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THE THANKSGIVING TRADITION ICE HOCKEY, WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A JUDGE AND MORE!

School Time


Healthy Teeth and Happy Teeth

Did you know that when you grow up you will have 32 teeth? It is very important to brush, floss, and swish your teeth to make sure they stay healthy. Brushing your teeth gets rid of the germs that cause cavities and problems with your gums. Brushing your teeth also keeps them sparkling white. It is very important to floss so that you can get the food and germs out from in between your teeth. Also, make sure you use mouthwash. It leaves your mouth feeling clean, and your breath smelling fresh.

It is also important to eat healthy foods to keep your teeth strong. Healthy foods to eat include,

,

, and

,

, and other sugary foods. These cause cavities. A cavity is a painful hole , . You should stay away from in your tooth that can grow bigger and deeper over time. They are caused by germs and sugars on your teeth.

two times a year. When you visit the dentist, he or she will do a really good job of cleaning your teeth. It is important to visit your They also check for cavities. Don’t be scared, they help make sure your baby teeth and grown up teeth stay healthy and strong. You should brush your

and

with fluoride toothpaste after breakfast and before bedtime. Fluoride keeps you from

every 3 months, or after you have had a cold or sore throat. Make sure you use a soft getting cavities. You should get a new toothbrush with short bristles. There are many different flavors of toothpaste to choose from. You only need to use a pea-sized amount

in your head each time you brush. If you eat in between meals, make sure you try to brush your teeth after. You can sing the while you brush your teeth; this will help make sure you are brushing long enough. After you finish brushing, it is time to floss! Flossing cleans the spaces between your teeth that your toothbrush can’t reach. There are many different flavors of floss like bubblegum or mint. These make flossing fun and yummy! After you floss, its mouthwash time! Have a grown-up pour the mouthwash in a

, put it in your

in your head then spit the mouthmouth, and swish it around, but don’t swallow! It will make a funny sound. This time, sing wash out into the sink! Now your teeth are happy, and your breath is fresh. Go show off your smile to your family and friends. Remember, healthy teeth are happy teeth! UNC Wilmington – School of Nursing Students Patrick Ebili, Ashley Enroth, Jessica Forlines, Stacy Hill, Hockenberry, M. (2005). Wong’s essentials of pediatric nursing. St. Louis: Elsevier Mosby.

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NOVEMBER 2008


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Copyright ©2008 by Kidsville News! Incorporated. All rights reserved. No part of this issue For advertising please may be reproduced in whole or in part in any information, form without permission of the call publisher or copyright holder. Neither participating advertisers nor the publishers will be responsible or Jack Stultz, Marketing Manager liable for misinformation, misprints or typographical errors. The publishers reserve the right (910) 222-6200 to edit any submitted material. Kidsville News! Incorporated is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or other material. Children’s submissions should include name, address, telephone number, and permission to publish signed by a parentAll or guardian. Copyright ©2007 by Kidsville News! Incorporated. rights reserved. No part of this issue may be reproduced in whole or in part in any Audit Pending form without permission of the publisher or copyright holder. Neither participating advertisers nor the publishers will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints or typographical errors. The publishers reserve the right to edit any submitted material. Kidsville News! Incorporated is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or other material. Children’s submissions should include name, address, telephone number, and permission to publish signed by a parent or guardian.

Dear Kids, November is a great month. To me, it means spending time with family as we celebrate Thanksgiving. It’s one of my favorite holidays because there’s so much tasty food to eat! Our recipe in this issue is something a little different — pumpkin soup! It has lots of spices in it that smell really good, and it’s perfect for a chilly November day. I also like to spend time with my family at Thanksgiving, watching football and playing some, too. Another sport that I like to watch during the fall and winter is ice hockey. In our “Come Out & Play” article this month, we learn all about how to play this terrific sport! Maybe I’ll give it a try this year. November 4 is Election Day! Be sure to encourage your parents to vote and to take you with them for the experience. In our “What It’s Like To Be...” interview, we learn about what it’s like to be an elected official — a district court judge. Enjoy November and have a wonderful Thanksgiving! As always, be sure to visit my Web site at www.kidsvillenews.com for more games and fun. Your friend,

Buster the Bus

Offering after school Karate Programs  with van pick-up from Leland Area Schools and now Roger Bacon Academy! � Free Trial Class �

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Adult Individual and Group Self Defense Classes Coming Soon... � � � 9387 Old Mill Road   Leland   910.616.7470   910.371.3351

NOVEMBER 2008

Bolivia Elementary School students had a very special visitor during Bus Safety Awareness Week. “Buster the Bus” visited with Pre-k, Kindergarten, and first grade students. Buster, both entertaining as well as informative, shared with students how to safely enter and exit a bus at their appointed stop and safe bus behaviors when riding to and from school. Buster the Bus is an interactive remote controlled vehicle sponsored by Brunswick County School’s Transportation Department. (Photo and caption courtesy of Kelly Tippett.)

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 3


Kidsville News! Happy Thanksgiving! The Pilgrims arrived in America on the ship the Mayflower in 1620. They had fled England so that they could worship and live free. Many of them were sick from the long trip. The winter was very harsh, and sickness and hunger killed half of them during the first year. But by the fall of 1621, things were much better. They had planted seeds earlier in the year and had a good harvest. They had a peace treaty with the Wampanoag Indians and could hunt in the woods without fear. Two Native Americans, Squanto and Samoset, helped the Pilgrims by teaching them how to fertilize crops and showing them the best places to catch fish and eel. The Pilgrims were eating better and were healthier. To celebrate the plentiful harvest, the Pilgrims held a celebration and, according to legend, invited their Indian neighbors.

There were three days of celebrations, including dancing, target shooting and games of skill and chance. After this first Thanksgiving celebration, the custom spread to other colonies, which celebrated on various dates. The first national Thanksgiving Day was proclaimed by President George Washington and was celebrated on Nov. 26, 1789. In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln made it an annual holiday and established the date as the last Thursday in November. In 1941, Congress declared it to be celebrated each year on the fourth Thursday of November.

Pardon Me!

