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INTRODUCTION: MOTIVATION, CONCEPT AND PUBLIC OPINION 1. INTRODUCTION 2. CONCEPT 3. PUBLIC OPINION II. POLITICAL SUPPORT 4. GOVERNMENT SUPPORT 5. CANDIDATURE COMMITTEE 6. LEGAL ASPECTS III. FINANCE 7. CANDIDATURE BUDGET 8. GAMES BUDGET AND GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTIONS 9. OCOG REVENUE GENERATING POTENTIAL IV. VENUES 10. COMPETITION VENUES 11. COMPETITION VENUE LOCATIONS 12. NON-COMPETITION VENUES V. ACCOMMODATION 13. HOTELS 14. MEDIA ACCOMMODATION VI. TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE 15. TRANSPORT: INFRASTRUCTURE CHART 16. AIRPORT 17. TRANSPORT: INFRASTRUCTURE MAP 18. TRANSPORT CHALLENGES 19. TRANSPORT: DISTANCES VII. GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE 20. DATES OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES 21. POPULATION 22. METEOROLOGY 23. ENVIRONMENT 24. EXPERIENCE 25. SECURITY

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53

APPENDIX 1 . MAP A - ISTANBUL’S OLYMPIC PROJECT 2. MAP B - EXISTING, PLANNED AND ADDITIONAL TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE AND VENUES 3. CHART I - EXISTING AND ADDITIONAL SPORTS VENUES 4. CHART II - ACCOMMODATION 5. CHART III - EXISTING AND PLANNED TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE 6. CHART IV - TRANSPORT 7. CHART V - METEOROLOGY

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INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION: MOTIVATION, CONCEPT AND PUBLIC OPINION

a. Motivation Istanbul has a twofold motivation for hosting the Olympic Games. One is the desire to benefit from the exceptionally enriching experience of Games organization. The other is the impelling drive to inspire a more profound conception of Olympism as a universal value. First, any host city stands to acquire a life experience over the course of just seven years. As for Istanbul, the cumulative effect of the following short list would be exalting: • • • • • • • • •

Human resources develop as tens of thousands are involved in vigorous organizational effort. Athletic aptitude and its potential resources develop. Management skills build up, benefiting from international know-how. City-wide planning and operations underscore social and environmental sustainability within the overall urban structure. Competence accumulates in specific areas of management and operations, including sport, transport, and security. Sport and transport infrastructures improve. Economic activity grows with increased business, trade, tourism, etc. Culture and awareness of cultures are promoted. The city acquires a novel look with modernized street furniture and signs, improved lighting and pedestrian paths, offering a better quality of life for all citizens, especially the disabled and disadvantaged ones.

Istanbul is one of the largest and fastest developing cities in the world. The Olympic Games would accelerate its sustainable development. Second, each edition of the Olympic Games incorporates a local flavor and acknowledges it as a part of Olympic universalism. The local in Istanbul is so often universal that the recognition of the city’s unique contribution has far reaching implications for a more wholesome outlook on Olympism. • Istanbul Games would claim for Olympism a universal heritage of diverse cultures that history has built into this city. In the words of the IOC Evaluation Commission, Istanbul is an historic and cultural icon. • Istanbul Games would showcase the Olympic values of non-discrimination, peace and tolerance that the city has sustained for centuries and makes visible to the naked eye. • The heart of a country that is predominantly Moslem and dedicated to secular parliamentary democracy beats in Istanbul. In an era when “conflict of civilizations” receives frequent reference, Istanbul Games will challenge the “conflict” and create an awareness of the bridge between civilizations. The term “Istanbul and the Olympic Games” signifies culture sustained, tradition conveyed and history revived, all at once. Istanbul wants the Olympic Games for its own and for the Games’ sake. b. Games Impact and Legacy Hosting the Olympic Games will have a positive impact on the city and the country if only for reasons of development, outlined in terms of human resources, sport and urban infrastructure, above. The Olympic legacy will be particularly significant in its social implications. Istanbul’s Olympic project has a strongly social character. It aims at responding to specific social needs of the city and the country with the same technical rigor and code of conduct that must be ensured in Games organization. Hosting the Games will therefore provide an excellent context within which to implement specific social programs. Essentially educational, these programs include educating the youth through sport and raising sustainabilityoriented civic consciousness as primary components. Educating the youth through sports and providing an enhanced sports infrastructure to sustain the spreading of sports culture will be a very significant legacy of the Olympic Games in social terms. Equally strong in social terms will be the environmental legacy of the Games. This will derive both from the large scale development projects showcasing environmental sustainability and from city-wide awareness-raising programs to support such projects in the long-term. The Olympic Games will leave Istanbul and Turkey with fresh social muscle supported by a powerful underlying structure. The legacy of self-confidence is unmistakable. 5


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CONCEPT

INTRODUCTION: MOTIVATION, CONCEPT AND PUBLIC OPINION

a. Vision of the Istanbul Games World cities are ushered into a new era of redefined and reshaped relations in the 21st century under the powerful impact of globalization. The setting is competitive. Cities are forming new urban systems and assuming new roles as they re-emerge beyond national boundaries. Given this framework, many cities need large urban projects to trigger their strategic development. Istanbul’s long-term planning strategies are based on its vision of competitive integration in global terms, consolidating relations with new trans-national urban systems in regional terms, and sustainable action and performance in local terms. Istanbul’s vision of the Olympic Games is shaped by its long-term development plans, which in turn are guided by the Games as the single largest project that would improve the quality of life and contribute to social integration throughout the city. The interaction is crucial to the Games concept that links Olympic viability to long-term urban development. Social, as well as physical and technical criteria have thus entered into the choice of Olympic site locations. Istanbul’s Olympic Project is basically unifying in that all Olympic Summer sports will be held in Istanbul and all athletes will be accommodated in one village. • There are two main clusters of competition venues, the Olympic Park and the Southern Complex (Ataköy), which lie 16 kilometers apart. • The Olympic Village is located in between the two main venue clusters. • Both the Olympic Park and the Village developments are located away from the northern forests, as well as areas historic value and attractive urban sites. Planned as model sustainable developments, these will remain as an enduring legacy of the Games. The Olympic Park, in particular, will provide extensive green space in this much-needed area of the city, as well as greatly enhancing sporting and recreational facilities in the city as a whole. • The MPC/IBC lies within the Southern Zone and the Media Village is conveniently located with respect to the MPC/IBC, as well as the Olympic Village. • Specific venue locations such as the Golden Horn, Prince Islands and the Asiatic coast are intended to emphasize the sea as a part of City’s diverse heritage, without requiring major construction activity. The Olympic Games will almost necessarily leave favorable footprints in cities (and countries) that take Games organization seriously and undertake the investment that the Olympics deserve. Mutual benefit is the condition of success, and as already mentioned Istanbul wants the Games both for its own and for the Games’ sake. Expected legacy of the Games may be associated with: • Social development, particularly in terms of educating the youth through sports and providing an enhanced sports infrastructure to sustain the spreading of sports culture • Economic revival with carry-on effects in the city and the country for at least two decades • A major step towards re-establishing Istanbul as a world city and re-defining its role in global terms Istanbul’s Olympic Project will in turn benefit Games organization and Olympism in terms of: • Stressing cost-efficiency and limiting the Games budget in accordance with IOC objectives • Enhancing cultural harmony among nations of the world • Setting an example that can be replicated in other regions of the world, thereby contributing to a global celebration of the Games b. Istanbul’s Olympic Project is shown on Map A.

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PUBLIC OPINION

INTRODUCTION: MOTIVATION, CONCEPT AND PUBLIC OPINION

a. General public opinion towards Istanbul’s project of hosting the Olympic Games Nation- and city-wide polls taken in 1992, 1996 and 2000 reveal that Istanbul’s project of hosting the Olympic Games enjoys strong support of the general public. Findings of the IOC poll referred to in the IOC Evaluation Commission Report (April 2001) also confirm strong support of the general public. Survey conducted by Taylor Nelson-Sofres-PIAR • Questions asked: - Concepts associated with the Olympic Games - News interests - Bidding cities - Attitude towards (support/opposition) Istanbul’s hosting the Olympic Games - Reasons for such support or opposition - Preparations needed for organizing the Games - Adequacy of Istanbul’s sport and general infrastructure to host the Games - Perceived positive and negative impact of hosting the Games - Istanbul’s bidding history - Level of interest in sports coverage by events/disciplines - Active participation in sports • Area covered: - Istanbul - Turkey (urban) • Date: November 2000 • Samples and respective sample sizes: - Turkey: 1002 - Istanbul: 815 - Turkish youth (14-22 years of age): 501 - Amateur athletes: 212 • Results revealed that: - 88 percent of Turkish public - 89 percent of Istanbulites support Istanbul’s bid to host the Olympic Games. b. Opposition to Istanbul’s project There is no organized opposition to Istanbul’s hosting the Olympic Games. Individual opposition reflected in survey findings is voiced in reference to the existing sports and transport infrastructure in the city.

