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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1

2 9-1-1 Call Centers

8

5 2011 Survey

9 Director Letter

13

Heroes

10 Board of Managers

14 Geographic Information Systems

7

12 District Staff

15 Wireless Phase II

Chairman Letter

Operations & Training

18 Public Awareness

Statements

MISSION

OBJECTIVES

The Tarrant County 9-1-1 Emergency Assistance District will continuously provide reliable, accurate, responsive, and effective emergency communication networks and services to our member jurisdictions ensuring the protection of life and property for citizens in our community.

Ensure availability of the 9-1-1 system to all persons and entities within the Tarrant County 9-1-1 Emergency Assistance District. Provide continuous improvement of systems and services through research and implementation of industry “best practices.” Enhance public education and awareness of available and future 9-1-1 services. Provide leadership in the areas of legislation, regulation and technology. Advise, inform and educate telecommunicators (and other public safety personnel) to ensure adherence to federal and state emergency communications laws and requirements.

TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT 2600 Airport Freeway Fort Worth, Texas 76111 www.tc911.org

Additional copies of the Tarrant County 9-1-1 Emergency Assistance District’s Annual Report can be obtained by contacting Alisa Simmons, Manager of Public Marketing at 817-820-1189 or asimmons@tc911.org.

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


9-1-1 CALL CENTERS

P Primary PSAPs 1. Arlington

2. Azle 3. Bedford 4. Benbrook 5. Blue Mound 6. Burleson 7. Crowley 8. Dallas/Fort Worth Airport 9. Dalworthington Gardens 10. Euless 11. Everman 12. Forest Hill 13. Fort Worth Police 14. Grand Prairie 15. Grapevine 16. Haltom City 17. Hurst 18. Irving Police

19. North East Tarrant Communications Center

20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34.

Kennedale Lake Worth Mansfield Naval Air Station-Ft. Worth North Richland Hills Pantego Richland Hills River Oaks Saginaw Sansom Park Tarrant County Sheriff’s Ofc. Watauga Westover Hills Westworth Village White Settlement Police

15

19

43

2 28 21

24 16

27

30

33

40

5

29

23

34

39

32

4

31 3

17

8

46

10

26

37

44

1

45

25

36

35

9

38

13

11

14

41

12

47

18

20

7 22

6

42

S

Secondary PSAPs

35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41.

Arlington Fire Dept. Careflite Ft. Worth Fire Dept. Irving Fire Department Medstar Tarrant County Fire Alarm White Settlement Fire Dept.

B

Backup PSAPs

42. 43. 44. 45.

Arlington Police Dept. Backup Burleson Backup DFW Airport DPS Backup Fort Worth Fire Backup Fort Worth Police Backup Medstar Backup Grand Prairie EOC Irving Police/Fire Backup Regional Backup-South

46. 47. 48.

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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2011 TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1/ NCTCOG SURVEY 2011 Survey Resident Awareness of 9-1-1 Services Tarrant County 9-1-1 District and North Central Texas Council of Governments Region. We conducted our 2011 survey to update the findings from the 2009 survey and gain a better understanding of the public’s knowledge of using 9-1-1 services. As in 2009, some of the topics examined in the survey included: General satisfaction with 9-1-1 services and satisfaction among those who have called 9-1-1 in the last few years. Residents’ perceptions of the most important things to tell a 9-1-1 calltaker and whether calltakers would know their location when calling 9-1-1 from a home phone, cell phone, contacted by text message, etc. Children’s awareness and use of 9-1-1 was also examined. Awareness of any recent advertising or news stories about 9-1-1 and their main sources of local news and information.

Satisfaction with area safety services remained high.

68% of respondents who called 9-1-1 rated the experience as excellent. Up from 61% in 2009.

Excellent Good Only Fair Poor

68

59

How would you rate your overall experience with 9-1-1 dispatch services?

56

Over half said their location is the most important thing to tell a 9-1-1 calltaker.

One-third of respondents had called 9-1-1.

Nature of emergency/reason why calling

If you had to call 9-1-1, what would you say is the most important thing to tell the 9-1-1 calltaker?

Location/address

No

Condition of person/situation

Not Sure

Other Don’t Know

2

Yes

Phone number

Have you called 9-1-1 in the last 2 or 3 years?