What happens to the pardoned About 45 million turkeys are eaten turkeys? Usually, the National Thanksevery year at Thanksgiving. But each giving Turkey and its alternate will year, two lucky turkeys are spared. Presidents traditionally have granted the spend the remainder of their natural lives at the Frying Pan Park in Fairfax National Thanksgiving Turkey a County, Virginia. This is the same place pardon. This tradition was started in to which the Thanksgiving Day Turkeys 1947 by President Harry Truman, the first to pardon a turkey in a special and their alternates have been retired for Thanksgiving-eve ceremony. the past 15 years. The farm is a 1930sWhy are two turkeys pardoned? An alternate is chosen in case the National Thanksgiving Turkey becomes ill or otherwise cannot participate in the ceremony. In 2007, the 60th anniversary of the National Thanksgiving Turkey presentation, turkeys May and Flower were pardoned on November 20. ChilYoungsters with Camp Fire USA and other guests join dren from all over the President George W. Bush around May, the 2007 National country cast their vote Thanksgiving turkey, during Rose Garden festivities at its to name the turkeys. offi cial pardoning Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2007. White House The 2007 National photo by Joyce N. Boghosian Thanksgiving Turkey and its alternate were era replica farm operated by the Fairfax from Dubois, Indiana, and were raised County Parks Department. Last year, under the direction of National Turkey the National Turkey and its alternate Federation Chairman Ted Seger. The were taken to Disney World, where they National Thanksgiving Turkey was served as honorary Grand Marshals for raised using normal feeding and other the Thanksgiving Day Parade. production techniques. The one You can help give the 2008 lucky exception is they were provided turkeys their new names! Visit the increased interaction with people so that White House Web site (www.whitethey would be prepared for their role at house.gov/kids) and vote for your the White House Ceremony. favorite names.

The first U.S. holiday — by Presidential Proclamation — was Thanksgiving Day, 1789. President George Washington proclaimed November 26 as Thanksgiving Day after a recommendation from both houses of Congress.

4 KIDSVILLE NEWS

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The Gettysburg Address was given by President Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863, during the Civil War. At the battlefield at Gettysburg, P.A., 17 acres were dedicated as a national cemetery. President Lincoln gave a two-minute speech that is one of the most quoted speeches in U.S. history.

NOVEMBER 2008


AR UND THE W RLD Japan

Guatemala

On November 1, at the Day of the Dead Kite Festival in Santiago Sacatepequez, people use kites to communicate with the spirits of the deceased. It is believed that the deceased relatives communicate through the wind and the movements of the kites. Families fly kites constructed of cloth, colored paper, bamboo and wire. The kites come in all sizes, from eight to 30 feet. The are beautifully decorated and are brightly colored. There is a prize for the best design. Sometimes the kites are flown from cemeteries.

Since 1961, the Elephant Round-up has been held on the third Saturday in November in Surin, Thailand. This area is known for its elephants, and the people that live in Surin are skilled at capturing them and training and taming them. Each year, more than 100 elephants participate in the round-up. They play games of soccer, carry logs and play tug-ofwar against human teams. They also have a parade of elephants through the city.

In Japan, November 15 is Shichi-go-san. Sichigo-san, meaning Seven-Five-Three, is a special time when parents take their boys that are ages three and five and girls that are ages three and seven dressed in their best kimonos to shrines. They pray for the health and growth of the children. The children are given long candies in bags decorated with turtles and cranes, which are symbols of longevity. The odd numbers of three, five and seven are considered lucky.

Opossum

The opossum is a marsupial, also known simply as the possum. Marsupials are animals that have a pouch in which they carry and nurse their babies. The opossum can have as many as 25 babies. They are not fully developed Kingdom: Animalia when they are born, so they climb into the Phylum: Chordata mother’s pouch and grow there for anothClass: Mammalia er five weeks. After that, they spend the Order: Didelphimorphia next two months clinging to their mother’s Family: Didelphidae back. Other marsupials are kangaroos and koalas. There are over 60 species of opossum, but the one found in our country is known as the common, or Virginia, opossum. The common opossum is about the size of a cat and can get up to 40 inches in length, including the tail. It has a pointing face with a pink nose. The opossum has five toes on each foot, with very sharp claws. The innermost toe on each foot is “opposable.” This means that the toe can be placed opposite another toe (like our thumb) to hold branches. Photo by Cody Pope, as seen in wikipedia.org The opossum has 50 teeth and uses them to eat almost anything. They eat insects, fruit, berries, small mammals and sometimes vegetable crops. They make their dens in hollow trees and stumps. Have you ever heard the expression “play possum”? Sometimes if a possum is surprised by another animal, it will lay down and pretend to be dead. This is known as “playing possum.” Sources: “Oppossum,” Encyclopædia Britannica. Image: Cody Pope on wikipedia.org.

NOVEMBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 5


We would like to thank all of this year’s Kidsville News! in Education program partners for providing Kidsville News! to area schools.

Change Your Body. Change You Life.

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NOVEMBER 2008


Manners Matter

• At a really large event, you are not expected to wait for everyone else because your food will get too cold if you do. Buffet dining has been around as far back as in ancient Egyptian times, but it was brought to Europe by Benjamin Franklin, who was Ambassador to France. Since he didn’t have large-enough furniture to entertain the French court, he simply laid a board across a trestle (a small bridge) and covered it with a cloth. He had it set for self-service (guests could get their own food). Thanksgiving Day Fun It is always a good idea to have a “project” on hand for after dinner when everyone else is watching TV or socializing. My family likes to decorate “turkey” cookies made from either homemade or storebought sugar cookie dough; we use candy corn for the turkey’s tail feathers and beak, and my kids love to pipe icing for the turkey’s feet and eyes. We also like to stress the purpose of a Thanksgiving holiday by learning about gratitude, which is what grown ups are talking about when they want you to “be thankful.” Gratitude or thankfulness is simply a good feeling or attitude you get when you think of all the great things in your life; you are “thankful” for your “blessings.” Here are some ideas you might want to try after you have your Thanksgiving Dinner to help you remember that Thanksgiving is a day that is all

with Truman and Mrs. F

Q.

Dear Truman and Mrs. F, We are going to a big family Thanksgiving dinner this year again. It will be at my Aunt’s house, and she puts all the food up on a big table, and then everyone goes up and makes his or her own plate — then sits down. Are we supposed to wait for everyone to get their food before we eat? —Kelly R.

A.

