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HEY! THIS PAPER BELONGS TO:

BLADEN AND ROBESON COUNTIES’ FUN FAMILY NEWSPAPER

MARCH 2009

NATIONAL NUTRITION MONTH ST. PATRICK’S DAY, WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE AN ENGINEER AND MORE!

Coastal Speech Center,Inc. 518 Liberty Hill Road, Lumberton, NC 28358


M I S S I O N

S T A T E M E N T

We believe that all students can learn and achieve mastery of basic grade level skills regardless of, their previous academic performance, family background, socioeconomic status, race or gender. We believe that the purpose of our schools is to educate all students to their highest level of academic performance while fostering positive growth in social behaviors and attitudes. We accept the responsibility to teach all students so they can attain their maximum potential.

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MARCH 2009


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Dear Kids, Happy Saint Patrick’s Day! March is Irish-American Heritage Month, National Nutrition Month, Music in Our Schools Month and National Craft Month, just to name just a few. But I think the best thing about March is that spring begins March 20! Spring is a great time to explore the outdoors. This year, I’m going to keep a nature journal about all of the cool things I see as nature comes to life this spring. March is all about reading here at Kidsville News! The week of March 2 is Newspapers in Education Week, and you know that newspapers and education are two of my favorite things. Since you probably received this copy of Kidsville News! in your classroom, you might think Newspapers in Education is pretty special, too! Reading is a very important life skill and a fun hobby. I’m really glad that you like reading Kidsville News! Have a marvelous March! Be sure to visit my Web site at www.kidsvillenews.com for more fun and games. Your friend,

THE CAPE FEAR REGION’S FUN FAMILY NEWSPAPER

Todd Godbey todd@mykidsvillenews.com

KIDSVILLE NEWS INC. PRESIDENT Bill Bowman bbowman@kidsvillenews.com

KIDSVILLE NEWS! PUBLISHER PO Box Your 15944 Info Here editor@yourpaperhere.com Wilmington, NC 28408 KIDSVILLE NEWS! NATIONAL EDITOR 910.338.1205 Joy G. Kirkpatrick kvnews@kidsvillenews.com www.KidsvilleNews.com/CapeFear

O P F

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Karissa Montgomery - karissa@upandcomingmag.com Shani Lewis - art@upandcomingmag.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Marcus Langley VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS

Jean Bolton - jbolton@upandcomingmag.com

PRESIDENT, KIDSVILLE NEWS! INC. SALES & MARKETING Bill Bowman Sam Lum - sam@upandcomingmag.com bbowman@kidsvillenews.com

Emily Lamar - elamar@upandcomingmag.com

KIDSVILLE NEWS! NATIONAL EDITOR ILLUSTRATOR Joy G. Kirkpatrick Cover & Truman • Dan Nelson kvnews@kidsvillenews.com

KIDSVILLE NEWS! PO Box ILLUSTRATOR 53790 • Fayetteville, NC 28305 Cover & Truman •• Fax Dan(910) Nelson (910) 222-6200 222-6199 Copyright ©2008 by Kidsville News! Incorporated. All rights reserved. No part of this issue may be reproduced in whole or in part in any information, form without permission of the call publisher or For advertising please copyright holder. Neither participating advertisers nor the publishers will be responsible or Jack Stultz, Marketing Manager liable for misinformation, misprints or typographical errors. The publishers reserve the right 222-6200 to edit any submitted material. Kidsville(910) News! Incorporated is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or other material. Children’s submissions should include name, address, telephone number, and permission to publish signed by a parentAll or guardian. Copyright ©2007 by Kidsville News! Incorporated. rights reserved.

Audit Pending No part of this issue may be reproduced in whole or in part in any form without permission of the publisher or copyright holder. Neither participating advertisers nor the publishers will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints or typographical errors. The publishers reserve the right to edit any submitted material. Kidsville News! Incorporated is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or other material. Children’s submissions should include name, address, telephone number, and permission to publish signed by a parent or guardian.

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 3


Kidsville News!

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March Is National Nutritional Month. Eat Right! National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign held annually in March by the American Dietetic Association. The campaign focuses on the importance of making informed food choices and developing good eating and physical activity habits. In 2005, the U.S. Department of Agriculture established a new “food pyramid.” This is a illustration that provides a guideline for healthy eating. As their slogan says, MyPyramid for Kids provides tips on how to “Eat Right. Exercise. Have Fun.” According to the U.S.D.A., grains, vegetables, fruits, milk products and meat and beans are all part of a healthy, balanced diet. Here are a few tips from the MyPyramid for Kids to get you started on the way to nutritious eating. Grains: Grains include bread, cereal and pasta. Half of the grains you eat should be whole-grain. Remember that just because bread is brown doesn’t mean it is whole grain. Read the ingredient list and make sure the first word is “whole.” Grains are a source of complex carbohydrates, which your body needs to make energy. But as with most things, you don’t need to go overboard with the amount that you eat. Vegetables: The more vegetables you eat, the better! Be sure to vary your veggies, and add color to your plate by trying all different colors. Choose greens like lettuce, broccoli and beans, and oranges like carrots and sweet potatoes. Fruits: Fruits are nature’s snacks, sweet and ready to eat. You should eat fruits every day. But go easy on the juices. Most are loaded with sugar. Drink water instead! Fruits are a source of simple carbohydrates, also called simple sugars. It’s much better to get your simple sugars from fruits than candy or soda because fruits contain vitamins, fiber and nutrients that other sweet treats do not have. Milk: Dairy products like cheese, yogurt and of course, milk, provide calcium for strong bones. Low-fat dairy products are good options. Meats and beans: Meat is a great source of protein, which your body needs to build up and maintain tissue in your body. Muscles, organs and your immune system are mostly made up of protein. Lean meats like chicken, turkey and fish are excellent choices. Be sure to eat them baked, broiled, or grilled — not fried! Other great sources of protein are eggs, Yellowstone National Park was established on March 1, 1872. This was the first area in the world to be established as a national park. Yellowstone is made up of land in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