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GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

POLITICAL SUPPORT

a. Status of national and local government support National and local government support for Istanbul’s bid is geared to the ultimate goal of success in Games organization. The immediate objective of a successful bid is corollary to that vision. Government support for Istanbul’s bid has unique characteristics in that Turkey is a country with an Olympic policy. This is expressed in legislation that the Parliament unanimously enacted in 1992 and in its active endorsement on the part of national and city authorities. Furthermore, Istanbul’s bid enjoys strong political support. Both the government in power and the main opposition party are committed to the bid. The following points bear on the status of national and local government support: • The IOBC benefits from top-level representation of central and the city government. The Minister of State in charge of Youth and Sports who holds a Cabinet post as Deputy Prime Minister in the present Government, chairs the committee while the Governor of Istanbul, the Mayor of Istanbul and the President of the NOC are its vice-presidents. This committee of top officials and elected office holders directs Istanbul’s preparations to host the Olympic Games. The 13-member Preparations Committee includes experts from all ministries directly involved in the organization of the Olympic Games (see Response 5, below). • Olympic legislation obliges all public bodies to support the IOBC in the preparations for and the organization of the Istanbul Games. The “Priority of Service” clause states that “All public institutions, private administrations and municipalities will be obliged to give priority to the execution of any and/or all services that may be required by the IOBC during the preparations for and organization of the Olympic Games.” • The Treasury has allocated the 584-hectare land for the Olympic Park, free of course. • The State Planning Organization (DPT) has incorporated Istanbul’s Olympic Project into the 8th Five-Year Development Plan. The DPT Special Commission for Physical Education, Sports and Istanbul Olympic Games founded for this purpose includes the President of the NOC, General Director of IOBC, two IOBC members and the Chairman of the Preparation Committee. • The IOBC has spent the bulk of its financial resources guaranteed by Law for the construction and upgrading of sport facilities. Foremost among new constructions is the 80,000-seat Atatürk Olympic Stadium in the Olympic Park. The stadium was inaugurated in 2001 and the IOBC has entered into agreement with the Galatasaray Sports Club and the National Athletics Federation for use of the Olympic Stadium. • The Housing Administration of Turkey entered into contract with the IOBC for the construction and post Olympic use of the Olympic and Media villages. • The State Highway Authority and Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality collaborate with the IOBC for Olympic Park transport infrastructure. • Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality financed the construction of the Ba¤c›lar Badminton Hall, which was completed in 2001. Public transport to the site will be enhanced by a major Public Transport Interchange that the Municipality is setting up at Ba¤c›lar. The Hall will be reserved for Olympic use during test events and for competitions during the Games, free of cost. • Finally, both the President and the Prime Minister of Turkey recently re-confirmed their commitment to the bid. President Sezer received members of the NOC Executive Board and the IOBC General Director at the Çankaya Presidential Offices, assuring them of his support. On a separate occasion, Prime Minister Erdo¤an (former mayor of Istanbul) met with the Minister of State in charge of Youth and Sports, the President of the NOC and the General Director of IOBC to discuss priority matters on Istanbul’s Olympic agenda. b. The covenant signed by the Prime Minister of the Republic of Turkey is attached. c. Municipal elections are due to take place on March 28, 2004. The letter of guarantee signed by the President of the NOC of Turkey and the Mayor of Istanbul is attached.

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CANDIDATURE COMMITTEE

POLITICAL SUPPORT

The Istanbul Olympic Games Preparation and Organization Council, alias the Istanbul Olympic Bidding Committee (IOBC), will be responsible for the 2012 candidature process. It is a three-partite body that ensures cooperation among the central government, the city and the NOC in accordance with the principles laid down by the IOC. The IOBC was founded by the Turkish Olympic Law enacted in April 1992 to provide the legal foundation for all work related to candidature, as well as the actual organization of the Istanbul Games. The IOBC tendered the city’s previous three bids, for the 2000, 2004, and 2008 Games. The IOBC’s Board of Directors is chaired by the Minister of State in charge for Youth and Sports. Its membership includes: • the Governor of Istanbul, • the Mayor of Metropolitan Istanbul, • the President and the Secretary-General of the NOC of Turkey, • General Director of Youth and Sports (GDYS), • an ambassador from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, • two representatives each from the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, from the NOC of Turkey and from the GDYS. The IOBC’s Executive Committee consists of five members, including two from Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, two from GDYS and one from the NOC of Turkey. A 13-member Preparation Committee is attached to the Executive Committee. The Preparation Committee ensures representation of the following ministries on the IOBC, in addition to the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, the GDYS and the NOC of Turkey: • • • • • • •

Prime Ministry Ministry of National Defense Ministry of the Interior Ministry of Finance Ministry of Public Works and Housing Ministry of Transport Ministry of Tourism

The Preparation Committee oversees coordination in Olympic site location and build-up, project assessment and arrangements for construction of Olympic facilities, upgrading of existing venues, planning and erection of the transport and communications infrastructure, and Games related international relations. It has specialized working groups and commissions on environmental issues, security, transport, accommodation, health, marketing and finance, media and telecommunications, culture, Olympism, and the Paralympics. The General Directorate of the IOBC manages the implementation of resolutions adopted by the above listed governing bodies, coordinates all investment and candidature-related activities, presides over the administration, and conducts relations with the Olympic family, national and international federations, and the media.

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LEGAL ASPECTS

POLITICAL SUPPORT

a. There are no legal obstacles to the organisation of the Olympic Games in Turkey. b. New laws to facilitate the organisation of the Olympic Games Turkey has its Olympic Law in place since 1992. From the time it came into force up until the present, the Turkish Olympic Law has been effectively implemented by every government. Such law ensures participation and full cooperation of a broad range of government and city authorities, as well as the NOC, in preparing Istanbul as the host city following a successful bid. It recognises the ultimate authority of the IOC in all Olympic matters and gives the Olympic Charter the force of law, with particular reference to the protection of all IOC rights over the Games and Olympic insignia. Nevertheless, the Istanbul Olympic Bidding Committee (IOBC) does not preclude the likelihood of new needs arising in the course of time leading up to the 2012 Games. Additional legislation would then be created in response to developments in the Games so as to facilitate their organisation. c. Turkish legislation does not require a referendum for hosting the Olympic Games. d. Legislation on sports Article 59 of the Constitution of the Turkish Republic stipulates that the State promote "sports for all" and support talented sportspersons. Administration of sports is regulated by a special law since 1938, amended several times to date with a view to meeting changing needs. At present, the General Directorate of Youth and Sports (GDYS) oversees all sport branches (except football) and their national federations via Regulations drawn up by a Council of interested bodies, including the NOC of Turkey. Since 1992 football is under the exclusive authority of the Turkish Football Federation, made fully autonomous by a separate law. Although basketball and volleyball remain under the umbrella organization of the GDYS, their respective federations too have been granted unique powers by two Regulations issued in 1997 and 1998, respectively. Meanwhile, presidents of all national federations are elected to office by the General Assembly of related sport clubs. Parliamentary deliberation is under way on a draft law on the Prevention of Violence and Disorder in Sport Competitions. e. Legislation and means to combat doping in sport The European Council Anti-Doping Agreement was made an integral part of national legislation in March 1993, and the GDYS put in force its Anti-Doping Regulation in August 1993. The Regulation designated the Turkish Doping Control Center (TDCC) at the Hacettepe University, Ankara, as the national authority entitled to perform in- and out-of-competition doping control analyses. TDCC was granted its initial IOC accreditation in 2001, confirmed annually since, and received ISO 17025 quality certificate from the United Kingdom Accreditation Service in 2002. In 2003, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) decided to give joint WADA/IOC accreditation to the TDCC. f. Agreement with the WADA The relevant Turkish authorities have committed themselves to implementing and fully respecting the rules laid down by WADA through various instruments. The TDCC has accepted and applies the World Anti-Doping Code. The Government of Turkey has signed the 2003 Copenhagen Declaration on Anti-Doping in Sport, and regularly contributes to the funding of WADA since 2002. The said declaration was also signed by the NOC of Turkey.

