beloved grandchildren; Kile Fitzgerald, Graham Fitzgerald, Sammy Fitzgerald, Danyelle Fitzgerald, Seth Fitzgerald, Isabella Eagan, Madison Eagan, Jordan Eagan, and Isaac Eagan; as well as several nieces, nephews, and friends.

1957 Susann Hayes Hoke

Susann passed away peacefully on April 1, 2020, after a courageous fiveyear battle with multiple myeloma. Her resolve, courage, and grace were admired by those who were aware of her struggle. Born on March 17, 1939, in Boston, Susann was the daughter of the late Robert Francis and Miriam (Comfrey) Hayes. She is survived by her husband, J. Russell Hoke, and her two sons, John and Wilson, and their families. Susann graduated from Thayer Academy with high honors in 1957 and matriculated to Wellesley College that following fall. She graduated from Wellesley in 1961 with honors as a Wellesley College Scholar, receiving a degree in Sociology. Upon graduation, she worked as a case worker for the Massachusetts Pardons and Parole office in Boston from 1961 to 1963. In this capacity, she interviewed and evaluated individuals who requested a pardon of a prior offense or commutation of a current sentence of incarceration. In 1963, she married her husband, Russell, who was then serving in the U.S.


say that sometimes they actually opened the decks and played cards. Throughout her life Susann had one obsessive passion - knitting. She started as a teenager and literally had knitted hundreds of sweaters, blankets, afghans, and Christmas stockings for family and friends. Her needles and yarn were always a constant companion. These gifts were always accepted with gratitude and worn or displayed with pride. Susann will be deeply missed and fondly remembered for her devotion to her family and friends, her kindness and compassion for others, her generous spirit, her quick mind, the strength of her convictions, and her tireless work ethic. In addition to her husband, Susann is survived by her two sons: John R III (husband of Karen) of Portland, OR, and R. Wilson (husband of Shanen) of Bethlehem, PA, and five grandsons: Riley, Owen, Elliot, Vyatt, and Quincy. Susann was the oldest of eight children in the Hayes family of Scituate. She had a twin sister, Nancy Hayes Sweetser ’57 (Verona, NJ). As identical twins, not only did they have the same attributes and traits and look exactly alike, but they also shared a unique bond and relationship which seemingly bordered on telepathic qualities. They each played a very important and supportive role in each other's lives for a span of 81 years. The other surviving siblings include: Robert Hayes ’58 (Duxbury), Ellen Hayes ’61 (Scituate), Joseph Hayes ’64 (Scituate), Elizabeth Hayes Schrader ’66 (Aiken, SC), Michael Hayes ’68 (Scituate), and Patricia Hayes Gordon ’68 (Barrington, RI); along with 19 nieces and nephews.

Phyllis Frogel Rubin

Phyllis, 81, of Falmouth, passed away on November 27, 2020, after a yearlong battle with cardiac amyloidosis. Phyllis was born to the late Reuben H. Frogel, MD, and Frances Baker Frogel on July 18, 1939, and was raised in Quincy and Braintree. She graduated from Thayer Academy in 1957 and Goucher College in 1961 and treasured her enduring friendships from her alma maters. Phyllis was married in 1962 to David K. Rubin, MD. After spending the early years of their marriage in Baltimore, Cleveland, and Milwaukee, they moved to Taunton in 1969 and then settled in Raynham to raise their three children: Jonathan, Pam, and Lisa. Phyllis was a true go-getter with a knack for fundraising. She combined her talents

