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En 2012, nous partagerons notre passion avec le monde. In 2012, we will bring our passion to the world.

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Candidature Olympique de Rio de Janeiro — Proposition d’acceptation de candidature pour l’organisation des Jeux Olympiques et Paralympiques de 2012 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Bid — Candidature acceptance proposal to host the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games


Brasília, le 17 Décembre 2003

Brasília, December 17, 2003

Pour Monsieur JACQUES ROGGE Président du Comité International Olympique

To Mr. JACQUES ROGGE President of the International Olympic Committee

Monsieur le Président,

Mr. President,

Si la motivation et l´enthousiasme sont des critères importants pour le choix du pays qui recevra les Jeux Olympiques de 2012, alors le Brésil mérite d’être choisi. Le brésilien joue dés sa naissance avec un ballon: il a le sport dans le sang. Quelle que soit la modalité du sport – des plus nobles aux plus populaires – il existe toujours un brésilien dédié à le pratiquer. Nous brésiliens croyons fermement au rôle du sport dans la construction d’un monde plus solidaire, participatif et integré. Comme sommet de la conquête sportive, les Jeux Olympiques et Paralympiques rassemblent ces idéaux comme aucun autre événement. Nous serons donc trés fiers d´accueillir le Jeux Olympiques et Paralympiques de 2012. Nous sommes persuadés que vous trouverez des collaborateurs enthousiastes pour réaliser ces Olympiades a Rio de Janeiro. Chaleur humaine, hospitalité et persévérance sont les traits principaux du peuple brésilien. En plus, deux autres points font toute la différence: notre climat tropical et le cadre magnifique de la ville de Rio, une des plus belles villes au monde. Au nom de Madame le Gouverneur de l´État de Rio de Janeiro, du Maire et du Président du Comité Olympique Brésilien, au nom de six millions de résidents de Rio de Janeiro et des 180 millions de brésiliens, je vous assure que, plus que n´importe quel autre pays, nous tenons a accuellir les Jeux Olympiques de 2012. Veuillez agréer, Monsieur, l’expression des mes sentiments les plus distingués. Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva Président de la République Fédérative du Brésil

If spirit and passion alone were enough for a country to be chosen as host of the 2012 Olympic Games, Brazil would certainly be the favorite. Brazilians are born running with a ball because sports run in their veins. Whatever the sport may be – from the most noble to the most popular – Brazilians are playing it. We Brazilians genuinely believe in the power of sport to build a more whole, integral and caring society. As the pinnacle of athletic achievement, the Olympic and Paralympic Games embody these ideals in a way that no other event can. Therefore, it would be our great privilege to help you further these ideals by hosting this magnificent event in 2012. We believe that in Brazil, and particularly in Rio de Janeiro, you will find the perfect partners for one of the most memorable Olympic Games ever held. Warmth, hospitality and persevereance are inherent characteristics of the Brazilian people. As if that wasn’t enough, we also offer a tropical climate and one of the most beautiful cities in the world. I speak on behalf of the Governor of the State of Rio de Janeiro, the Mayor, the President of the Brazilian Olympic Committee, the six million residents of Rio de Janeiro and 180 million inhabitants of Brazil,when I assure you that, more than any other country, we would be the most enthusiastic hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games. Sincerely Yours, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva President of the Federative Republic of Brazil


I. INTRODUCTION: MOTIVATION, CONCEPT & PUBLIC OPINION

1 Introduction

Rio de Janeiro has everything to give. And everything to gain.

A PASSION FOR NATURE. Rio is a city of surpassing beauty — 30 kilometers of sun-drenched coastline studded with majestic peaks and carpeted in tropical rain forest. A bay, an ocean, a mountain range and the world’s largest urban park, all contained within one shimmering city. In Rio, nature has carved out an unrivaled setting for the Olympic and Paralympic Games. A PASSION FOR THE ENVIRONMENT. Rio has a strong, longstanding concern for the environment, and for the 2012 Games we look forward to building on the many environmental initiatives currently underway. A PASSION FOR LIFE. A city is a collection of people, and it is the residents of Rio, or Cariocas, who lend the city its famously vibrant spirit and infectious sense of joy. Like Brazilians everywhere, Cariocas are warm and welcoming, generous and festive. In 2012 Brazil will welcome the world to Rio in a spirit of celebration, harmony and athletic achievement.

A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE. Hosting the 2012 Games is the culmination of many years of effort to secure Rio’s standing as a major destination for worldclass events. Building on the solid foundation of the 2007 Pan American Games, we will host an Olympic and Paralympic Games defined by both efficiency and passion. Our vision is of one city, one village. All competition within the city of Rio proper. All athletes housed in a single Olympic Village, located in the heart of the main cluster of venues in the developing Barra district. An Olympic Ring, road and rail, will be linking the Village to the bulk of Games venues. All competition venues are within a 26km radius from the Olympic Village. A PASSION FOR THE FUTURE. If we have everything to offer the 2012 Games, we also have everything to gain from them. They will leave an imprint on our city, on our country, and indeed on our continent, that will remain indelible for generations to come. Venues will be developed with a strong commitment to legacy, providing facilities across the city, particularly for the young and underprivileged. Key environmental efforts will be accelerated by the Games, delivering measurable gains in the quality of the environment. Development of the transport network will connect all parts of the city with the new area of Barra. Needier neighborhoods will house events and share substantially in the long-term benefits to the city.

A PASSION FOR SPORT. Stroll along the beach in Flamengo, Copacabana, Ipanema or Barra, or around Lagoa, and you will understand how deeply sport is woven into the fabric of Carioca life. Everywhere you turn, you will see runners, walkers, tennis and volleyball players, cyclists, swimmers, surfers, rowers, hang gliders, and maybe even a football player or two. Brazilians are also among the world’s most passionate and knowledgeable fans.

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For the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, we believe we offer qualities that perfectly echo the Olympic spirit and that no other city or country on earth can offer in such abundance. The Games will also make a world of difference to Rio, Brazil and South America long after the closing ceremonies.


I. INTRODUCTION: MOTIVATION, CONCEPT & PUBLIC OPINION

2 Concept

One village. One city. One world.

THE ALL-CITY STRATEGY. We will cluster infrastructure in four distinct zones of the city, which will achieve several objectives — building on existing infrastructure, enabling optimal transportation, security and hospitality services, and spreading the benefits of the Games among all residents of the city. BARRA. The jewel in Rio’s Olympic crown, the Barra region will comprise several facilities already under construction for the 2007 Pan American Games, as well as a number of new facilities, including a state-of-the-art, 80,000-seat Olympic Stadium, the Athletes Village, Media Village and broadcasting and press centers. All will be located along the Olympic Boulevard, which will stretch from the Athletes Village to the Olympic Ring, linking the venues and facilities into a beautiful linear park. More than 50% of sports will be within five minutes of the Athletes Village. Barra is also the site of the IOC hotel. SUGAR LOAF. Rio’s Zona Sul (South Zone) is one of the most beloved stretches of real estate on earth. Copacabana. Ipanema. The Lagoa. Corcovado. Sugar Loaf. Lined by ivory sand and blue-green waters and dotted by rocky peaks, it is hard to imagine a more exhilarating backdrop for events such as the triathlon, beach volleyball, rowing, canoeing, cycling and sailing.

MARACANÃ. The soul of Brazilian football, Maracanã Stadium will be a key venue for Olympic football. With seating for 100,000, it has the capacity to handle Olympic-size demands. Volleyball and water polo competition will also be conducted within the Maracanã Complex, in existing venues. Within the Maracanã Zone will be two additional football stadiums, one of them a handsome new 45,000-seat venue currently being built for the 2007 Pan American Games — the João Havelange Stadium. DEODORO. Deodoro is an area that offers some five million square meters of green parkland with rolling hills — an ideal setting for equestrian events and shooting. LONG-TERM PLANNING. Our Olympic strategy meshes perfectly with our long-term vision for the city. Barra da Tijuca is the city’s natural area of expansion, already growing by more than 10,000 residents per year. When the Games are over, Olympic structures will become readily marketable properties, leaving a positive legacy for the city. Moreover the Games will accelerate some crucial environmental initiatives in the area, such as the remediation of the lagoons. The use of the Maracanã and Deodoro regions will provide a significant boost to the ongoing efforts to regenerate these parts of the city. ENHANCED BY FESTIVITIES. The streets of Rio are filled with music, dancing, street performances, parades, exhibitions, concerts, fashion, food. During the Olympic Games this spirit of celebration will be stronger than ever, providing a festive backdrop to the competition for families, Games guests, the Olympic Family and residents of Rio.

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The village is the Olympic Village, a city-within-a-city that will house all 17,000 athletes and team officials. The city is Rio; for the first time ever all Olympic events will be held within the limits of a single city. The world is our world, knit together by a spirit of peace and celebration, illuminated by the Olympic Flame, animated by the abiding passion of Brazil.


I. INTRODUCTION: MOTIVATION, CONCEPT & PUBLIC OPINION

3 Public Opinion

Our people are passionate about bringing the Olympic Games to Brazil.

A recent poll confirms that Brazilians are strongly in favor of bringing the 2012 Olympic Games to Rio de Janeiro. Support is overwhelming in the City and State of Rio de Janeiro, with more than nine out of ten approving of the bid to stage the Games in Rio.