nuts and beans. Oils: Oils are included on the MyPyramid, even though they are not a food group. A small amount of oils is recommended for good health. You can get oils from fish, nuts and liquid oils. Corn, canola, olive and soybean oil are examples of liquid oils. The MyPyramid for Kids also recommends that you incorporate exercise into your life every day! Aim for at least 60 minutes of exercise and activity each day. Turn off the TV, get outside and get moving! Walk, dance, ride your bike; it all helps. Just get up and get moving. The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health has come up with a fun way to help you think about food. Using the slogan “Go, Slow and Whoa!” they have created a chart that categorizes popular foods so you’ll know if it is good for you, something you can eat occasionally or a food that should be avoided. You can find the chart at the NHLBI’s “We Can” Web site, wecan.nhlbi.nih.gov. Sources: American Dietetic Association, www.eatright.org; US Department of Agriculture, www.mypyramid.gov/kids; The Nemours Foundation, kidshealth.org; NHLBI, wecan.nhlbi.nih.gov. that Patrick charmed all snakes on the island to come down to the seashore, slither into the water and drown. There are other possible explanations for why Ireland has no snakes. Some scientists believe that during the Ice Ages, the climate became too cold and the land too frozen for snakes. All snakes in Ireland vanished, and they haven’t returned, as it would be difficult for snakes to migrate across the sea!

Did you know there are no snakes in Ireland? Legend has it

4 KIDSVILLE NEWS

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Move your clock forward one hour on March 8. Daylight Saving Time begins!

MARCH 2009


AR UND THE W RLD Spain

Fiesta de Las Fallas (the fires), one of the most unique festivals in Spain, has been celebrated for 150 years. It started as a feast day for St. Joseph, the patron saint of carpenters, and has evolved into a fiveday celebration of fire. The festival takes place in Valencia, Spain. It focuses on the creation and destruction of ninots — huge lifelike statues made of cardboard, wood and plaster. Some of the statues are many stories tall and have to be put into place with cranes! On the 19th (known as La Crema), men with axes chop holes in the statues and stuff them with fireworks. At midnight, all of the ninots are set on fire!

India

March 22 is the first day of the New Year on the Saka calendar. This calendar was adopted by India in 1957 after gaining independence from Great Britain. The Saka calendar is a solar calendar with the same Leap Year schedule as the Gregorian calendar. In Leap Years, the New Year falls on March 21. Although they have tried to create a unified calendar for all of India, many local variations still exist.

Australia

In Australia, March 2 is Eight Hour Day, or Labor Day. In Western Australia and Tasmania, they celebrate the day with parades and celebrations to remember trade union efforts to limit working hours. During the 19th century, the unions pushed for shorter work days, with the slogan “Eight hours labor, eight hours recreation, eight hours rest!”

Owl

On March 6, the International Festival of the Owls will be held in Houston, Minnesota. This festival was created to honor these extraordinary birds. Why March 6? This is the birthday of Alice, the Great Horned Owl. Alice is an injured owl who Kingdom: lives at the Houston Nature Center. Animalia Owls have been known as wise creatures because they represented Athena, the Greek goddess of reason. But Phylum: Chordata owls were also thought of as bad omens and feared by Class: Aves some people because of their nighttime activity and their Order: Strigiformes hooting sounds. Owls are nocturnal animals, which means they are Family: Strigidae and awake at night. They live all over the world, except for Tytonidae Antarctica. There are many different kinds of owls, but all have flat faces with small curved beaks and big feet with large talons. Owls have very large round eyes, but they cannot move their eyes. To make up for their eyes, they can turn their heads 180 degrees! That means owls can turn their heads to look directly behind them. Owls are five to 28 inches in length, with wingspans from one to 6.6 feet. They fly very quietly, which makes them hard for people to find. Owls eat mostly small animals like mice, but some eat insects as well. Fish owls eat fish along with mice, and bay owls have been know to hunt for bats. Owls swallow their prey whole, then cough up things that they cannot digest, like fur and bones, in compacted pellets. Owls live in many different places, even in deserts! They make nests in holes in cliffs, trees and buildings. Bigger owls sometimes use the abandoned nests of hawks and crows. Sources: Britannica Encyclopedia Online; International Festival of Owls, Houston Nature Center, www.festivalofowls.com

MARCH 2009

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Alice the Great Horned Owl. The International Festival of Owls started as a celebration of her hatch-day. © Images by Ingvalson.

KIDSVILLE NEWS 5


Parade Route

March Madness Word Find

Find the words below that appear in this issue of Kidsv News! Have fun!

Truman is heading to a Saint Patrick’s Day parade. Can you help him get out of the maze?

Parade Route

Truman is heading to a Saint Patrick’s Day parade. Can you help him get out of the maze?

