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IT’S SCHOOL BUS SAFETY MONTH! WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A SCHOOL BUS DRIVER, ELECTIONS AND MORE!

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    

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    

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    

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     

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    

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    

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    

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     

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    

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    

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    

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    

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     

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    

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    

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    

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    

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     

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    

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    

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    

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    

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     

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Peyton Roberts (Left) and Alex De La Cruz (Right) with Truman on the opening day of school at Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary

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OCTOBER 2008


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THE CAPE FEAR REGION’S FUN FAMILY NEWSPAPER

Todd Godbey todd@mykidsvillenews.com

KIDSVILLE NEWS INC. PRESIDENT Bill Bowman bbowman@kidsvillenews.com

KIDSVILLE NEWS! PUBLISHER Your 15944 Info Here PO Box editor@yourpaperhere.com Wilmington, NC 28408 KIDSVILLE NEWS! NATIONAL EDITOR 910.338.1205 Joy G. Kirkpatrick kvnews@kidsvillenews.com www.KidsvilleNews.com/CapeFear

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PRESIDENT, KIDSVILLE NEWS! INC. SALES & MARKETING Bill Bowman Sam Lum - sam@upandcomingmag.com bbowman@kidsvillenews.com Emily Lamar - elamar@upandcomingmag.com KIDSVILLE NEWS! NATIONAL EDITOR ILLUSTRATOR Joy G. Kirkpatrick Cover & Truman • Dan Nelson kvnews@kidsvillenews.com

KIDSVILLE NEWS! PO Box ILLUSTRATOR 53790 • Fayetteville, NC 28305 Cover 222-6200 & Truman •• Fax Dan(910) Nelson (910) 222-6199

Copyright ©2008 by Kidsville News! Incorporated. All rights reserved. No part of this issue For advertising please may be reproduced in whole or in part in any information, form without permission of the call publisher or copyright holder. Neither participating advertisers nor the publishers will be responsible or Jack Stultz, Marketing Manager liable for misinformation, misprints or typographical errors. The publishers reserve the right (910) 222-6200 to edit any submitted material. Kidsville News! Incorporated is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or other material. Children’s submissions should include name, address, telephone number, and permission to publish signed by a parentAll or guardian. Copyright ©2007 by Kidsville News! Incorporated. rights reserved. No part of this issue may be reproduced in whole or in part in any Audit Pending form without permission of the publisher or copyright holder. Neither participating advertisers nor the publishers will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints or typographical errors. The publishers reserve the right to edit any submitted material. Kidsville News! Incorporated is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or other material. Children’s submissions should include name, address, telephone number, and permission to publish signed by a parent or guardian.

Dear Kids, Wow, fall is off to a wild start! We’ve got hurricanes brewing and that other whirlwind — the presidential election — coming up next month. This election will be historic no matter who wins! In this issue, you can learn more about the voting process. Lots of things go on during the month of October. National School Bus Safety Week is one of them. It’s very important that you know these safety rules to make sure you get to school and back home safely. Our school bus drivers do a great job of getting all those kids to school each day — it’s a big responsibility. I spoke with the School Bus Driver of the Year for the “What’s It Like to Be...” article this month, so you can read all about the job of a bus driver. Halloween is always a fun holiday with costumes and candy, too! If you participate in Halloween festivities or trick-or-treating, make sure you stay safe. Check out the top-10 safety tips. Enjoy October and have fun! Be sure to visit my Web site at www.kidsvillenews.com. Your friend,

Offering after school Karate Programs  with van pick-up from Leland Area Schools and now Roger Bacon Academy! � Free Trial Class �

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OCTOBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 3


Kidsville News!

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All About the Election November 4 is General Election Day in the United States. Election Day 2008 is going to be a day to make history. The United States may end up with the first female Vice President or the first African-American President. Either way, it will be an important first in the history of our nation! So what is an election? An election is the democratic process of choosing one person from a group of candidates to hold a political office or some other position of responsibility. The election process is done by voting. Elections may be held to select officers at any level of government. In addition to the President and Vice President of the United Sates, mayors, county officials, judges and sheriffs, members of state legislatures and members of Congress are all elected to office. Presidential elections are only held every four years. Elections are an important part of our country and other democratic nations. Elections give people the opportunity to choose their leaders. Voters have input on the way that they want their government to run and elect leaders that have the support of the most people. How do you vote? On election day, you go to a polling place to cast your vote. The polling place can be a church, school, fire station, or other community building. At the polls, there are usually one inspector, two judges (one Republican and one Democrat), two clerks (one Republican and one Democrat) and one marshall. The judges and clerks find your name on the list, have you sign and add your name to another list to say that you have voted. Another judge will give you the ballot and explain it. Then you take the ballot

to a voting booth and pick the people that you would like to serve you. There also might be other decisions to vote on, like a new tax for your state. After you have marked your ballot, you take it to the marshall who places it in the ballot box. Sometimes there is a machine into which you insert the ballot, and in some communities, they use computer screens for the voting instead of a paper ballot. Although you can’t vote in the real election until you are 18, kids can get a firsthand experience by going to the voting polls with their parents. In fact, in 1988, Kids Voting USA was founded in Phoenix, Arizona, to teach children about the election process. Students go to official polling sites on Election Day accompanied by a parent, guardian or other adult. Students cast their own ballots, which simulate the official ballot. Students vote in their own voting booths located near adult polling booths. And the Kids Voting results are reported by news media just as official results are. Kids Voting is as close to the real thing as anyone under the age of 18 can get. Plus, studies show the program increases adult voter turnout! So encourage your parents to take you to the polls with them so you can have a hands-on experience voting in an election! Sources: Kids Voting USA; Elections, Reviewed by Kay J. Maxwell, The New Book of Knowledge.

Fire Prevention Week is October 5-11. To learn about the dangers of fire and how to stay safe, visit www.firepreventionweek.org. Are you looking for a new hobby? If so, October is the month for you! It’s National Roller Skating Month and National

4 KIDSVILLE NEWS

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October 19-2

School Bus Safety Tips

Things Kids Should Know About School Bus Safety • The bus driver and others cannot see you if you are standing closer than 10 feet to the bus. Stay out of the danger zone! • If something falls under or near the bus, tell the driver. NEVER try to pick it up yourself! • While waiting for the bus, stay in a safe place away from the street. • When you get on or off the bus, look for the bus safety lights and make sure they are flashing. • Be alert to traffic. When you get on or off the bus, look left, right, left before you enter or cross the street. • When the driver says it is safe to cross the street, remember to CROSS IN FRONT of the bus. • Stay in your seat and sit quietly so that the driver is not distracted. • Some school buses now have seat belts. If you have seat belts on your school bus, be sure to learn to use the seat belt correctly. Students riding a school bus should always: • Arrive at the bus stop five minutes early. • Stand at least five giant steps (10 feet) away from the edge of the road. • Wait until the bus stops, the door opens and the driver says it’s okay before stepping onto the bus. Info courtesy of National School Bus Safety Week Committee, National School Transportation Association, www.yellowbuses.org.