Of those providing a definite response to the questions:

• 94% of residents of the City of Rio indicated their approval to the staging of the Games in Rio

• 94% of residents of the State of Rio indicated their

Independent research was conducted by Ibope, the premier polling firm in Latin America. During the months of October and November 2003, they interviewed 421 people aged 16 and over in the City of Rio, 1,000 people in Rio de Janeiro State and 2,000 people nationally.

Respondents were asked a series of questions, including the following:

• •

• • Their interest in sports and the Olympics in general • Their level of awareness of the Rio Bid • Whether or not they generally approved of Brazil bidding for the Olympics, and their reasons why or why not

• Whether or not they approved of Rio as the city

• •

approval to the staging of the Games in Rio 83% of Brazilians outside the State of Rio indicated their approval to the staging of the Games in Rio 72% of residents of the City of Rio indicated an interest in buying Games tickets 63% of residents of the State of Rio indicated an interest in buying Games tickets 47% of residents outside the State of Rio indicated an interest in buying Games tickets 54% of residents of the City of Rio indicated a desire to work as a volunteer during the Games 51% of residents of the State of Rio indicated a desire to work as a volunteer during the Games 38% of residents outside the State of Rio indicated a desire to work as a volunteer during the Games

representing Brazil, and why or why not Games

• Whether or not they would be interested in buying tickets for the Games

NO OPPOSITION. No formal opposition exists to Rio’s hosting the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The people of Brazil clearly recognize the benefits the Games will offer.

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• Whether or not they would volunteer to work at the


II. POLITICAL SUPPORT

4 Government Support

Enthusiastic support at every level.

These commitments are confirmed in the two letters of guarantee by the Government of Brazil and the City of Rio de Janeiro, reproduced below. A third letter of

support, from the State of Rio de Janeiro, also has been obtained. The country’s legislature is also firmly in favor of Rio’s candidature, with members of all parties joined in enthusiastic support. They have shown this support in various legislative actions, detailed further in Question 6. 2004 ELECTIONS. Mayoral and City council elections will be held in all Brazilian cities in October, 2004. All major candidates for Rio’s mayoral election have already pledged their support for the City’s 2012 candidature. No elections are scheduled for State and National governments in the period up to July 2005.

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Federal, State and City governments are united in their support of Rio de Janeiro’s candidature to host the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. All three levels of government are actively participating in all aspects of the candidature, including the financing of the effort. Rio has in place all the governmental guarantees demanded by the IOC for the organization of the Games, and enjoys the direct involvement of the President of the Republic of Brazil, the Governor of the State of Rio de Janeiro and the Mayor of the City of Rio de Janeiro.


II. POLITICAL SUPPORT

5 Future Candidature Committee

A proven success. The Committee for our candidature to host the 2012 Games will be structured similarly to the Committee that was responsible for Rio’s successful bid to host the 2007 Pan American Games. The Candidature Committee will be co-chaired by the Mayor of Rio de Janeiro and the President of the Brazilian Olympic Committee. Responsible for its administration will be an Executive Committee with representatives from the Brazilian Olympic Committee, from Federal, State and City governments, from the Organizing Committee of the 2007 Pan American Games

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

GOVERNOR OF RIO

STATE GOVERNMENT

MAYOR OF RIO

CITY GOVERNMENT

This structure ensures that all major entities connected with the candidature and future Olympic organizing efforts will be integrated, including government-level and sports administrators. This guarantees that decisions made by the Candidature Committee will have legitimacy and final authority. The Candidature Committee will also have a Vice President and Managing Directors for specific areas.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

CO-PRESIDENTS

C. Maia (Mayor of Rio) C. Nuzman (NOC President)

BRAZILIAN PARALYMPIC COMMITTEE

VICE PRESIDENT

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF WORKFORCE AND FINANCE

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF INFRASTRUCTURE

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF VENUES

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF SPORT

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE COMPOSITION

- IOC Dean Member - IOC Member / NOC President - NOC Vice President & Secretary General - Vice President, Candidature Committee - Secretary General, Pan Am Games 2007 - Member, Brazilian Olympic Committee Assembly - City of Rio, Olympic Bid Secretary & Coordinator - City of Rio, Attorney General - State of Rio, Chief of Staff - State of Rio, Secretary of Sport - Government of Brazil, Minister of Sport - Government of Brazil, National Secretary for High Performance Sports

GAMES CONSULTANTS

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF TECHNOLOGY

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENT

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF SECURITY

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PRESIDENT OF BRAZIL

and from Brazilian IOC members. The government representatives will hold cabinet level positions.


II. POLITICAL SUPPORT

6 Legal Aspects

No hurdles.

NEW LAWS. Key legal sanctions have already been granted through a series of legislative acts: In April 2003, the City Legislature of Rio de Janeiro passed legislation which expressly authorized the Candidature of Rio for the 2012 Games. This same body then enacted legislation to create the “Municipal Fund for the Support of Olympic Sport,” authorizing the application of resources towards the development of Olympic Sport and the Candidature of the city to host the 2012 Games. For its part, the State Legislative Assembly, in March 2003, passed legislation which authorized the Executive Branch of the State to support the 2012 Candidature of the city of Rio de Janeiro. All levels of government enthusiastically support Rio’s Bid and we are confident that, as the need arises, any further legislation that is needed will be swiftly enacted.

NO REFERENDUM. No referendum is required to approve a project of this nature in Brazil. THE LAWS OF SPORT. A broad range of sportsrelated laws currently exist in Brazil. Three in particular stand out: • Law no. 9.615/98 governs all issues regarding the organization of sports in Brazil • Law no. 10.671/03 is a recently revised statute which provides broad consumer protection to sports spectators • Decree-Law no. 21/83 approved the text of the Treaty of Nairobi concerning the protection of the Olympic Symbol ANTI-DOPING LAWS. A ministerial decree has been in effect since 1985, governing doping in football. Congress is currently drafting a comprehensive anti-doping bill. In the meantime, the Sports Ministry created the Commission to Combat Doping, with its main objective to create uniformity as defined by WADA. The Brazilian Government, through its embassy in Denmark, signed the Declaration of Copenhagen on anti-doping. All anti-doping procedures adopted by Brazil to date follow IOC and IF guidelines.

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There are no legal obstacles to the organization of the Olympic Games in Brazil at any level — Federal, State or Municipal. Indeed, this legal autonomy is guaranteed in the Constitution of the Republic, which assures the full autonomy of sports entities and grants them complete freedom to organize competitions.


III. FINANCE

7 Candidature Budget

A generous candidature budget. The Rio 2012 Candidature Committee will be financed by cash and in-kind contributions from the City of Rio de Janeiro. The candidature campaign will consist of two distinct efforts: the bid-related activities of the various departments of Rio’s City government and the activities of the Candidature Committee itself. The government efforts will be in-kind contributions, while committee activities will be financed by the City of Rio in cash, as indicated below. The category entitled “Entertainment” includes allowance for site inspection visits by the International Sports Federations and the IOC Evaluation Commission. (US$ MILLION)

APPLICANT PHASE

CANDIDATE PHASE

TOTAL

$ 3.4 $ 2.1 $ 5.5

$10.6 $ 7.2 $17.8

$14.0 $ 9.3 $23.3

$ 2.2 $ 2.5 $ 0.2

$ 3.3 $ 3.9 $ 1.6

$ 5.5 $ 6.4 $ 1.8

$ $ $ $ $

$ 4.3 $ 2.5 $ 2.1 $ 0.1 $17.8

$ 4.4

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES Salaries Consultants Entertainment Promotional Expenses • National • International Travel Other Costs Total Expenditures

0.1 2.5 0.5 0.0 5.5

$ 2.6 $ 0.1 $ 23.3

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Cash In-Kind Total Revenues


III. FINANCE

8 Games Budget & Government Contributions

OCOG Budget

GOVERNMENT COMMITMENTS. The City of Rio de Janeiro, the State of Rio de Janeiro and the Federal Government each have committed US$50 million in government funding to the Rio 2012 OCOG budget.

NON-OCOG BUDGET. In addition to these cash contributions to the OCOG, the City, State and Federal Governments (in some cases in conjunction with private partnerships) will be investing more than US$400 million in new sports venues, US$360 million in new housing for villages, US$3.7 billion in roads and rail infrastructure and more than US$300 million in environment initiatives in the Barra region. In addition to the financial subsidies from the City, State and Federal Governments, we have received all the required government guarantees, as outlined in question 4.

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The Games Budget will be structured with a mix of private and public funding. The majority of revenue will be derived from the private commercial sector in the form of international sponsorships and broadcast rights, as well as domestic sponsorships, licensing, ticket sales and other Games-related revenues, which will be raised by the OCOG.