CLOCK MARCH PATRICK FRUITS MEAT SHAMROCK GRAINS Madness MILK Word Find SPRING March GREEN VEGETABLES Find the words below that NUTRITION appear in this issue of Kidsville News! Have fun!

N L J SMARCH N X X H F U GMEAT E P X MILK E I T JNUTRITION R H X LN JU STNRX IX TO IX FK UG GJETP ZX IQ HD IG TC JRRXH AX VA JI U T R I T I O N GY JA TOZAI DH EJ AR CQ RS XRARV IJ PT MN AI OZ AVDIE MA NG LH S R R I P M U M X E D X U A S Z V I M N L D I EY DC XBUQA LS QZ HT CS BW QJLOQ YH HA BO W J O Y H B S E L J F T D L N J F T D L N F S LY GL NGENG EG GU GF MT PM SPGSL GY LS YP

CLOCK FRUITS GRAINS GREEN

N H E N K G Y Q I X Y S L Y T

O Q A OI JM TM I GI UL DA ZK E AL SC FK X UQ SS

X D I NF RX NC R HN MR IZ TG J OL EC SF N FE PM

I M M IY IK LP M AC KE EE LX O CC KR XH O QF SL

F X C R Y S N C R H Z I G V E J C L D C G R F W N U E K N M

Y K P M Q Q C L E L E J X L K O R C Z R W S H P O J F P T L

Y S C SH TI IV U RE FC KD V G G IR BW T U I VK EN

PATRICK SHAMROCK SPRING VEGETABLES

Q Q L L J L K R Z W S P J P T

S T I U R F K V G I B T I V E

KIDSVILLE KIDSVILLE COUNTS

COUNTS

Help Truman complete this math square. Try to fill in the missing numbers. Use Help Truman complete math square. the numbers 1 through 16 this to complete the Each numbernumbers. is used only Tryequations. to fill in the missing Use once. Each row1isthrough a math equation. Each the numbers 16 to complete column is a math equation. Remember that multiplication and the equations. number is used only division are performed before addition andEach subtraction.

once. Each row is a math equation. Each column is a math equation. Remember that multiplication and division are performed before addition and subtraction.

ELIZABETHTOWN OFFICE Bladen County Hospital Elizabethtown, NC 28337 tel: 910.862.5104 fax: 910.862.1231

6 KIDSVILLE NEWS

Call to set up your FREE speech and hearing screening today!

g Offerin sy eechea the Sp r fo e devic ring Stutte

Certifie d VitalStim Therap ists

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WILMINGTON OFFICE 3722A Shipyard Blvd. Wilmington, NC 28403 tel: 910.343.8988 fax: 910.343.4144

MARCH 2009


This page is brought to you by Coloring Corner

National School Breakfast Week begins March 2. What’s your favorite breakfast? Write a sentence about it and color the picture.

Truman

Truman’s Tricky Picture

Find these items! Visit our Web site at www.kidsvillenews.com for the solution and more fun and games!

MARCH 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 7


This page is brought to you by

Hey Kids! Send me your artwork and poetry (be

sure to use the ‘Send It’ form). Also, send in something for “Me & My...” It could be a picture of you and your best friend or favorite animal, anything really — just be sure to write two paragraphs telling me about the photo.

By: Brandon Rowland Middle School

By: Anna East Robeson

By: Cesar St. Pauls Elementary

By: Dylan Bladenboro Primary

By: Ashlynn Dublin Elementary By: Trey Bladenboro Primary

Hey Kids! Truman wants your original artwork, letter, poems and stories! We may print them in a  

later issue or use them on our website! Just have your parents fill out this form and send it with your work to:  Kidsville News!, PO Box 15944, Wilmington, NC 28408  Name___________________________________________________________________________Age___________  Address________________________________________________________________________________________  City___________________________________________________________State____________  Zip_________________  School________________________________________________________________________________________ Email Address_________________________________________________________________________________ Your signature (This is my own work): ______________________________________________________________________________________________  Parent’s Signature (Permission): ______________________________________________________________________________________________  Helpful Hint: Send in your drawings IN COLOR AND ON UNLINED PAPER! 

8 KIDSVILLE NEWS

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By:Mikayla Pembroke Elementary MARCH 2009


We would like to thank all of this year’s Kidsville News! in Education program partners for providing Kidsville News! to area schools.

GOT CHILDREN?

YES THERE IS HELP! Robeson County Local Interagency Coordinating Council and Child Care Directions, Inc. want to help!

LUMBERTON

ELIZABETHTOWN • CLARKTON

Ages birth to 5 Growth & Development Parenting classes Health Vision Hearing Speech Childcare Behavior Motion Growth

CALL 910.272.3825 Ext. 27 MARCH 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 9


WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... AN ENGINEER? National Engineers Week was recently held February 15 - 21. Engineering has been called the “invisible” profession. Everything around us and that we use every day has been engineered in some way, but yet most of us don’t know much about engineering. Reading more about engineering made me want to learn more about what an engineer does, so I contacted a civil engineer for the city of Fayetteville in North Carolina. Jeffery Brown told me that there are many different types of engineers — mechanical, environmental, chemical and more. Engineers use their imagination and analytical skills to invent, design and build all types of things. He has worked as a civil engineer for the city for six years and is now the City Engineer. In his job, he ensures that the infrastructure for the city, like roads, sidewalks and drainage systems, are designed properly to make the city a great place to live and work. Keep reading to learn more!