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CANDIDATURE BUDGET

FINANCE

As explained in response to Question 5 above, the Turkish Olympic Law of 1992 has founded the Istanbul Olympic Bidding Committee (IOBC) as the legal body responsible for Istanbul’s candidature. All candidature expenses, covering both Phases I and II, will be financed from IOBC’s own resources. Such resources accrue from its statutory revenues in the form of allowances from several public sources, which averaged USD 28 million (in 2004 values), annually, since IOBC’s foundation. (For details, see Response to Question 8 below.) Phase I: IOBC’s budget for the Application Phase of its 2012 bid is USD 750 thousand. The breakdown of that amount by main items is shown below. ITEMS Editorial and research work Communications and PR Website construction and administration Consultant services (urban planning, architecture, environment, sports organization, finance) Administrative and logistic expenses Salaries Candidature Acceptance Fee TOTAL

OUTLAY (USD ‘000) 250 80 30 50 40 150 150 750

Phase II: IOBC’s estimated budget for the Candidature Phase is USD 5.250 million. The distribution of such outlay by main items is estimated as follows: ITEMS Promotion of candidature International National Purchase of services Preparation of the Candidature File Architectural and engineering design work Visual and print material Website administration and content production International relations (IOC events and other organizations) Administrative and logistic expenses Salaries Registration Fee TOTAL

OUTLAY (USD ‘000) 2,500 1,500 1,000 1,450 700 150 500 100 150 150 500 500 5,250

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8 GAMES BUDGET AND GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTIONS

III FINANCE

The IOBC (Istanbul Olympic Bidding Committee) estimates that, apart from IOC contributions (television rights and TOP sponsorship) and ticket sales, around 60 percent of the Istanbul OCOG’s budget will be financed by public subsidies and 40 percent from private sources, that is, by local sponsors, official suppliers, and licensees. Public subsidies to the Istanbul OCOG will consist of allowances already guaranteed by the Turkish Olympic Law of 1992. The Olympic Law that created the IOBC as the legal body responsible both for bidding for the Games and acting as the Istanbul OCOG following a successful bid, has also secured for it a steady inflow of earmarked revenues from several public sources. Such revenue inflow will continue uninterrupted after the IOBC transforms into the OCOG, in amounts necessary for flawless organisation of the Games and coverage of any potential economic shortfall. Hence, the Turkish Olympic Law stands for a strong commitment on the part of the Turkish State to back the future Istanbul Games with all the financial means required. Since its foundation, the IOBC’s statutory revenues have provided it with a yearly income of USD 28 million, on average, in 2004 values.* The largest contribution has accrued from 1-percent dividends from the annual budget of the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, which accounted for 38 percent of the IOBC’s total revenues to date. Besides an annual appropriation from the consolidated budget of the central Government, the Olympic Law also entitles the IOBC to the following regular allowances: • • • •

5 percent of the National Lottery’s annual net earnings 1 percent of football betting revenues 1 percent of Horse Racing Joint Wagers ticket sales 1 percent of the Housing Fund receipts

Further, the Law authorises the Government, if need arises, to increase up to fivefold the above percentage allowances as well as the IOBC’s share from the Metropolitan Istanbul’s annual budget. From its foundation to present, the IOBC bid for the 2000, 2004, and 2008 Olympic Games. Only 4 percent of its expenditures, however, went to finance its candidature budgets for these three consecutive bids. Eighty-eight percent, in contrast, were invested in sports facilities with a view to equipping the city with a sports infrastructure necessary for a successful staging of the Games. The single largest contribution of the IOBC to Istanbul’s sports infrastructure is the 80,000-seat Olympic Stadium that cost USD 126 million and was inaugurated in December 2001. The Olympic Stadium was constructed on land owned by the IOBC. It is located in the southern part of the 584-hectare land allocated by the Treasury of the Republic for the development of the Olympic Park. The allocation, which followed from the Olympic Law, is no less a token of the national Government’s unreserved commitment to back Istanbul’s Olympic bid. The Olympic Law also sets in place the legal assurance for the future Istanbul OCOG to avail of free-of-charge cooperation and performance of all public bodies in the provision of government related services. All security arrangements related to Olympic Games organization, and all other government related services such as medical care, customs, etc. will be provided at no cost to the OCOG. All sport and non-sport venues owned by the public bodies will also be made available to the OCOG at no cost.

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9 OCOG REVENUE GENERATING POTENTIAL

III FINANCE

As explained in response to previous questions, the Turkish Olympic Law guarantees an irrevocable national funding for the future Istanbul OCOG in the form of percentage allowances from several public sources. Such funding, which supported the IOBC since its foundation, will remain in effect following Istanbul’s election as the host city, and will constitute the main source of “subsidies” for the OCOG budget. The yearly average of IOBC allowances equaling USD 28 million to date, in 2004 values, implies a minimum amount of national funding around USD 196 million from the election of the host city to the Games period. As the Olympic Law authorizes the Cabinet to increase IOBC allowances up to fivefold, the upper limit of such national funding is no less than USD 900 million.* Further, the IOBC estimates that the future Istanbul OCOG will raise around USD 210 million in total ticketing revenue. Its estimate for Istanbul’s revenues from local sponsorship, for the period 2009-2012, is set at around USD 200 million, about 60 percent to be contributed in kind. In addition, value-in-kind contributions by official suppliers of the future Istanbul OCOG are estimated to amount to USD 80 million in monetary value. Licensing revenues for the period, on the other hand, are expected to reach USD 25 million. Other national revenue sources that the IOBC plans to make use of for the 2012 Games include an Olympic coin program (USD 5 million), a stamps program (USD 3 million), a special lottery program (USD 6 million), and donations from the public (USD 5 million). Ticketing revenue forecast is based on the following assumptions: • A total of more than 8 million tickets will be available for sale for the competition sessions of the 2012 Games, after provision for Olympic family seating. About 6 million of available tickets will be sold. Average ticket price for competition sessions will be USD 30, ranging from USD 10-30 for secondary events to USD 50-100 for prime events. • Ticket availability for the opening and closing ceremonies will be 73,000 for each, and sales ratio 100 percent. The average ticket price for these events will be USD 200. Estimated local sponsorship revenue is set at an equivalent of USD 200 million. This amount will be raised through USD 10-million contributions, on average, from some 20 Turkish corporations in return for marketing rights in Turkey. Telecommunications, banking, aviation, automotive, tire, passenger transit, insurance, household appliances, food manufacturing, energy management, shopping centers, cosmetics, furniture and carpeting, construction, and glass products come forth as industries from which the Istanbul OCOG is likely to attract national sponsors, depending upon the TOP sponsorship program. Official suppliers, on the other hand, will include partners from categories such as air conditioning, cleaning management services, electrical accessories and building automation, electrical appliances, electronic newsletters, freight forwarding, housekeeping services, logistics services, material handling equipment, packaging and recycling services, pathology services, radiology equipment, rental vehicles, research services, solid waste collection services, sports equipment and articles, temporary structures, and waste management services. Finally, the IOBC estimates that over a four-year period, around 50 licensees will pay an average of USD 500 thousand for the purchase of licensing royalties. These licensees will cover a full range of wearing apparel, collectibles, and other merchandise. The Istanbul Games licensing program will provide access to a sizeable local retail market, one indicator of that size being the turnover of retail apparel market (around USD 800 million in 2002).

* In converting monetary values to 2004 US dollars, the US Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Deflator inflation index numbers included in the

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10 COMPETITION VENUES

IV VENUES

Existing sports venues proposed for the Olympic Games and additional ones that will be built for hosting the Games are indicated on Chart I attached. Major principles that entered into the choice of competition venues include the following: 1. Athletes’ convenience was assigned primary importance. Towards that end, the majority of sporting venues are clustered in the Olympic Park and the Southern Zone that lies 16 km from the Park. The Olympic Village is 5 minutes away from the Olympic Park and 20 minutes away from the Southern Zone. The latter trip will take considerable shorter in 2012. 2. To maximize post-Olympic use and cost-efficiency, existing venues were evaluated for their potential use during the Games. Those that can be modified and/or upgraded for Olympic use even if they are not currently used as sporting venues were selected on that basis. Examples of such venues include the Tüyap Exhibition Center, Mydonose Showland and Park Orman. 3. An Olympic Project in a metropolis as large and extensive as Istanbul required incorporation of specific features to promote greater sharing of and widespread participation in the Olympic experience. This is reflected in several competition venues locations, which were chosen in view of their soundness in urban terms and suitability in terms of the compact project. 4. Given that perspective, three venues are proposed on the Asian side of the city, in addition to the cross continental marathon race. These are the Fenerbahçe Stadium (football), Bostanc› coast (beach volley) and Prince Islands (triathlon). 5. Use of venues such as the Prince Islands, the Golden Horn (rowing and canoeing) and the route around the Old City (cycling road race) will be an enriching contribution to the Olympic Games, associating top level sporting activity with an awareness of the natural and historic environment.

