Page 1

D-FOLIO

Troy Goodall

TROY

Goodall

T

roy Goodall’s father presented him with his first camera at the age of 15. An old mate had given up photography, so Goodall found himself the owner of an Olympus OM 10 with a prime lens in his teenage hands. “I just starting snapping away at family members,” he recalls. Like many other kids who grow up to become photographers, Goodall spent plenty of time in the school darkroom. Eventually, he went on to hone his skills at university. Dad’s inspiration apparently paid off, because his son is one of New Zealand’s up-and-coming pro photographers, shooting any number of high-profile ad campaigns. What’s evident throughout his work, both personal and professional, is that Goodall has already developed something of a distinctive style, at turns darkly funny and often hyper-realistic. It’s a technique he learnt working at a studio shooting family portraiture, a noble profession but one he eventually lost interest in. “I guess I really got bored of it,” he admits. “They were really strict with how stuff had to be shot, with the placement of people and these triangles you had to make.” So, with some perfectly good subject matter and the equipment to pull it off, Goodall began to experiment. “I would just spend about 10 minutes trying to get a shot like that, and then spend the rest of it for me.” The resulting images from these experiments are intriguing – children screech or look bored, kids openly muck about before the camera. They both adhere to the rules of portrait photography while gently poking fun at them. And Goodall had hit on something. While he jokes about teasing kids to get an interesting photo, Goodall admits it’s the repartee a photographer establishes with a model that can make or break the image. “I guess it’s probably my strong point in photography is being able to work well with people,” he says. “When I see somebody I know how I could shoot them.” Goodall also developed his touch with post-production through his tenure at a studio, working for two years retouching before striking out on his own. Once he knew what he could achieve with his computer, and what he wanted, anything was possible. He recommends the approach to those new to Photoshop. “I reckon they should just sit down in front of the computer themselves and play around with all the tools and how they work and just see what they start to like in an image,” he says. “There’s no right or wrong. If they do something completely different and it looks good to them, then play with that.” He does, however, urge caution in becoming too reliant on post-processing techniques, suggesting photographers should do as much in-camera as they possibly can. “When you’re working by yourself and you’re in your office, if you’re sitting on your computer you can go too far before you know it,” Goodall warns. “The thing with Photoshop is that you can make anything look pretty cool. You’ve got to start with something really hot already. You’ve got to be really technical in your lighting.” He also explains that patience is a virtue for those looking to shoot for a living, but that although aspiring photographers might face rejection from countless magazines, in the end it’s not unachievable. “I don’t think it’s a job only a select few can do. If you can take a good photo and you’ve got the drive, then you can do it.”

38

www.dphoto.co.nz

www.dphoto.co.nz

39


D-FOLIO

Troy Goodall

40

www.dphoto.co.nz

www.dphoto.co.nz

41


D-FOLIO

Troy Goodall

The thing with Photoshop is that you can make anything look pretty cool. You’ve got to start with something really hot already. You’ve got to be really technical in your lighting.

42

www.dphoto.co.nz

D Photo  

Troy Goodall Photography Article

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you