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


Of Those Who Called 9-1-1

Most said their emergency is the second most important thing to tell a 9-1-1 calltaker.

91% owned their own cell phone. Nature of emergency/reason why calling

Yes No

If you had to call 9-1-1, what would you say is the SECOND most important thing to tell the 9-1-1 calltaker?

Location/address Phone number Condition of person/situation Other

Do you have your own cell phone?

Don’t Know

9-1-1 Call Awareness Home Phone Cell Phone Office Phone

Some residents do not know if 9-1-1 calltakers would know their location when calling from different phones or can be contacted by different methods.

Other

Agree Disagree Not Sure

9-1-1 call takers know your location or address when you call 9-1-1 from your home phone.

Not Sure

Did you call 9-1-1 from your home phone, your cell phone, office phone or more than one phone?

Yes

Agree

Agree

Disagree

Disagree

Not Sure

Not Sure

9-1-1 call takers know your location or address when you call 9-1-1 from a cell phone.

You can send a text message from a cell phone to 9-1-1 to report an emergency.

No Not Sure

Was your call answered quickly?

Yes

Yes

Agree

No

Disagree

Not Sure

Were you aware that by law, you can charge an old, inactive cell phone and use it to call 9-1-1 emergency services?

Not Sure

9-1-1 call takers know your location or address when you call 9-1-1 from a hotel or office building.

No

Agree

Agree

Not Sure

Disagree

Disagree

Not Sure

Did the 9-1-1 call taker understand your needs and obtain the necessary information?

Would you agree or disagree that 9-1-1 call takers can call you back if you call 9-1-1 from an old, inactive cell phone?

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

Not Sure

9-1-1 will be notified if you post an emergency on Facebook or Twitter.

3


TV

9-1-1 Public Awareness

Newspaper Radio

Yes

Internet

No

Billboards

Not Sure

Other Don’t Know

Have you seen or heard any ads, either on TV, radio or billboards, about 9-1-1 emergency services in the last year?

TV continues to be the main source of information for residents.

Yes No Not Sure

Have you seen or heard any news stories, either positive or negative, about 9-1-1 services in the last year?

Refused

Where did you see or hear the ads about 9-1-1 emergency services?

Facebook

TV

Foursquare

Radio

Linked In

Newspaper

My Space

Internet

Twitter

Some of Each

You Tube

Not Sure

None Not Sure

When it comes to getting local news and information, which do you rely on most?

Children’s Knowledge of 9-1-1

Of the these Internet sites, which two do you use most often?

Yes No

Most parents continue to say their children know how to dial 9-1-1 and the information they should give calltakers.

Not Sure

Does your child or children know how to dial 9-1-1 and what information to give the call taker in an emergency?

Family Member School Church/Community Event Other (-1%)

Sometimes safety personnel visit the schools to talk to the children about using 9-1-1. Has your child ever brought home pencils, stickers or coloring books from school about 9-1-1?

4

Yes No Not Sure

Some of Each Not Sure

(If yes) How did your child learn how to use 9-1-1 and report the information to the call taker? Was it from a family member, at school, or at a church or community event, or somewhere else?

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


On October 24, 2010, 16-year old Ryan Reed was a passenger in the SUV being driven by his grandfather Joe Posavitz. They were driving through Arlington, headed back to their Weatherford home when Mr. Posavitz experienced a massive heart attack…with the vehicle still in motion. Using his cell phone…Ryan, who has Aspergers Syndrome, a form of autism, dialed 9-1-1. His call was answered by Arlington 9-1-1 Calltaker Angie Phillips. Angie quickly went to work to try to determine the location of Ryan and his grandfather. He remained calm and on the line while following Angie’s directions until first responders arrived at the scene. Mr. Posavitz, who spent six-weeks in the hospital, credits Ryan for being alive today.