Stamp Collecting Month. Do a search on the Internet or at your local library to learn more about these activities. Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta will be held on October 4-12. This is the largest gathering of hot-air balloons in the world. People from countries all over the world come to New Mexico to participate and watch as more than 700 hot-air balloons are on display.

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OCTOBER 2008


AR UND THE W United States

On the second Monday in October, the United States celebrates Columbus Day. This day celebrates October 12, 1492, the day that Columbus’s ships arrived in the New World after traveling across the ocean from Spain. The holiday is also celebrated in most Spanishspeaking countries and is observed as Dia de la Raza or Day of the Race.

Germany

October 3 is Tag der Deutschen Einheit or the Day of German Unity. This day celebrates the reunification of East and West Germany on October 3, 1990. The country was divided for 45 years. When the country reunited, the new Germany took the official name of Federal Republic of Germany. Each year on October 3, there’s a big celebration at the Brandenburger Tor (Brandenburg Gate) in Berlin. They have concerts there. Also, the government picks one major German city (a different one each year) to host another celebration.

RLD

Jamaica

National Heroes’ Day is observed on the third Monday in October. It is a celebration of the island’s seven National Heroes and is also the date on which awards within the Jamaican honours system are given. In celebration, they have parades, live performances of music and folk and cultural dance. Children learn about the contributions that these national heroes made to their country through documentaries and speeches.

Raptors

October is Raptor Month! Raptors, or birds of prey, are birds that pursue other animals for food. They use their super vision to hunt for food while they are flying. There are many different birds that are raptors. They are primarily birds in the Accipitridae family and Falconidae family. Hawks, eagles, buzzards and falcons are considered raptors. They are diurnal — meaning that they are active during the daytime and rest at night. Owls are also considered raptors, except they are nocturnal, meaning they hunt for their food at night and sleep during the day. Eagles are one of the more well-known raptors. They are also larger than most other raptors (except for vultures). Like the other birds of prey, eagles have large hooked beaks for tearing apart the flesh of their food. They have strong legs and powerful talons or claws. The bald eagle is the national bird of the United States and is used as a symbol for our country. Once an endangered species, the bald eagle was taken off the endangered species list last year. Falcons fly swiftly through the air and can capture other birds in midair. They can also hover while searching the ground for prey. In addition to other birds, they also eat rabbits, mice, lizards and insects. There is a sport called falconry, where people use the bird as a hunting partner. These falcons are specially trained to work together with their human partner. Sources: “Raptor,” “eagle,” Wikipedia; “falcon,” “raptor,” Encyclopædia Britannica. Images: metrocreativegraphics.com.

OCTOBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 5


Brunswick County��� Emergency Services

We would like to thank all of this year’s Kidsville News! in Education program partners for providing Kidsville News! to area schools.

PREV ENT H OME FI RES Fi re Preventio n Week Octo ber 5th - 11th 2008 Dia l 911 Pra ctic e H o me Fi re Ex it D ri l ls Che c k Sm o ke Dete cto rs Craw l Low I n Sm o ke

UILDS CONFIDENCE LACY WBEST -THOMAS INSURANCE AGENCY

(L-R) Jazmin Torres, Dylan Bryant, Kathryn Romola, Allyson Smith and Zoe Wilson

Adult & Children Classes FREE Introductory Class After School Program We Pick-Up (From Local Schools)

910-383-2101

Hwy 17 South In Front of Wal-Mart Across from Magnolia Greens

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FOCUS

RESPECT

supporting education

Kayla Davis, a fifth grade student in Mrs. Skiver’s class, sang the Star Spangle Banner. Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary School held a 9/11 ceremony for staff and students to reflect on the 2001 tragedy that took so many lives and to remember the soldiers who continue to serve to protect our freedom and country. A moment of silence was observed in honor of our military men and women. Students were also encouraged to write a letter or card to send to soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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OCTOBER 2008


Manners Matter

with Truman and Mrs. F

Q.

Dear Truman and Mrs. F, Is okay to eat ribs and T-bone steaks with your fingers? Also, what is the proper way to eat spaghetti? — Mary Ellen

A.

Dear Mary Ellen, It is not okay to eat any kind of steak with your fingers! However, it is OK to eat ribs with your fingers if the restaurant or dinner is casual. Most likely, you are not going to be served ribs at a formal event. As for spaghetti: Some people twirl pasta with a fork inside of a spoon. While this is correct, a more “polished” way to eat it would be just to twirl a small amount with your fork, then put it into your mouth. If a spoon is provided, then use it. If not, don’t ask for one. Try not to suck any stray noodles into your mouth! Spaghetti, fried chicken, corn on the cob, etc., are all awkward to eat, no matter what. They belong to a group of foods I like to call

“funny” foods. Here are some pointers that might help you: • Fried chicken: At home or for a casual dinner, fingers are fine unless your hostess or mother uses a knife and fork. At a formal dinner, you should use a knife and fork.

• Spaghetti: Twirl the pasta around your fork. Use a pasta spoon if one has been provided. • Corn on the cob: You may eat it with your fingers. • Pizza: You may eat it with your fingers.

and knife. If you take a bite and find little bones, push them to the front of your mouth with as little fuss as possible and place it onto the side of your plate either with your fingers or your fork. • Ribs: There is no neat way, but you may pick them up. • Steak: Use your fork and knife to cut the meat away from the bone, one bite at a time. • Asparagus: If the stalks are firm, you may eat it with your fingers. Using a fork and knife is also correct. It’s too hot! What do I do? I am sorry to tell you that blowing on your food is not okay! You should not blow on it before it goes into your mouth, and you should not fan your food with your mouth open after you have taken a bite of something that is too hot. The best way to cool down if you happen to take a hot bite is to take a drink. Do NOT spit out the food, though. Just hang on, and it will cool down and you can swallow.

• Melon: Watermelon is eaten by hand only at picnics. Otherwise, use your fork and knife or a spoon. If a half of a cantaloupe or melon is served, use a spoon. • Fruit served in sections: You can use a knife, fork or spoon. • Oysters on the half shell: Pick up the shell by hand and scrape underneath the oyster with a cocktail fork. Bring the shell to your lips, and as quietly as you can, slurp the oyster out.