Dear Kelly, The kind of dinner you have described is called buffet-style dining, and no matter how beautiful or elegant, it is considered an informal meal, so you and the other guests will serve yourselves throughout the meal, including seconds; it is OK to use your same plate for seconds, too. Whether or not you have to wait for everyone to help himself or herself before you start eating depends: • If you are seated at tables with 8 or less, you should wait until everyone at your table has gotten his or her food, and then you should all start together. • If you are in a very small family setting, you should wait until everyone has served himself or herself and has started to eat before you begin.

Community Helpers

The Longwood-Grissettown Fire Department, Brunswick County EMS and a D.A.R.E officer visited the Kindergarten students at Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary and talked to them about fire safety, emergency services and drug abuse as part of a Community Helpers event.

NOVEMBER 2008

about giving gratitude. Fall Leaf “Thanks” Cards Autumn leaves that have fallen from the trees (no dry ones), white copy paper, construction paper, crayons, craft glue, scissors Place the leaf flat on a table and cover with white paper. With your crayon, color firmly over the area where the leaf is with one or more colors. Fold a sheet of construction paper in half; cut out the leaf picture, and glue it onto the front of the “card.” Add your “thanks” message on the inside. Think about to whom you will be giving the card, and write the things about that person for which you are thankful. For example, you might write “Mom — she is sweet. She loves me very much. She makes my lunch everyday.” Thanks Chain Construction paper, stapler, pens Cut colored paper into oneinch strips. On each strip, write something for which you are thankful. Tape or staple strips into rings and intertwine to form a “thanks chain.” See who can form the longest chain! Truman and Mrs. Susan Fleming will be glad to answer your questions on manners and etiquette. Mrs. F is a home economist, editor and lifestyle writer, specializing in the areas of entertaining and children’s etiquette. E-mail your question to manners@kidsvillenews.com. If we use your question in the paper, you will receive a Kidsville News! t-shirt!

LACY WEST-THOMAS INSURANCE AGENCY supporting education

Voted #1 in Insurance! LACY WEST-THOMAS INSURANCE AGENCY 700 West Broad Street � Elizabethtown, NC 28337 910-862-4156 � www.lacywestinsurance.com

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 7


Election Word Find

KIDSVILLE COUNTS Help Truman complete this math square. Try to fill in the missing numbers. Use the numbers 1 through 16 to complete the equations. Each number is only used once. Each row is a math equation. Each column is a math equation. Remember that multiplication and division are performed before addition and subtraction.

Election Day is November 4. Find the words below that relate to the election. BALLOT CHOOSE CLERK DEMOCRACY

F C N Q M R C R O T A N E S L

L C E Z X E S Z W R U B F E L

C A X P R P K R A Y P C Y V A

POLLS PRESIDENT REPRESENTATIVE SENATOR

ELECTION JUDGE MARSHALL NOVEMBER

P W D T R R K D E F Z A F W H

Y O C S E E M Z I B F X R O S

Let’s Talk Turkey! ay April showers bring M ay M do flowers, but what s! flowers bring? Pilgrim

rkey hide Why did the tu n? behind the bar uld see him So no one wo dressing.

E C L L L S S Q F P M J M D R

R W C L E E O I L M K E N Q A

J J O Y S N Q G D T D O V A M

P Y S D Q T B D Y E I F W O U

C V H I I A A D Y T N E S C N

L J L D L T N Z C J Q T V H M

H K O L C I Z E K S V O K O P

B S O K T V L A C R W V Z O J

B T V Z W E J U D G E R V S H

Q Z U D E M O C R A C Y G E Q

Why did the tu rkey cross the road? To prov e he wasn’t chicken! What happened when the turkey got in a fight? He got the stuffing knocked out of him!

Hey Kids! Come visit the Kidsvile News! website. Check out the cool games, info and puzzles. Plus — talk to Truman!

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NOVEMBER 2008


This page is brought to you by Coloring Corner

Do you help cook your Thanksgiving meal? What is your favorite dish? Write a sentence about it and color the picture.

Truman

Truman’s Tricky Picture

Find these items in the picture and then color it! Have fun! Look for the solution on the kidsvillenews.com Web site.

NOVEMBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 9


Helpful Hint: Send in your drawings IN COLOR AND ON UNLINED PAPER!

Parent’s Signature (Permission): ______________________________________________________________________________________________

Your signature (This is my own work): ______________________________________________________________________________________________

School________________________________________________________________________________________

City___________________________________________________________State____________ Zip_________________

Address________________________________________________________________________________________

Name___________________________________________________________________________Age___________

Truman wants your original artwork, letter, poems and stories! We may print them in a later issue or use them on our website! Just have your parents fill out this form and send it with your work to: Kidsville News!, PO Box 15944, Wilmington, NC 28408

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By: Syana Aranda Lincoln Elementary

By: Wayne Mitchell Lincoln Elementary

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By: Bradley Hamilton Lincoln Elementary

By: Gary Lincoln Elem

By: Haley Kearney Lincoln Elementary


25

Mickey Mouse’s 80th Birthday

18

National Young Reader’s Day

✪ Veterans Day

11

General Election Day

4

✪ This symbol recognizes the holiday as a Presidential Proclamation.

✪ National Family Week

23

24

17

16

American Education Week

10

Daylight Saving Time Ends

3

9

2

✪ National Adoption Month

Birthday of Charles Schulz, Creator of “Peanuts”

26

19

12

5

✪ National American Indian Heritage Month

✪ Thanksgiving

● New Moon

27

20

❍ FULL MOON

13

6

Aviation History Month

National Flossing Day

28

21

14

7

NOVEMBER National Family Literacy Day®

All Saints’ Day

29

Family Volunteer Day

22

I Love To Write Day

America Recycles Day

15

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1


WHERE IN THE WORLD IS... CZECH REPUBLIC?