Ryan was previously honored for his lifesaving 9-1-1 call by Tarrant County 9-1-1 District and the Arlington Fire Department. In March, 2011 received recognition on the national level. Ryan, along with Angie Phillips, the Arlington 9-1-1 calltaker that handled his call, received awards for their heroic teamwork from the Next Generation 9-1-1 Institute and the Congressional Next Generation 9-1-1 Caucus on Capitol Hill. The two received a standing ovation from an audience of 500 that included lawmakers, FCC leaders, 9-1-1 administrators, and telecommunications executives at the eighth annual national 9-1-1 Honors Gala at the Ronald Reagan Center in Washington D.C. March 29, 2011. The master of ceremonies for the evening was NFL great and Heisman Trophy Winner Tim Brown. Ryan’s 9-1-1 call can be heard by going to www.tc911.org

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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2011 Kid Hero Dontasha Robeson 8-years old Forest Hill, Texas Eight-year old Dontasha Robeson called 9-1-1 when her mother experienced a diabetic episode while making dinner.

6


On the evening of December 10, 2010, Dontasha and her mother were spending a quiet evening at home. Her mother was making dinner when Dontasha noticed her mom was having problems. While at the stove, her mom began to experience a diabetic episode. Dontasha quickly called 9-1-1 for help. While on the phone with Forest Hill 9-1-1 dispatcher Windy Morehead, this pint size hero explained the problem and followed Ms. Morehead’s every instruction. The eight-year old even tested and reported her Mom’s blood sugar levels to Ms. Morehead. At one point during the call Dontasha realized that the burners on the stove were still turned on and food was cooking. She told Ms. Morehead she didn’t know how to turn the stove off, but she quickly figured out how to turn off the burners. Dontasha remained on the line with Forest Hill 9-1-1 as she was instructed. When Ms. Morehead advised her the ambulance was outside, she unlocked the door and let the paramedics in to help her mother.

For her quick thinking and life-saving call, Dontasha was recognized as a 9-1-1 Kid Hero. Dontasha’s 9-1-1 call can be heard by going to www.tc911.org. 7


9 - 1 - 1 H E RO - J O S P E H P O P E

IN MEMORIUM Joseph Pope 1961 - 2011

In 2011, the Tarrant County 9-1-1 family lost a friend with the passing of Joe Pope, the emergency communications commander of Northeast Tarrant Communications Center (Netcom). Joe suffered a heart attack on March 1, 2011 near his home. Joe, 50, who formerly worked at Fort Worth Police Communications, was hired when Keller, Southlake and Westlake formed a regional dispatch center. Colleyville joined the center in 2010, and the combined center was renamed Netcom. He was one of the dispatchers on duty the night of the shootings at Wedgwood Baptist Church in Fort Worth on Sept. 15, 1999. Joe’s wife Pamela, a Fort Worth Police officer leaving behind his wife Pamela, three children and two step-children who loved him dearly.

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RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


“The next generation of 9-1-1 service, or NG9-1-1, is coming soon. This completely new digital network will deliver new services and technologies that will expand our 9-1-1 horizon.”

Welcome to the annual report of the Tarrant County 9-1-1 Emergency Assistance District for fiscal year 2010. As in past years, we have focused on investing time and resources in ways that are meaningful and beneficial to our customers. I am very proud of our accomplishments and hope this report will demonstrate our commitment to excellence and responsive customer service. In order for our 9-1-1 system to keep pace, we have continued to modify our legacy analog network. At the same time, we have monitored the development of technology to meet the demands of 9-1-1’s future. The next generation of 9-1-1 service, or NG9-1-1, is coming soon. This completely new digital network will deliver new services and technologies that will expand our 9-1-1 horizon. New tools will be available for call takers and field responders. We look forward to NG9-1-1 and the innovations it will bring. Another program initiated during 2010 was our PSAP Assistance Program. Under this program, a Public Safety Answering Point can apply for “grant style” funding for reimbursement of certain calltaker related expenses. Some of the more popular requests were maintenance, remodeling, chairs and specialized training. Last fiscal year, almost one million dollars was distributed. This program has been extended through at least calendar year 2011. We value your partnership in serving the citizens of the Tarrant County 9-1-1 Emergency Assistance District and are committed to supporting you. Your continued support is appreciated. Please do not hesitate to contact me if I may be of assistance or answer any questions you might have.

Respectfully,

Respectfully,

Larry Boyd

Greg Petrey

Chairman, Board of Managers

Executive Director

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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B OA R D O F M A N AG E R S Board Chariman, Jim Austin, retires. Long-time Tarrant County 9-1-1 District board chairman, Jim Austin, retired from board service with the District after 13 ½ years. Appointed to the Board in 1997 by the Fort Worth City Council, he served as chairman since April 2005. Jim was a tireless supporter and advocate for the 9-1-1 district and its initiatives with a genuine interest in the work performed by the staff and a sincere concern for the citizens’ served by the agency.