III. FINANCE

9 OCOG Revenue Generating Potential

Nearly US$1 billion in revenue

OCOG DOMESTIC REVENUE Domestic Sponsors & Suppliers Ticket Sales Licensing, Coins & Philately Government Subsidies Other Revenues Total Domestic Revenue

(US$ MILLION) $ 450 $ 260 $ 50 $ 150 $ 75 $ 985

DOMESTIC SPONSORSHIPS AND SUPPLIERSHIPS. We will offer 15 exclusive market categories, with the highest level sponsorship tiers attracting an average investment of US$30 million per sponsor. Supplierships, with more limited marketing rights and benefits, will be offered at a lower level of investment. The estimate for suppliership revenue is based on an average value of US$2 million in product or service, over a total of about 50 agreements. In the case of both the TOP and Domestic Sponsorship programs, we expect to receive revenue in the form of both cash and value-in-kind (VIK). The Games Budget will match VIK revenues to specific expenditure categories. The primary categories of domestic sponsorship are expected to include such segments as telecommunications services, automotive, airlines, finance/banking, power, oil and mining. The Brazilian advertising market alone has an approximate annual value of US$4.5 billion. The domestic sponsorship revenue estimate represents only about 2.5% of the total market capacity over the quadrennium. Usually, the presentation of major events such as the Olympic Games and the Soccer World Cup create an increase of about 5% in Brazil’s annual advertising market.

TICKET SALES. Ticket revenues are projected to be US$260 million, based on conservative sell-through assumptions. In an effort to make the Rio 2012 Games available to the widest possible cross-section of Brazilians, ticket prices are projected to be in line with Athens 2004, and lower than prices for Sydney 2000. LICENSING. Royalties from collectible products, coins and stamps are consistent with traditional programs of this kind. Discussions are already underway with the Brazilian Central Bank and Post Office to implement dedicated Olympic programs for coins and stamps. GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES. Subsidies of US$50 million each have been committed by the City of Rio de Janeiro, the State of Rio de Janeiro and the Federal Government of Brazil. OTHER REVENUES. Based on previous Games experience, further revenue can be anticipated from accommodation commissions, arts festival revenues, merchandising and games-time concessions. Financial contributions from the IOC are estimated to be in excess of US$1 billion, subject to further confirmation from the IOC. This estimate assumes that gross receipts related to broadcast rights will be on the order of US$800 million, while the expenditure budget will include approximately US$200 million in host broadcaster costs. The revenue estimate for TOP Sponsorships is estimated at US$220 million in current year values, based on the reported performance of the TOP IV program for the Sydney Games.

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The domestic revenue-raising capacity of Rio 2012 is conservatively estimated to be US$985 million in current year values, as indicated in the table below.


IV. VENUES

10 Competition Venues

Where the passion will unfold.

But the Olympics are about much more than convenience, security and comfort. They are about sport, about achievement, about human emotion in its most concentrated form. And so we have also given great forethought to selecting those venues that will most enhance the emotional experience of the athletes, spectators and television viewers around the world. A football final at Maracanã is more than just a football final; it is dusted with the history of the world’s most revered football shrine. As the triathletes struggle to the finish line, the image will become even more indelible when they are running alongside Copacabana Beach, with the Sugar Loaf rising in the background. In selecting Olympic and Paralympic venues, we sought to give equal emphasis to the past, the present and the future. THE TRADITION. History will be well represented by the football stadiums Maracanã, São Januário and Moça Bonita, which will benefit from significant upgrades before the Games, helping to preserve these important elements of Rio’s sporting heritage. The modern pentathlon and archery events will be staged in the classic Flamengo Sports Club and Brazilian Jockey Club. And an important gift of the Games will be the renovation of the Rowing Center on the Lagoa, an historic city landmark.

THE PRESENT. We are fortunate to be able to reuse in 2012 a number of the ultramodern facilities currently being built for the 2007 Pan American Games. Most notable among them is the 45,000-seat João Havelange Stadium in the Maracanã region. It will house football games and will also be the site of an important legacy — the National Olympic Training Center. In Barra Olympic Park, we are building a new 5,000-seat velodrome, a world-class aquatic center and a 15,000-seat indoor arena. The RioCentro Exhibition complex, the largest in Latin America, will host a number of sports events in 2007 and will benefit from a major upgrade prior to the Pan American Games. These are the first steps towards developing a spectacular sports and recreation complex among the mountains and lagoons of Barra. THE FUTURE. Finally, there is the future, represented most notably by the new, 80,000-seat Olympic Stadium, which will be the crowning feature of Barra Olympic Park, located along the magnificent Olympic Boulevard. For generations to come, this handsome, spacious facility will be both a much-used sports stadium in this fastest-growing part of the city and a glorious reminder of the 2012 Games. In addition, the Olympic Village will bring an additional 17,000 residents to the area, and the planned transport infrastructure will enhance access and connectivity. Sporting infrastructure will be supplemented with other activities to ensure the long-term sustainability of the complex. The effects of this development in Barra will be dramatic, as a new ‘town center’ evolves, creating a dynamic and diverse community surrounding Barra Olympic Park. Details of our venues – past, present and future – are found in Chart I in the appendices to this document.

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We have given great forethought to the convenience, security and comfort of all Olympic and Paralympic venues. The result is a compact and efficient plan, comprising world class venues grouped in four geographic zones, linked by major transport routes.


IV. VENUES

11 Venues

– Map A in the appendices

A focus on legacy. Our concept comprises all 31 competition venues, within a 26 kilometer radius of the Olympic Village. They include:

The major non-competition venues — the Olympic Village, Media Village, International Broadcast Center and Main Press Center — all are purpose-built facilities, with solid financing and plans for post-Games resale in place.

12 existing venues.

10 additional venues constructed for the Olympic Games. Three are new permanent venues (the Olympic Stadium, National Tennis Center and the new Gymnastics Pavilion at RioCentro). One, the Brazilian Jockey Club for archery, is an internal upgrade of an existing facility. And importantly six are temporary venues (venues for baseball, softball and field hockey in Barra Olympic Park, as well as beach volleyball and triathlon in Copacabana Beach and the road cycling at Flamengo Park).

Four key zones. Venue locations are identified on Map A, appended to this document. The compact master plan locates all venues within the city of Rio, within a 26 kilometer radius of Barra Olympic Park and the Athletes Village. The Barra Zone (above photo) is located in Barra da Tijuca, the city’s fastest growing region and home to more than 50% of sports. The legendary Maracanã Stadium is the centerpiece of the Maracanã Zone. The Sugar Loaf Zone encompasses the most famous stretch of coastline in Rio — and possibly in the world — including Copacabana Beach. The Deodoro Zone houses three competition venues – equestrian, shooting and the Moça Bonita Football Stadium. LINKED BY TRANSPORT. The three primary venue Zones — Barra, Maracanã and Sugar Loaf — are conveniently linked by the Olympic Ring, a network of major roads, freeways and rail and bus systems that connect more than 90% of the venues. The Deodoro Zone is linked to the Olympic Ring by rail and by the Avenue Brasil Expressway.

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9 planned venues built primarily for the Pan American Games in 2007 — the National Aquatic Center, Rio Olympic Arena (Basketball) and Barra Velodrome in Barra Olympic Park, the João Havelange Stadium and the National Olympic Training Center for table tennis and taekwondo within the Maracanã Zone, the mountain bike facility at Outeiro Hill, the Flamengo Sports Club/ Brazilian Jockey Club facilities for modern pentathlon, the canoe slalom facility at Rio Water Planet and the Deodoro Shooting Center.


IV. VENUES

12 Olympic Village/IBC/MPC

We aim not just to comfort athletes, but to inspire them.

ATHLETES RESIDENCES. Athletes will be housed in modern, spacious one, two and three-room apartments in highly secure buildings. All bedrooms will be suites, with a maximum of two athletes per suite. A kitchen and living room will be shared by a maximum of six athletes and as few as two. There will be 4,272 apartments and 8,496 suites for 16,992 athletes and delegation members. The residential zone will house a policlinic, restaurants, leisure centers and a conference center. With buildings occupying only 5% of the land at the Olympic Village, 95% of the space remains available for a combination of revitalizing wide-open spaces and state-of-the-science training facilities, such as an athletics track, swimming pools, gymnasiums, bike and jogging paths, and tennis courts. A LIVING LEGACY. The Olympic Village will be financed by public/private partnerships, financed at attractive rates by Federal and Municipal institutions. Once the Games are over, the Olympic Village will become a vital Olympic legacy. We will convert the site into a residential condominium complex.

The apartments, with their extensive leisure facilities and privileged location three kilometers from the beach in one of Rio’s most desirable neighborhoods, will be much in demand on the open market. A TRULY GLOBAL VILLAGE. Because all 2012 Olympic events will be staged within Rio’s city limits, there is no need for additional, remote housing — athletes will be within a few kilometers of the majority of the events. With a single Olympic Village, every athlete and official will have the chance to share in the full Olympic experience, furthering the Olympic ideals of global harmony and community. IBC, MPC. The broadcasting and press centers will be comfortable, centrally located workplaces equipped with all the facilities and amenities broadcasters and journalists need to perform their jobs effectively. The 93,500 square meters International Broadcast Center (IBC) will be located immediately opposite the 50,000 square meters Main Press Center (MPC) both connected by a covered bridge. These facilities will be situated on the Olympic Boulevard, very close to the Olympic and Media Villages and within a few minutes from all Barra Olympic Park facilities. The transportation hub for media constituents will have direct access to the Olympic Boulevard and the Olympic Ring, which will be the primary routes for their dedicated transportation. As for the Olympic Village, the IBC and MPC will be financed via public/private partnerships with the aim of selling the properties as prime commercial space after the Games are completed.