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11 COMPETITION VENUE LOCATIONS

IV VENUES

Location of sports competition venues, as well as the Olympic Village, IBC/MPC and the Media Village are shown on Map B. Further to the explanation provided under response to Question 10 above, guiding principles in the respective location of competition and non-competition venues, including the Olympic Village, the IBC/MPC and the Media Village, are outlined below: 1. Billions of viewers join in the grand celebration of sports that is the essence of the Olympic Games. On time and high quality coverage of the Games for viewers around the world requires that the media is provided with every means to carry out their task. 2. As mentioned under "Media Accommodation", Istanbul proposes to accommodate about 2000 media representatives in 4-star or 5-star hotel rooms. The Media Village planned for the majority of media representatives is very conveniently located with respect to the main international airport, competition venues and the IBC/MPC. 3. The IBC/MPC will be set up in the CNR-World Trade Center that is presently used as a venue for trade fairs and exhibitions. The venue is only 1 km from the main international airport, 16 km from the Media Village, 16 km from the Olympic Park and 4 km from the Southern-Zone competition venues. 4. The location of the main international airport in close proximity to the IBC/MPC and involving a relatively short trip to the Olympic Village and the Media Village is a significant advantage. The airport is already connected to the urban LRT system that is under extensive development.

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12 NON-COMPETITION VENUES

IV VENUES

A. OLYMPIC VILLAGE a. Concept and Post-Olympic Use Istanbul plans a single Olympic Village to accommodate all athletes. About 16,000 athletes and officials will be housed in the Village to be constructed in Halkal›, 4 km to the Olympic Park. Low-rising (4-storey) apartment blocks with a Village hub and stretches of sporting facilities will define the general urban character of the development. The Olympic Village is conceived within the framework of an extensive housing project being carried out by the Housing Administration of Turkey (TOK‹). The project responds to the city’s housing needs and the high housing demand in Halkal›. Its post-Olympic use, therefore, is integral to the project. Other elements of sustainability include designing features to meet Paralympic needs, radically improved access to public transport, harnessing renewable energy sources and technologies, creating conservation and reuse infrastructure and minimizing emissions throughout the Village. Now served by municipal bus lines and commuter trains, Halkal› will be connected to the urban rapid transit system, greatly facilitating public transport. The specifically Olympic legacy will result from implementation of sustainable energy, water and waste-management policies. b. Financing TOK‹ will finance the construction of the housing units suitable for Olympic and Paralympic use, while the IOBC will finance the construction of all buildings and facilities that are required for the Olympic Games, but not planned by TOK‹. These include Olympic zoning requirements, security fencing, training venues and other facilities specified in the Olympic Village Guidelines. c. Additional Accommodation Istanbul’s project includes additional day accommodation in Silivri (60 km from the Olympic Village, and the Olympic Park) for participants in equestrian and sailing events. Existing infrastructure at the Klassis Golf & Country Club and Klassis Resort Hotel in Silivri will be used for this purpose. Klassis accommodates 2102 persons in two five-star hotels, 198 apartments and 53 villas. It has conference facilities, including 14 meeting rooms for 40-160 persons and a ballroom for 700. B. INTERNATIONAL BROADCAST CENTER (IBC) / MAIN PRESS CENTER (MPC) a. Concept The IOBC plans to install the IBC/MPC in a combined venue, namely, the international fair center CNR Expo within the Istanbul World Trade Center (IWTC). The complex is within walking distance of the main International Airport, 14 km from the Media and Olympic villages, and 16 km from the Olympic Park. It is accessible by light rail, which will connect to the Village site and the Olympic Park as planned. The CNR Expo started operating 15 years ago and is now the largest trade fair facility in Eurasia. Its currently available covered space of 93,000 sq m includes eight interlinked exhibition halls with a total area of 85,000 sq m at a minimum height of 9 m and 8,000 sq m of office area, all equipped with quality infrastructure. Two new halls under construction will add 22,000 sq m to the total exhibition area. Overall, CNR Expo will provide 115,000 sq m of covered space for the IBC/MPC, with an estimated 75,000 sq m for the IBC and 40,000 sq m for the MPC. Present facilities include adjacent open-air parking area for 5,000 and closed parking structure for 750 vehicles. A congress center (4,000 visitor capacity) and two superior category hotels (638 rooms) will be added to the IWTC complex before 2006. The Istanbul OCOG will ensure availability of the facilities well in advance of the Games for overlay purposes. The IBC will be designed and operated by the Olympic Broadcasting Services (OBS), while the OCOG will provide logistics and security services, as well as office equipment, information facilities, telecommunications, internet access, mobile telephony, etc. The MPC will also be outfitted with pay phones, business telephone lines with data port handsets, and ISDN, DSL, and broadband data lines. The premises will be handed back to its owners after retro-fit following the Games. b. Finance The greater part of the premises proposed for the IBC/MPC already exists, and the remaining is under construction by the owners of the CNR Expo, namely, Istanbul World Trade Center, Inc. Overlay and retro-fit expenses will be financed by the OCOG.

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13 HOTELS

V ACCOMMODATION

a. Existing and planned accommodation in Istanbul is indicated on Chart II attached. As indicated on the chart, there are about 20,000 existing and 9,000 planned 4-star or 5-star rooms. Existing and planned 3-star rooms add up to 8,500. All of the nearly 6,500 4-star or 5-star rooms that were at the planning stage in 2001 have since been added to the City’s existing accommodation infrastructure. b. The following table lists the number of hotel rooms within 10 kilometers of Silivri (proposed for equestrian and sailing events). Silivri: Existing Accommodation Within a radius of 10 km of City Center CLASS Number of hotels Number of rooms 4 + 5 star hotels 2 409 3 star hotels 4 225 2 star hotels 1 27 1 star hotels 2 78 Apartments 1 425 (5-star level of comfort) 1 1 94 one-bedroom, 140 two-bedroom, 17 three-bedroom apartments Silivri: Planned Accommodation: CLASS 4 + 5 star hotels 3 star hotels 2 star hotels

Within a radius of 10 km of City Center Number of hotels Number of rooms 3 490 1 72 1 36

c. Convention rates at 3-star, 4-star, and 5-star hotels in Istanbul ranged between USD 50 and USD 650 during July-August 2003. Average rates, including breakfast and taxes, are shown below. Summer 2003 Convention Rates Comfort Level 5-star 4-star 3-star

Price Range (USD) 250-650 100-250 50-120

Average Price (USD) 350 150 75

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MEDIA ACCOMMODATION

ACCOMMODATION

Istanbul proposes village type accommodation for the majority of media representatives and four-star or five-star hotel rooms for other media members. About 15,000 rooms will be provided in the Media Village and 2,000 rooms will be provided in superior category hotels. Hotels will be assigned for media accommodation in view of their location with respect to the MPC/IBC, as well as other competition and non-competition venue clusters. This would suggest predominantly Ataköyzone and central city (Old City and Taksim zone) hotels for media use. Media Village: a. Concept and Post-Olympic Use The Media Village is planned across the valley from the Olympic Village in Halkal›. It will match the Olympic Village in terms of general urban characteristics. Design features of housing units, however, will vary in accordance with the needs of its initial users (media representatives) and its intended post-Olympic use. The IOBC will comply with IOC guidelines and honor suggestions from interested parties in meeting Olympic requirements. At this stage, it benefits from consultant services in urban planning for the city to take full advantage of the Media Village following the Games. The Media Village is planned as a part of an on-going housing project undertaken by the Housing Administration of Turkey (TOKI). Along with the Olympic Village, it will be a model development, highlighting environmental health and sustainability in enhancing the city’s housing stock. The Media Village will be linked to the MPC/IBC by light rail. It will also be served by an official media shuttle. b. Financing TOK‹ will finance the construction of the Media Village, while the future Istanbul OCOG will be responsible for outfitting and overlays.