Retiring Tarrant County 9-1-1 District board chairman, Jim Austin & new chairman Chief Larry Boyd.

10

Larry Boyd

Rick Brunson

Chairman City of Irving Appointee Chief - Irving Police Dept.

Tarrant County Commissioners’ Court Appointee Enterprise Support Services Manager - Tarrant County

Don Crowsen

Richard Fregoe

City of Arlington Appointee Chief - Arlington Fire Dept.

City of Grand Prairie Appointee Deputy Mayor ProTem Council Member District 4

Sam Greif

Krystal James

Harry Jeffries

City of Fort Worth Appointee Operations Battalion Chief Fort Worth Fire Dept.

Title Description 1 Title Description2

Mayors’ Council Appointee Mayor - City of Watauga

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


D I S T R I C T S TA F F

Richard Atkins

Warren Austin

Mandy Chanthapanya

Monte Cockrum

Bill Horne, ENP

Assistant Director Administration & Regulatory

Geographic Information Systems Analyst

Administrative Assistant

Network Support Specialist

Database Manager

Kevin Kleck

Gracie Martinez

Wanda McCarley

Melinda Oliver

Technical Operations Manager

Database Coordinator

Operations Group Manager

Chief Fiscal Officer

Greg Petrey, ENP Executive Director

Phillip Rohrbough

Gary Ross

Yvonne Serl, ENP

Alisa Simmons

Yui Skulpoonkitti, GISP

Geographic Information Systems Analyst

GIS/GPS Specialist

PSAP Support Specialist

Manager of Public Marketing

Manager of Geographic Information Systems

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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Wanda McCarley Operations Group Manager

“We have looked at feature functionality resembling NG9-1-1 which is currently available in the vendor community.”

NG9-1-1 Bringing Depth to the Vision NG911 has been in our vocabulary and on our minds for several years now. Standards have been under development, technical discussions have been taking place, long range planning has been on the drawing board, and best practices have been formulating in the professional circles. While there is much to be done on the NG9-1-1 front lines, our Operation Group has worked this past year to learn, share, develop, plan and prepare. With what we know today we can add depth to our knowledge of NG9-1-1 and enhance our vision of how it may apply to Tarrant County 9-1-1 District PSAPs and jurisdictions. With assistance from our Technical Operations Advisory Committee we have looked at feature functionality resembling NG9-1-1 which is currently available in the vendor community. Our TOAC has had opportunity to think through the complexities of many of these offerings and consider how similar functionality would actuality work within their service areas. Our Technical Team has had the opportunity to work with our new IP network. Testing and monitoring have become realities. We have more data to exchange with others who are working on similar projects. We’ve begun to think about policies, security, and operational issues. A representative advisory group from our member jurisdictions has been working with staff to explore governance, security, policy, roles, change management and cyber issues. Through the year we’ve pursued early preparatory efforts for participation in the Commission on State Emergency Communications’ (CSEC’s) First office Application project. We’ve learned a great deal and this project has caused us to think in real terms about how we may actually apply some aspects of NG9-1-1 we’ve only seen on paper to this point. We’ve also been busy preparing the selected PSAPs that will be participating in that project. Our GIS Department has been deeply involved both with our own development and with the CSEC’s EGDMS effort. Aspects of call routing and location verification are beginning to take shape and the path forward is becoming much clearer. A very important part of NG9-1-1 is the role of GIS in the basic routing and verification functions necessary for the delivery of 9-1-1 calls and data. This is a profound mind-shift which will impact many of our processes and procedures. Training has taken on a dual role. Not only must we meet the requirements of today’s 9-1-1 environment, but we must also prepare to meet tomorrow’s. A goal for our training effort is to introduce new training issues precipitated by NG9-1-1 and, at the same time, to obtain feedback on pivotal issues that impact the member and user community. All in all it has been a busy year with lots of challenges on the NG9-1-1 front. It has also been a very meaningful year. The vision of NG9-1-1 is becoming clearer and is taking on dimension. From a flat image to 3D we are looking at issues from a position of prospective. In partnership with our member jurisdictions, we are moving into a better place for planning and decision making. 12

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


“Our GIS staff has been developing and maintaining the required GIS data layers for NG9-1-1, such as road centerlines, address points, emergency boundaries and jurisdictional boundaries.”