Truman and Mrs. Susan Fleming will be glad to answer your questions on manners and etiquette. Mrs. F is a home economist, editor and lifestyle writer, specializing in the areas of entertaining and children’s etiquette. E-mail your question to manners@ kidsvillenews.com. If we use your question in the paper, you will receive a Kidsville News! t-shirt! Image: metrocreativegraphics.com

• Fish with bones (or any kind of food with shells): Take out as many of the bones as possible with your fork

LACY WEST-THOMAS INSURANCE AGENCY supporting education

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U C E Y A W I H M F E M O I L

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R S X F O N E E W P G X K O J

S G A Y I L E W E C A N T S I

CANDY CATS EERIE HALLOWEEN PUMPKIN

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K E J M N P P C H T V G Z S V

S Z W F P U H A W U L P F P J

J P P M M J P R K Y E N D F G

O H O P J N I V S X W V V H M

M T K O N S G I U G T Z B L W

I I H Z K J U N S B G O P L F

N C K X N Y Z G A Z J G J S Y

CARVING COSTUME GHOST MASK SPOOKY

Voted #1 in Insurance! LACY WEST-THOMAS INSURANCE AGENCY 700 West Broad Street • Elizabethtown, NC 28337 910-862-4156 • www.lacywestinsurance.com

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 7


This page is brought to you by Coloring Corner

Do you dress up for Halloween? Write a sentence about who or what you are going to be this year.

Visit www.kidsvillenews.com for more fun and games! Truman

Truman’s Tricky Picture

Find these items in the picture and then color it! Have fun! Look for the solution on the kidsvillenews.com Web site.

8 KIDSVILLE NEWS

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OCTOBER 2008


Get to School Safely! Help the school bus get to school safely.

October Word Find

Find the words below that relate to October. BUS DRIVER CANDY COBWEBS COLUMBUS

Y A Q V M I S H J C G T A Z W

KIDSVILLE COUNTS

O S A Y H F C A A S A L L A P

B Q W F V O X Y C S K N K E E

COSTUME FALL GOURD HAYRIDE

X U M S B O G R K C D N D Q A

C O S W T J I I O B X I M Y D

X H E D B J R D L K K K M G E

X B J M R E A E A L I P C U R

S L W A B I P Q N Z O M S K F

JACK-O-LANTERN OCTOBER POPCORN PUMPKIN

E A L O T L V W T I I U E I R

K M T T L B K E E W H P S H J

E C U A D G I P R H G O U R D

O R F T A Q W J N Z J G O N R

C I M U S C O L U M B U S A S

N R O C P O P K M Z N P D O W

A J G N D P C Y O H M S N O A

Help Truman complete these math word problems!

Truman is at the Sam found the perfect pumpkin. It costs Austin student6 at pumpkin patch with $8.Clemmons, Sam has 5 adollars, quarters, 8 his 4 friends. It costs dimes and 4 nickels. Howa much money Supply Elementary, enjoyed $10 to take the hayday does he have? of fishing over the summer ride. How much do they need all together? with his Papa, Grandma Brenda Does he have enough money to buy the andpumpkin? Uncle Jonathan. Austin There are four rows of pumpkins. Two caught his very first fish………. rows have 20 pumpkins each. One row has 13 pumpkins and one row has 9 pumpkins. If no, A how much money does Sam need SHARK! How many pumpkins are there? to borrow to buy the pumpkin?

OCTOBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 9


���������

By: Alyssa Lincoln Elementary

Helpful Hint: Send in your drawings IN COLOR AND ON UNLINED PAPER!

Parent’s Signature (Permission): ______________________________________________________________________________________________

Your signature (This is my own work): ______________________________________________________________________________________________

School________________________________________________________________________________________

City___________________________________________________________State____________ Zip_________________

Address________________________________________________________________________________________

Name___________________________________________________________________________Age___________

Truman wants your original artwork, letter, poems and stories! We may print them in a later issue or use them on our website! Just have your parents fill out this form and send it with your work to: Kidsville News!, PO Box 15944, Wilmington, NC 28408

By: Chloe Lincoln Elementary

By: Kaylee Roger Bacon Academy

������������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������

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By: Travis Jessie Mae Elementary

By: Austin Supply Elementary

By: Kadeja Lincoln Elementary


Walt Disney TV Premiere, 1954

27

20

✪ Columbus Day

13

✪ National GermanAmerican Day

✪ Child Health Day

6

National Stamp Collecting Month

Statue of Liberty Dedicated, 1886

● New Moon

28

21

❍ FULL MOON Hunter’s Moon

14

7

Raptor Month

✪ This symbol recognizes the holiday as a Presidential Proclamation.

26

National School Bus Safety Week

✪ National Character Counts Week

19

Traditional Columbus Day

Mexico: Dia de la raza

12

National Newspaper Week

✪ Fire Prevention Week

5

National Roller Skating Month

National Popcorn Poppin’ Month

2

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22

National School Lunch Week, Oct. 13-17

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8

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iPod First Unveiled, 2001

23

16

✪ Leif Erikson Day

9

Disney World Opened, Redwood National 1971 Park Established, 1968

1

Halloween Mount Rushmore Completed, 1941

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24

17

10

3

October

International Magic Week

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First Newspaper Comic Strip, 1896

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4


WHERE IN THE WORLD IS... JAMAICA?