It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! In Central Europe, east of Germany, there is a small country called the Czech Republic. To find it, get out your globe, and find longitude 15º E and latitude 49º N. This tiny country is smaller than the U.S. state of South Carolina. Czech Republic is a land-locked country, which means it is bordered by land, not water. However, water from the country's rivers flows to three seas — the North Sea, Baltic Sea and Black Sea. It is bordered by the countries of Austria, Germany, Poland and Slovakia. The country was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until after World War I. It then became an independent country called Czechoslovakia in 1918. This new country was made up of regions of Bohemia, Moravia, Silesia, Slovakia and Carpathian Ruthenia. In 1993, the country split into Czech Republic and Slovakia. Czech Republic has a temperate climate with cool summers and cold Where in the winters. The land has gently rolling plains, hills, plateaus and low World Word mountains. The capital of Prague is one of the most visited cities in plateau [pla-toh] Europe. Tourism is very important to the economy. Czech Republic is one of the most prosperous countries in an elevated piece of land that is level. It is elevated Central Europe. The top industries are automobiles, machinery and equipment and metal work. The Czech people from adjoining land on love the sports of ice hockey and soccer (football). The country is also known for its puppetry and marionettes. at least one side and may Sources: The World Factbook prepared by the Central Intelligence Agency. have deep canyons.

South Brunswick Island Rotary visited Supply Elementary to distribute dictionaries to third grade students. Each third grade student received their own dictionary. Spanish speaking students received a Spanish and an English dictionary.

Brunswick County��� Emergency Services 9-1-1 FOR EVERYONE WHEN TO CALL 9-1-1?

In an Emergency When you Need Help You Need the Police, Fire Department, or an Ambulance

WHAT TO SAY TO THE 9-1-1 TAKER?

Tell Where Help is Needed Tell What Help you Need (police, fire, ambulance) Tell What’s Wrong Give your Name and Address

OTHER 9-1-1 TIPS:

(Left to right) FRONT ROW: Alex Winston, Savannah Thompson, Qu’Mya Hewett, Madison Huff, and Aly Hardison BACK ROW: Jeff Achterberg, Harvard Holden, Principal Dr. Dwight Willis, and Richard Cox 12 KIDSVILLE NEWS

Speak Loudly and Clearly Don’t Nod your Head - say “YES” and “NO” Out Loud Answer All Questions Don’t Hang Up Until the Dispatcher Tells you to

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NOVEMBER 2008


WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... A JUDGE? Have you ever been to the courthouse? That is where judges work. They hear cases against people who may have broken the law and decide what to do. Since we’re talking about elections in November, I thought it would be neat to interview someone who has been through the election process. In North Carolina, judges are elected. But not anyone can run for the office of judge; they have to have special qualifications. Then the people get to pick the candidate that they think will do a good job as a judge. Judge George Franks is a District Court Judge in Fayetteville, North Carolina, and he was glad to let us know what it’s like to be a judge. TRUMAN: What does it take to become a District Court Judge in North Carolina? FRANKS: To be a judge in North Carolina, you have to first become an attorney. To be an attorney, you have to go to college and graduate with a four-year degree, and then you go to law school. Once you graduate law school, you have to pass a licensure test, the Bar Exam. People who are lawyers are members of the Bar, which is a term that comes from when we were an English colony. That is why it is called a Bar Exam. Once you are an attorney, you can become a judge in two ways. In North Carolina, all judgeships are elected offices, so you can run in the election for a specific judge’s seat or position. Not all states elect judges. Another way to become a judge in North Carolina is to be appointed by the Governor to a judgeship that is open, but the term has not expired, as when a judge retires or resigns. I ran for the office against another lawyer who was already a judge and was elected. In my type of judgeship, we have to run for election every four years, including judges who have been appointed. TRUMAN: When and why did you first become interested in being a judge? FRANKS: I became interested in becoming an attorney when I was earning my college degree in psychology. After some time in that profession, I went to law school and became a lawyer. I considered being a judge even in law school, but I waited until much later to actually try to be one. I was 57 when I decided to run for election as a judge. One of the main reasons I ran for Judge was that I felt that as a judge, I could do what is fair and right and even solve problems. I believed that I could be part of the solution while being fair and following the law. You see, in most of my cases, I am both the Jury and the Judge. TRUMAN: What exactly do you do every day? FRANKS: A typical day depends upon which type of Court I am holding. If it is traffic court and misdemeanor criminal court (small cases), we start by opening Court and calling the docket, which is like calling roll at school. I then usually hear from persons about continuances, guilty pleas and then trials. I have to ask people about having an attorney and make sure that each case is handled fairly. When there is a trial in that court, I listen to the testimony and decide if someone is guilty. If I find someone guilty, I have to decide what to do. Some people get put in jail; most people pay a fine and court costs (money). Other times we can make people do “community service” (free work for the community). Some people we put on probation so that we can check on them, make them get counseling or even drug and alcohol test them. If they continue to act bad or don’t do the things they are supposed to, we can then put them in jail. Probation is a way to get them to be good without going to jail, but if they misbehave, we can put them in jail. When I am in the Court involving domestic violence and family issues, I sometimes have to try to help families with problems, make decisions about which parent will take care of the children, and if it is criminal domestic Court, decide if a crime was committed and then what to do. We usually

NOVEMBER 2008

try to solve the problem, but if that doesn’t work, I have jail that can be used. My day ends when all of the cases have had something done with them. TRUMAN: What’s the hardest part of your job? FRANKS: The hardest part of my job is when I see some young person doing the wrong things time after time, and I have to send them to jail because they keep doing the wrong thing. The other really difficult thing is when I have to decide which parent will take care of the children when the parents break up. That is also the very most important thing that I do. TRUMAN: What’s the best part of your job? FRANKS: The best part of my job is when I know I have made the right decision and that we have solved a problem. Many of the cases in my court are usually caused by some problem between people or with one person. When I am part of the solution, I feel really great. TRUMAN: You had to be elected. Since we’re coming up on elections, what was that experience like? FRANKS: I am actually a shy person, but to be elected, I had to meet a lot of new people. Once I started campaigning, I actually found that I enjoyed meeting people and discussing what was important to me about being a judge and how I would do things differently. I had a lot of help from my wife, my children, my sister-in-law, and a retired judge friend. Once people learned that I was running, I got more support from friends and people I didn’t even know who wanted a change. It was hard work and took a lot of time. I had to run in a county-wide race. I got to travel the county and meet new people, attend different churches and discover new communities within my county. I was very glad that I did it, and it was an amazing experience. I look forward to another term and have already notified the state Administrative Office of the Courts that I will be a Candidate Judge in 2010 for my seat when my term ends. That means I like what I am doing and am proud that the people of my county have chosen me to be their judge. I am honored by that trust and continually strive to be fair and impartial to everyone and to do my best to follow the law while respecting everyone’s rights. TRUMAN: What kind of advice would you give to kids who might be interested in becoming a judge one day? FRANKS: Well, the first thing is to study, read, and stay out of trouble so that you can get good grades to go to law school. Once you are a lawyer, watch the judges and decide what you like about the judges you think are fair and good. To be a good judge, you have to be fair, honest, impartial, a good listener, make sure everyone is heard and just do your best to do the right thing. TRUMAN: Well, thanks for taking time out of court to talk with me, and thank you for serving our community!

www.kidsvillenews.com/capefear

KIDSVILLE NEWS 13


Union Elementary School students, parents, and staff gather at the flag pole before school on Wed. Sept 24 for prayer for the school, the students, the administration, staff, and the world. See You at the Pole is a national event that began in Texas in 1990.