to proudly work in development for nearly 20 years at the Massachusetts Easter Seals Society, helping to ensure that vital services were provided to local residents with disabilities. As they approached retirement more than 20 years ago, Phyllis and David relocated to Falmouth. Phyllis valued her deep involvement there with the Falmouth Women's Club, AAUW, her workout buddies at the gym, and several book groups. Despite slowing down over the past year, Phyllis continued to enjoy spending time with her beloved husband, whether they were at the Cape Symphony or home watching Jeopardy! and rooting for the Patriots. A longtime Democrat, Phyllis distracted herself in recent months by closely following political news and insisting that she live to see a favorable election result. Phyllis devoted decades of service to Congregation Agudath Achim in Taunton. She was the first woman to serve as its chairman of the board, as well as an active leader and member of its Sisterhood for over 50 years. Even after retiring to Falmouth, Phyllis volunteered untold hours to her synagogue to help sustain its small community. She positively adored her dear friends from the congregation. She is survived by her loving husband David K. Rubin, MD; her children Jonathan (Sheryl), Pam (Russ Seligman), and Lisa (David Antoine); and her grandchildren (Micah and Carly Rubin; Teddy and Jamie Seligman; and Danny, Jared, and Kayla Antoine). She is also survived by her sister, Barbara Frogel Rippa ’51, and several cousins, nieces, and nephews.

IN MEMORIAM: 1970s-1980s

Navy. They had two boys during this military commitment, and the family moved to various Navy communities on the East Coast. While her husband deployed at sea for months at a time, Susann steadfastly held the family intact, as well as volunteered to support other Navy families in need with the Navy Relief Society. In 1968, with the military obligation completed, her husband embarked on a number of engineering assignments with various technical and consulting firms, moving the family to numerous locations throughout the Northeast. The family finally settled in Shillington, PA (Flying Hills), in 1976. Susann was always interested in community involvement, the nuclear family unit, and the nurturing and support of children. As a result, she began to volunteer in a number of capacities with various local organizations, including hospitals, libraries, elementary schools, and children’s and youth organizations. As her boys grew and became more independent, she became a case worker at the Berks County Children and Youth Services (BCCYS) in 1981. She worked at BCCYS until retirement in 2004. She always carried a full caseload of children in need of support. Eventually, she became a supervisor of adoption, taking children from a foster care setting and placing them with loving, adoptive families. In her final year at BCCYS, she was nominated by the county to the Federal Department of Health and Human Services as an individual contributor in adoption excellence. Susann was selected for the award, and in accepting the citation in Washington, DC, she was acknowledged for having been responsible for over 700 adoptions during her tenure at BCCYS. In retirement, she enjoyed cruising to many foreign locations with family and friends. She was devoted to her five grandsons and cherished the time involved in as many of their activities as possible. The numerous trips to Portland, OR, and Bethlehem, PA, included sporting events, school plays, classroom visits, spring breaks, and graduations. Susann also continued her active volunteerism. She was a member of the Berks County Youth Aid Panel Program, meeting monthly to prevent youth from becoming more involved in delinquent behavior. She also continued in her role as a board member for The Children's Home of Reading and her weekly volunteer support in the emergency room at the Reading Hospital. On the social side, Susann truly enjoyed playing bridge on a weekly basis with her gal pals. On many occasions she would

1958 Alice Derby Beal

Alice passed away peacefully September 19, 2020, just eight days shy of her 80th birthday. In her final weeks she was surrounded by the love and compassion of family, friends, and the caring staff at Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston. She died as she had lived: bravely, gently, and reassuring the people she loved that all was okay. Alice was born in Boston, the daughter of Elmer Goodrich Derby and Lucy Davis Derby. She grew up in Braintree with her brother E. Stephen Derby ’56. Their family spent their summers in Clinton,