It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! On your globe, find longitude 77º W and latitude 18º N, and you'll find the island nation of Jamaica in the Caribbean Sea. This tiny island is slightly smaller than the U.S. state of Connecticut. The tropical island is hot and humid, and its beaches are home to many resorts for vacationers. Outside of the coastal plain, the terrain of Jamaica is mostly mountainous. Jamaica was discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1494, which led to settlement by the Spanish in the 16th century. But Jamaica’s first inhabitants were the Tainos, indians believed to be originally from South YAmerica. O B X CThe X XTainos S E K called E O Cthe N Aisland "Xay(Over, Down, Direction) maca," meaning "land of wood and water." The Europeans brought African A S Q U O H B L A M C R I R Jslaves to the BUS DRIVER (3, 1, SE) island. The British captured Jamaica from the CANDY (1, 10, SE) Q Spanish A W M S in E 1655 J W Land T Uestablished F M O G a plantaCOBWEBS (2, 7, NE) tion economy producing sugar, cocoa and coffee. This economy was very but depended on slave labor. During the battle for the island, the V Y F S W D M A O T A T U successful C N COLUMBUS (13, 6, S) Spanish freed their slaves COSTUME and armed them to fi ght. These ex-slaves became known as the Maroons. For many years, they fought against the British. In M H V B T B R B T L D A S P D (15, 7, NW) FALL (12, the 3, SW) 1739, British realized I F O O that J J they E I could L B G not Q Cdefeat O P the Maroons, so they signed a treaty giving them land and independence GOURD 11, S) theirSown Where in the C X rulers. G I R In A exchange, P V K I W the O PMaroons C to live(11, under agreed to help catch runaway slaves, for which they were paid. HAYRIDE (1, 8, E) World Word H A Y R I D E Q W E P J L K Y Slavery in Jamaica was abolished in 1834, and many of the former slaves became farmers. Jamaica gained independence JACK-O-LANTERN (1,9,E) Plantation [plan-teyJ A C K O L A N T E R N U M O OCTOBER (12, 1, SW) from Britain in 1962. POPCORN (14, 7, N) S S CEnglish-speaking B K L Z I W H Zisland M Z Hin the Caribbean, but Jamaicans have their own colorful way of speaking shuhn] Jamaica is theClargest (10, 12, W) G A K D X K I O I H G J B N Mrecognized music. They use primarily drums, small wind and string a large farm or estate on PUMPKIN it. Reggae music is Jamaica's most internationally T L N N I K P M U P O G U P Shas had big results with its athletes. The Jamaican sprinters have recently which crops are raised, instruments. Jamaica is proud that the tiny island A L K D M M C S E S U O N usually by resident set records and won medals at the Olympics Sin DBeijing. Z A E Q Y G U K I H R N A O O workers Sources: The World Factbook prepared by the Central Intelligence Agency; Jamaica Tourist Board, www.visitjamaica.com. W P E A D E R F R J D R S W A

October Word Find

Plant A Tree

Get to School Safely!

ind Word F K E O C N A r e b o t J E Oc R I R X X S

C X C O G L A M Y O B U F M O H B

T U n) N Directio ) J W L A S Q T U C Down, M S E D O T A (Over, (3, 1, SE Q A W A S P RIVER D M A D W L BUS D (1, 10, SE) S T O P B Y V Y F NE) G Q C CAND T B R B B S (2, 7, C L B V E P S) I W E M H 3, 6, COB W O BUS (1 ) O J J Y V K I COLUM E (15, 7, NW I F O J L K R A P M P I U E ST G ) O C M O Q W 2, 3, SW S C X R N U I D E FALL (1 (11, 11, S) E R H T Y Z D M A N H A GOUR E (1, 8, E) W H Z K O L M ,9,E) L Z I HAYRID ANTERN (1 J A C J B N K G B -L H ) C P S O I JACK-O R (12, 1, SW C S S BE O G U X K I P D N OCTO N (14, 7, N) U K P M R G A O S D POPCO 12, W) N I K E S U O O IN (10, T L N M C S PUMPK R N A

October Word Find D M I H A L K G U K

A R S W

Kidsville Counts

D X X S E K E O C N A Y O B RXJ C QY F (Over, Down, Direction) Z A E D E R P E AA S Q U O H B L A M C R I R J BUS DRIVER (3, 1, WSE) Truman is at the pumpkin patch with his 4 friends. It costs $10 to take CANDY (1, 10, SE) Qelthe A S EHow J Wmuch L TdoUthey F need M O allG together? $40 y!WhayM ride. f a COBWEBS (2, 7, NE) S ool h V Y F S W D M A O T A T U C N c S o t COLUMBUS (13, 6, S) Get M H V B T B R B T L D A STwo P rows D have 20 pumpkins each. One There are four rows of pumpkins. COSTUME (15, 7, NW) FALL (12, 3, SW) I row F Ohas O 13 J pumpkins J E I Land B one G Qrow C has O 9P pumpkins. How many pumpkins GOURD (11, 11, S) S are C Xthere? G I62R A P V K I W O P C HAYRIDE (1, 8, E) H A Y R I D E Q W E P J L K Y JACK-O-LANTERN (1,9,E) Sam found perfect J A C K O the L A N Tpumpkin. E R N It U costs M O$8. Sam has 5 dollars, 6 quarOCTOBER (12, 1, SW) money does he have? $7.50 POPCORN (14, 7, N) C ters, S S 8Cdimes B Kand L 4Znickels. I W HHow Z much M Z H Does he have enough money to buy the pumpkin? No PUMPKIN (10, 12, W) G A K D X K I O I H G J B N M

If no, how much money does Sam need to borrow to buy the pumpkin?

T L N N I K P M U P 50¢ A L K D M M C S E S Z A E Q Y G U K I H W P lEleACoDunEtsR F Rto taJke 10 costs $ Kidsvi nds. It

O U R D

ie his 4 fr 40 ch with l together? $ ne al pkin pat each. O s ey need the pum th at o d n mpkins is e 20 pu many pumpki Truman de. How much ws hav ri ro ow o H ay h s. Tw the kin ns. p ki m p u m p u ws of p one row has 9 d e four ro There ar 3 pumpkins an , 6 quar 1 dollars

12 Get KIDSVILLE NEWSSafely! to School

G O N R

U S A S

P D O W

S N O A

Walmart donated a tree and some pansies to Lincoln Elementary. Mrs. Johnsons 4th/5th grade AIG students planted the tree and flowers.

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OCTOBER 2008


WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... A SCHOOL BUS DRIVER? National School Bus Safety Week is October 19 - 25, so I thought it would be a great time to learn more about what it’s like to be a school bus driver. Day after day, school bus drivers get children safely to school and home again. It must be a little bit stressful to know that so many young people count on you to be a great driver. And how do they stand all the distractions and noise from the kids on the bus? I wanted to find out, so I spoke with Angelia Woodie, who has been a school bus driver for 15 years. She is a school bus driver in Cobb County, Georgia, and winner of the 2007 Thomas Built Buses’ Children’s Choice School Bus Driver of the Year award.