TRUMAN: What does it take to become a civil engineer?

of our city. It is very rewarding to ride by a project upon completion and realize that you had a hand in bringing it from an idea on paper to reality. It is a pleasure to serve the citizens of Fayetteville and see the joy on their faces when we are able to eliminate the flooding on their property or give them a new paved street to travel.

BROWN: Typically the path taken is obtaining a Bachelor of Science in some discipline of engineering from an accredited university. After successfully passing the Engineering Intern (EI) examination, you have to work four years under the direct supervision of a Professional Engineer. Upon completion of these four years, you then are eligible to take your Professional Engineer examination. As you can see, it takes quite a bit of hard work and dedication to become a licensed Professional Engineer.

TRUMAN: What advice would you give to kids who are interested in a profession in engineering?

TRUMAN: When and why did you first become interested in becoming an engineer? BROWN: I first became interested in the field of engineering when I was a senior in high school. My physics teacher, John Gilmore, always talked about his brother, who is an Electrical Engineer. I was always fascinated by stories he would tell our class about the cool things his brother was doing. I always enjoyed math and wanted to choose a profession that involved math. TRUMAN: What exactly do you do? What’s your typical day like? BROWN: As the City Engineer, I am responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Engineering Section. I lead a group of four talented staff engineers, as well as direct the Cad Section, who support the engineers in drafting construction drawings. In the Engineering Section, we are responsible for street designs and street improvement projects, sidewalk design, stormwater drainage improvement projects, proposed development reviews, project management and assisting other city departments with their engineering needs. A typical day for me would be attending several meetings, returning voicemails and e-mails throughout the day and providing guidance to staff on the many projects that we are currently working on.

BROWN: I would encourage them to learn as much about the profession as they possibly can while they are young. There are many disciplines of engineering, including civil, mechanical, electrical, chemical, environmental, and computer engineering, to name just a few. Not only are there many other types of engineering, there are numerous specializations within each field. I would definitely recommend that kids job shadow an individual within their interested field to get a first hand look at what they do on a daily basis. If teachers are interested, I would encourage them to make contact with local professional societies or organizations to have an engineer come into the classroom to speak about the many numerous opportunities that then engineering profession has to offer. The Internet has a tremendous amount of information available as well. TRUMAN: Thanks for talking with us about being an engineer. Without people like you creating the infrastructure for our cities, they wouldn’t be very nice places to live. Thanks for your hard work!

Attention Parents and Teachers: Kidsville News! is growing in Robeson and Bladen Counties and Truman needs help with Community Development!

TRUMAN: What’s the hardest part of your job? BROWN: Identifying ways to improve the overall efficiency of the Engineering Section without having to sacrifice the quality and accuracy of the services we provide. TRUMAN: What’s the best part of your job? BROWN: I would say improving the quality of life for the residents

10 KIDSVILLE NEWS

If you, or someone you know is great with people and have a heart for children, Email Todd@mykidsvillenews.com

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MARCH 2009


You Can Make a Difference in Your Community

Bladen County Hospital is pleased to announce the arrival of Bladen County’s first Pediatrician

Nileshwa Senthe, M.D. 300 A East McKay Street Across from Bladen County Hospital Elizabethtown

• Reach every K-5th grader in the county and their families

Office Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

• Help raise EOG scores

For an appointment, please call (910) 862-5500

• Help lower the high school drop-out rate

Contact Todd Godbey at 910.338.1205 or todd@mykidsvillenews.com

BLADEN COUNTY SCHOOLS MARCH 2009 MARCH 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 11


Keep kites and yourself away from power lines!

Don’t play near transformer boxes!

Reminding you to play it safe around electricity!

This electrical safety tip is sponsored by:

• Do not play near transformer boxes, or put anything in any holes in them. If you see one that is not locked, call your power company. This is as dangerous as an overhead line being down, and should be treated the same way. Stay away.

• If you come upon an overhead power line that is low or lying on the ground, always assume that any one who touches it or comes near it will be killed. Never touch a power line with your hand or with any other object.

• Do not climb trees that have power lines through or near the limbs.

Other safety rules to follow when playing outdoors:

• Never fly kites in wet or rainy weather. Wet kite string is a strong conductor of electricity.

• If the kite gets stuck in branches or a tree, look around before you try to retrieve it – there may be electric wires around that you did not see.

• If you do fly a kite around power lines and it gets tangled, do not try to remove the kite. Leave it there.

• Never fly a kite near electric power lines. Try to stay in areas that are clear such as fields, parks or beaches.

When flying a kite, the sky’s the limit, but remember to play it safe.

March 20th marks the first day of spring this year. As warm weather moves in, follow these safety tips to keep yourself and your friend’s safe while playing outside:

Have a Fun and Safe Spring!


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Bunsen Burner Day

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Saint Patrick’s Day

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❍ FULL MOON, also called the Worm Moon

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National Anthem Day

Newspaper in Education Week, March 2-6

3

✪ This symbol recognizes the holiday as a Presidential Proclamation.