31


15 TRANSPORT: INFRASTRUCTURE CHART

VI TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

Existing transport infrastructure in Istanbul and infrastructure planned irrespective of the city’s application are outlined on Chart III. Development in transport infrastructure over the past five years (1998-2003) is summarized below for indicative purposes: • New roads - 115 km completed - 56 km under construction - 52 km construction contract-awarding phase - 30 km construction project-study phase • New elevated junctions - 65 construction completed - 26 under construction - 13 due for public tender - 4 project-study phase The above mentioned investment in road systems is being followed by major developments in the urban rapid transit system. Completed and planned rail systems include: -

20 km completed 32 km (6 lines) under construction 33 km (3 lines) construction contract-awarding phase 113 km (12 lines) application project phase 85 km (Marmaray) tender completed, announcement of successful bidder to be followed by groundbreaking in 2004.

Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality finances all of the above rail projects other than Marmaray. Funding has been secured for the Marmaray project from JBIC - Japan Bank for International Cooperation ( USD 800 million) and EIB - European Investment Bank (USD 700 million).

33


16

VI

AIRPORT

TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

a. Main international airport Atatürk International Airport is the main airport to be used for the Olympic Games. It is located in the European side and is the main airport that serves the city. Its existing International Terminal was opened in 2000 and the extension, which is due to be opened in May 2004, will increase international terminal capacity from the present 14 million to 20 million passengers per year. Atatürk International Airport is a state-of-the-art facility, conveniently located with respect to main venue clusters, including the Olympic Park, Village and IBC/MPC. It is accessible by public transport (LRT) and round-the-clock airport bus service. Its large car park provides space for more than 7000 vehicles. b. Other airports Sabiha Gökçen is Istanbul’s second international airport, located in Kurtköy on the Asian side. It was opened in 2001. At present, it is served by the TEM motorway and is accessible by airport bus service. Its significance as an alternative gateway to the city is expected to increase on completion of the Bosphorus tunnel rail crossing and upgrading of the transcontinental surface rail system. The third airport included in Istanbul’s airport system for the Games is at Çorlu. It lies 22 kilometers from Istanbul’s Silivri district (proposed site for equestrian events) and will be used for handling equestrian traffic. c. Current capacity of airports and transport links to the City center

Airport Atatürk International Sabiha Gökçen International Çorlu 1 1

Number of Number of Departure Gates runways Domestic International 3 1 1

15 4

30 8 2

Terminal capacity Distance to (passengers/yr) city center (km) Domestic International 7.5 million 14 million 500 thousand 3 million 1,000,000

21 50 22 2

For equestrian traffic from Silivri where equestrian events will take place

2 Distance

35


17 TRANSPORT: INFRASTRUCTURE MAP

VI TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

Istanbul’s existing and planned transport infrastructure is shown on Map B. • Istanbul is accessible by air, sea, rail and motorway. • There are two international airports, one on the European and the other on the Asian side. The main international airport is served by light rail. • Two major highways with interconnected ring roads serve the city. These are the E80 State Highway and the Trans-European Motorway (TEM), with a cross-continental bridge on each. They connect Istanbul to other cities in the country, as well as to European and Middle Eastern countries. • The 24-kilometer section of the E80 Highway circles the central city area from the north. • The TEM is a fully access controlled 2x4-lane motorway to the north of the E80. Part of the TEM (between tollbooths near the Olympic Park on the European side and Kozyata¤› on the Asian side) serve urban, as well as transit traffic. • The new motorway planned to the north of the TEM will provide Istanbul with a third ring road. It runs along the immediate north of the Olympic Park. • There are high-quality, 2x3-lane coastal and radial roads on both sides of the Bosphorus. • Istanbul’s rapid transit system is partially operational at present. As the single largest project being implemented in the city, it is planned to shift the weight of public transport from road to rail. • The Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality operates an 8-kilometer Metro line an 18-kilometer LRT line and an 11 kilometer tramline on the European side. Planned construction will expand the rail network to 178 kilometers by 2012. • TCDD (Turkish State Railways) operates the 27.6-kilometer European and 44.2-kilometer Asian commuter lines. The Marmaray Project comprises the Bosphorus Tunnel Rail Crossing to link the Asian and European commuter lines and the upgrading of these old commuter lines as LRT. Marmaray will also provide rail connection between the two international airports. • Rail lines will link central city districts to the Olympic Park, as well as the Village site of Halkal› that is now served by Municipal buses. • State-owned passenger and vehicle ferries and the Municipality-owned Istanbul Sea Bus Corporation (IDO) provide public transport by sea. • Two major Public Transport Interchanges are located at Yenikap› and Ba¤c›lar, with secondary ones at key city locations, including Bak›rköy, Zeytinburnu, Taksim and Bostanc›, among others.

37


18 TRANSPORT CHALLENGES

VI TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

Current transport challenges faced by Istanbul may be grouped under two main areas: • Structure of transport authority • Quality of public transport Firstly, responsibility for and authority over various transport services and functions are dispersed in Istanbul. Municipal corporations, as well as the State Highway Authority and branches of central government departments share authority over the road, rail, ferry and active transport network, with mechanisms and bodies instituted to ensure coordination among them. This complex authority structure has had certain implications in terms of the overall approach to urban transport. Basically, authorities have tried to meet growing transport demands through increasing the supply. Hence, they have focused on infrastructure development, but not so much on integrated demand management. Secondly, access to efficient public transport is uneven. Although the current share of public transport within the overall urban transport system is 80 percent, rail accounts for about 10 percent of all public transport. Limited use of sea transport options and incomplete functional integration of transport services also impact the quality of public transport in this multi-centered city with a unique transcontinental settlement pattern. These issues were addressed at the First Istanbul Urban Transport Convention (2002). Citizens and NGOs participated in the event that was organized by local and central government authorities and six major universities in Istanbul. Following the Convention, Greater Istanbul Municipality took up work on sustainable solutions to Istanbul’s transport problems, including new legislation to create a single authority to plan, fund, develop and manage transport in Istanbul. Meanwhile the national panel on transport (2003) also adopted an agenda of sustainable transport and joined the city government in aiming to limit the length of an urban trip to 30 minutes. Istanbul’s present approach to transport issues involves restructuring of urban transport authority and an integrated management response to transport demands. Public transport policy favors rail systems over bus services, which is reflected in on-going infrastructure development. Meanwhile, the urban road network is being radically improved, especially with elevated junctions in key intersections to increase efficiency. Establishing a single Transport Authority, increasing application of Intelligent Transport System (ITS) technology and a greatly enhanced infrastructure will ensure the operational efficiency that is required to overcome the main challenge of meeting public transport needs during the Olympic Games.

39


19 TRANSPORT: DISTANCES

VI TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

Distances between various competition and non-competition sites are indicated on Chart IV attached. All distances are given in km except for the Triathlon site at Prince Islands which also involves a sea journey. The chart shows two hotel areas rather than a single "main" hotel area. The explanation for this is found in the fact that Istanbul is a multi-centered city, and identification of such a main area would be an over-simplification. Hotel Area I refers to Taksim where a concentration of especially 4-star and 5-star hotels is found. Hotel Area II refers to the Old City where both the number of properties and the overall number of rooms are very high. Another hotel area that lies within the Southern Zone was not indicated on the chart to avoid further complication. This is the Atakรถy/Bakโ€บrkรถy area that includes several superior category hotels located very close to venues in the Southern Zone and within 15-20 minutes of the Olympic Park. As indicated in response to Question 13.b, high quality accommodation infrastructure is available very close to Silivri, proposed site for equestrian and sailing events. Similar infrastructure of 4-star and 5-star hotels is available on the Asian side near football and beach volley venues, as well as in the Prince Islands, proposed for triathlon events.

41


DATES OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES Istanbul proposes to hold the Olympic Games from 20 July to 5 August 2012. The proposed dates are very convenient in view of climactic conditions in the city, as well as agreeing with the national and international calendar of sporting events. Proposed dates for the Paralympic Games are August 17-29, 2012, allowing for 12 days after the Closing Ceremony of the Olympic Games. The requirement of holding the 2012 Games within the 15 July - 31 August period introduces one additional factor that comes up periodically. The period covers the Moslem holy month of Ramadan, which runs from July 20 to August 18 in the year 2012 (http://www.ori.unizh.ch/hegira.html). Thus, given the above-suggested dates, the Opening Ceremony of the Games would take place on the first day of Ramadan. Former editions of Summer and Winter games (1924 Paris, 1948 London, 1980 Moscow, 1994 Lillehammer) have coincided with Ramadan, although without addressing the issue directly. Forthcoming Games may also be organized during Ramadan, indeed with great success in terms of associated implications for world peace.