Yui Skulpoonkitti, GISP Manager of Geographic Information Systems

2001 Graphic Information Systems (GIS) Annual Report As we move to Next Generation 9-1-1 (NG9-1-1), the GIS data plays a crucial role in the Emergency Call Routing Function/Location Validation Function (ECRF/LVF) within an Emergency Services Internet Protocol Network (ESInet). Using the map data, the emergency caller’s location is pre-validated in LVF and then with ECRF, the valid location is routed to the appropriate Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP). Therefore, preparing the GIS data for NG9-1-1, we need to ensure that the quality of the GIS database should include accuracy, timeliness, completeness and consistency. Our GIS staff has been developing and maintaining the required GIS data layers for NG9-1-1, such as road centerlines, address points, emergency boundaries and jurisdictional boundaries. The data maintenance plans, workflow process and quality control (QC) are implemented during the process. The synchronization of GIS data, MSAG and ALI databases are performed to ensure the GIS mapping is as accurate as possible, which assists in accurately determining the location of the emergency calls. The data integrity is also checked and maintained. To support regional data sharing with other agencies or entities, the GIS data standards and guidelines, such as GIS database design standards and addressing standards, were also applied. In order to combine seamless GIS dataset for use in regional or statewide ESInet, coordination and work with surrounding jurisdictions were needed to ensure that boundary maps, road names and addresses had no gaps or overlaps. TC9-1-1 GIS has been participating in the Enterprise Geospatial Database Management System (EGDMS) project, with the Commission on State Emergency Communications (CSEC). The EGDMS will be employed for the integration and provisioning of 9-1-1 geospatial data to NG9-1-1 emergency call routing functional components in the ESInet. The 2011 digital orthos and Pictometry were also updated to our GIS system. The GIS software, ArcGIS 10.0 including patches and service packs, were installed for our desktops and servers. Additionally, the RDBMS software, which stores our GIS data, was updated to MS SQL Server 2008.

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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WIRELESS PHASE II CALL TESTING In 2011 Tarrant County 9-1-1 continued the extensive wireless testing program that was started in 2005. The data gathered from this testing program placed Tarrant County 9-1-1 on the leading edge of 9-1-1 agencies in the nation in gathering first hand data about wireless calls inside their territory. The fact that the per cent of wireless calls has grown to over 80% emphasizes the need for current and accurate information on the location of wireless callers. The primary objective of the testing program is to gain first hand knowledge about each of the 6 major wireless networks in order to better train the call takers how to handle wireless calls. Another objective of this Phase 2 testing is to determine if the wireless carriers are continuing to meet the FCC mandate for accuracy. The testing program involves test calls from each of the 6 major wireless network’s phones. There are over 300 test sites throughout the Tarrant County 9-1-1 District service area. The data gathered during the testing program allowed the wireless training for the 9-1-1 call takers to be updated and greatly simplified. The training for the call takers is now based on results that are unique to Tarrant County 9-1-1. The wireless training now is based on the Where’s WALDO puzzle. WALDO goes to a PSAP and makes a test call from an intersection. The call taker uses the training to locate WALDO on the map and tell WALDO the actual intersection.

Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Call Testing In 2011 Tarrant County 9-1-1 continued to test VoIP telephone service. There are now 5 working VoIP telephone lines that are used to generate 9-1-1 calls. The primary objective of the testing is to gather first hand knowledge about VoIP in order to better train the call takers how to handle VoIP calls.