Virginia Williams recently welcomed the Sheriff’s Department to speak with the third grade students about the police force dogs. After finishing the story, Officer Buckle and Gloria, children learned about how animals help our communities. Children were surprised to have a real Sheriff’s Department Dog, Jacko, come and visit. Pictured with Jacko are K-9 Deputy Eddie Galloway, his son Logan, and Lt. Roger Harrington.       

      

      

     

14 KIDSVILLE NEWS

 

    

      

     

      

      

      

     

Printed on Recycled Paper

      

      

      

      

      

      

Brunswick County Schools November 2008 NOVEMBER 2008


“Goober”

Over the past few years author Claire Connelly made trips to Supply Elementary to talk to fourth grade students about her inspiration for becoming a writer. The Author shared her idea for a new book about a dog named “Goober”. She encouraged the fourth grade students to submit their own story ideas about what “Goober” would have experienced when he attended Supply Elementary School. Because of the fourth grade student’s interest and the ideas that they submitted, Ms. Connelly dedicated her new book “Goober” to Supply Elementary School.

This publication is dedicated to the loving memory of

Nancy Hall-Godbey

May we all strive to be as intelligent as she was! NOVEMBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 15


ART GALLERY Réne Magritte & Bizarre Realism René Magritte was a famous Belgian artist critics hated his paintings. Upset by their reaction, René moved to Paris known for painting bizarre images in a realistic to join other young artists involved in the up-and-coming Surrealism way. For example, one of his paintings is of a man movement. He lived in Paris until 1930, when he moved back to in a bowler hat with an apple instead Brussels. During this time period, René began earning of a face. an international reputation for his unusual artistic style, René Francois Ghislain Magritte and he showed his work in European galleries. In 1936, was born on November 21, 1898, his work was even displayed in the United States. This in Lessines, Belgium. René liked time, the critics liked it! to draw, and his father, Leopold, Throughout his life, René continued to produce encouraged the boy’s abilities by putartwork that people called “magical surrealism” ting him in art classes. By the age of because of the mysterious images he painted. In 12, René was painting up a storm! In the 1960s, several of his paintings were featured 1916, René enrolled in the Academy on the covers of rock albums. After that, he was of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he acknowledged as an inspiration by musicians like Paul studied painting and met other young Simon and the Beatles, as well as by many famous F L Cartists. P Y E R J P C L H B (Over, Down, Direction) artists like himself. Two years later, contemporary C C O C J inYBrussels. V J K S he left school to pursue his career as René diedAon W August 15, W 1967, BALLOT (9, 7, NE) an artist. after his death, people are still intrigued his O CHOOSE (10, 14, E) Even N E X D C L C O S H Lby O In his early years as a profespaintings, and in 1992 the Metropolitan Museum of CLERK (7, 3, SW) The Son of Man, Q Z P T S L L Y D I D L K sional artist, René followed Cubism, a kind of abstract art Art in New York City held a retrospective exhibition DEMOCRACY (15, 4, S) oil painting, 1964 X R R E L E S Q I L C T that uses a lot of geometric shapes and patterns. But, as ELECTION (14, 6, SW)of hisMwork. Written he developed his skills, René was inspired by surrealism, a JUDGE (14, 7, S) R EbyPTamar R Burris, E Sa former E N elementary T A Tschool I V teacher(8, who now works as a freelance writer and curriculum developer for PBS, style of art that uses dreamlike and fantasy images. He wanted his MARSHALL 15, W) C S K K M S O Q B A N Z L the Discovery Channel paintings to be like a poem of pictures instead of words, and he thought NOVEMBER (10, 15, NW)and other education-related companies. Sources: Rene R Z ofRWorld D Biography, Z Q Iwww.bookrags.com/ G D D Z E A Magritte from the Encyclopedia surrealism accomplished this idea. POLLS (4, 1, SE) biography/rene-magritte; Rene Magritte on Wikipedia, en.wikipedia.org; O W A E I F L D Y Y C K C In 1927, René held his first one-person art show in Brussels, but the PRESIDENT (3, 4, SE) The Magritte Site, www.magritte.com. REPRESENTATIVE (1,6,E) T R Y F B P M T E T J S R SENATOR (1, 14, N) A U P Z F M K D I N Q V W VOTE (13, 12, W)

Election Word Find

N E S L

B F E L

C Y V A

A F W H

X R O S

J M D R

E N Q A

O V A M

F W O U

E S C N

T V H M

O K O P

V Z O J

Kidsville Counts! Election Word Find Election Word Find (Over, Down, Direction) F C BALLOT (9, 7, NE) CHOOSE (10, 14, E) N CLERK (7, 3, SW) Q DEMOCRACY (15, 4, S) M ELECTION (14, 6, SW) JUDGE (14, 7, S) R MARSHALL (8, 15, W) C NOVEMBER (10, 15, NW) R POLLS (4, 1, SE) O PRESIDENT (3, 4, SE) REPRESENTATIVE (1,6,E) T SENATOR (1, 14, N) A VOTE (13, 12, W)

N E S L

L C E Z X E S Z W R U B F E L

C A X P R P K R A Y P C Y V A

P W D T R R K D E F Z A F W H

Kidsville Counts!