VII GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

20

43


POPULATION Current and projected population figures for Turkey, the City and the Province of Istanbul are shown on the following table: 2003 Turkey Istanbul (City) Istanbul (Province)

70,712,000 9,927,357 10,833,615

2012 (estimated) 79,970,000 12,290,000 13,668,000

Population figures for the City include the 27 inner city districts that are within the boundaries of Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality. Population figures for the Province include the five outer districts of Istanbul, as well as the inner city districts.

VII GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

21

45


METEOROLOGY Istanbul proposes to hold the Olympic Games between July 20 and August 5, 2012. Information given in Chart V reflects data from the past ten years for that period of time.

VII GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

22

47


ENVIRONMENT a. Current environmental conditions in Istanbul Environmental conditions improved significantly as a results of major projects implemented over the past decade. Using natural gas instead of coal, reducing road traffic through metro and light rail systems, conservation of water sources, rehabilitating creeks, building wastewater and solid waste treatment plants are among factors that contributed to the cleaner environment. As of Winter 2003, air pollution is below WHO, EPA, EU and Turkish Air Quality Protection thresholds; potable water supply meets estimated needs until 2040; Istanbul Water and Sewerage Administration (ISKI) treats 90 percent of wastewater; scores of marine species are restored to the Golden Horn and Municipal solid waste treatment (compost) and energy generation plants came into operation. Other significant developments include ISKI’s international award winning (2003) AEC/Geospatial Information System for Water and Wastewater Infrastructure, the first Turkish observation satellite (BILSAT, launched September 2003) to monitor environmental pollution and completed master planning for transmission and distribution of electric power in Istanbul.

VII GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

23

(more at http://www.ibb.gov.tr/ibbeng/210/annualreport2002.pdf; http://www.ibb.gov.tr/ibbtr/102/10206/1020635/fr/2003/havaolcum.htm) b. Major environmental projects in Istanbul include: • Golden Horn Environmental Protection: “A project worthy of global recognition” earning the City of Istanbul First Prize of the Metropolis Award 2002 for its “contribution to better quality of life.” Budget USD 313,000,000; funded by World Bank, Istanbul Water and Sewerage Administration and Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (more at http://www.metropolis.org) • Rehabilitation of Fener and Balat - Minority Quarters of old Istanbul: Improving living standards of the inhabitants; rehabilitation of housing and infrastructure; development of basic services of education, health and culture. Partners: European Commission, Fatih District Municipality, Turkish Undersecretariat of Treasury (more at http://www.deltur.cec.eu.int/english/e-mali-sheets2.html) • Creek rehabilitation and flood control; wastewater collection, purification and discharge systems: ongoing projects for 19 creeks and wastewater systems involving Kurba¤al›dere, Küçükçekmece, Göksu, Küçüksu and Tuzla, among others. Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, Istanbul Water and Sewerage Administration. • Yeflilçay and Melen Istanbul Water Supply Project: Largest project after GAP being implemented by State Hydraulic Works (DSI); Budget USD 1.5 billion, funded by Turkish Goverment and Kuwaiti and Japanese loans secured. • Environmental Education and Practice Project (ÇEP): Introduced curriculum changes and active involvement of students in environmental issues. Governorship of Istanbul in coordination with Ministries of Education and Environment, Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality and districts municipalities, supported by environmental and other NGOs (e.g.Istanbul Chamber of Industry); 2300 schools participating at present. • “My Home Istanbul”: City-wide social project run by the Municipality to enhance civic consciousness and promote social inclusion. • International Center for Hydrogen Energy Technologies (ICHET): Project to promote renewable energy sources and transfer hydrogen technologies. USD 40 million; UNIDO and Turkish Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources. • Reforestation and extensive tree planting projects. Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality and districts municipalities, Ministry of Forestry, and NGOs. c. Assessment of the environmental impact of staging the Olympic Games Staging the Olympic Games will leave Istanbul with a solid environmental legacy through showcasing sustainable practices not simply within the context of individual functions or features, but at the level of concerted planning and action. It will also provide an opportunity to bring the city’s numerous already implemented or on-going projects into focus, articulating their unified significance. d. Environmental impact studies Turkish legislation requires environmental impact studies from the early planning (project proposal) stage through tendering, project implementation and finalization. It has been revised (2002) to meet EU Acquis Criteria. Legislation classifies projects by preliminary and full EIA requirements. Studies have been conducted for several of the proposed venues, including the Olympic Stadium, Olympic Park, Olympic Village, and the Sinan Erdem Dome.

49


24 International sports events organized within the past 10 years include the following: Year Event

Sport

2003 2003 2002 2002 2002 2001 2001 1999 1999 1997

Volleyball Athletics (European Cup 2nd League) Archery (Indoor) Taekwondo Triathlon Weightlifting Basketball Swimming, Diving, Synchronized swimming Freestyle Wrestling Beach Volley – Alanya Open

European European European European Balkan World European European World World

Number of participant countries 12 14 25 48 7 47 16 43 53 21

Number of participant athletes 204 634 150 370 100 267 288 998 271 194

City Antalya, Ankara Istanbul Ankara Samsun Istanbul Antalya Antalya, Ankara, Istanbul Istanbul Istanbul Alanya

GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

VII

EXPERIENCE

51


SECURITY a. Ultimate responsibility Ultimate responsibility for security during the Istanbul Games will lie with the Istanbul Directorate of Security (IDS), local branch of the National Police. The IDS is placed under exclusive authority of the Governor of Istanbul, who will hold office as vice-chair of the Istanbul OCOG. The Governor also commands the local Gendarmerie, responsible for security in non-urban Istanbul, and the Coast Guard, which works in cooperation with the Marine Police. The Governor will head an Olympic Security Coordination Center (OSCC) to liaise the IDS departments with the OCOG, municipal authorities, and other public bodies. Military authorities and the National Intelligence Organization will also be represented at the Security Coordination Center. b. Resources Human resources for the Games security will consist of the following: • Police forces: The IDS currently has around 32,000 commissioned officers on duty. In addition, following Istanbul’s election as the host city, the IDS Training Center will carry out a program to graduate 9,000 Olympic officers over the lead up to the Games. The IDS will deploy an estimated number of about 25,000 officers for Olympics-specific security missions. To supplement ordinary policing functions in the city, it plans on temporary move of appropriate numbers of officers from the 18,000-strong National Police force in neighboring provinces. • Armed Forces: Competent army corps units will assume Olympic security missions especially in surveillance, maritime and airspace security, screening, and bomb management. • Civil defense corps: Istanbul has a reserve of 6,000 civil defense workers trained for public safety services. Under the Governor’s command, this workforce will be available for Olympic services. • Municipal emergency teams: The Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality employs a reserve of 9,000 emergency workers, including the fire brigades among others. This force will be operational in facilitating contingency plans in venues. • Municipal police: The present taskforce of 3,200 municipal officers who attend to lawful provision of community services will take part in Olympic security arrangements. • Private security: Private security organizations in Istanbul currently employ 12,000 personnel in total. Their resources will be used for routine internal security arrangements on Olympic sites, e.g., accreditation for back of house areas, ticketing, and vehicle permits. • Volunteers: OCOG volunteers will be assigned tasks in the control of access rights to the venues and their various zones, according to accreditation entitlements.

VII GENERAL CONDITIONS, LOGISTICS AND EXPERIENCE

25

Based on the above, the IOBC estimates that a total 45,000 to 50,000 personnel will be employed for Olympic security during the Istanbul Games. The IDS employs state-of-the-art technologies in surveillance, online and radio communications, x-ray and magnetometer screening, explosive detection, and CCTV coverage. The OSCC will be networked through an intranet system, and have access to national and international security and intelligence databases. In addition to regular police communications channels, a special Olympic radio network will be established on a private and secure network with encrypted communications. c. Single management structure Single management is an inviolable rule in Turkey’s public security system. As the ultimate authority in Olympic security, the IDS will hold unrestricted command of all human or technical resources allocated for such security, whatever their provenance. Its command will be applicable with no functional or territorial restrictions. Existing laws give security authorities discretionary powers in implementing regulations related to public order management, right of assembly, traffic restrictions, and other matters relevant to efficient security operations. In case of need for new legislation to tackle uniquely Olympic circumstances relating to such matters as immigration control, criminal process, use of personal data, or deployment of military personnel, the Cabinet would introduce such legislation into the Parliament.