Birthday of Vincent Van Gogh, 1853

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Freedom of Information Day

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✪ National Poison Prevention Week, www. poisonprevention.org

National Agriculture Week, www.agday.org

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Barbie Debut, 1959

Read Across America Day: Birthday of Dr. Seuss

Yellowstone National Park Established, 1872

Daylight Saving Time Begins

National School Breakfast Week

2

✪ American Red Cross Month

1

✪ Education and Sharing Day

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Planet Uranus Discovered, 1781

Deaf History Month Begins, March 13 April 15

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Music in Our Schools Month

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library.bladenco.org

● New Moon

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Absolutely Incredible Kid Day

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Girls Scouts of the USA Founded, 1912

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✪ Irish-American Heritage Month

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First Round-the-world Balloon Flight, 1999

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Youth Art Month

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BLADEN COUNTY LIBRARY BRIDGER MEMORIAL LIBRARY CLARKTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

111 N. Cypress St. 313 S. Main St. 10413 N. College St.

Thursday, March 19th at Bladen County Library Call to preregister at 862-6990

“Spr ing Eve” Plant Swap

Pecan Day: Anniversary of George Washington planting pecan trees at Mt. Vernon in 1775.

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Registered Dietitian Day

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National Craft Month www.craftplace.org

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March


ART GALLERY William H. Johnson: Painting African-American Life lived for almost 10 years. Although Johnson liked Denmark, he was homesick. In 1938, he moved back to New York to join the Work Projects Administration Federal Art Project. As part of this project, Johnson painted murals and taught art at the Harlem Community Art Center alongside other African-American artists. In 1941, he had his first major New York art show! It was the first time people saw many of his folksy, simple paintings of African-American life and almost everyone liked them. Splitting time between New York and his hometown of Florence for several years, Johnson painted portraits of family and friends, as well as African-American soldiers and important American leaders like Abraham Lincoln, who had ended African-American slavery. But, Johnson’s wife died in 1944, and he was very unhappy. In 1956, he stopped painting altogether. Johnson died in 1970 after a long battle with depression and mental illness. Before his death, he donated most of his work to the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Over the years, he had his paintings. William H. Johnson’s painting, Harlem Street produced more than 1,000 works of art! After graduation, Johnson lived in France for several Written by Tamar Burris, a former elementary school teacher who now years before moving back to New York for a short time. Settling in Harlem works as a freelance writer and curriculum developer for PBS, the Discovery in 1930, he gained attention in the New York art world for his FrenchChannel and other education-related companies. Sources: Art and Life of inspired landscape paintings. His artwork even won a gold medal award William H. Johnson: A Guide for Teachers, americanart.si.edu/education/ from the Harmon Foundation, an organization set up to recognize Africanclassroom/help/bio/; William Henry Johnson on MSN Encarta, encarta.msn. American achievements. With this award, Johnson’s fame spread nationcom/encyclopedia_761587573/William_Henry_Johnson.html; William H. wide! But, he was unhappy in the U.S. and moved to Denmark, where he Johnson on Wikipedia, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_H._Johnson. William H. Johnson was an African-American painter known for his simple and colorful paintings of the African-American community. William Henry Johnson was born on March 8, 1901, in Florence, South Carolina. As a child, he loved the cartoons in his local newspaper and drew pictures whenever he could. A local teacher encouraged him to pursue a career in art. But, life in segregated South Carolina was difficult for African Americans. They were not treated equally, and Johnson knew he would never be taken seriously as an artist if he stayed in the South. So, in 1918, Johnson moved to New York City to follow his dream. There, he took classes at the National Academy of Design, where he won many awards for

READING STRUGGLES? WEAK COMPREHENSION?

POOR SPELLING SKILLS? HOMEWORK BLUES?

Does This Sound Familiar? If your child is struggling in one or all of these areas, contact Coastal Speech Center to schedule an evaluation. Our one-on-one method provides a unique approach to learning.

GET A JUMP START ON IMPROVING YOUR CHILD’S END OF GRADE SCORES Now Servicing: Bladen, Columbus, and Brunswick Counties

210 Liberty Hill Road • Lumberton, NC 28358

14 KIDSVILLE NEWS

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MARCH 2009


March 2nd is Dr. Seuss’ Birthday The National Education Association (NEA) celebrates reading each year with Read Across America Day on March 2 (Dr. Seuss‛ birthday). This celebration is in its eleventh year and hopes to encourage adults to read to children. The NEA website says that “motivating children to read is an important factor in student achievement and creating lifelong successful readers”. Motivated readers do better in school. How can you engage small children while reading? Here are some tips.

Act the Part: While you read, put emphasis in your voice.

Make each

character have a different voice. Use noises.

Be close. Snuggle while you read. Choose age appropriate books. If you need help choosing,

talk to a librarian. Also, try to choose books about subjects your child is interested in like animals or a specific television show.

Do read everyday.

“Experts have found that reading to your pre-schooler for just 15 minutes a day is the most important thing you can do to prepare your child for a positive future.” Call Amy Cox, Program Manager for the Robeson County Partnership for Children, at 910-738-6767 for more resources about children birth to five in Robeson County.         

       

        

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     

      

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        

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      

     

     

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     

     

     

     

     

       

MARCH 2009

       

Robeson County Schools March 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 15


This publication is dedicated to the loving memory of

Nancy Hall-Godbey

March Madness Word Find (Over, Down, Direction) CLOCK (10, 11, NE) FRUITS (15, 6, N) GRAINS (2, 5, SE) GREEN (15, 9, NW) MARCH (9, 8, NE) MEAT (7, 8, NW) MILK (12, 4, SE) NUTRITION (1, 4, E) PATRICK (6, 8, NE) SHAMROCK (8, 12, NW) SPRING (13, 2, SW) VEGETABLES (13, 6, SW)

May we all strive to be as intelligent as she was!