16 KIDSVILLE NEWS

F L CB ET ZV XZ EW SE ZJ WU RD UG BE FR EV L

Y(Over, E RDown, J PDirection) C L H CB BALLOT (9, 7, NE) OCHOOSE C W J(10,Y14,VE)J K NS CLERK C L C (7,O3,SSW) H L O QO DEMOCRACY (15, 4, S) SELECTION L L Y (14, D 6, I SW) D L MK EJUDGE L E(14, S 7,QS)I L C RT (8, 15, EMARSHALL S E N T A W) T I CV NOVEMBER (10, 15, NW) MPOLLS S O(4,Q1, BSE)A N Z RL ZPRESIDENT Q I G (3, D 4, D SE) Z E OA REPRESENTATIVE (1,6,E) I F L D Y Y C K TC SENATOR (1, 14, N) BVOTE P M(13,T12,EW)T J S AR F M K D I N Q V NW X J E O F E T O EV R M N V W S V K SZ O D Q A O C H O LO S R A M U N M P J

C P AQ W XZ D PU T RD R PE R KM K RO D AC E YR F PA Z CC A YY F VG W A H

S E H Q

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R W C L E E O I L M K E N Q A

J J O Y S N Q G D T D O V A M

P Y S D Q T B D Y E I F W O U

C V H I I A A D Y T N E S C N

L J L D L T N Z C J Q T V H M

H K O L C I Z E K S V O K O P

B S O K T V L A C R W V Z O J

B T V Z W E J U D G E R V S H

Q Z U D E M O C R A C Y G E Q

Kidsville Counts! Printed on Recycled Paper

NOVEMBER 2008

B T V Z W E J U D G E R V S H


TM

A SECTION ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS

BOOKSHELF

Titanicat

Author/Illustrator: Marty Crisp, Robert Papp (Illustrator) Publisher: Sleeping Bear Press Age Range: 3 to 8 Young Jum Mulholland has signed up for the adventure of a lifetime. He is starting a job as cabin boy on the Titanic and heading across the sea to America. Part of his duties include taking care of the ship’s cat, 4-0-1. He soon learns that 4-0-1 has a litter of kittens to take care of, too. But who is really taking care of whom? In the end, you may be surprised. This wonderful book, based on true accounts from survivors of the ill-fated Titanic, features beautiful artwork (especially of the tortoiseshell cat!) created by award-winning artist Robert Papp. —JK

Boomer and Halley: Lost and Found Author/Illustrator: Mary Jane McKittrick, Bob Ostrom (Illustrator) Publisher: Tuxedo Cat Productions Age Range: 4 to 8 Mary Jane McKittrick is back with the second installation of the Boomer and Halley “Little Lessons, Big Results” series. This time, you learn about how this odd couple — an Australian Shepard and a lively silver cat — came to live with their humans, Harold and Edna. Packed with at least 30 illustrations by well-known artist Bob Ostrom, the book is well done and has some special features that make it unique. The “Little Lessons” are introduced with a letter to the parents explaining the PAWS system. A bookmark explains the character traits that children will learn throughout the book and especially in locations where they see a pawprint. The pawprint is the clue to the parent that this is a good place in the book to pause and ask a question about the underlying lesson in the text. What a great idea! And these loveable characters make the book so much fun that kids won’t even realize they are learning! — JK

The Lucky Star

Author/Illustrator: Judy Young, Chris Ellison (Illustrator) Publisher: Sleeping Bear Press Age Range: 8 to 12 It’s 1933 during the Great Depression, and the future doesn’t look so bright from where ten-year-old Ruth is standing. Millions of people are out of work, and families are struggling to keep food on the table. Ruth is wearing hand-me-down shoes from a neighbor. Her school has closed because the town has no money to pay the teacher or to keep the building running, her mother is working every day and her dad lost his job at the lumberyard. Luckily, he found another job, with the Civilian Conservation Corps, but will have to be gone. Ruth worries about how her little sister will learn to read and how she herself will continue her education. Her mother is optimistic and looks at the stars every night, pinning a blessing on each one. “We don’t have much, but remember, there’s always someone who is worse off than you are. So count your lucky stars that you’ve got what you’ve got,” she says. Ruth soon learns that she does have a lucky star as she finds her own special way of helping her family and others. A beautifully done book with a touching story and soft colorful images that lend a peaceful quality to the book. —JK

Turkey Bowl Authors/Illustrator: Phil Bildner, C.F. Payne Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Age Range: 5 to 8 From the publisher: It’s Thanksgiving, and that means it’s time for ... football! Ethan has waited his whole nine-yearold life to be old enough to play in the annual family Turkey Bowl football game. This is his year. He wakes up Thanksgiving Day, dresses in all of his football finest and runs downstairs to greet the team — his whole family. But the kitchen isn’t full of aunts and cousins and uncles — a blizzard has snowed them out. And it looks like the Turkey Bowl just isn’t meant to be this year. After all, who could play football in a blizzard? Ethan, that’s who!

P ARENTOWN NOVEMBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 17


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S MART Prepare una lista y compruébela dos veces