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CT, a tradition that both she and Steve carried forward with their families. Proudly frugal, Alice was quick to tell you that as a "townie,” her parents got a big tuition discount at Thayer Academy. Alice graduated from Thayer in 1958. She was heavily involved in high school, participating in activities such as field hockey, basketball, and chorus. After being told by her guidance counselor that she "wasn't qualified to apply to Middlebury College" and that she "would never get in,” Alice hopped on a bus and headed up north to interview at the school. She enrolled that fall and graduated in 1962. She entered the working world as an office manager in Boston at Mass Mental Health. Shortly afterwards, she went on a ski trip with friends where she met James Holland Beal Jr., the love of her life who changed her life forever. She left her job and the couple began their married life in Hingham, followed by a move to Scituate where they resided for the majority of their 55-year union. In that time they enjoyed traveling to places near and far. They particularly enjoyed cruising the world from the warm seas of the Caribbean to the glaciers of the Arctic. Alice devoted herself to being a full-time mother/wife and embraced this role with passion. She dedicated her life to her family, her community, and her animals. Alice was beloved by all who were fortunate enough to know her. The Beal home became a neighborhood hub for all of the kids on the block. Whether you had skinned your knee, needed your nose wiped, wanted to learn how to ride your bike, the door at 43 Daedalus Circle was always open and felt like home to so many. Alice was an excellent listener, keeper of secrets, helpful coach, and made everyone feel welcome and safe. She cooked a legendary blueberry pie and delicious grape catsup. Her secret recipe for "nibbles" was second to none. Alice's love for people impacted everyone she met for the better. She touched hundreds of lives through her family, her church, her favorite barn, and the many places she volunteered. When her daughter Deb was grown, Alice returned to the workforce as a librarian at Scituate Town Library. She loved her patrons and was somewhat of a local celebrity. She was a longtime member of Scituate Harbor Yacht Club and spent many hours with Deb and Jim and friends on their sailboat "Kidlet.” She was an active member of St. Luke's Episcopal Church where she sang and played bells in the choir. One of the highlights of each year was always the Church Fair where she worked happy hours with her friends and knitted

Thayer Magazine /// Summer / Fall 2020

homemade hats, sweaters, and mittens with her fellow "Knit-Wits.” In addition to her love for the people in her life, Alice was a true lover of all animals. Her backyard bird feeders were always filled to the brim with the best seed. Throughout her life she had many dogs. Right up until her death, one of her greatest joys was the daily walks she took with them. Donning her signature bucket hat and blue jacket, she enjoyed including friends and family on these jaunts, using the time to talk and catch up. Horses were a passion. Briggs Stable helped her finally realize her dream to have a horse of her own. Dick Briggs found a Morgan horse named Baritone and told her that he was "the one.” Despite never getting her husband or daughter to saddle up, the Beal clan could be found every Wednesday night of the summer for 30+ years at the mini horse shows. Alice lived life to the fullest and never complained. Even after kidney failure, she continued to live life on her terms. Three days a week she arose at the crack of dawn and armed herself with a pocketbook packed with knitting, a good book, and her iPad (so she could play Words with Friends). She made productive use of her time at Davita Dialysis by pursuing her interests and connecting with people, just as she made the most of her time here on Earth. Alice's love and fierce devotion to her husband and daughter prepared her for her ultimate role as grandmother. When Holly arrived five years ago, Alice gained a renewed purpose and new lease on life. The two were blessed to be able to spend time together every day and shared a bond that will always be magical. In addition to her husband James Holland "Jim" Beal Jr., Alice is survived by her daughter, Deb Beal, and granddaughter, Holly, of Scituate; her brother, E. Stephen (Carolyn) Derby, and nephew, Michael (Nancy) Derby, all of Annapolis, MD; her niece, Anne G. Derby of Hingham; as well as by many friends and extended family members. She was predeceased by her daughter Laura.