N H E N K G Y Q I X Y S L Y T

L F I U G C A S Z E C W J L M

J U T T J R O R V D B J F G P

S G J R T X A R I X Q O T N S

N E R I Z A D I M U L Y D E G

X P H T I V E P N A Q H L G L

X X X I H J A M L S H B N G Y

O Q A O J T G U D Z A S F U S

X D I N R N H M I T O E S F P

I M M I I L A K E L C K X Q S

F X C R N R Z G J L C F N E M

Y K P M C E E X O C R H O F L

Y S C H I V E C D G R W U K N

Q Q L L J L K R Z W S P J P T

S T I U R F K V G I B T I V E

Parade Route

Dickerson’s

PHARMACY Supporting education in Bladen County since 1982

Highest Quality Service Lowest Possible Prices

Did You Know…

…that allergy season is almost here. Try to stay away from dust and pollen. If you have a runny nose, sneezing or scratchy throat, it might be your allergies. Go to your local pharmacy and they can help you.

KIDSVILLE COUNTS!

503 Doctors Drive • Elizabethtown NC • 910-862-3465 16 KIDSVILLE NEWS

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MARCH 2009


PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF ROBESON COUNTY You are cordially invited to attend a series of Parent Night Video Activities sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and the Public Schools of Robeson County. The 2009 Education News Parents Can Use videos will discuss ways to ensure children’s educational success. Listed below are the dates and some of the topics scheduled for the year. Please  note that some topics had not been released prior to the printing of this  information.  We will have dinner from 6pm-6:45pm in the Foods and Nutrition  Classroom located at the PSRC Central Office Complex and will watch the video from 7pm-8pm in the same location. March 17   April 28    May 19    June 16    July 21   

“Charter Schools: School Reform That Works” Topic to be determined later Topic to be determined later Topic to be determined later Topic to be determined later

Please note the following: •An “ice-cream party” will be given to the school with the most parents in attendance (based on percentage). •CEU credits will be provided for PSRC employees. •Door prizes will be given. •Sessions are recorded for future reference. Space is limited; therefore, you must preregister by calling Ms. Amy S. Haigler at 910-735-2190, to let her know of your intention to attend the dinner/video. Feel free to contact Ms. Haigler for additional information or concerns you may have about this program designed for the parents of the Public Schools of Robeson County.

We look forward to hearing from you and thanks again for all that you do to ensure educational success for all students.

410 Caton Road • Lumberton, NC 28358 • 910-671-6000 • Dr. Johnny Hunt, Superintendent • Mr. Tommy Lowry, Assistant Superintendent MARCH 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 17


WHERE IN THE WORLD IS... GUAM?

It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! Guam is a small island in the region of Oceania in the North Pacific Ocean. Although it is closer to the Phillipines, China and Australia than it is to the mainland United States, Guam is a territory of the U.S. To find Guam, get out your globe, and find longitude 144º E and latitude 13º N. Guam's motto is "Where America's Day Begins" because of its extremely eastern location. This warm tropical island is one of the first pieces of U.S. land to see daylight every day and the first to greet the new year. Guam is actually part of the Marianas Islands archipelago. This island chain was created by volcanic activity in the Marianas Trench. The Marianas Trench has the deepest earth depth in the whole world! The Blue Hole, a popular underwater cave on Guam, is being considered for the new seven wonders of the world. The native people of Guam are Chamorro. The island has its own language called Chamoru. A popular phrase is "Hafa Adai," which means "Hello, how are you?" Guam was discovered by Magellan in March of 1521. Guam was surrendered to the United States by Spain in 1898. It was captured by the Japanese in 1941, but was retaken by the U.S. three years later. The U.S. military base on the island is one of the most strategically important U.S. bases in the Pacific. Tinian is another island that is part of the Marianas, and it is well known for its strategic role in the staging of the Enola Gay, the bomber that dropped Where in the the bombs that ended World War II in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As an World Word unincorporated territory of the U.S., the citizens of Guam elect a governor archipelago [ahr-kuhand have a delegate in the U.S. House of Representatives. However, they do pel-uh-goh], a large not vote for president or vice-president. group or chain of Thanks to Lisa Scherer Rachford, native of Guam, for her contributions to islands this article. Sources: The World Factbook, Central Intelligence Agency.

Truman will be starting the Family Fun Mile along with Rocky from SRMC.

Come out and see Truman… Great event for families to be active and enjoy the fun and festivities of the Rumba on the Lumber presented by the City of Lumberton and the Robeson Road Runners.

Date: Saturday, March 7, 2009 Time: 10:00am (Registration from 8:30am – 9:45am)

(Note: Kids K-8 can register at school with the PE Teachers. Registration forms will be given to the kids to take home and have parents sign and return form to their PE Teacher)

FREE t-shirts for the 1st 500 K-8th grade participants to arrive on the day of the race! Medals to all who cross the finish line.