53


ANNEX 1 - MAP A: ISTANBUL’S OLYMPIC PROJECT ANNEXE 1 - CARTE A: PROJECT OLYMPIQUE D’ISTANBUL


ANNEX 2 - MAP B - TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE AND VENUES ANNEXE 2 - CARTE B -INFRASTRUCTURE DE TRANSPORT ET SITES


APPENDIX

3

CHART I – EXISTING AND ADDITIONAL SPORTS VENUES

Existing Sports Venues Construction/upgrade

Sports Venues

Sports/Events

Total spectator capacity

Olympic Stadium

Running Jumping Athletics Throwing Combined Football Final Opening Ceremony Closing Ceremony

80,000

2001

-

-

Ba¤c›lar Badminton Hall

Badminton

5,000

2001

-

-

22,500

1992

2005-2008 1

15,000,000

2,000

2001

-

-

12,000

1991

-

-

1998

2001

Private

Sinan Erdem Dome

Basketball Gymnastics

Artistic

Cycling

Mountain Bike

Parkorman Klassis Equestrian Club

TÜYAP Exhibition Center 2

Equestrian 1st hall 2nd hall

Fencing

4th hall

Taekwondo Table tennis

7th hall

Gymnastics

5th hall 8th hall

Handball

Fenerbahçe Stadium

Ataköy Aquatic Center

Date of upgrade

Cost of upgrade (if not yet completed) In USD 2003

Source of financing (Public/private/joint)

Public

4,000 2,000 5,000 Rhythmic Trampoline

5,000 5,000 8,000

Football

40,000

1982

2001

Private

Football

56,000

1971

2000

Public

Football

20,000

1951

2000

Public

Football

15,000

1973

1998

Public

Weightlifting

5,000

1999

-

Water-polo

3,500

1996

1999

Swimming Fencing Shooting Riding Running Indoor

5,000 4,000 4,000 10,000 10,000 12,000

1979

1999

1989

2001

‹zmir Atatürk Stadium Bursa Atatürk Stadium Kocaeli ‹smet Pafla Stadium Mydonose Showland

Construction date

Aquatics

Air Force Academy 2

Modern Pentathlon

Abdi ‹pekçi Hall

Volleyball

Public

Public

1 Seating and technical facilities 2 Temporary seating to be installed

Additional Sports Venues Sports Venues

Sports/Events

Baseball & Softball Stadiums

Baseball Softball

Olympic Park

Exhibition Center Slalom Center Olympic Velodrome Hockey Stadium Olympic Natatorium

Prince Islands Silivri Olympic Marina Kazl›çeflme Arena Bostanc› Beach Volleyball Center

Boxing Judo Wrestling Slalom Track

1st hall 2nd hall Canoe/Kayak Cycling Hockey

Swimming Diving Synchronized Swimming

Aquatics

Tennis Club Olympic Polygon Olympic Archery Golden Horn Rowing and Canoeing Center

Total spectator capacity

Tennis Shooting Archery Rowing Canoe/Kayak

Flatwater Triathlon Sailing

Construction Cost in USD 2003

Permanent or temporary venue

Source of financing (Public/private/joint)

Start

End

8,000

2009

2011

12,000,000

Temporary

Public

10,000

2007

2010

20,000,000

Permanent

Public

8,000 5,000 8,000

2010 2009 2008

2011 2011 2010

10,000,000 10,000,000 8,000,000

Permanent Permanent Temporary

Public Public Public

12,000

2008

2011

40,000,000

Permanent

Public

12,000 3,000 4,000

2008 2010 2011

2010 2010 2011

20,000,000 5,000,000 3,000,000

Permanent Permanent Permanent

Public Public Public

10,000

2008

2009

5,000,000

Permanent

Public

2010 2007 2006

2011 2009 2010

2,000,000 5,000,000 17,000,000

Temporary Permanent Permanent

Public Public Public

2010

2011

6,000,000

Temporary

Public

Volleyball

Indoor

2,500 1,000 12,000

Volleyball

Beach

12,000


APPENDIX

4

CHART II – ACCOMMODATION

A. Existing Accommodation: CLASS

Within a radius of 10 km of the City Center

TOTAL

Within a radius of 11-50 km of the City Center

Number of hotels

Number of rooms

Number of hotels

Number of rooms

Number of hotels

Number of rooms

155 112 123 126 28 8 2

16,706 6,768 4,626 4,168 2,918 150 245

22 16 10 12 12 0 1

2,870 1,038 756 444 2,226 0 238

177 128 133 138 40 8 3

19,576 7,806 5,382 4,612 5,144 150 483

4 + 5 star hotels 3 star hotels 2 star hotels 1 star hotels University campus Apartments (4-5 star) 1 Other 2

B. Planned Accommodation: CLASS 4 + 5 star hotels 3 star hotels 2 star hotels 1 2

Within a radius of 10 km of the City Center

TOTAL

Within a radius of 11-50 km of the City Center

Number of hotels

Number of rooms

Number of hotels

Number of rooms

Number of hotels

Number of rooms

32 7 7

5,870 518 265

14 2 2

3,163 178 56

46 9 9

9,033 696 321

82 one-bedroom, 2 two-bedroom, 16 three-bedroom, 4 four-bedroom apartments 2 floating hotels, 1 holiday village


APPENDIX

5

CHART III – EXISTING AND PLANNED TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

Existing Length + capacity (# of traffic lanes or tracks) Type of Transport Infrastructure (Motorways, major urban arterial network, suburban rail, subway, light rail public transport systems)

Within City boundary Length (km) 1.6

# of Lanes 2x3

1.5

2x4 2x4 2x3 1 2x3 2x2 2x3 2x2 2x4

Construction/upgrade

From City boundary to outlying venue Silivri Length (km)

Construction date

Road bridge

Bosphorus Bridge

Road bridge

Multi lane road

Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge Trans-European Motorway-TEM (E80-O-2) D100 State Highway (0-1)

49.5

Multi lane road

Interconnecting roads

66.0

Multi lane road

Coastal Main Roads

50.0

Road

Other urban roads

7,500.0

Suburban rail

Sirkeci-Halkal›

27.0

1

1871-1886

Suburban rail

Haydarpafla-Gebze

45.0

1

1872-1892

LRT

Aksaray-Atatürk International Airport

19.5

2

1989

Tramway

Eminönü-Zeytinburnu

11.2

2

1992

Subway

Taksim-4. Levent Prince Islands-KartalBosphorus-Sirkeci Prince Islands-KartalSar›yer-Büyükçekmece Prince Islands-Kartal-YeniköyBalat-Eminönü

8.3

2

2000

29 3

25

54 3

11

273

35

Motorway

Ferry Seabus Motorboats

57.5

Date of upgrade

# of Lanes

Source of financing Cost of upgrade (Public/private (if not yet completed) /joint) in USD 2003

1973 1988 38

2x2

1988-1992

45

2x2

1973 1980s-1990s 1960s -

2004-2008 2004-2009

750,000,000 2 700,000,000

Public Public Public

2003

1

23,5 km from Metris (K1) to Büyükçekmece 2 For 45 multilevel junctions and 114 km of road upgrading 3 Nautical miles

Planned Type of Transport Infrastructure (Motorways, major urban arterial network, suburban rail, subway, light rail public transport systems)

Length (km) + capacity (# of traffic lanes or tracks) From City boundary Within City boundary to outlying venues # of # of Length Length Lanes (km) (km) Lanes 4.2 2

Construction

Start

End

Cost in USD 2003

Source of financing (Public/private /joint)

Tramway

Eminönü-Karaköy-Kabatafl

2002

2004

30,000,000

Public

Tramway

Edirnekap›-GOP1 transfer center- Sultançiftli¤i

15.6

2

2002

2004

175,000,000

Public

Subway

Taksim-Yenikap›

5.2

2

1998

2005

450,000,000

Public

LRT

Aksaray-Yenikap›

0.7

2

1998

2005

27,000,000

Public

Funicular

Taksim-Kabatafl

0.6

1

2002

2005

20,000,000

Public

Tramway

Zeytinburnu-Güngören-Ba¤c›lar

5.8

2

2003

2005

20,000,000

Public

Subway

4. Levent-Seyrantepe (1st phase)

1.1

2

2004

2006

Subway

4. Levent-Ayaza¤a (2nd phase)

2.5

2

2004

2007

250,000,000

Public

LRT

Kad›köy-Kartal

22.0

2

2004

2008

400,000,000

Public

LRT

Intercity Bus Terminal (Esenler)-Ba¤c›lar-Mahmutbey

7.5

2

2004

2008

250,000,000

Public

LRT

Üsküdar-Altunizade (1st phase)