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The Olympic Village in the Barra Zone is designed to give 2012 Olympic athletes the tranquility, convenience and comfort they need to prepare single-mindedly for competition at the highest levels of human endeavor. To that end, we have designed a spacious residential complex nestled in green parklands, comprising some 387,120 square meters. In addition, we will build adjacent to the athlete residences a 210,260 square meter international zone, consisting of a logistics center, commercial center, restaurant and media center.


V. ACCOMMODATION

13 Accommodation

Hotels

The Olympic Family Hotel will be a newly constructed five-star hotel, located on the Barra coastline. The Barra Zone concentrates most of the investments in new hotels, with some 2500 additional rooms already planned for construction. If required, significant capacity exists to provide additional rooms in cruise ships docked in the Rio de Janeiro port area.

MEDIA ACCOMMODATION. Members of the accredited press and broadcast groups will be offered accommodation in two specially constructed Media Villages in the Barra da Tijuca district, comprising a total of 17,152 suites. CONVENTION RATES. Average convention rates in 2003 are as follows: 5 star accommodation 4 star accommodation 3 star accommodation

R$ 450 R$ 240 R$ 180

US$150 US$ 80 US$ 60

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Rio boasts a good supply of quality accommodation in all price ranges throughout the city and its immediate surroundings. Details are outlined in Chart II, located in the appendices to this document.


V. ACCOMMODATION

14 Media Accommodation

A newly constructed, dedicated Media Village.

The Media Village will consist of two villages in close proximity to each other. Media Village One will comprise 19 10-story buildings located on a 134,143 square-meter lot. Media Village Two will sit on a 956,845 square-meter lot, nearly two-thirds of which will be green parkland and other outdoor facilities. Together, the two Villages will offer 17,152 suites in 8,720 apartments, offering 4-star hotel comforts. All apartments will have terraces,

air-conditioning and Internet, along with access to on-site leisure facilities such as restaurant, bar, swimming pools, saunas and health clubs. Arriving journalists and broadcasters will have an easy, 24-minute journey to the facilities from Tom Jobim International Airport via either the Transpan rail link or the Yellow Line expressway. FINANCING AND LEGACY. The Media Villages will be developed and constructed by the private sector, and will be financed at attractive rates by Federal and Municipal institutions such as the National Economic and Social Development Bank (BNDES) and the Federal Savings Bank. After the games the Media Villages will be sold as residential condominiums. Our analysis confirms that there is more than enough demand for new housing in Barra to absorb the supply.

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To accommodate the media, we will construct two new facilities expressly for this purpose in the heart of the Barra district. We chose to construct new facilities because Barra is a new and developing region and hotel accommodation is dispersed. The villages will be centrally located and will give the media easy access to the bulk of the venues, in close proximity. The villages will also be within about three kilometers of the IBC and MPC.


VI. TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

15 Transport Infrastructure

Connecting the venues: The Olympic Ring

The Olympic Ring will optimize connectivity between the major venue zones in the city, and will offer substantial efficiencies for transport operations during the Games, particularly with respect to travel times from the Athletes Village to competition venues. Details of the existing, planned and additional infrastructure are provided in Chart III of the appendices. ROAD IMPROVEMENTS. The Olympic Ring road infrastructure is substantially complete. It consists almost exclusively of freeways and major arterial roads. The only current exception is the Lagoa-Barra expressway linking the Barra and Sugar Loaf areas. However, this four-lane expressway will be getting a major upgrade and by 2007 will be expanded from four lanes to seven, four leading into Barra, three outgoing. Connecting the Barra Zone with the International Airport is the Yellow Line, completed in 1998, a six-lane highway that passes directly in front of the site for the João Havelange Stadium. Also being constructed for the Pan American Games is the T5 bus corridor, running from Barra to the north, and connecting to the northern suburban train line.

UPGRADED RAIL SYSTEMS. Rio de Janeiro’s mass transit system will benefit from a number of important upgrades in anticipation of the 2007 Pan American Games. Indeed, this will be one of the lasting legacies of those Games. The major rail system improvement planned for completion by the 2007 Pan American Games is Phase One of the Transpan surface rail link, which will connect Barra with the north of the city, as far as the International Airport. The underground metro rail system currently services a portion of the Olympic Ring. By 2012, the metro will be extended between the Sugar Loaf and Barra Zones (Line 4). Also for 2012, Phase Two of the Transpan will be complete, connecting the International and Domestic Airports. During the 2012 Games, these two rail links, along with public buses utilizing the Olympic Ring roads, will deliver the spectators and accredited constituents efficiently and in accordance with the projected demands. A LEGACY OF CONNECTIVITY. The development of this transport infrastructure fits perfectly with the city’s long-term growth plans. We will be greatly improving connectivity between Barra and the rest of the city, making the fastest-growing part of the city more accessible to all, and leaving a lasting legacy for Rio.

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At the center of the 2012 Rio Games transport plan is the “Olympic Ring” concept, which will consist of freeways, major arterial roads and a mass transit rail system linking 90% of the competition venues.


VI. TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

16 Airport

A modern, efficient International Airport. A six-lane highway completed in 1998, known as the Yellow Line, connects the Barra Zone with the International Airport. The Santos Dumont Domestic Airport, will also be in use during the Games. A major expansion will increase its capacity from 5.6 million to 8 million passengers annually. As mentioned before, for 2012, Phase Two of the Transpan surface rail link will be complete, connecting the International and Domestic Airports.

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The International Airport for the 2012 Games is the International Airport Gale達o - Tom Jobim. This is a modern, recently expanded airport located on Ilha do Governador in the city of Rio. The airport has a capacity of up to 15 million passengers per year. There are two runways and facilities to serve up to 60 airplanes at the same time. It is 18 kilometers from the center of the city and 31 kilometers from the Barra Olympic Park. In addition to the Transpan train that will link the airport to Barra and downtown Rio, those regions are also connected to the airport by a number of existing bus lines.


VI. TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

17 Transport

– Map B in the appendices

Transport Infrastructure

EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE: In relation to the current transport plan, the following key infrastructure exists: • Yellow Line – 6 lane Expressway that forms the west and north sections of the Olympic Ring, linking Barra to the International Airport and Olympic Village, beside the João Havelange Stadium. • Red Line – 6 lane Expressway that links with the Yellow Line and forms a section of the eastern part of the Olympic Ring • Avenue das Américas – 12 lane major arterial road which forms the southern section of the Olympic Ring in the Barra Zone. • Avenue Ayrton Senna – 12 lane major arterial road which forms the south-west section of the Olympic Ring, connecting the Yellow Line with Avenue das Américas. • Lagoa-Barra Expressway – Forms a south section of the Olympic Ring, linking Barra to the Sugar Loaf Zone. • Rebouças Tunnel / Paulo de Frontin Elevated Way 4-6 lane major arterial road which links the Sugar Loaf Zone to the Red Line. • Avenue Abelardo Bueno – Forms the main part of the Olympic Boulevard, from the Yellow Line to Barra Olympic Park, RioCentro and the Olympic Village. • Avenue Salvador Allende – Forms the south-western section of the Olympic Boulevard, and links the Olympic Village and RioCentro to the Avenue das Américas. • Metro Line 1 (Siqueira Campos - Saens Peña) – 17 stations, connects the south and north of the city, passing through downtown to access the Sugar Loaf Zone. • Metro Line 2 (Estácio – Pavuna) - 16 stations, connects the north of the city to downtown, access to Maracanã Stadium.

• Deodoro Heavy Rail Line – Heavy rail connecting downtown to the north of the city, providing access to João Havelange and Maracanã Stadiums. • Santa Cruz Heavy Rail Line – links downtown to Maracanã Stadium and Deodoro Zone venues. PLANNED INFRASTRUCTURE: The following infrastructure is currently planned for completion prior to 2012, and will directly benefit the Olympic Plan • Metro Line 4 (Botafogo - Barra da Tijuca) – will connect Barra da Tijuca to Sugar Loaf Zone and downtown, linking with Metro Line 1. • Transformation of Heavy Rail to Surface Metro – upgrade of existing rail system. • T5 Bus Corridor – implementation of an eco-bus (operated by natural gas) system between Barra and the north of the city, with a dedicated corridor. • Surface Rail Link Transpan (1 st stage: Barra da Tijuca International Airport; 2 nd stage: International Airport – Domestic Airport) – extension of the Transpan to link both airports and downtown. ADDITIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE: If Rio is selected to host the 2012 Olympic Games, the following additional infrastructure will be developed, ensuring a complete transport solution for both public and accredited constituents. • Transpan Extension – Extension of the Transpan into Olympic Boulevard to service Barra Olympic Park and adjacent venues. • T5 Bus Corridor Extension – Extension of the T5 Corridor to access Barra Olympic Park and adjacent venues. • Metro Line 4 Extension – Extension of Metro Line 4 to link with the Transpan and Barra venues.

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The existing, planned and additional transport infrastructure for Rio is indicated on Map B, found in the appendices. The majority of planned and additional infrastructure is located on the Olympic Ring.