TRUMAN: What does it take to become a school bus driver? WOODIE: To become a school bus driver, you have to go through several weeks of training. They teach you all the parts of a bus and how to drive it. Before you can drive with children on the bus, you have to pass a written and a driving test. When you pass these tests, then you receive a CDL license with an S endorsement, which means you are now able to drive a school bus with children aboard. I think one of the main things you need to be a bus driver is that you have to love children and have a lots of patience. TRUMAN: When and why did you first become interested in being a school bus driver? WOODIE: I first became interested in being a bus driver when my children started kindergarten. I thought it would be a neat job to have so that I could be with them on holidays and summer. In case you haven’t guessed, I only work when the children are in school. TRUMAN: What exactly do you do every day? WOODIE: I start my mornings at 6:30 a.m. That’s when I check my bus out for any problems that might keep me from picking up the children. After checking my bus, I start picking up children in the a.m. First is my elementary run. After delivering them to school, I go to my next run, which is my high school, and after delivering those to the school, my next pick up will be for middle school. These runs take about two and half hours to complete in the morning. And in the afternoon, I will pick up the same children and deliver them home which will take three and a half hours. TRUMAN: How many kids are on your school bus?

WOODIE: It varies from each of my bus routes. Anywhere between 30 and 68. TRUMAN: That’s a lot. How do you keep your eye on the road and your mind focused with so many children and so much noise on the bus? WOODIE: My main concern when driving is their safety. Teaching the children to follow the rules makes my job easier to focus on the driving while their job is to listen to the bus driver’s instructions and help keep the ride fun and safe. I can’t stress enough how important the children are in how a bus driver’s job can be. The children make all the difference! So make your bus driver proud: BE COOL AND FOLLOW THE RULES. TRUMAN: What’s the hardest part of your job? WOODIE: The hardest part of my job is getting all the children to follow the rules on the bus. These rules are for their own safety, and it would be the greatest reward if all students would read and follow the rules of the bus. TRUMAN: What’s the best part of your job? WOODIE: Working with the children and being able to be off all summer and holidays with pay. TRUMAN: What kind of advice would you give to kids who might be interested in becoming a school bus driver one day? WOODIE: I would tell them that it is a great job for anyone that loves to work with children and drive a big yellow bus. Also, if you drive a bus, it allows you time between runs and during the summer to go to college and earn your degree. TRUMAN: Well, thanks for talking with me, and congratulations on your award!

Angelia Woodie, center, was nominated as School Bus Driver of the Year by a fifth grader named Keirra who has been a passenger on Woodie’s bus since kindergarten. The Thomas Built Buses’ School Bus Driver of the Year contest, now in its second year, allows students to write an essay nominating their favorite school bus driver. Keirra’s nomination was in the form of a poem and included a drawing of Mrs. Woodie, shown at the left.

OCTOBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 13


Kids everywhere love Halloween! You get to dress up and get candy — what a great holiday! The Halloween customs that we observe on October 31 had their beginnings long ago. Many of them came from the beliefs of the druids, who were priests of ancient Gaul and Britain. They believed that witches, demons and spirits of the dead roamed the earth on the night before November 1. In the 1800s, the Roman Catholic Church made November 1 a holy day, called All Saints’ or All Hallows’ Day. The night before, October 31, became known as All Hallow Even, which eventually became Hallowe’en or Halloween. Costumes & Candy To keep away the bad spirits, the druids lit bonfires. To protect themselves from the bad spirits and their tricks, they also disguised themselves and offered the spirits good things to eat! This is how we have come to celebrate Halloween by dressing up in costumes and going trick or treat! Pumpkins & Cornstalks Pumpkins, cornstalks, autumn leaves, nuts and fruit are used for decoration during the Halloween season. They are reminders of the druids’ autumn festival in honor of the harvest. It has also become tradition to carve your pumpkin, creating the jack-o-lantern. You can also make a jack-o-lantern without carving by painting or drawing a face on your pumpkin or decorating it with stickers.

Halloween is a fun time, but it’s important that it is also a safe holiday. • Make sure your costume is safe. Be sure the eye holes are large enough and do not obstruct your vision. • When purchasing a costume, masks, beards and wigs, look for the label “Flame Resistant.” • Also, make sure that your costume is not easy to trip over! • If you are carrying a prop, such as a sword or broom, make sure that it is not sharp and that you do not run with it! • When you go out trick-or-treating, make sure that an adult goes with you and that you carry a flashlight so you can see where you are going. • For greater visibility during dusk and darkness, decorate or trim costumes with reflective tape that will glow in the beam of a car’s headlights. • Stay in your own neighborhood and don’t visit houses that do not have their porch lights on. • Never go in to anyone’s house or car without your parent. • Do not to accept — and, especially, do not eat — anything that isn’t commercially wrapped. • And of course, candy looks yummy, but make sure your parent checks it before you begin enjoying it! Have a safe and Happy Halloween!

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14 KIDSVILLE NEWS

Blackhawk Helicopter at Belville Elementary

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Christian Lan caster Right before launching!

OCTOBER 2008


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                                                                                          Specializing in Events for over 18 years!              ♦ Corporate Picnics ♦ Church Events ♦ School Functions ♦   ♦ Inflatables ♦ Rock Walls ♦ Entertainment ♦ Inflatable Movie Screens ♦       ♦ Tents ♦ DJ’s ♦ Carnival Games ♦ And much, much more! ♦            CALL US! (843) 756-8368     PO BOX 216 ♦ LORIS, SC 29569      WWW.EVENTSANDTENTS.COM                      PTO Vice President,  Karen Jones (front right)  and PTO President Kim

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               Union Grandparents Day:   This publication is dedicated to the loving memory of       Fillman (back right) pass out goody bags and direct    grandparents to classrooms. Over 520 grandparents    attended Grandparents’ Day at Union Elementary.       Zion Fitzgerald enjoys time with  his grandmother, Jean O’Neill on Grandparent’s Day. Grandparents visited their grandchild’s   classroom and participated in planned activities.   May we all strive to be as intelligent as she was!