1963 Sandra Cano Assad

Sandra "Sandie,” born in Quincy in 1945, passed away surrounded by her loved ones at the age of 72 June 18, 2018. Sandie, daughter to Raphael and Antoinette Cano, was known for her strength, intellect, and sense of style. Sandie attended high school at Thayer Academy where she participated in cheerleading and field hockey. She graduated cum laude in 1963. She was married to her best friend and high school sweetheart Art Assad ’61 for 51 years where they shared an enduring and unconditional love for each other. Art worshipped the ground Sandie walked on, and she never shied away from telling others how lucky she was for having him. Their marriage was one straight from a storybook. In the years since they married, they traveled the world together and shared many amazing adventures, including her deep love for Paris. In addition to being a loving wife, Sandie was also a proud mother of her two sons and three grandchildren. Over the years, Sandie spent many hours watching and cheering for her children and grandchildren as they excelled in the activities they loved. Sandie also built a name and established herself as one of Atlanta's top real estate agents. Prior to that, she enjoyed her years as an elementary school teacher in Northern California. In recent years, Sandie and Art built their dream home in the River Club in Suwanee, GA, where they were fortunate to establish numerous friendships for which they were both grateful. Their circle of friends in the neighborhood will forever be one of their greatest combined accomplishments. Sandie adored her group of girlfriends. Because of these close-knit friends, she lived more in recent years than she ever had and was truly happy. Survivors include her husband, sisters Nancy Thomas (husband Danny) and Patricia Cano, sons Jason Assad (wife Stacie), and Ryan Assad (wife Deanna), three grandchildren, Chad Assad, Alexandra Assad, and Madison Assad.


ancient régime France. Besides annual trips to Paris, Larry and Betsy also traveled to India, China, Japan, Europe, and the Caribbean to hike, birdwatch, and visit friends. A graduate of Bowdoin College, Larry’s classmates and fellow Beta Theta Pi brothers remember him as passionate, intelligent, and eager to debate justice, aesthetics, music, and the Red Sox. “At Bowdoin, you filled every room you ever walked into,” one fraternity brother told Larry before he died. Bemused by these recollections, Larry remembered himself as a lackadaisical student and the bane of his professors, one of whom accused him of being a dilettante. “Yes,” he replied, “From the Latin, ’to love and cherish.’” Larry spent his junior year in Paris at the Sorbonne, the beginning of a long love affair with the City of Light. He spoke French like a native and later became one of the State Department’s top Arabists. Other passions were bird-watching, Proust, the Mark Trail comic strip, the Red Sox, the Book of Common Prayer, George Brassens’ chansons, and Jean Redpath’s Scottish ballads, which he sang to his daughters and grandchildren in a lovely tenor voice. His conversation was peppered with Latin tags and obscure historical references from his deep reading in the classics, history, philosophy, and literature. The day before he died, he quoted Socrates’ last words: “Crito, we owe a cock to Asclepius; pay it and don’t forget.” Maine has long been a place of refuge for the Pope family and no place more so than Larry’s beloved New Portland farm. Dressed in his “greens” and shabby jeans, he would canoe down Lemon Stream twice a day, spotting warblers and casting a fly in search of wild brook trout. Apart from the farm, Larry’s greatest loves were his family: his wife of nearly 44 years, Elizabeth “Betsy,” and his two daughters, Eleanor Pope of Sunnyside, NY, and Elizabeth Pope of Portland. “They are my legacy,” he once said. His sons-in-law, Patrick Clark of New York and Samuel Rich of Portland, were “lads for windy weather,” he said, providing limitless love, solace, and support at the end of Larry’s life. Above all, he doted on his four grandchildren, Anna and Marcus Clark and Theodore and Isaac Rich. In addition, Larry is survived by his beloved brother, Ralph Pope ’65, and his wife, Jean, of Arrowsic and Fernandina Beach, FL. Larry grew up in Braintree, the son of Eleanor and Everett Parker Pope, a banker and recipient of the Medal of Honor for gallantry in the Pacific. Although Larry never faced bullets in battle like his father,

he met his cancer diagnosis with courage. “There are worse things in life than having time to prepare for death,” he told friends.