VI. TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

18 Transport Challenges

More centralized Games, fewer transportation challenges. venues will be in use, with a Games population base of 8,000 athletes and officials and 3,000 accredited media

• All athletes and officials will be housed in a single

HIGH DENSITY IN BARRA. The strength of our Barra clustering concept also presents some challenges. However, early analysis by the City transport and venue planners confirms that the transport infrastructure and the physical layout of the site will be capable of handling the initial demand projections for peak sessions.

village in the heart of Barra da Tijuca, in immediate proximity to more than 50% of sports. • The accredited media group will be housed in two adjacent villages, also in the Barra Zone, and within three minutes of the International Broadcast Center and Main Press Center. • The Olympic Ring will link 90% of the competition venues. • We will employ a strategic, staged approach to the significant upgrade of road and mass transit infrastructure on the Olympic Ring and other major Olympic routes. • We will have a valuable opportunity to test the system during the 2007 Pan American Games, during which event more than 20 of the 31 Olympic competition

HIGH CAPACITY TRANSPORT TO THE BARRA ZONE. The major current challenge to the proposed Olympic plan is a shortage of high-capacity transport serving Barra da Tijuca, both in terms of road and mass transit infrastructure. As detailed above, the capacity of the Expressway connecting Barra and the Sugar Loaf area is to be expanded significantly (from four lanes to seven) by 2007. In terms of mass transit, this will be addressed by the construction of the Transpan surface rail link between Barra, the two principal airports, and the city center and by the addition of the new metro line — Line 4 — which will run between Barra and Line 1 in the Sugar Loaf Zone.

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It is always a challenge to provide reliable, timely transport to the significant number of discrete Olympic constituent populations within acceptable service standard. But for Rio this challenge is significantly lessened, because of the geographic concentration of the venues and the Olympic Ring transportation concept:


VI. TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

19 Travel Distances

More than 50% of sports within a five-kilometer radius. MAXIMUM TRAVEL TIMES OF 35 MINUTES. For 15 of the 31 competition venues, travel times are less than 5 minutes from the Olympic Village. 29 venues are within 30 minutes of the Olympic Village. All the competition venues are within 35 minutes of the village. Chart IV, located in the appendices, provides distances and journey times for all venues.

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The Barra Zone will house more than 50% of the sports, all within five minutes of the Olympic Village. Similarly, accredited media will also be housed in villages in the Barra Zone, around three minutes from the International Broadcast Center and the Main Press Center. Most of the venues outside the Barra Zone are connected via excellent road and mass transit infrastructure on the Olympic Ring.


VII. GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

20 Dates of the Games

A beautiful winter for the Summer Games. the low 70s, and the skies are the clearest of the year. Traditionally part of our low season for tourism, July is in fact an ideal time of year to savor all that the “Wonderful City” has to offer. The beaches, parks, lagoons and mountains are full of life and color, and the nightlife is vibrant. The month of July coincides with the school holiday period in Brazil and the road traffic is the lightest of the year. This will present a wonderful opportunity for the young people of Rio to participate in the Games — whether attending the events, volunteering, or simply sharing the Olympic spirit.

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We propose holding the Games in July, 2012, with the opening ceremonies on Friday, July 13, and the closing ceremonies on Sunday, July 29. If it is mandatory, we can postpone the commencement of the Games in one week. The month of July in Rio falls in the southern hemisphere’s winter. But winter in Rio is anything but wintry. In our balmy tropical climate, July is more like late spring or early summer in a temperate climate. And it is absolutely perfect for the practice of sports. Warm days, averaging around 24°C, combine with cool, 19°C nights. There is little rainfall, the relative humidity is in


VII. GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

21 Population

Diversity and harmony. Population growth is slowing more markedly in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Rio had 5,970,000 residents in 2003, and the National School of Statistics Science of IBGE projects that the population by 2012 will be just over six million people. While all Olympic events will be held within the city of Rio, the potential Olympic audience is much larger than the city itself. In 2003, the greater metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro had a population of 11,1 million, and it is estimated that this population will increase to 12 million by 2012.

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Brazil is famously a country with a broad and vibrant mix of races and cultures — principally African, indigenous and white European. In addition, Brazil also has large communities of Asian and Middle-Eastern backgrounds, including the largest Japanese community outside of Japan. We believe deeply in diversity and tolerance, and we believe these values are in perfect harmony with the Olympic ideals. According to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), there were an estimated 177,7 million Brazilians as of November 2003. The trend in Brazil is of continued population growth, but at a much slower rate than during the rapid expansion of the 1960’s and 70’s. The IBGE predicts the Brazilian population could be as high as 194,5 million by 2012.


VII. GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

22 Metereology – Chart V

Warm days. Mild nights. We look forward to introducing the world to the Rio de Janeiro winter. Warm days and cool nights offer ideal conditions for holding competitions and for enjoying Rio’s outdoors lifestyle.

TEMPERATURE (OC)

Full details on temperature, humidity, wind direction and precipitation are found in Chart V below:

HUMIDITY (%)

WIND DIRECTION GENERAL TENDENCIES

MÍN.

MAX.

AVERAGE

MÍN.

MAX.

AVERAGE

DIRECTION (O)

STRENTH (KM/H)

09:00

15,0

28,4

21,9

52

98

77

360

11,1

12:00

15,2

32,2

24,6

38

95

65

160

14,8

15:00

14,8

34,8

24,8

30

93

67

160

18,5

18:00

14,4

33,2

23,4

37

95

73

200

16,7

21:00

14,8

31,0

22,3

45

95

78

190

13,0

PRECIPITATION

NUMBER OF DAYS

ALTITUDE IN METRES

YEAR

ANNUALLY

PERIOD OF GAMES

2003

129

4

2002

123

4

2001

114

3

2000

114

4

1999

151

2

1998

172

3

1997

144

3

1996

171

7

1995

144

1

1994

146

2

Average

142

3

City

Possible other sites where significant differences exist

Rio de Janeiro

2,0

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Weather Station at the International Airport of Rio de Janeiro INMET / Pereira Passos Institute - Period: from 1994 to 2003 – July


VII. GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

23 Environment

Nature’s Games.

URBAN CHALLENGES. But Rio is also a densely populated urban habitat facing a number of environmental challenges. Most of these stem from the irregular occupation of the city’s hillsides, whose sanitary conditions and waste disposal are progressively being brought up to standard. That notwithstanding, the majority of the city’s oceanic beaches offer good bathing conditions year round, including Copacabana, Ipanema and Barra da Tijuca. The city’s air quality generally oscillates between good and regular. Of the dozens of major environmental efforts currently under way, three stand out: FAVELA-BAIRRO PROGRAM. This is a comprehensive effort to turn the hillside squatter slums (favelas) into bona fide neighborhoods (bairros), particularly to bring proper sanitation and drainage to these needy areas. The program has been run by the City since 1994, with financing from the International Development Bank. Spending to date totals some US$600 million. REGENERATION OF GUANABARA BAY. Over the years the quality of the water in this picturesque bay has deteriorated. Stage one of a current major regeneration program seeks to achieve three important goals: a large section of the city will receive sewage systems where none existed previously; sixteen municipal districts in Rio’s metropolitan area will receive basic sanitation services; and a large new sewage treatment

center will be completed. This is a State-run effort, financed by the International Development Bank and the Japanese Bank for International Cooperation. BARRA RENEWAL. In Barra da Tijuca, the State government is building 286 kilometers of sewage collection systems, a treatment station and an underwater emissary. Also in Barra, the City of Rio will be implementing a 5-year, US$266-million program aimed at regenerating the lagoons, including macro drainage, reforestation, family relocation and environmental education. The bulk of the renewal program will be complete for the 2007 Pan American Games, but will continue after that time. Financing comes from the Japanese Bank for International Cooperation. A GREEN LEGACY. The 2012 Games will be a great stimulus to Rio’s environmental program, spurring or accelerating environmental initiatives such as regeneration programs, air quality enhancement programs, the promotion of use of environmentally friendly technologies in Olympic construction, and public education programs on topics such as recycling. GAMES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT. Preliminary environmental impact surveys conducted to date on proposed venues and Olympic plans provide comfort that no major environmental impediments exist to the proposed concepts. Importantly though, the City is bound by strict legislation requiring full impact studies to be conducted before building permits are granted. Environmentally Sustainable Design (ESD) principles will be implemented in all design and construction projects associated with the Rio 2007 Pan American and 2012 Olympic Games.

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Rio de Janeiro is a city blessed with extraordinary beauty, a stunning natural backdrop for the 2012 Olympic Games. There are 30 kilometers of ocean beachfront, Tijuca National Park, the largest urban park in the world, Guanabara Bay and extensive wetlands.


VII. GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

24 Experience

A city of passion, a world of experience.