The ABCs of Money: Make a list and check it twice By Susan Beacham The holiday season is upon us, and already we can feel the rush. It’s exciting and fun but also potentially the biggest budget buster time of the year for all of us. All these holiday good feelings seem to erode our common sense, kill our budget resolve and leave us with an unpleasant surprise when the bills come due in January. I’m here to help. This is the first of three columns aimed at getting us through this holiday season with our pride—and bank accounts—intact. This month, I offer my Top Ten Tips to Avoid Holiday Debt and Set an Example of Smart Spending for the Wee Ones Who Are Watching. 1. Make a list. Start by asking your entire family to sit down together and make a list of people they want to remember with a gift this holiday season. Each family member should compile his or her own list. The list must be in writing. A written list is easier to focus on because it is tangible. 2. Set a spending budget. Now that you know how many people are on your list, write a dollar amount next to each name. That is how much you would like to spend on that person. Total up the list to see what kind of money you are thinking about spending. (Remember, the amount you plan to spend on a person can be $0 if you can come up with creative and free gifts, such as a home-made coupon book promising hugs and kisses for Grandma.) 3. Cut the budget down to size. Once you have the total, chances are it will add up to way too much money. Now is the time to cut the list and trim the budget. It may mean cutting certain people, or it may mean spending less on one person or another. Do whatever it takes to bring the budget within your means. 4. Create an earning/savings plan. Now that you have a list and a budget, where is all that money going to come from? Talk about a plan to set aside money from earnings. Help your children create a job list that will help them earn the money they need to pay for the gifts they want to give. 5. Don’t shop without your list. As a family, agree to shop only with the list and budget in hand. Also, agree to buy only for those on the list and at the amount specified. 6. Use cash. This is especially important for your kids. They will learn the important lesson that when money is gone, it’s gone. Take only your budgeted amount with you when you go shopping. 7. Agree to shop with purpose. Hit the mall only twice for holiday shopping. When you’re there, stay on task. Don’t buy anything that isn’t on your list. If you happen upon something you’d like for yourself, put it on your own wish list. Better yet, wait until after the holidays and get it on clearance or with a gift card someone else gave you. 8. Choose the stores where you want to shop. Sounds strange, but make a list of the stores where you want to buy your holiday gifts and shop only those stores. Many times during the holiday, seasonal stores pop up selling stuff we never even considered buying. This kind of stuff is generally overpriced and plays on your holiday emotions. Don’t be tempted. Shop only the stores you shop regularly that have earned your loyalty due to their good value and quality. 9. As you shop, edit your list. You may find a great deal on one gift, which means you can spend less on that person on your list. That money can be applied to another person. However, never spend more than you have budgeted on a person until you find you have some money in your budget “bank” because you got a great deal somewhere else. 10. Model the behavior you want your child to model. This approach to holiday gift giving will not only help you as an adult, but also be the model your children use as they grow. Remember, they are watching you. Do only what you want them to do. Finally, remember it is easy to get carried away during the holiday season. Holiday shopping is no different than any other shopping in the eyes of a child — they are watching you and learning from your behavior. Susan Beacham is the founder and CEO of Money Savvy Generation, which creates innovative products and services to help parents, grandparents and educators teach children money-management skills. E-mail her at Susan@MSGen.com. Copyright 2008. All Rights Reserved.

18 KIDSVILLE NEWS

Por Susan Beacham La temporada de vacaciones está cerca y podemos sentir ya la emoción. Es excitante y divertido, pero también es posiblemente para todos nosotros la temporada en la que más aumentamos nuestro presupuesto. Todos estos buenos sentimientos sobre las vacaciones parecen borrar nuestro sentido común, aniquilar nuestra capacidad para manejar nuestro presupuesto y nos dejan con una desagradable sorpresa cuando tenemos que pagar las deudas en enero. Estoy aquí para ayudarle. Éste es el primero de tres artículos cuyo objetivo es hacernos pasar las vacaciones con nuestro orgullo- y nuestras cuentas bancarias- intactos. Este mes, les ofrezco mi ayuda con diez consejos básicos para evitar las deudas de las vacaciones y servir de ejemplo a los pequeños que nos están observando de cómo gastar de manera inteligente. 1. Prepare una lista. Comience pidiendo a su familia entera que se sienten juntos y que preparen una lista de gente a la que quieren comprar un regalo estas vacaciones. Cada miembro de la familia debe completar su propia lista. La lista deberá ser escrita. Una lista escrita hace más fácil el centrarse porque es algo más tangible. 2. Establezca un presupuesto para gastar. Ahora que sabe cuánta gente hay en su lista, escriba la cantidad de dólares junto a cada nombre. Esa cantidad es lo que le gustaría gastarse en esa persona. Sume el total de la lista para ver cuánto está pensando gastarse. (Recuerde, la cantidad que planea gastarse en una persona puede ser $0 si puede ser capaz de inventarse algo creativo y hacer regalos gratis tales como un cupón que usted haga para un libro- donde prometa abrazos y besos para la abuelita.) 3. Reduzca el presupuesto una vez que tenga el total, hay probabilidades de que el total sea demasiado dinero. Ahora es el momento de reducir la lista y ajustar el presupuesto. Puede que signifique que tenga que eliminar a ciertas personas o gastar menos en una persona u otra. Haga lo que tenga que hacer para ajustar el presupuesto dentro de sus límites. 4. Cree un plan de ganancias/ahorros. Ahora que tiene una lista y un presupuesto, ¿de dónde va a sacar todo el dinero? Hable sobre un plan para apartar dinero de las ganancias. Ayude a sus hijos a crear una lista de trabajos que les ayudarán a ganar dinero que necesitan para comprar los regalos que quieren dar. 5. No vaya de compras sin su lista. Pónganse de acuerdo en familia para ir de compras solo cuando tengan la lista y el presupuesto en la mano. También acuerden comprar solo para las personas que están en la lista y gastarse la cantidad especificada. 6. Use dinero en metálico. Esto es especialmente importante para sus hijos. Aprenderán la lección tan importante de que cuando el dinero se va, se va. Lleve consigo solo la cantidad presupuestada cuando vaya de compras. 7. Acuerden comprar con un propósito en mente. Vaya al centro comercial solamente dos veces para las compras de navidad. Cuando este allá, manténgase centrado en lo que tiene que hacer. No compre nada que no esté en su lista. Si ve algo que quiere para usted, póngalo en su lista de deseos. Mejor aún, espere hasta después de las vacaciones y consígalo cuando ya esté en las rebajas finales o con una tarjeta regalo que alguien le haya dado. 8. Escoja los comercios donde quiere comprar. Parece extraño, pero prepare una lista de los comercios donde quiere comprar sus regalos de navidad y solo compre en estos comercios. Muchas veces durante las vacaciones, los comercios de temporada aparecen con cosas que antes ni nos habíamos planteado comprar nunca. Este tipo de cosas normalmente son más caras y juegan con sus emociones navideñas. No se deje tentar. Compre solo en los comercios donde compra regularmente y que antes se han ganado su lealtad por el buen valor y la calidad que ofrecen. 9. Mientras compra, edite su lista. Puede que encuentre una gran oferta en uno de los regalos lo cual quiere decir que puede gastar menos dinero en esa persona de su lista. Ese dinero puede gastarlo ahora en otra persona. Sin embargo, nunca gaste más de lo que haya presupuestado en una persona porque haya encontrado una buena oferta en otro sitio, hasta que sepa que tiene dinero en su presupuesto ‘ahorrado’. 10. Sirva de modelo para la conducta de sus hijos. Este enfoque de cómo dar durante las vacaciones no solo le ayudara a usted como adulto, sino que también será el modelo para sus hijos cuando crezcan. Recuerden que le están observando. Solo haga lo que quiere que ellos hagan. Finalmente, recuerde que es fácil dejarse llevar durante las vacaciones. Las compras de vacaciones no son diferentes de ninguna otra ante los ojos de los niños—ellos le están observando y aprendiendo de su comportamiento. Susan Beacham es la fundadora y Directora Ejecutiva de Money Savvy Generation, compañía que crea productos innovadores y servicios para ayudar a los padres, los abuelos y los educadores a enseñar a los niños las habilidades de gestión sobre el dinero. Copyright 2008 Todos los derechos reservados. Traducido por Maite Lamberri.