1964 Thomas Graziano

Thomas, 73, of Stoughton, died peacefully at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston May 23, 2020. He leaves behind his beloved wife of 34 years, Linda A. Chester. Thom was born in Stoughton on May 27, 1946, a son of the late Thomas and Josephine (Patella) Graziano. He was raised in Stoughton and graduated from Thayer Academy in the Class of 1964 where he was a multi-sport athlete participating in wrestling, baseball, and football. He then went on to attend Parsons College in Iowa. Thom had a long and successful career as a computer programmer at EMC and a consultant for IBM until his retirement in 2014. Thom, known as Papa, was very caring for his grandchildren. He enjoyed printing out pictures for them to color and secretly sharing his Oreo cookies at any time of the day. In addition to his wife, Thom is survived by his son, James Graziano and his wife Janelle Belanger of Stoughton, as well as his grandchildren, Isabella, Charlotte, and Oliver Graziano. He was the brother of Elizabeth Giblin of Stoughton and the late Robert Graziano and is also survived by several nieces and nephews.

IN MEMORIAM: 1970s-1980s

Laurence Pope ’63 Laurence E. Pope died on Oct. 31, 2020, with dignity as he had wished, at his home in Portland with his wife, Elizabeth “Betsy,” and two daughters at his side. He was 75 and the cause was pancreatic cancer. Larry, a career Foreign Service Officer for three decades, was posted to Vietnam, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia, Bahrain, and Chad, where he served as ambassador. In the State Department he served as Director of Northern Gulf Affairs (Iran and Iraq), Associate Director of Counter Terrorism and political advisor to General Anthony C. Zinni, Commander in Chief of U.S. Central Command in Tampa. He was a recipient of the Secretary of Defense Medal for Distinguished Civilian Service. Larry’s colleagues recalled his diplomatic talent, personal courage, scholarship, and ability to think deeply and solve problems — all of which made him a natural leader. “I tried hard to get my country to do the right thing,” he once said. He believed strongly in public service and in national and international government institutions which he lamented had suffered in recent years. In his last book, The Demilitarization of American Diplomacy: Two Cheers for Striped Pants, he argued for more diplomacy in the information age to avert needless wars. In 2000, Larry’s presidential nomination to be ambassador to Kuwait was blocked because he refused to betray General Zinni, who had publicly ridiculed the misguided effort to overthrow Saddam Hussein. Rather than wait for another posting, Larry resigned from the State Department. He and Betsy packed their bags and headed north, singing Schooner Fare’s “Portland Bound.” They never regretted their decision, every year growing fonder of the Forest City, where they found a circle of lifelong friends and the kindest neighbors whose love and support (and soup, muffins, and porch visits) helped them bear the unbearable these last few months. Following his resignation, Larry was soon in demand as a consultant for the military and other organizations. He was a regular on Maine Public Radio’s “Maine Calling,” contributing keen insights on world affairs. As a second career, Larry became a “scholar-diplomat,” writing François de Callières: A Political Life, the first biography of the man considered a leading theorist of diplomacy. His research led to friendships in the U.S. and Europe with other academics specializing in

1971 John J. Delaney III

John, a longtime resident of Cohasset, passed away peacefully on March 20, 2020, at the age of 68 after a long battle with cancer. He was surrounded by family. Born in Boston to the late John J. Delaney Jr. and Norma O'Shea Delaney of Scituate. He was the proud father of Sarah Delaney (Peter Jackson) of Falmouth, ME. He was the beloved brother of Ann Szymanski (Jack) of Scituate, Katherine Lauziere of Raynham, Betsy Delaney ’79 (Greg Tardif ) of Hamden, CT, and Norma Delaney ’82 (Patrick Pilkington) of Sudbury, and

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IN MEMORIAM: 1950s-1970s

a loving uncle to four nieces and two nephews. A graduate of Thayer Academy and Boston University, John enjoyed a career in commercial real estate, brokering, and owning properties in the Greater Boston area. In addition to spending time with his dear dog, Reese, John enjoyed boating and restoring European cars; he also loved listening to music and reading historical and political literature. John was a skilled carpenter and craftsman who built his life with his hands. He found great joy in working on projects in his garage and remodeling houses. He had a deep appreciation for art and enjoyed taking photographs of sunsets along the beaches and coves of the South Shore. John made friends wherever he went and will be forever loved and remembered by many.