Nancy Hall-Godbey

OCTOBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 15


War I (known then as “The Great War” since it was the only world war up to that point in history). Phoebe was her given name, but it was her stage name by which you know her. Phoebe was the fifth of seven children born in a log cabin to Jacob and Convers Susan Moses in 1860, aNewell Quaker couple(N.C.) Wyeth was born in Needham, Massachusetts, living in rural western Ohio. She couldn’t on October 22, 1882. The oldest read, but she sure could shoot.of four brothers, N.C. loved nature and spent much of his childhood She lost her father when she was just playing outdoors on his famsix years old. A few ily’s years later, shealso began farm. N.C. loved to hunting for food to help feed the fampaint, and by the time he was ily. She was such a good aimold, thathis she 12 years watercolor could shoot the headpaintings off a running had earned him a local reputation as a quail. artist. When N.C. She was so goodbudding at hunting that was a teenager his father she was able to support the famsent him to Mechanics Art ily by selling her game to local School in Boston so that residents. Local hotel theowners young artist could learn preferred the animals that Phoebe drafting skills. But N.C. did shot because she always shotto it be in the head, meaning that there not want a draftsman, andleft in 1899, transferred would be no buckshot in thehe animal. She did well enough to Massachusetts Normal pay off the mortgagetoon the family home in just three years! Art This School to study illustration. Recognized a petite woman — who stood only fiasve-feet tall as an adult — truly gifted student, N.C. was invited to attend the went on to become one of the Wild West’s biggest celebrities. She Howard Pyle School of Art in Delaware in 1902. couldofsplit the edge of aillustrators playing card with heratfithe rst time, shot and then One the most famous in America Howard shoot five more holesteacher in thatand same card before hitmonths the ground. Pyle was a wonderful inspiration. Justitsix after N.C. began at the school, hePhoebe published his first Saturday Instudying 1881, the spunky little competed against a Evening famous Post cover illustration. his 22nd birthday,near N.C.Greenville, was alreadyOhio. a professhooter named Frank By Butler in a contest

She took her stage name after the Cincinnati neighborhood in which she and Frank lived. Phoebe Moses became known as Annie Oakley. After they were married, she worked as Frank’s assistant in his show, but they both sional illustrator! realized that Annie Oakley had more talent Because of his interest the(their American and Howard than heindid first West clue should have Pyle’s been instructions to paint what you see, N.C. made several trips to the westwhen she beat him in the shooting match earlier). ern United States in the early 20th century. His pictures of So he became her assistant. Native Americans and cowboys convinced Outing Magazine You’vetoheard Tell shooting applepainter off namethe himstory “one of of William our greatest, if not our the greatest, of a man’sofhead? Well, Annie Oakley cigarette outfrom of outdoor American life.” In once 1911,shot N.C.a moved away western subjects and began moreone classical imagthe lips ofhis Germany’s Kaiser Wilhelm II,painting prompting person to es. He illustrated book, Treasure remark sarcastically that if Robert she hadLouis beenStevenson’s a worse shot, there might was War later I. asked to illustrate many more books for never haveIsland, been aand World several different publishers, including The Boy’s King Arthur, And what ever happened with the accusation that she had a Robin Hood and Robinson Crusoe. N.C. also created drug habit?illustrations for magazine advertisements, calendars and Newspaper publisher Randolph Hearst published a of posters. He wasWilliam even commissioned to paint large murals historical events forarrested the Missouri State Capitol and story that Annie Oakley was for stealing to payBuilding for drugs. the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston, among other places. It turned out that a burlesque performer was the guilty one and, died the on October 19, her 1945, in awas trainAnnie accident. But, when arrested,N.C. she told police that name Oakley. his work on through his five children, and When the real Annielived Oakley took Hearst to talented court and won, he three became well-known artists themselves. In fact, after refused to pay up. She went on to win 54 out of 55 libel suits N.C.’s death, his artist son Andrew Wyeth even helped against newspapers the story. completethat one re-printed of his unfinished murals in New York. This story isWritten part ofbythe Red,Burris, Whitea & Trueelementary Mysteriesschool series by Tamar former teacher who now works freelance writer and curriculum developer is Paul Niemann, authorasofa Invention Mysteries. More information for PBS, theatDiscovery Channel and other education-related companies. available www.InventionMysteries.com. © 2008 Paul Niemann.

ART GALLERY

N.C. Wyeth, Painter of Outdoor American Life

Sources: N.C. Wyeth, A Catalogue Raissoné of Paintings, www.ncwyeth.org, N.C. Wyeth on Wikipedia. Image from Scribner’s, “The Sheriff” (1912).

Mystery Solved! HEY KIDS! You can get more stories like the one above … and it’s no mystery how. These stories are by “Invention Guru” Paul Niemann, author of the Invention Mysteries series of books.

Find out the following info – and stump your friends with your new knowledge: • Who is the greatest inventor of all time? • What inventions have kids created? • Who invented baseball? • What are the 5 greatest inventions of all time?

Special Autographed Set for Kidsville News Readers! Both Books for $25.90

“Invention Guru” Paul Niemann

To order, please surf on over to www.KidsvilleNews.com with an adult and look for the books at the top of the page, or have your parents send a check for $25.90 plus $2 for postage to: Invention Mysteries, 2614 South 24th Street, Quincy, IL 62305. You can even have the author sign your books for you!

Hey Kids! Come visit the Kidsvile News! website. Check out the cool games, info and puzzles. Plus — talk to Truman!

www.kidsvillenews.com/capefear 16 KIDSVILLE NEWS

Printed on Recycled Paper

OCTOBER 2008


TM

A SECTION ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS

BOOKSHELF

Christopher Columbus: The Voyage That Changed the World Author/Illustrator: Emma Carlson Berne

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Age Range: 10+ From the publisher: Christopher Columbus made the voyage that, for better and worse, changed history. Born in the bustling port city of Genoa, Italy, Columbus fell in love with the sea and spent his youth learning all he could about steering and navigating a ship. Dreaming of wealth and fame, he believed he could find a new route to the Indies by sailing westward. Expert biographer Emma Carlson Berne paints this compelling portrait of his life and times in a language that will help children follow his journeys to the “New World.” With careful attention to context, she explains how Columbus won support for his expedition, what happened when he finally reached land, what effect his arrival had on the native people and how he ultimately clashed with the Spanish crown.

Soulville: Soul Stuff for Kids of All Ages

The Haunted Ghoul Bus

Author/Illustrator: Lisa Trumbauer, Jannie Ho (Illustrator) Publisher: Sterling Publishing Age Range: 4 to 8 From the publisher: Of course children know about the big yellow school bus — but have they ever heard about the haunted ghoul bus? It’s wilder and way cooler, with a Mutant Mummy driver and a menagerie of monster passengers. But one Halloween day, someone else gets on board by mistake: a normal little boy. Soon he’s taking a ride with a furry werewolf, a skeleton whose rickety bones go clitter-clatter, a grinning pumpkin head, a swirl of bats and a friendly witch named Dolores. Told in fun and appealing rhyme, and featuring holiday-bright illustrations of a cast of unforgettable characters, this playful picture book has sturdy cardstock pages and embossing throughout. It’s perfect for celebrating a (not too) scary Halloween. Kids will want the ghoul bus to come to their neighborhood, too!