5.5

2

2004

2008

200,000,000

Public

Subway

Bak›rköy-fiirinevler-Sefaköy (1st phase)

6.0

2

2004

2008

200,000,000

Public

Tramway

Golden Horn Ring

11.5

2

2005

2008

80,000,000

Public

LRT

Ümraniye-Intercity Bus Terminal-Göztepe

5.7

2

2006

2008

160,000,000

Public

Tramway

Eyüp-Demirkap›-Ulubatl›

2.0

1

2005

2008

30,000,000

Public

13.5

2

2004

2008

1,800,000,000

Public

Bosphorus tube tunnel crossing

Marmaray

Yedikule-Sö¤ütlüçeflme Tube Tunnel

LRT

Kartal-Tuzla

9.0

2

2006

2009

150,000,000

Public

Tramway

Üsküdar-Kad›köy

4.2

2

2006

2009

50,000,000

Public

Elevated rail

Bak›rköy-‹ncirli

3.3

2

2006

2009

38,000,000

Public

LRT

Kartal-Tuzla

9.0

2

2006

2009

150,000,000

Public

Tramway

Altunizade-Tepeüstü (Ümraniye-Dudullu (2nd phase)

6.7

2

2006

2010

350,000,000

Public

Subway

Mahmutbey-‹kitelli-Baflakflehir- Olympic Park

6.0

2

2006

2010

200,000,000

Public

Elevated rail

Mecidiyeköy-Merter

16.0

2

2007

2010

300,000,000

Public

Tramway

Kad›köy-Bostanc›

8.6

2

2007

2012

120,000,000

Public

LRT

Sefaköy-Beylikdüzü (2nd phase)

18.7

2

2008

2012

500,000,000

Public

Subway

Yenikap›-Ba¤c›lar

10.0

2

2008

2012

420,000,000

Public

Road

Other urban roads

132.0

Various

2004

2008

500.000.000

Public

Motorway

Northern Motorway

17.0

2x3

Project designed

Public

Motorway

Çobançeflme Junction-Olympic Park-Northern Motorway

16.5

2x3

Project designed

Public


APPENDIX

6

CHART IV – TRANSPORT

All distances in km and journey times in minutes by bus

Atatürk Airport Km.

Min.

Atatürk Airport Hotel Area-I Taksim Main Hotel Area-II Old City

21

27

Hotel Area-I Taksim Hotel Area-II (11,033 rooms) Old City (17,867 rooms)

Olympic Stadium

Media Village

MPC/IBC

Km.

Min.

Km.

Min.

Km.

Min.

Km.

Min.

Km.

Min.

Km.

21

27

14 (rail)

20

16

22

16

22

16

22

0.5 (rail)

3

6

10

25

30

25

30

25

30

21

27

19

22

19

22

19

22

14 (rail)

20

4

5

1

3

16

22

4

5

16

22

16

22

22 22

14 (rail)

20

6

10

Athletes Village

16

22

25

30

19

22

Olympic Stadium

16

22

25

30

19

22

Media Village

Athletes Village

4

5

Min.

16

22

25

30

19

22

1

3

4

5

0.5 (rail)

3

21

27

14 (rail)

20

16

22

16

22

16

Athletics

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

4

5

16

Rowing

14

23

10

22

6

6

20

21

20

21

20

21

14

23

Badminton

19

25

23

30

20

25

13

20

13

20

13

20

19

25 22

MPC/IBC

Baseball

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

4 (rail)

4

18

24

10 (rail)

14

16

20

16

20

16

20

4 (rail)

4

Boxing

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Canoe/Kayak (Flat water)

14

23

10

22

6

6

20

21

20

21

20

21

14

23

Canoe/Kayak (Slalom)

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Basketball

Cycling (Track)

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Cycling (Time trial)

30

30

11

20

17

30

25

26

25

26

25

26

30

30

Cycling (Mass start)

14

23

10

22

6

6

20

21

20

21

20

21

14

23

Cycling (Mountain Bike)

32

32

13

22

19

32

27

28

27

28

27

28

32

32

Equestrian

64

70

75

62

62

45

57

45

57

45

57

45

64

70

Fencing

22

25

49

50

36

37

29

20

29

20

29

20

22

25

Football

33

42

16

20

22

30

40

42

40

42

40

42

33

42

Gymnastics (Artistic) Gymnastics (Rhythmic, Trampoline) Weightlifting Handball

4 (rail)

4

18

24

10

14

16

20

16

20

16

20

4 (rail)

4

22

25

49

50

36

37

29

20

29

20

29

20

22

25

0.5 (rail)

3

21

27

14 (rail)

20

16

22

16

22

16

22

0

0

22

25

49

50

36

37

29

20

29

20

29

20

22

25

Hockey

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Judo

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Wrestling

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Aquatics (Swimming, diving,synchronised swimming)

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Aquatics Waterpolo

4 (rail)

4

18

24

10

14

16

20

16

20

16

20

4(rail)

4

Modern Pentathlon

4

5

19

28

13

18

18

20

18

20

18

20

4

5

Softball

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Taekwondo

22

25

49

50

36

37

29

20

29

20

29

20

22

25

Tennis

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Table Tennis

22

25

49

50

36

37

29

20

29

20

29

20

22

25

Shooting

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Archery

16

22

25

30

19

22

4

5

*

*

4

5

16

22

Road

71

9

32

9

13

3

21 1

24

21 1

24

21 1

24

71

9

Sea

12 4

30

12 5

30

11 6

25

12

30

12

30

12

30

12

30

Triathlon

Total Sailing

-

39

-

39

-

28

-

54

-

54

-

54

-

39

60

65

71

60

58

42

53

40

53

40

53

40

60

65

Volleyball Indoor

13

15

14

20

6

10

20

24

20

24

20

24

13

15

Volleyball Beach

40

48

23

26

29

36

50

40

50

40

50

40

40

48

* Walking distance, within the Olympic Park 1 Distance to Bak›rköy Sea Bus Station 2 Distance to Kabatafl Sea Bus Station 3 Distance to Yenikap› Sea Bus Station. 4 Distance in nautical miles from Bak›rköy to Prince Islands 5 Distance in nautical miles from Kabatafl to Prince Islands 6 Distance in nautical miles from Yenikap› to Prince Islands


APPENDIX

7

CHART V - METEOROLOGY

Source: Ministry of Environment and Forestry - Department of Meteorology Data: Recorded at Florya Station (SW, European side); no significant variation in data recorded at Sarโ€บyer (NE European side) or Gรถztepe (Asian side) stations. Istanbul - Florya TEMPERATURE (ยบC) 09:00 12:00 15:00 18:00 21:00

Minimum Maximum Average 17.7 31.0 26.5 21.9 34.1 28.5 18.4 34.0 28.9 19.2 34.0 26.7 19.4 30.0 24.2

WIND DIRECTION (m/sec) General tendencies Direction Strength East-Northeast 2.6 East 2.9 East-Northeast 3.1 North-Northeast 2.9 Northeast 2.1

HUMIDITY (%) 07:00 14:00 21:00

Minimum Maximum Average 56.0 96.0 78.9 30.0 90.0 55.0 38.0 96.0 75.4

PRECIPITATION(%) Number of days Year Period of Games (20 July-5 August) Annually July August 1994 106 3 4 1995 118 6 4 1996 124 0 8 1997 131 6 9 1998 113 2 0 1999 113 1 5 2000 110 1 2 2001 106 1 6 2002 118 5 11 2003 107 2 1

ALTITUDE IN METERS Istanbul Istanbul Olympic (average) Village 10

45

Olympic Park

Silivri

100

25

Izmir

Kocaeli

Bursa

29

76

100


Project management / Gestion du projet Istanbul Olympic Bidding Committee SAM Research and Consulting Istanbul-Turkey Text / Texte SAM Research and Consulting Istanbul-Turkey Design / Conception SERDAR BENLI DESIGN OFFICE Istanbul - Turkey Printing / Impression AVCI Istanbul - Turkey

Istanbul 2012 Applicant File  
Istanbul 2012 Applicant File  
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