Event: Rumba on the Lumber Family Fun Mile sponsored by Southeastern Regional Medical Center and SRMC’s Community Health Services Project HEALTH (Healthy Eating and Active Lifestyles for Tomorrow’s Health) 18 KIDSVILLE NEWS

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MARCH 2009


You Can Be a

Battle of the Books

Help Make Learning Fun and Fight Illiteracy! For more information on Kidsville News! and other ways to get involved, call 910.338.1205, or e-mail todd@mykidsvillenews.com

Rosenwald Elementary School participated with Battle of the Books at Lumberton Junior High School. Rosenwald Elementary is very proud of the hard work and the determination that our students had. Students are listed from left to right front row: Cheyanne English, Marissa Thompson, and Robert Allen; Back row: Ny’Tasia Jones, Myiah Livingston, Jordan Scott, Breonna Miller, Ny’Kayla Watson, and Kiara Graham.

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

What do leprechauns have to do with St. Patrick’s Day? Nothing really, but since they are known as Ireland’s national fairy, leprechauns have become a fun symbol of Ireland. And on March 17, Saint Patrick’s Day, it seems as if the whole world turns a little Irish. Ireland, after all, is from where the celebration of the holiday came. St. Patrick was the Patron Saint of Ireland. Patrick was born around 385 A.D. in Scotland, probably in the County Kilpatrick. His parents were Calpurnius and Conchessa. They were Romans living in the British Isles and were in charge of the colonies. At the age of 14, Patrick was captured by a band of raiding Celts and was taken back to Ireland, where he was put to work as a slave herding sheep. At that time, all of Ireland was a pagan country, and the main religion was Druidism. Patrick learned all he could about his captors. During his captivity, he turned to God in prayer. He became a deeply religious man. At about the age of 20, he had a dream in which God told him to leave Ireland by going to the coast. He walked 200 miles and finally reached the coast. There he found some sailors who agreed to take him back to Great Britain, and he was reunited with his family. Patrick began to study for the priesthood. Then, he had another dream where the people of Ireland were calling out for him to come back and share his faith. After completing his studies, Patrick was ordained as a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He arrived in Ireland and began to convert the tribes from pagans to Christians. He stayed in the country for over 40 years; preaching, building churches and helping the Irish tribes. While there, it is written that Patrick performed a number of miracles, wrote many books and shared love with the people of Ireland. He died on March 17, 461, and was later canonized as a saint by the Catholic Church. St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated worldwide. Today it has become more of a fun celebration than the Christian holiday it was originally. In many cities, there are large parades, parties and lots of green. The shamrock is also a symbol you see a lot during St. Patrick’s Day. It is said that Patrick used the three-leafed shamrock during his sermons as a symbol to explain the Holy Trinity. In Ireland, many people still wear a bunch of shamrock on their lapels or caps on this day or green, white and orange badges (after the colors of the Irish flag). In America, many people celebrate by wearing green-colored clothing. Traditionally, those who are caught not wearing green are pinched!

MARCH 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 19


Story Time with Truman The Sea Turtle Story

Chapter Three - The Sea Turtle Hospital

A Quality Serials Story By Mary Maden Illustrated by Vicki Wallace

THE STORY SO FAR… Pancake, a loggerhead sea turtle, is struck by a boat and badly injured. After several beach-goers spot the struggling sea turtle, she is rescued and taken to a State University Vet School for treatment. At the Vet School, doctors operate on Pancake, fixing her shell with screws and pins. The hurt turtle needs a special place to recover––so Pancake is sent to a sea turtle hospital! At the sea turtle hospital, Pancake was put in the squeaky-clean tank that Lolly had prepared for her. She seemed happy to be back in water. Lolly smiled. She knew that Pancake was a very lucky turtle––she was safe. Others of her kind weren’t living so well. Of the eight species or kinds of sea turtles found in the world, all are either threatened or endangered! That was one reason Lolly cared so much about her job. She knew firsthand how important the work at the sea turtle hospital was. Every single sea turtle they helped made a difference! And this poor sea turtle had been through a lot! Pancake had been injured, removed from her home, operated on and now she was in a strange place with people. The staff worried that all these events would be too much for Pancake. Many times a severely stressed turtle refused to eat and had to be forcefed. They hoped Pancake would eat on her own. Lolly looked down at Pancake. They were going to try giving Pancake some food. Lolly crossed her fingers for luck. Luckily, Pancake had an appetite. She began to eat right away. “Why, this turtle is a pig!” exclaimed one of the volunteers, looking on as Pancake took to the food. “You must be starved!” Lolly said. Lolly was so glad to see the turtle eating! It was a very good sign indeed. At first, Pancake needed a lot of care. Jan and her staff took good care of the sea turtle. Every week, her bandages had to be changed and her wounds cleaned and debrided. She was getting vitamins and medicine by mouth. Sometimes, Lolly was on hand to help. Pancake always seemed to respond to Lolly’s presence. When she wasn’t at school, doing homework or helping her mother in the bookstore, Lolly would look in on Pancake every chance she got. She often stopped by in the late afternoons after school. “Hi, Jan,” Lolly said, bursting through the door of the sea turtle hospital. “How’s Pancake?” Lolly walked over to Pancake’s tank and looked in. “Hi, Pancake,” Lolly said. “How are you doing?” “She’s doing just fine,” Jan said. “I am happy with her progress. How was school today, kiddo?”