Wireline Calls Wireless Calls Oct-10 Nov-10 Dec-10 Jan-11 Feb-11 Mar-11 Apr-11 May-11 Jun-11 Jul-11 Aug-11 Sep-11 Average

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RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


P U B L I C AWA R E N E S S - S U P E R B OW L X LV

February – SUPER BOWL On Sunday, February 6, 2011, all eyes were on North Texas for Super Bowl XLV at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington. Because Super Bowl XLV and the events and festivities surrounding the big game brought in hundreds of thousands of visitors to a variety of venues spread throughout the North Texas Region, the planning process included significant efforts to ensure public safety. Two members of the Tarrant County 9-1-1 District Board of Managers were a part of the Regional Public Safety Planning Committee. Larry Boyd, Irving Police Chief and Don Crowson, Arlington Fire Chief and co-chair of the committee collaborated with leadership from other north Texas fire and police departments, state public safety agencies in addition to the FBI ATF and ICE. They planned for traffic, large crowds attending events, and the potential for criminal activity targeting Super Bowl visitors and local residents. Alisa Simmons, the district’s public marketing manager/public information officer was a member of the public safety Communications Action Team and was one of 20 local, state and federal PIOs that worked in the Joint Information Center (JIC), which was tasked with media relations for the Super Bowl.

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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P U B L I C AWA R E N E S S - M E D I A Public Awareness Campaign The district’s outreach efforts included advertising aimed at millions of citizens in Tarrant County and north Texas. The campaign featured the slogan, “9-1-1 Needs To Know Where To Go” on billboards and a 30-second television spot which encouraged citizens to be prepared to give the 9-1-1 calltaker the location or address of the emergency. The 9-1-1 message was delivered using a variety of platforms including TV, Cable, Radio, Cinema and Billboard, as well as news coverage of 9-1-1 education and awareness activities during April and September 2011. Back to School with Radio Disney The Tarrant County 9-1-1 District partnered with Radio Disney for the radio station’s Back-to-School event at Irving Mall on August 20, 2011. It was an afternoon of non-stop activity and 9-1-1 education geared toward children and parents that took a break from school shopping to stop by the Radio Disney Pic - this page live remote. Led by Irving 9-1-1 dispatcher and public education pro Shantelle Oliver, Cell Phone Sally, Red E. Fox and Radio Disney air personalities taught youngsters about 9-1-1 in a fun and interactive way. Just in time for back-to-school, Oliver gave presentations teaching children the difference between an emergency situation and a non-emergency situation, demonstrating how to call 9-1-1 from a cell phone (push the green/send button) and the importance of knowing their parent’s address and phone number. Radio Disney’s programming is geared to children 3-12 year olds and their parents. April 2011 Public Awareness Campaign The April 2011 National 9-1-1 Education Month public awareness campaign included components aimed at heightening public awareness about the 9-1-1 system. The public service announcements ran on broadcast and cable television, minority radio, cinema and billboard advertising, reaching millions of people. • Television and Cable TV - reached 40% - 2 million viewers- of all Adults 18+. There was also a 10- minute feature segment aired on 5 Talk Street, hosted by Scott Murray. • Billboards - reached 16.5 million Adults 18+ in Tarrant County for the duration of the campaign. • Minority Radio - More than 800 9-1-1 public service announcements aired on Dallas/Fort Worth radio withfor programming Need Pic stations or two this article geared toward Hispanics, Vietnamese & African-Americans. Live news interviews aired on Radio Saigon, and Spanish stations. • Cinema – 41 Theaters, 545 screens, 58,860 spots, 1.7 million total attendance September 2011 Public Awareness Campaign • •

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Television and Cable TV - reached 52% - 2.6 million viewers- of all Adults 18+. Billboards - reached 34 million Adults 18+ in Tarrant County starting in September.

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


P U B L I C AWA R E N E S S R E P O RT

The Tarrant County 9-1-1 District maintained its commitment to providing 9-1-1 public education to citizens countywide. The agency’s relationships with individual 9-1-1 communications centers throughout the county ensured that our combined efforts heightened awareness about the 9-1-1 system and how it operates here in Tarrant County in general and specifically in each city. The district also maintained it’s partnerships with area fire departments, police departments and EMS providers to disseminate the 9-1-1 message. During FY11 the district distributed 9-1-1 educational materials to 9-1-1 communications centers, police, fire and EMS agencies. These educational materials and curriculum were utilized to educate school children, teens, adults and senior citizens. The district provided materials or participated in health and safety fairs at churches, libraries, hospitals and other venues. The agency supported the efforts of area fire departments during Fire Safety Education Month in October, in addition to the crime prevention efforts of National Night Out events, Citizen Police Academies and Citizen Fire Academies offered by many police and fire departments. National 9-1-1 Education Month During the month of April 2011, the Tarrant County 9-1-1 District joined the nationwide efforts of the emergency communications industry in observing National 9-1-1 Education Month locally. The United States Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives each have resolutions designating the month of April as National 9-1-1 Education Month. The resolutions urge government officials, school administrators, caregivers, businesses and families to observe the month with appropriate 9-1-1 educational training, ceremonies, events and activities.

