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secured with an indiscreet pin or brooch, either under the chin, on the lapel, nape of your neck or shoulder. These days however, the brooches and pins are hugely decorative, and meant to be showcased. Bank executive Ateena Rashid, 29, an avid fan of tudung accessories, says the accessories are an easy and stylish way to jazz up a plain tudung. “I don’t fancy printed scarves as I find them too ‘busy’ and difficult to match. I prefer wearing plaincoloured cotton headscarves that I drape loosely around my head. The accessories are perfect as they add some colour and style to an otherwise understated scarf,” says Ateena. The accessories come in various shapes, styles and colours. While they may look a little garish all lined up in a store, Ateena urges shoppers not to dismiss the pins so quickly. “At first, I was unimpressed when my cousin took me to the shop. The accessories seemed too bold for me. But when I took the time to look through the racks, I found many that suited my understated style. Some even looked a little vintage. I

March 9-22, 2012

pa r t i c u l a rly l i ke d t h e m e t a l brooches that had intricate carvings. And, some of the dangling ones in matte silver were also quite cool. I have about 35 in my collection now and though I don’t use them every day, I keep going back for more,” says Ateena. The best part, she points out, is how inexpensive the accessories are—often you can get three or four pieces for 10 ringgit or 12 ringgit (US$3-$4). The bigger, heavier (read: sturdier) pieces that are more intricate, such as the brooches, go for 10 ringgit or 12 ringgit a piece. And, if metal isn’t your preference, how about sewn-on fabric patches? Hiral Doshi offers a solution for women who want to refashion their existing tudungs by sewing on decorative patches, tassels or lace which she sources and imports from India and Dubai. “Instead of buying new headscarves, many of my customers bring in their old ones and ask me to jazz them up with some of my patches. Tudungs aren’t cheap to begin with and since most of them already have quite a collection, they find it more cost-effective to recycle

their old ones. I have an extensive catalogue of patches, lace and borders they can choose from, and they tell me how they want to use these decorative patches. They can choose to have them sewn on, or the patches can be made into brooches which they can pin on their scarves. Of course, if they want, I can help suggest some styles,” says Doshi, 26. Administrative assistant Siti Hajar Kadir finds Hiral’s accessories perfect for her as they provide something different from the usual items at the shops and boutiques which she frequents. “I like simple styles, but I also like accessories that are different and unique. I prefer stones and pearls ... but not too much. And I like what Hiral has to offer. They’re stylish and different,” says Siti Hajar. Hiral started her fashion business—Trendy Fusion Fashion— about a year ago after leaving her job as an auditor. She operates from her home in Bangsar, Kuala Lumpur. Interested customers can call to fix an appointment but she also supplies her products to boutiques in the Klang Valley, particularly in Shah Alam.

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AsiaNews  
AsiaNews  

March 9-22, 2012

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