Rio has hosted innumerable international championships, of which the following stand out: International Championships EVENTS FIFA World Club Championships FINA Swimming World Cup FINA Short Course Swimming World Championships FINA Water Polo World League FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour

YEAR 2000 2002/2001/2000 1995 2001 2003/2000/1999/98/ 97/96/95/94/93 FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships 2003 FIVB Volleyball World League 1999/98/97/96/95/94/93 Formula Mundial (Indy) 2000/1999/98/97/96 IAAF Athletics Grand Prix 2001/2000/1999/98/97/ 96/95 ITF Davis Cup 2002/2001/2000 ITTF Table Tennis World Cup 2000 ITU Triathlon World Cup 2003/2000 Motor Bike World Championships 2003/2002/2001/00/99 Rio de Janeiro Bycicle Tour 2003 / 2002 Rio International Half Marathon 2003/2002/2001/2000/ 1999/98/97 VII South American Games 2002

Rio has also hosted other major events, such as: XII ANOC General Assembly & IOC Executive Board Meeting I Summit Meeting of Latin America, The Caribbean and the European Union* III World Conference on Environment and Sports IV World Olympic Fair

2000 1999 1999 1998

As part of its strategy to be Brazil’s center for large-scale events, Rio has already been selected to host a number of important sporting events in the next few years. Several stand out. In particular, the XV Pan American Games will be staged in 2007 with all the sports on the Olympic programme scheduled. More than 20 venues proposed for Olympic use will be used in 2007. FIBA XV Women Basketball World Championships UIPM Modern Pentathlon World Championships XV Pan American Games Para-Pan American Games IJF Judo World Championships ICF Canoeing Slalom World Championships

2006 2006 2007 2007 2007 2007

For the Pan American and Para-Pan American Games, the Organizing Committee of the Games has hired a number of specialists with considerable experience in disciplines such as planning, stadium design and construction, security, transportation and environment. Rio has also successfully produced a great many major cultural events: • International music festivals, including Rock in Rio in Barra da Tijuca, with 1.2 million spectators (350 thousand per day); • The annual Samba School parade during Carnaval, which attracts some 60,000 spectators per day, including many foreign tourists. • New Year’s Eve on Copacabana Beach, which draws 2 million people a year.

* 48 Heads of State and 7.000 accredited participants.

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Rio de Janeiro has proven experience in hosting large-scale, world-class sports and cultural events. The people of Rio are passionate in their appreciation of sports, festive and peaceful spectators who always demonstrate great civic pride.


VII. GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

25 Security

A clear chain of command.

The Olympic Security Command will be staffed by personnel from Federal, State and Municipal law enforcement, security and intelligence agencies, and from the Brazilian Armed Forces. A WEALTH OF SECURITY RESOURCES. The full resources of Brazil’s law enforcement, intelligence, security, armed forces and emergency response agencies will be mobilized in support of the Olympic security operation. Most Olympic security personnel will come from the following public sector agencies: Federal Government of Brazil: Armed Forces - Army, Navy and Air force Federal Police Federal Highway Police Brazilian Intelligence Agency State of Rio de Janeiro: Military Police Civil Police Military Fire Brigade Civil Defense Services

Municipality of Rio de Janeiro: Municipal Guard CET-RIO (Traffic Engineering) Civil Defense

Specially trained private security companies may be contracted to provide security support to law enforcement personnel. Advanced technology will be in place to support the command and control structure for the security

operation of the Games and will include fully integrated, secure communications and information networks. The Security Command and Control Center, Intelligence Center, venue command centers and specialist support units will be linked to this secure communications and information network. Advanced protective security technologies will also be used to support the Olympic security operation, including closed circuit television (CCTV), access control and alarms. Technologies used to support Olympic security will be selected on the basis of suitability to task, reliability of service and capacity for seamless integration. In addition to securing Olympic and non-Olympic venues, security will also focus on points of entry, such as airports, seaports and border crossings. A SINGLE MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE. Brazil’s constitutional and legislative arrangements enable the creation of an effective single management structure, which will be established to secure the Olympic Games. This model has been successfully utilized in Brazil on various occasions, including during the 1992 United Nations World Environment Conference attended by close to two hundred countries and more than one hundred Heads of State. This will also be the structure adopted during the 2007 Pan American Games. FULL SUPPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT. All three levels of Brazilian Government (Federal, State and Municipal) have declared their willingness to implement new laws, if necessary, in order to achieve an effective security structure appropriate to the special circumstances and needs of the Olympic Games. We recognize that this new investment in security will be one of the Games’ most important legacies.

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Ultimate responsibility for Olympic Games security will rest with the Federal Government. Accordingly, the Federal Government will appoint a Commander of Olympic Security, who will have complete operational responsibility for the security of the Games. This appointee will lead a fully integrated independent command whose sole purpose will be to work with the Rio OCOG and other Olympic entities to ensure the safety and security of the Olympic Games.


SOMMA IRE • TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 2 3

INTRODUCTI O N : M O T I VAT I O N , C O N C E P T E T O P I N I O N P U B L I Q U E

PA G E S

INTRODUCTI O N : M O T I VAT I O N , C O N C E P T & P U B L I C O P I N I O N

PA G E S

Introduction • Introduction ............................................................................................................... 02 - 03 Concept • Concept ........................................................................................................................... 04 - 05 Opinion Publique • Public Opinion ....................................................................................................... 06 - 07

SOUTIEN POL I T I Q U E POLIT ICAL S U P P O RT 4 5 6

Soutien du Gouvernement • Government Support..................................................................................... 08 - 09 Futur Comité de Candidature • Future Candidature Committee ................................................................ 10 - 11 Aspects Juridiques • Legal Aspects ....................................................................................................... 12 - 13 F INANCEME N T F INANCE

7 8 9

Budget de Candidature • Candidature Budget ................................................................................... 14 - 15 Budget des Jeux & Contributions du Gouvernement • Games Budget & Government Contribution .............. 16 - 17 Potentiel de réalisation de recettes du COJO • OCOG Revenue Generating Potential .................................. 18 - 19 SIT ES VENUES

10 11 12

Sites de Compétition • Competition Venues .......................................................................................... 20 - 21 Carte – Sites • Map – Venues ............................................................................................................... 22 - 23 Village Olympique/CIRTV/CPP • Olympic Village/IBC/MPC ....................................................................... 24 - 25 HÉBERGEM E N T ACCOMMOD AT I O N

13 14

Hébergement • Accommodation ........................................................................................................ 26 - 27 Hébergement des Médias • Media Accommodation ................................................................................ 28 - 29 INFRAST RUC T U R E D E T R A N S P O RT T RANSPORT I N F R A S T R U C T U R E

15 16 17 18 19

Infraestructure de Transport • Transport Infraestructure......................................................................... 30 - 31 Aéroport • Airport ............................................................................................................................ 32 - 33 Transport • Transport ...................................................................................................................... 34 - 35 Défis des Transports • Transport Challenges ......................................................................................... 36 - 37 Trajets • Travel Distances .................................................................................................................... 38 - 39 CONDITIONS G É N É R A L E S , L O G I S T I Q U E E T E X P É R I E N C E GENERAL CO N D I T I O N S , L O G I S T I C S A N D E X P E R I E N C E

20 21 22 23 24 25

Dates des Jeux • Dates of the Games ...................................................................................................... 40 - 41 Population • Population ........................................................................................................................ 42 - 43 Météorologie - Tableau V • Meteorology - Chart V ....................................................................................44 - 45 Environnement • Environment ........................................................................................................... 46 - 47 Expérience • Experience .................................................................................................................... 48 - 49 Sécurité • Security ............................................................................................................................ 50 - 51 ANNEXES APPENDICE S

Carte A • Map A ............................................................................................................................... 52 - 53 Carte B • Map B ................................................................................................................................. 54 - 55 Tableau I • Chart I .............................................................................................................................. 56 - 57 Tableau II • Chart II ............................................................................................................................. 58 - 59 Tableau III • Chart III ........................................................................................................................... 60 - 61 Tableau IV • Chart IV ................. ......................................................................................................... 62 - 63 Tableau V • Chart V ............................................................................................................................ 44 - 45


CHART I Existing, planned and additional sports venues

CONSTRUCTION/UPGRADE SPORTS/EVENTS

TOTAL SPECTATOR CAPACITY

CONSTRUCTION DATE

DATE OF UPGRADE (IF APPLICABLE)

PERMANENT OR TEMPORARY WORKS

ESTIMATED COST OF UPGRADE (IF NOT YET COMPLETED) IN USD MILLIONS 2003

SOURCE OF FINANCING (PUBLIC/PRIVATE/JOINT)

RioCentro Convention Center Pavilion 2

Badminton, Fencing

5,000 / 3,000

1977

Q1 ‘12

Temporary Works

$5.0

OCOG

RioCentro Convention Center Pavilion 3

Boxing

6,000

1977

Q1 ‘12

Temporary Works

$5.1

OCOG

RioCentro Convention Center Pavilion 4

Handball, Judo, Wrestling

8,000 / 6,000 / 6,000

1977

Q1 ‘12

Temporary Works

$6.0

OCOG

RioCentro Convention Center Pavilion 5

Weightlifting

5,000

1977

Q1 ‘12

Temporary Works

$3.3

OCOG

1979

Q4 ‘10 Q3 ‘11

Permanent Works Temporary Works

$10.0 $5.0

City OCOG

SPORT PRECINCTS/VENUES

EXISTING

BARRA ZONE

SUGAR LOAF ZONE

Glória Marina

Sailing Rowing, Canoe - Sprint

15,000

1953

Q2 ‘07 Q1 ‘12

Permanent Works Temporary Works

$9.8 $3.9

State OCOG

Water Polo

5,000

1978

Q4 ‘06, Q3 ‘11 .Q1 ‘12

Permanent Works Temporary Works

$3.3 $1.7

State OCOG

Volleyball

13,500

1953

Q3 ‘05 Q1 ‘12

Permanent Works Temporary Works

$6,0 $2.9

State OCOG

Maracanã Football Stadium

Football

100,000

1950 refurb. 1999

Q4 ‘06, Q4 ‘10, Q1 ‘12

Permanent Works Temporary Works

$50.0 $5.0

State OCOG

São Januário Football Stadium

Football

30,000

1927 refurb. 1992

Q2 ‘11 Q1 ‘12

Permanent Works Temporary Works

$10.0 $5.0

City OCOG

Equestrian

15,000

1888 refurb. 1964

Q4 ‘06 Q1 ‘12

Permanent Works Temporary Works

$10.0 $5.0

Federal OCOG

Football

20,000

1904 refurb. 1948

Q2 ‘11 Q1 ‘12

Permanent Works Temporary Works

$10.0 $5.0

City OCOG

SPORTS/EVENTS

TOTAL SPECTATOR CAPACITY

START

END

ESTIMATED COST IN USD 2003 MILLIONS

PERMANENT OR TEMPORARY VENUE

Lagoa Rowing Center MARACANÃ ZONE

Julio Delamare Aquatic Center Maracanazinho Arena

DEODORO ZONE

Deodoro Equestrian Center Moça Bonita Football Stadium

CONSTRUCTION SPORT PRECINCTS/VENUES

SOURCE OF FINANCING (PUBLIC/PRIVATE/JOINT)