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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A F I DAV I T

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RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS & GOVERNMENT FUND BALANCE SHEET September 30, 2011 ASSETS Cash and investments Service fees receivables Net pension asset Nondepreciable capital assets Depreciable capital assets, net Total assets LIABILITIES Accounts payable Long-term liabilities: Due within one year Due in more than one year Total liabilities FUND BALANCE/NET ASSETS Fund balance: Unassigned Total fund balance Total liabilities and fund balance

General

Adjustments

Statement of Net Assets

$ 19,937,179 759,845 - - - 20,697,024

$ - - 763,411 1,264,681 6,141,267 8,169,359

$ 19,937,179 759,845 763,411 1,264,681 6,141,267 28,866,383

355,592 - - - 355,592

- 60,005 240,019 300,024

355,592

20,341,432 20,341,432

(20,341,432) (20,341,432)

-

60,005 240,019 655,616

$ 20,697,024

Net assets: Invested in capital assets Unrestricted

7,405,948 20,804,819

7,405,948 20,804,819

Total net assets

$ 28,210,767

$ 28,210,767

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES & GOVERNMENT FUND REVENUES, EXPENDITURES & CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE For the year ending September 30, 2011

General

Adjustments

Statement of Activities

$ 6,263,592 2,256,690 3,277,810 46,137 405,416 319,285 - 12,568,930

$ - ( 532,205) - - - - 1,015,805 483,600

$ 6,263,592 1,724,485 3,277,810 46,137 405,416 319,285 1,015,805 13,052,530

Capital outlay Total expenditures/expenses

3,959,646 16,528,576

( 3,959,646) ( 3,476,046)

13,052,530

Program revenues: Charges for services - 9-1-1 service fees

13,763,541

-

13,763,541

( 2,765,035)

3,476,046

711,011

61,144 61,144

- -

61,144 61,144

Expenditures/expenses: 911 services: 9-1-1 service fees Personnel Lease and contractual services Supplies and materials Other fees and services Other Depreciation Total 9-1-1 services

Net program revenues General revenues: Interest income Total general revenues Excess of revenues over expenditures Change in net assets Fund balance/net assets: Beginning Prior period adjustment Ending 20

( 2,703,891)

2,703,891

772,155

772,155

23,045,323

5,126,221

28,171,544

-

( 732,932)

( 732,932)

$ 20,341,432

$ 7,869,335

$ 28,210,767

RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES & CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET & ACTUAL

GENERAL FUND Original

Final

Actual Amounts

Variance with Final Budget Positive (Negative)

$ 12,031,301

$ 12,031,301

$ 13,763,541

$ 1,732,240

40,200

40,200

61,144

20,944

12,071,501

12,071,501

13,824,685

1,753,184

11,137,500

11,137,500

10,223,238

914,262

Personnel

2,272,837

2,272,837

2,256,690

16,147

Lease and contractual services

2,793,523

2,793,523

3,277,810

( 484,287)

Supplies and materials

53,850

53,850

46,137

7,713

Other fees and services

425,230

425,230

405,416

19,814

Other

995,103

995,103

319,285

675,818

17,678,043

17,678,043

16,528,576

1,149,467

( 5,606,542)

( 5,606,542)

( 2,703,891)

2,902,651

23,045,323

23,045,323

23,045,323

$ 17,438,781

$ 17,438,781

$ 20,341,432

For the year ending September 30, 2011

Budgeted Amounts

REVENUES Service fees Interest income Total revenues EXPENDITURES 9-1-1 service fees

Total expenditures EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING FUND BALANCE, ENDING

- $ 2,902,651

Legal Representation: Taylor, Olson, Adkins, Sralla, & Elam, L.L.P. RESPONDERS | TARRANT COUNTY 9-1-1 DISTRICT | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

21


Tarrant County 9-1-1 Annual Report 2011  

Tarrant County 9-1-1 Annual Report 2011

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