The Aye-Aye

Author and Producer: Kevin Salem Publisher: Little Monster Music Age Range: 6 and up Is it a book? Is it a CD? It’s a spectacular mix of both! The small board book features catchy verse, taking the reader through the history of soul music. The lively illustrations were drawn by children and add to the fun feel of this little gem. The “Soul Facts” on each page provide trivia on some of the most influential musicians in soul, including Aretha Franklin, Sly Stone and Marvin Gaye. The accompanying CD features real kids singing a powerful selection of soul music, greats like “Dancing in the Street,” “Stand By Me,” “Mustang Sally” and more. Kevin Salem has also produced an equally magically book/ CD on The Beatles, titled All Together Now: Beatles Stuff for Kids of All Ages. — JK

Authors/Illustrator: Jody Sullivan Rake Publisher: Advantage Capstone Press Age Range: 5 to 7 One of the newest books in the Weird Animals series, The Aye-Aye is a great book for new readers and below-level readers. The books in the series highlight some of the oddest-looking creatures in the world. Explaining their physical characteristics, habitat and behavior teaches the reader how these strange animals survive in the world. The full-color, full-page photographs of the aye-aye illustrate the simple text. As the reader learns about this unique kind of lemur, they’ll be fascinated by the close-up photographs of this big-eyed creature. The book features an index, glossary and Internet sites for further learning opportunities. — JK

P ARENTOWN OCTOBER 2008

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 17


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S MART How to Keep the “Gift” in Your Gift Cards By Susan Beacham At her last birthday party, my daughter Allison, now 16, received almost nothing but gift cards. She and I have spent untold hours in the malls trying to redeem these cards. It is agonizing to watch her try to shop at stores she has never shopped at before or try to find something she wants that matches the value on the card so she does not have to add her own cash to the purchase. None of us intend to do this when we give a gift card to a child. The idea is to give them the freedom to choose their own gift. But gift cards come with angst as well as hidden fees and other nasty fine print handcuffs. It shouldn’t come as any surprise, then, that it is estimated as much as $8 billion was lost last year by consumers who let their gift cards go unused — expired, lost or ignored. Chances are generous friends and relatives shower your children with these cards at every gift-giving opportunity. Now you need to step in. Follow these five steps to show your children how to take charge of what they have before they unwittingly re-gift the entire amount back to the store. 1. Ask your kids to gather all the gift cards they have and bring them to the table. Then, work together to create a written log for each child’s gift cards with the name of the card, the value of the card, the card number and the expiration date. 2. Separate the cards into retail gift cards and bank gift cards and then read the fine print on the back of each. There can be different rules of redemption for each card. Bank cards can be the trickiest to keep track of. 3. Look at the back of each card and add to your log the replacement card rules if the card is lost or stolen. Is there a fee? Do you need the original card number and original receipt? Also write down any other fees, such as monthly fees that begin to get charged after a certain period of non-use. These fees can quickly erode the value of the card — and some are retroactive. 4. Get some white correction tape — the kind they sell at any office supply store — and put a strip of it somewhere on the card. Every time the card is used, show your child how to mark the purchase on the tape. This will help everyone keep an eye on the value remaining on the gift card. 5. Know your state law on gift card redemptions. A consumer’s No. 1 protection is to read the fine print before purchasing gift cards. Contact your local Attorney General’s office and speak to the consumer fraud representatives to learn about the protections you have under local law. A few final thoughts: If your child receives a gift card and is too young to appreciate or understand what she has, consider giving her cash in exchange for the value of the card. Cash is more concrete. With it, she can exercise all her money choices — save, spend, donate and invest — and see the money disappear. Going forward, discourage family and friends from buying gift cards for your children, at least until the kids are old enough to keep track of the card and the stored value amount. Encourage cash as an alternative to gift cards. As a good friend of mine says, “Cash is always the right size, and it’s always the right color!” Susan Beacham is the founder and CEO of Money Savvy Generation, which creates innovative products and services to help parents, grandparents and educators teach children money-management skills. E-mail her at Susan@MSGen.com. Copyright 2008. All Rights Reserved.

18 KIDSVILLE NEWS

¿Cómo conservar el ‘regalo’ en sus certificados de regalo? Por Susan Beacham En su última fiesta de cumpleaños, mi hija Allison, que ahora tiene 16 años, recibió casi todos sus regalos en certificados de regalos. Ella y yo habíamos pasado horas incontables en los centros comerciales intentando gastar estos certificados. Es agonizante verle intentar comprar en tiendas que nunca ha comprado antes o intentar encontrar algo que quiere y que cueste el mismo dinero que hay en el certificado para que así no tenga que añadir dinero suyo a la compra. Ninguno de nosotros pretende esto cuando damos un certificado de regalo a un niño/a. La idea es darles la libertad para que elijan su propio regalo. Pero los certificados de regalo vienen con angustia además de otros costos ocultos y otras desagradables limitaciones en letra pequeña. Entonces no debería sorprendernos, se estima que el año pasado los consumidores perdieron tanto como unos 8 mil millones por dejar sus certificados sin utilizar- expirados, perdidos o ignorados. Las posibilidades son que sus generosos amigos y parientes regalen a sus hijos estos certificados en cada ocasión que tienen para dar regalos. Ahora es cuando usted necesita entrar en acción. Siga estos cinco pasos para mostrarles a sus hijos como hacerse cargo de lo que tienen antes de que, sin saberlo, devuelvan el regalo enteramente a la tienda. 1. Pídales a sus hijos que reúnan todos sus certificados regalo y que los traigan a la mesa. Después, trabajen juntos para crean un registro escrito para cada hijo, apuntando el nombre de los certificados que tienen, su valor, el número del certificado y la fecha de expiración. 2. Separe los certificados de regalo y los certificados de regalo bancarios y después lea la letra pequeña en la parte de atrás de cada uno de ellos. Puede que haya diferentes reglas para redimir cada certificado. Los certificados de regalo bancarios son los más complicados de llevar la cuenta. 3. Mire la parte de atrás de cada certificado y añada a su registro las reglas para substituirle en caso de pérdida o robo. ¿Hay costos? ¿Necesita usted el número original del certificado y el recibo original? También escriba otros costos, tales como costos mensuales que comienzan a ser cobrados después de un periodo de no ser utilizados. Estos costos pueden sobrepasar el valor del certificado- y algunos son retroactivos. 4. Consiga un poco de cinta correctora blanca—la que venden en cualquier tienda de suministros de oficina –y ponga un poco en cada certificado. Cada vez que utilice el certificado, muestre a su hijo como marcar la compra en la cinta. Esto ayudará a todos a mantener la vista en el valor remanente en el certificado de regalo. 5. Conozca lo que dice la ley estatal sobre la redención de certificados de regalo. La regla número uno del consumidor es leer la letra pequeña antes de comprar certificados de regalo. Contacte la oficina del Fiscal General y hable con los representantes del fraude al consumidor para averiguar las protecciones que usted tiene bajo la ley local. Algunas sugerencias finales: si su hijo recibe un certificado de regalo y es demasiado joven para apreciar o entender lo que son, considere darles dinero a cambio por el valor del certificado. El metálico es más concreto. Con ello, pueden ejercitar todas sus elecciones con el dinero—ahorrar, gastar, donar e invertir—y ver el dinero desaparecer. Vaya más allá, dígales a su familia y amigos que no compren los certificados regalos para sus hijos, al menos hasta que los niños sean lo suficiente mayores para llevar la cuenta del certificado y de la cantidad del valor que queda. Anímelos a que les den dinero como una alternativa a los certificados regalo. Como un buen amigo mío dice: “El metálico siempre es de la medida correcta y siempre es del color adecuado!” Susan Beacham es la fundadora y Directora Ejecutiva de Money Savvy Generation, compañía que crea productos innovadores y servicios para ayudar a los padres, los abuelos y los educadores a enseñar a los niños las habilidades de gestión sobre el dinero. Copyright 2008 Todos los derechos reservados. Traducido por Maite Lamberri.