BARRA ZONE

Swimming, Diving, Synchronised Swimming

15,000 / 5,000

Q2 ‘05, Q3 ‘11

Q1 ‘07 Q1 ‘12

$27.0 $13.5

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City & Private Developer OCOG

Rio Olympic Arena

Basketball

15,000

Q4 ‘04 Q3 ‘11

Q3 ‘06 Q1 ‘12

$31.9 $5.6

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City & Private Developer OCOG

Barra Velodrome

Cycling - Track

5,000

Q4 ‘04 Q3 ‘11

Q3 ‘06 Q1 ‘12

$10.3 $4.2

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City & Private Developer OCOG

Outeiro Hill

Mountain Bike

3,000

Q1 ‘11

Q2 ‘11

$2.4

Temporary Works

OCOG

Canoe-Slalom

8,000

Q2 ‘05 Q3 ‘11

Q4 ‘06 Q1 ‘12

$5.3 $2.7

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City & Private Developer OCOG

Modern Pentathlon

Shooting/Fencing: 3,000, Swimming: 3,000, Equestrian/ Race: 3,000

Q2 ‘05 Q3 ‘11

Q4 ‘06, Q2‘11, Q1‘12

$10.00 $3.0

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City & Private Developer OCOG

Joao Havelange Stadium

Football

45,000

Q4 ‘03 Q3 ‘11

Q3 ‘05 Q1 ‘12

$60.0 $5.0

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City OCOG

National Olympic Training Center

Table Tennis, Taekwondo

5,000

Q4 ‘05 Q3 ‘11

Q1 ‘07 Q1 ‘12

$15.0 $4.0

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City OCOG

Shooting

3,000

Q2 ‘05 Q3 ‘11

Q4 ‘06 Q1 ‘12

$9.0 $3.0

Permanent Works Temporary Works

Federal OCOG

Olympic Stadium

Opening & Closing Ceremonies, Athletics

80,000

Q2 ‘09 Q2 ‘11

Q2 ‘11 Q4 ‘11

$149.3 $74.7

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City & Private Developer OCOG

RioCentro Convention Center Pavilion 6

Gymnastics Artistics, Rhythmic, Trampoline

17,000 / 5,000 / 5,000

Q4 ‘09 Q3 ‘11

Q2 ‘11 Q1 ‘12

$20.0 $7.5

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City OCOG

National Tennis Center

Tennis

10,000 / 5,000 / 3,000

Q1 ‘10 Q3 ‘11

Q2 ‘11 Q1 ‘12

$13.3 $6.7

Permanent Works Temporary Works

City & Private Developer OCOG

Barra Baseball Stadium

Baseball

8,000

Q1 ‘11

Q4 ‘11

$10.0

Temporary Works

OCOG

Barra Softball Stadium

Softball

8,000

Q1 ‘11

Q4 ‘11

$8.0

Temporary Works

OCOG

Field Hockey

8,000 / 5,000

Q1 ‘11

Q4 ‘11

$11.0

Temporary Works

OCOG

Beach Volleyball

12,000

Q1‘11

Q4‘11

$7.2

Temporary Works

OCOG

PLANNED

National Aquatic Center

Rio Water Planet SUGAR LOAF ZONE

Flamengo Sports Club Brazilian Jockey Club

MARACANÃ ZONE

DEODORO ZONE

Deodoro Shooting Center

Barra Hockey Center SUGAR LOAF ZONE

Copacabana Beach Volleyball Stadium Copacabana Beach Flamengo Park Brazilian Jockey Club

Triathlon

5,000

Q4‘11

Q1‘12

$3.3

Temporary Works

OCOG

Cycling - Road

3,000

Q4‘11

Q1‘12

$1.2

Temporary Works

OCOG

Archery

4,000

Q2‘11

Q4‘11

$2.6

Temporary Works

OCOG

57

R I O 2 012

ADDITIONAL

BARRA ZONE


CHART II Accomodation

A. Existing Accomodation:

CLASS

WITHIN A RADIUS OF 10 KM OF THE OLYMPIC VILLAGE

WITHIN A RADIUS OF 11-50 KM OF THEOLYMPIC VILLAGE

TOTAL

NUMBER OF HOTELS

NUMBER OF ROOMS

NUMBER OF HOTELS

NUMBER OF ROOMS

NUMBER OF HOTELS

NUMBER OF ROOMS

4 + 5 STAR HOTELS

14

2,512

59

9,484

73

11,996

3 STAR HOTELS

14

791

91

6,327

105

7,118

2 STAR HOTELS

-

-

83

2,632

83

2,632

1 STAR HOTELS

1

72

13

517

14

589

OTHERS:

-

-

-

-

-

-

MILITARY VILLAGE

-

-

6

278

-

278

CRUISE SHIPS

-

-

5

3,500

5

3,500

HOSTELS / BED & BREAKFAST (BEDS)

-

-

55

478

45

65

MOTELS

8

379

16

769

24

1,148

TOTALS

37

3,754

328

23,985

349

27,326

B. Planned Accomodation: WITHIN A RADIUS OF 10 KM OF THE OLYMPIC VILLAGE

WITHIN A RADIUS OF 11-50 KM OF THEOLYMPIC VILLAGE

TOTAL

NUMBER OF HOTELS

NUMBER OF ROOMS

NUMBER OF HOTELS

NUMBER OF ROOMS

NUMBER OF HOTELS

NUMBER OF ROOMS

4 + 5 STAR HOTELS

4

2,353

59

449

6

2,002

3 STAR HOTELS

1

144

91

1,064

7

1,200

2 STAR HOTELS

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 STAR HOTELS

1

-

-

-

-

-

OTHERS:

-

-

-

-

-

-

MILITARY VILLAGE

-

-

-

-

-

-

CRUISE SHIPS

-

-

5

3,500

5

3,500

HOSTELS / BED & BREAKFAST (BEDS)

-

-

-

-

-

-

MOTELS

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTALS

5

2,497

13

5,013

10

7,510

59

R I O 2 012

CLASS


CHART III Transport Infrastructure

LENGTH (KM) + CAPACITY (Nº of Traffic Lanes or Tracks)

FROM CITY BOUNDARY TO OUTLYING VENUES

CONSTRUCTION DATE

DATE OF UPGRADE

COST OF UPGRADE (IF NOT YET COMPLETED) IN USD 2003

Red Line – 6 line Expressway that links with the Yellow Line and forms a section of the eastern part of the Olympic Ring.

17 km 6 lanes

not applicable

1992

-

-

-

Yellow Line – 6 lane Expressway that forms the west and north sections of the Olympic Ring, linking Barra to the International Airport and Olympic Village, beside the João Havelange Stadium.

17 km 6 lanes

not applicable

1998

-

-

-

Avenue das Américas – 12 lane major arterial road which forms the southern section of the Olympic Ring in the Barra region.

18 km 12 lanes

not applicable

2001

-

-

-

Avenue Ayrton Senna – 12 lane major arterial road which forms the south-west section of the Olympic Ring, connecting the Yellow Line with Americas Avenue.

6 km 12 lanes

not applicable

1998

-

-

-

Avenue Brasil – Highway which is a part of BR-101and is connected to BR-116 and BR-040, and is an alternative to using the Red Line. It connects Douwtown to the Deodoro Zone.

55 km 14 lanes

not applicable

1996

in progress until 2005

US$ 76 million

57% City Government 43% Federal Government

Lagoa-Barra Expressway – Forms a south section of the Olympic Ring, linking Barra to the Sugar Loaf area.

14 km 4 lanes

not applicable

1982

2007

U$ 222 million

100% City Government

Rebouças Tunnel / Paulo de Frontin Elevated Way – 4-6 lane major arterial road which links the Sugar Loaf area to the Red Line.

6 km 4 lanes

not applicable

1973

-

-

-

Avenue Salvador Allende – Forms the south-western section of the Olympic Boulevard, and links the Olympic Village and RioCentro to the Americas Avenue.

7 km 4 lanes

not applicable

1992

-

-

-

Avenue Abelardo Bueno – Forms the main part of the Olympic Boulevard, from the Yellow Line to Barra Olympic Park, RioCentro and the Olympic Village.

4 km 10 lanes

not applicable

1992

in progress until 2004

US$ 4 millions

64% City Gorvernment 36% Private

Metro Line 1 (Siqueira Campos - Saens Peña) – 17 stations, connects the south and north of the city, passing through downtown to access the Sugar Loaf Zone.