1977 David Zaff ’77

David, of Easton, at age 60, on August 27, 2020. Devoted son of Suzanne Hoffman Zaff ’56 and Alice & the late Alan Zaff ’56. Beloved grandson of the late Benjamin & Ida Zaff and the late Max & Anne Coffman. Loving brother to Amy Zaff Thieringer ’80 and Adam Zaff & his wife Michelle. Cherished uncle to Matt, Ben, and Brooke Hatfield and Rachel and Allison Zaff. Lifelong Boston sports fan and avid golfer and fisherman.

2007 Patrick Beauregard ’07 ALUMNI BOARD MEMBER

Alumni Board Member Patrick, 32, was born into eternal life while surrounded by his loving family on September 6, 2020, after a courageous, faith-filled, and awe-inspiring battle with colorectal cancer. Patrick was born on February 9, 1988, in Portland, ME, to George and Kathleen (Simard) Beauregard. One of four children, Patrick grew up in Medfield and was often referred to by his siblings as the "golden child.” He was a proud graduate of Thayer Academy where he forged long-lasting friendships, recently demonstrating his pride by serving on the Academy's Alumni

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Association Board. He was an Honor Roll student, a Class Officer, and played basketball and lacrosse. Upon graduating Thayer Academy in 2007, Patrick attended Providence College in Providence, RI, where he fostered further long-lasting friendships honored to this day, and met the love of his life, Amanda. He graduated with his bachelor's degree in Political Science in 2011. Shortly after college graduation, Patrick decided to pursue a lifelong dream of his by serving in the military. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in April 2013 and served as an Intelligence Analyst until he was honorably discharged in July 2019. During his service, Patrick received commendations for exceptional leadership, initiative, loyalty, and dedication to duty. Patrick also led an accomplished career as the Assistant Vice President of Operations for Northeast Security. His stage IV colorectal cancer diagnosis in September 2017 at the age of 29, a month after marrying his beloved wife Amanda, changed everything for Patrick. Throughout his cancer battle that included over 40 rounds of chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and many surgeries and procedures, Patrick chose to remain positive, living by the mantra "Panda Power … Pray, Hope, Don't Worry.” It is this positive attitude and will to live that allowed him to accomplish his final goal - meeting his son, Noah Patrick, on July 10, 2020. At the same time he fought his own disease with grace and fortitude, he also worked tirelessly to ensure that youngonset colorectal cancer received the attention of researchers, donors, and potentially at-risk individuals. He appeared on several news outlets, participated in numerous fundraising events, and met with representatives on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., to advocate for greater funds and awareness for prevention, research, treatment options, and cancerrelated care. Through Patrick's selfless and noble work, the fight against young-onset colorectal cancer will continue and will benefit others for years to come. It's nearly impossible to express just how great of a man Patrick was. Caring, conscientious, unselfish, reliable, loyal, hilarious yet humble, quick-witted yet thoughtful, truly a man of family, God, and country. He was the epitome of a good man and good person in every way. Patrick somehow always remained positive and maintained his great sense of humor until the very end. He will always be remembered with a beautiful smile on his face.

Patrick is survived by his loving wife, Amanda (Flood) Beauregard, and their son, Noah Patrick Beauregard; his parents, George and Kathleen (Simard) Beauregard; his brother Daniel ’05 and his wife Melissa (Hart); his sister Kaylin (Beauregard) Nimblett and her husband Paul; his brother Brendan; parents-in-law Charles and Roselyn (Heath) Flood; and his sisters-in-law, Regan and Devin Flood. Patrick was the grandson of Henry and Patricia Simard and the late Rodolphe and Marguerite Beauregard, step-grandson of Shirley Beauregard, and also leaves numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, and friends.