Printed on Recycled Paper

OCTOBER 2008


KIDSVILLE KITCHEN

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

October is National Popcorn Poppin’ Month! October is National Popcorn Poppin’ Month, a time to honor America’s favorite magical, munchable maize. You don’t need an excuse to grab a handful of these simple kernels of goodness, but a month-long celebration gives you plenty of time and justification to try new recipes. It’s hard to believe a snack food that tastes so good can actually be good for you! • Popcorn is a whole-grain food, which makes it a complex carbohydrate that is not only low in calories, but also a good source of fiber. • Popcorn is low in calories — only 31-55 calories are in one cup of unbuttered, and when lightly buttered, one cup still has only 133 calories. • Popcorn has no artificial additives or preservatives and is sugar-free. • Popcorn contains energy-producing carbohydrates.

POPCORN CARAMEL APPLES WHAT YOU NEED: • 6 cups popped popcorn • 1 tablespoon butter, melted • 2 teaspoons sugar • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon • 2 cups dried apple chips HOW TO MAKE IT (makes 7 cups): Preheat oven to 300° F. Line a 9 x 13-inch baking pan with foil; butter foil. Spread popcorn in pan and drizzle with melted butter; toss popcorn. Sprinkle popcorn with sugar and cinnamon and toss again. Heat in oven 7 minutes. Sprinkle apple chips over popcorn and heat an additional 3 minutes. Serve warm or cool to room temperature. Store in an airtight container.

HAPPY HALLOWEEN MINI POPCORN BALLS WHAT YOU NEED: • 10 cups popped popcorn • 1 (1-lb.) pkg. miniature marshmallows • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or margarine • 1 cup diced dried fruit (papaya, mango or peaches) • 1 cup butterscotch chips • Orange food coloring (optional) HOW TO MAKE IT (makes 16 balls): Mix popcorn, fruit and butterscotch chips in large bowl; set aside. In large saucepan, heat marshmallows and butter over low heat until melted and smooth. Stir in several drops of food coloring if desired. Pour over popcorn and candy, tossing to coat evenly. Cool to allow handling (5 min.). Butter hands well and form into 3-inch balls.

Courtesy of The Popcorn Board. For more recipes and information, go to www.popcorn.org.

OCTOBER 2008

• Reach every K-5th grader in the county and their families • Help raise EOG scores • Help lower the high school drop-out rate

Contact Todd Godbey at 910.338.1205 or todd@mykidsvillenews.com ” EEPER

“SUNK

ES HUGH N O T S LANG LER ED BY LYSSA MIL R I P S IN BY A POEM ALL UN SM S E H L T , ME AL EAMS. G N I ORIES R M B E M SUNB ARM PINK THE W IN A SOFT L L A ME EM BRING Y WRAP TH H SEE MA CLOT S CAN E SO I Y E RTHY Y WO L N O E WHER Supply e recent lementary f if ly awa rded S th grade st of Nor udent, e cond P th Ca Aly la Catego rolina Stude ce in the 20 ssa Miller, ry for 08 Poe w nt Con test, try Co as her po C u e h n m a cil rlo On Sa entitle t d “Sun tte Young nity to urday, Octo k e eper”. be r in Sali ead her poe r 4 Alyssa w sbury. m at P ill hav o e the which S opp all the he will rece etry Day at i v C w e a co atawba ortuinning and a p p y oem Co of “Ba check y Leav llege for $1 s are publis es” (in 5 as h hed), a cert er Sec if ond Pl ace Pr icate, ize.

www.kidsvillenews.com/capefear

KIDSVILLE NEWS 19


of Try This At Home Try this delicious and healthy after school snack!

Skyscrapers… graham cracker floors and fruit walls!

Draw a line from the foods at the bottom of the page to their home in the Food Guide Pyramid.

It is important to eat foods from each area of the Food Guide Pyramid everyday to stay healthy! Can you think of a healthy meal that has food from every part of the pyramid?

Example:

Grains

Vegetables

Fruit

Oil

Milk

Meat & Beans

1. Spread peanut butter on one side of your graham cracker. 2. Put your favorite fruit, cut bite size, on the peanut butter. 3. Spread peanut butter on both sides of a graham cracker, and place on top. 4. Repeat the layers as many times as you want! Yum!

Ingredients: Graham crackers Peanut butter Your favorite fruits How tall can you build yours?

Seahawk Science How to do it: 1. Go into the dark room and wait a few minutes until your eyes adjust. You should be able to see your teeth in the mirror. 2. Chew a lifesaver with your mouth open, watching yourself in the mirror. 3. In the mirror, you can see the candy sparking and glittering like lightning in your mouth!

What you need:

� Wintergreen-flavored � �

LifeSavers® A mirror A dark room (Bathrooms may work best)

How it works: When you chew the candy, light energy comes from the friction created by your teeth on the hard candy. This light is called triboluminescence.

Visit the Watson School of Education at www.uncw.edu/ed or call (910) 962-4142 for more information.

Write a story to share with your friends and family! Will it be non-fiction, a mystery, an adventure, or something else? Add an illustration to make your story out of this world! Stories written for the Author Showcase 2008 at the Betty Holden Stike Ed Lab.


Brunswick October 2008 Kidsville News!  

Brunswick October 2008 Kidsville News!

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