13 km 2 ways

not applicable

1998/2003

-

-

-

Metro Line 2 (Estácio – Pavuna) - 16 stations, connects the north of the city to downtown, access to Maracanã Stadium.

22 km 2 ways

not applicable

1998

-

-

-

Deodoro Heavy Rail – Heavy rail connecting downtown to the north of the city, providing access to João Havelange and Maracanã Stadiums.

22 km 4 ways

not applicable

1970

in progress until 2007

US$ 86 million

54 km 4 ways

not applicable

1970

in progress until 2008

US$ 72 million

1970

in progress until 2009

US$ 58 million US$ 43 million US$ 29 million

Japeri Heavy Rail Line - Connects Rio’s Downtown section to part of the city’s metropolitan area.

61 km 2 ways

Belford Roxo Heavy Rail Line - Connects Rio’s Downtown Zone to part of the city’s metropolitan area.

33 km 2 ways

not applicable

1970

in progress until 2010

Saracuruna Heavy Rail Line - Connects Rio’s Downtown Section to part of the city’s metropolitan area..

35 km 2 ways

not applicable

1970

in progress until 2011

TYPE OF TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE (Motorwais, Major Urban Arterial Network, Suburban Rail, Subway, Light Rail Public Transport Systems)

PLANNED

SOURCE OF FINANCING (Public/Private/Joint)

WITHIN CITY BOUNDARY

Santa Cruz Heavy Rail Line – links downtown to Maracanã Stadium and Deodoro Zone venues.

not applicable

LENGTH (KM) + CAPACITY (Nº of Traffic Lanes or Tracks)

43% BIRD 31% State 21% Private 6% Federal Government

CONSTRUCTION SOURCE OF FINANCING (Public/Private/Joint)

WITHIN CITY BOUNDARY

FROM CITY BOUNDARY TO OUTLYING VENUES

START

END

COST IN USD 2003

Metro Line 4 (Botafogo - Barra da Tijuca) – will connect Barra da Tijuca to Sugar Loaf Zone and downtown, linking with Line 1.

16 km 2 ways

not applicable

2006

2009

US$ 760 million

45% State 55% Private

Transformation of Heavy Rail to Surface Metro – upgrade of existing rail system.

227 km 2 ways

not applicable

2005

2011

US$ 768 million

66% Federal 28% State 6% Private

T5 Bus Corridor – implementation of a eco-bus (operated by natural gas) system between Barra and the north of the city, with a dedicated corridor.

24 km 2 ways

not applicable

2005

2007

US$ 104 million

70% City Government 30% Private

41 km 2 ways

not applicable

2005

2007 (1st Phase) 2011 (2nd Phase)

US$ 1.2 billion

70% City Government 30% Private

Transpan Surface Rail Link (1st stage: Barra da Tijuca - International Airport; 2 nd stage: International Airport – Domestic Airport) – extension of the Transpan to link both airports and downtown.

TYPE OF TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE (Motorwais, Major Urban Arterial Network, Suburban Rail, Subway, Light Rail Public Transport Systems)

ADDITIONAL

CONSTRUCTION / UPGRADE

LENGTH (KM) + CAPACITY (Nº of Traffic Lanes or Tracks)

CONSTRUCTION SOURCE OF FINANCING (Public/Private/Joint)

WITHIN CITY BOUNDARY

FROM CITY BOUNDARY TO OUTLYING VENUES

START

END

COST IN USD 2003

Transpan Extension – Extension of the Transpan into Olympic Boulevard to service Barra Olympic Park and adjacent venues.

6 km 2 ways

not applicable

2009

2011

US$120 million

70% City Hall 30% Private

T5 Bus Corridor Extension – Extension of the T5 Corridor to access Barra Olympic Park and adjacent venues.

10 km 2 ways

not applicable

2008

2010

US$ 40 million

70% City Hall 30% Private

Metro Line 4 Extension – Extension of Metro Line 4 to link with the Transpan and Barra venues.

6 km 2 ways

not applicable

2009

2011

US$140 million

45% State 55% Private

17 nautical miles. 2 ways

not applicable

2008

2010

US$ 80 million

100% Private

Maritime Connection Praça XV – Barra da Tijuca - Maritime Connection from Barra da Tijuca to Rio’s Downtown Section.

61

R I O 2 012

EXISTING

TYPE OF TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE (Motorwais, Major Urban Arterial Network, Suburban Rail, Subway, Light Rail Public Transport Systems)


CHART IV Transport

ATHLETE ACCOMMODATION

MAIN HOTEL AREAS

DISTANCES(Km) AND JOURNEY TIMES(min) BY BUS IN 2003

LOCATION

GATEWAY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

km

min

km

min

km

min

km

min

km

min

km

min

km

min

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Ilha do Governador

-

-

33

27

24

20

34

29

31

25

30

24

28

21

HOTELS - BARRA ZONE

Barra da Tijuca

33

27

-

-

22

19

10

8

7

6

5

4

6

5

HOTELS SUGARLOAF ZONE

Copacabana

24

20

22

19

-

-

25

23

22

19

19

16

20

17

OLYMPIC VILLAGE

Barra da Tijuca

34

29

10

8

25

23

-

-

3

4

9

11

5

6

OLYMPIC STADIUM

Barra Olympic Park

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

MEDIA ACCOMMODATION

Barra da Tijuca

30

24

5

4

19

16

9

11

5

6

-

-

4

5

MPC/IBC

Barra da Tijuca

28

21

6

5

20

17

5

6

3

3

4

5

-

-

ATHLETICS

Barra Olympic Park

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

ROWING

Lagoa Rowing Center

21

18

18

21

4

5

26

24

23

20

20

19

21

20

BADMINTON

RioCentro

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

BASEBALL

Barra Olympic Park

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

BASKETBALL

Barra Olympic Park

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

BOXING

RioCentro

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

CANOE/KAYAK – SLALOM

Rio Water Planet

42

38

20

24

34

34

10

12

11

13

18

22

15

18

OLYMPIC STADIUM BARRA ZONE

SUGARLOAF ZONE

MPC IBC

MEDIA VILLAGE

OLYMPIC VILLAGE

CANOE/KAYAK

Lagoa Rowing Center

21

18

18

21

4

5

26

24

23

20

20

19

21

20

CYCLING – TRACK

Barra Olympic Park

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

CYCLING – ROAD

Flamengo Park

20

15

39

32

10

10

39

34

34

26

39

32

36

28

MOUNTAIN BIKE

Outeiro Hill

32

26

8

10

23

21

2

3

5

7

6

8

3

4

EQUESTRIAN

Deodoro

28

23

27

33

40

33

20

24

33

27

24

29

21

26

FENCING

FOOTBALL

RioCentro

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

Maracanã Stadium

16

13

34

28

11

11

35

29

32

25

30

23

31

25

Joao Havelange Stadium

18

14

18

16

27

22

19

17

16

13

16

14

14

11

São Januário Stadium

12

10

27

23

13

13

28

24

25

20

25

21

23

18

Moça Bonita Stadium

39

31

29

35

51

42

22

27

52

44

27

33

24

29

GYMNASTICS

RioCentro

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

WEIGHTLIFTING

RioCentro

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

HANDBALL

RioCentro

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

HOCKEY

Barra Olympic Park

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

JUDO

RioCentro

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

WRESTLING

RioCentro

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

SWIMMING

Barra Olympic Park

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

WATER POLO

Júlio Delamare Aquatic Park

16

13

34

28

11

11

35

29

32

25

30

23

31

25

Brazilian Jockey Club

21

18

18

21

4

5

26

24

23

20

20

19

21

20

Flamengo Sports Club

21

18

18

21

4

5

26

24

23

20

20

19

21

20

SOFTBALL

Barra Olympic Park

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

TAEKWONDO

National Olympic Training Center

18

14

18

16

27

22

19

17

16

13

16

14

14

11

TENNIS

National Tennis Center

33

27

9

7

24

22

1

2

2

2

7

9

4

5

TABLE TENNIS

National Olympic Training Center

18

14

18

16

27

22

19

17

16

13

16

14

14

11

SHOOTING

Deodoro Shooting Center

28

23

27

33

40

33

20

24

33

27

24

29

21

26

ARCHERY

Brazilian Jockey Club

31

25

7

6

22

19

3

4

-

-

5

6

3

3

TRIATHLON

Copacabana Beach

24

20

22

19

-

-

25

23

22

19

19

16

20

17

MODERN PENTATHLON

SAILING

Gloria Marina

20

15

39

32

10

10

39

34

38

30

39

32

36

28

VOLLEYBALL

Maracanãzinho Arena

16

13

34

28

11

11

35

29

32

25

30

23

31

25

BEACH VOLLEYBALL

Copacabana Beach

24

20

22

19

-

-

25

23

22

19

19

16

20

17

63

R I O 2 012

Note: there will be neither secondary Olympic Village nor alternate accommodation.


Nous brésiliens croyons fermement au rôle du sport dans la construction d’un monde plus solidaire, participatif et integré. Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva Président du Brésil

We Brazilians genuinely believe in the power of sport to build a more whole, integral and caring society. Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva President of Brazil


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Rio De Janeiro 2012 Applicant File  

Rio De Janeiro 2012 Applicant File  

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