In Memoriam

T U E S D AY, J A N U A RY 1 9 , 2 0 2 1 - T H AY E R A C A D E M Y M A I N L AW N

A slight breeze kicked up, some forty-five minutes after sunset, quickening the illuminated American flag to billow in the early evening chill. Only the faint, familiar sounds of cars along Washington Street served as background music to another quiet evening in Braintree. That stillness stopped at five thirty, when a bell tolled high atop Thayer's tower. A second toll quickly followed — followed by another, then another, then another. Forty times, the bell rang. Forty times to honor and memorialize the more than 400,000 American lives lost during the pandemic. Forty peals of grief. Forty peals of remembrance: for grandmothers and grandfathers; mothers and fathers; sisters and brothers; sons and daughters; relatives and friends and co-workers and strangers and loved ones, old and young. Americans, all. Roughly a minute and a half after it began, the ringing ceased. A final peal lingered long into the night sky, as the flag continued to wave. And then, after the briefest moment of silence, a few flurries began to descend from above, followed by a few more. For roughly a minute and a half, thousands upon thousands of snowflakes fluttering down from the heavens — a providential commemoration; a sacred, short-lived scene of beauty. By Paul Kahn

Video of the bell tolling: thayer.org/bellmemorial

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The Final Word

HUMAN TRANSLATION © 2020

POEM TRANSLATED BY

Thayer Faculty Member Aidan Rooney P ’07, ’15 after L’Homme Qui Te Ressemble − R E N É PHI LO MBE

I knocked at your door, I knocked at your heart, looking for a good bed, looking for a good fire. Why turn me away? Let me in, my friend! Why do you ask if I am from Africa, if I am from Asia, if I am from Europe, if I am from America? Let me in, my friend! Why do you ask the length of my nose, the size of my mouth, the shade of my skin, the name of my gods? Let me in, my friend! I am not a black, I am not a red, I am not a yellow, I am not a white. I am just like you. Let me in, my friend! Let me in your door, let me in your heart. Like you I am the one whatever age, the one in all the skies, the one who looks like you.

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AIDAN ROONEY

René Philombe, born Philippe Louis Ombédé (1930 -2001) was a Cameroon poet and writer. A political activist from his teens, Philombe became a policeman in 1949. He unionized the police and became their union secretary in Douala. In the mid-1950s, after he was permanently crippled by spinal disease, he began writing seriously. His Lettres de ma cambuse (1964; “Letters from my Hut”) won the Prix Mottard of the Académie Française. His other published works include Sola, ma chérie (1966; “Sola, My Darling”), a novel about seemingly unjust marriage customs; Un Sorcier blanc à Zangali (1970; “A White Sorcerer in Zangali”), a novel about the effect of a missionary’s clash with the colonial administration in a small village; Choc antichoc (1978), “a novel made of poems”; and Africapolis (1978), a tragedy. The latter two are both thinly veiled allegories of life under a malevolent dictatorship. Many of his patriotic literary activities earned him long periods in prison despite his infirmities. In 1981, his manuscripts were seized by authorities and destroyed.


GIVING TO THAYER 2019-2020

View the Annual Report online at www.thayer.org/annualreport

General’s Council / Young Alumni Leaders Giving Levels young alumni leaders:

the general’s council: $1,877–$2,999

Headmaster’s Circle

$10,000–$24,999

Sarah White Glover Society

$3,000–$4,999

Trustee’s Circle

$25,000–$49,999

Anna Boynton Thompson Society

$5,000–$9,999

Founder’s Circle

$50,000–$99,999

Gold Circle

$100,000 +

Leadership Circle

1-4 years out 5-9 years out 10-14 years out 15-19 years out

$50+ $100+ $250+ $750+


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MAGAZINE Summer / Fall 2020

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Thayer Magazine - Crises & Community - Summer/Fall 2020  

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