Printed on Recycled Paper

NOVEMBER 2008


KIDSVILLE KITCHEN

Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

You Can Be a

Perfect Pumpkin Soup!

Not only are pumpkins a favorite at Halloween time, but they also stay in season through Thanksgiving. This is a super-easy, delicious and nutritious soup that tastes great on a crisp fall day! You might think soup is a strange thing to make with pumpkin, but give it a try! In Morton, IL, home of Libby’s pumpkin packaging plant, they hold a Pumpkin Festival each year. It features all sorts of pumpkin-based foods, such as pumpkin pancakes, ice cream and even pork chops! Did you know that pumpkin is a member of the squash family? Canned pumpkin is surprisingly low in fat and high in fiber. It is also an excellent source of Vitamin A, 80% of which is from beta carotene. Beta carotene is what gives pumpkin its orange color.

Help Make Learning Fun and Fight Illiteracy! For more information on Kidsville News! and other ways to get involved, call 910.338.1205, or e-mail todd@mykidsvillenews.com

CINNAMON-SPICED PUMPKIN SOUP WHAT YOU NEED: • 1 - 15-ounce can of pumpkin • 1 - 14 1/2-ounce can of reduced sodium chicken broth • 1 cup low-fat milk • 1 tablespoon light-brown sugar • 2 tablespoons white sugar • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg • 1/2 teaspoon ginger • 1/4 teaspoon salt HOW TO MAKE IT (makes six servings): Have an adult help you open the cans of pumpkin and chicken broth. Use a spoon to get all of the pumpkin out of the can and into a sauce pan. Pour the chicken broth into the pan. Add one cup of milk into the pan and stir together. Measure all of the sugar and spices into a bowl. Add them to the pumpkin mixture in the sauce pan and stir them all together. Have an adult helper turn on the stove to heat the soup. Bring the soup to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer for six minutes, using a timer. Serve the soup in mugs or bowls. This is a great lunch on a cold day or a good side dish with chicken or pork chops. You can store leftover soup in the refrigerator and reheat it to serve again. Courtesy of The Playful Chef Cookbook: A Culinary Education for Kids. The Playful Chef Cookbook helps kids learn how to make delicious and nutritious meals and snacks. It includes 33 creative and fun recipes, each incorporating tips on planning, shopping, tools, safety, and nutrition. For more information, visit www.playfulinc.com

NOVEMBER 2008

During National Constitution Week, Mrs. Shirley Babson, chairperson of Brunswick County School’s Board of Education, visited several Bolivia Elementary School classrooms. Mrs. Babson shared with students her resent visit to the Republican National Convention in Minneapolis, MN. She explained to Cupolo, n and Mr. David so ab B y le ir Sh students that the Mrs. livia. Principal at Bo convention was where republicans officially nominated their candidate for the presidency of The United States. In addition, Ms. Babson discussed the Constitution and its promise for security, equality, and liberty to all American’s. When she asked the class, “What does America mean to you?” Bolivia Elementary student Steven Shepherd responded, “Pride and Freedom.”

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 19


of Try This At Home Read these words and try to figure out what they have in common: Optical Illusions are tricks that are played on your eyes. Are the dots in the picture black or white? Look at the next two pictures. Do they seem like they are moving?

racecar noon

Hannah kayak

toot dad

eye mom

Hint: Try to spell each one backwards!

These words are palindromes. They are spelled the same forward and backward. Can you think of more? Check out Go Hang a Salami! I’m a lasagna hog! And Other Palindromes by Jon Agee A great read aloud to share with your kids! Before you start: Which black pipe cleaner do you think is longer? Why?

Seahawk Science How to make your optical illusion: 1. Cut one pipe cleaner exactly in half (you can use your ruler to measure it). This will be your long piece. It is black in the picture. 2. Cut 2 more pipe cleaners in half. Make sure that they are a different color than your 1st pipe cleaner. These will be your end pieces. They are red in the picture.

What you need:

Are your eyes playing tricks on you?

� Pipe cleaners � Ruler � Scissors

3. Wrap the end pieces around the ends of the long pieces so that they look like the objects in the picture. 4. Ask your family and friends which center pipe cleaner looks longer! Have them measure with a ruler if they do not believe you!

Visit the Watson School of Education at www.uncw.edu/ed or call (910) 962-4142 for more information.

saturday marine explorers Programming for children ages 6 – 10 years old.

Saturdays, 9 a.m. – Noon $15 each session $65 for spring series Nov. 15

Fintastic Fun – Everything you ever wanted to know about sharks. Register by Nov. 12

To register and more information

www.uncw.edu/marinequest or call 910.962.3195 UNCW is an EEO/AA Institution

MarineQuest Youth Programs

1. Read something every day. Teach by example. When your child sees you reading every day, you are sending a strong message that reading is important. 2. Have a library card and make regular trips to the library. A trip to the library is an inexpensive way to introduce new and exciting reading materials into your home each week. Also, it is fun to find materials on the same topic and share information together. 3. Have reading materials in many places that are easy to find and reach. Keep reading materials in the bedroom and beside a comfortable chair or couch. These locations suggest times and places for reading that are relaxing. 4. Talk to your child about what you are reading or watching on TV. There is a strong connection between talking and reading. Children benefit from talking about the world, and that includes what an adult is reading, doing in daily life, and seeing on television. 5. Read aloud to and with your child. During this read aloud time, you have the opportunity to read aloud and so does your child. It is important to read books that the reader likes. Do not hesitate to read and reread favorites.

Suggestions are from “Parent Involvement: One Key to Reading Success” by Dr. Barbara Honchell, University of North Carolina Wilmington and Dr. Sandy Jones, St. Andrews Presbyterian College.


Kidsville News! Brunswick November 2008