20 KIDSVILLE NEWS

“Pretty good,” Lolly replied. “I got an ‘A’ on my science test!” “I am not surprised,” Jan responded. “You are a smart girl. I think you will make an excellent marine biologist someday.” “Thanks, Jan,” Lolly said, blushing a little from the compliment. Lolly wanted to be a marine biologist more than anything. She loved marine animals––really, all animals! She read all she could about them. Of course, some of her favorite reading materials were books on sea turtles. Lolly had also learned from her experiences at the sea turtle hospital. Even though Lolly was young, Jan and the other volunteers took her seriously. They encouraged her in her dreams of becoming a marine biologist. Volunteering gave Lolly opportunities to observe, learn and participate in the important work that was being done at the turtle hospital. One day she would help marine animals such as Pancake as a career. She knew that working at the sea turtle hospital gave her invaluable experience. Maybe Lolly didn’t get paid with money, but she knew that she received something much more precious. Through her volunteer work, Lolly gained the knowledge that she could really make a difference in the world. “Lolly, it’s time to go home,” Jan said. They said goodnight to Pancake. As she was leaving, the young girl smiled to herself. Yep, she wouldn’t trade her job at the sea turtle hospital for anything in the world! Slowly, over time, Pancake’s shell began to heal. When her bandages were changed, the wounds were treated with an antibiotic cream and covered with an artificial skin held on by Super Glue! Every day, Pancake seemed to get a little better. She was eating and gaining weight. Pancake had even grown! Her shell was healing nicely, too. Lolly was thrilled. Often, Lolly would just visit and talk to Pancake. Sometimes she would give her shell a nice scratching. Pancake loved having her back scratched. Lolly was always very careful when she was around Pancake. Sea turtles have no teeth, but they have sharp, powerful beaks that can bite. But Lolly had received training at the hospital. She knew about sea turtles and the proper way to handle them. Still, Pancake never tried to bite Lolly! Eventually, Pancake didn’t require bandages anymore. She was truly making progress. Things seemed to be going very well — until one day Lolly noticed something wrong. “Jan, come here, please,” Lolly’s voice was full of concern. “Something’s wrong with Pancake. She doesn’t seem to be using one of her flippers!” Next Time… Pancake’s Progress A Teacher’s Guide to accompany this six-chapter story is available on the Kidsville News! Web site at www.KidsvilleNews.com. Copyright 2001 by Mary Maden. All rights reserved. Mary Maden is an award-winning author. Visit her on the Web at www.marymaden.com.

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MARCH 2009


TM

A SECTION ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS

BOOKSHELF

A Fuzzy-Fast Blur: Poems About Pets

Author: Laura Purdie Salas Publisher: Capstone Press Age Range: 6 to 10 Some think I wear a constant frown, It’s just my tongue that weighs me down! With an opening poem titled “Slobbery,” what’s not to love about this book? The book is full of fun poems about pets — from the traditional cats and dogs, to the more non-traditional pets like snakes, spiders and even a pet rock! The vivid color photographs, expanding across the two-page spreads, are beautiful and help bring the poems to life. It’s perfect for early readers and a terrific choice for parents to read to pre-readers. In the back of the book, readers will learn more about poetry. “The Language of Poetry” section explains different types of poetry, like acrostic and haiku, as well as terms like rhyme and rhythm. A glossary also defines unfamiliar words that are in the featured poems. —JK

Food for Thought: The Stories Behind the Things We Eat Author/Illustrator: Ken Robbins Publisher: Flash Point Age Range: 6 to 10

From the Publisher: Deliciously interesting, tasty morsels of cultural history combined with luscious photographs will leave readers hungry for more. “Every kind of food has its story.” Acclaimed photographer Ken Robbins guides us through the history, mythology, and literary significance of food. Fascinating facts (it was an apple that started the Trojan War; oranges used to be so expensive that only the rich could afford them) and stunning photographs make Food for Thought a tasty read that will have everyone looking at his or her plate in a new way.

A Fine St. Patrick’s Day Author/Illustrator: Susan Wojciechowski

Fletcher and the Springtime Blossoms Authors/Illustrator: Julia Rawlinson, Tiphanie Beeke (Illustrator) Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Age Range: 4 to 7 Fletcher loves everything about spring: listening to the birds sing, smelling just-opened flowers and playing chase with butterflies. But then Fletcher sees something he never expected to see in spring: snow. Oh, no!But it turns out that spring has another surprise in store for Fletcher—a warm and wondrous one. Jump into spring with Fletcher and friends!

Publisher: Random House Children’s Books Age Range: 5 to 8

Welcome to the rival towns of Tralee and Tralah, where the annual St. Patrick’s Day decorating contest is under way. Every year, Tralah defeats Tralee. This year, though, little Fiona Riley has a wonderful idea that will help Tralee win the contest for sure. But neither town has counted on a stranger arriving — a funny little man with pointed ears and boots trimmed with bells — who will turn the contest upside down!

P ARENTOWN MARCH 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS 21


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S MART Recession-Proof Resilience: What Mothers Can Do To Stay Strong in Tough Economic Times

Recesión-Prueba de Resistencia: ¿Qué pueden hacer las mamás para mantenerse fuertes durante los tiempos difíciles?

Motherhood is tough. It’s tough even in the best of times, when the school-job-homework-dinner-bath-bedtime juggle is at its absolute smoothest (which, face it, is rarely all that smooth). But throw in a financial setback—you or your partner lose a job or your house gets foreclosed on or a salary cut forces you to cancel a much-needed family vacation—and the whole house of cards threatens to collapse. Yes, our tanking economy yields plenty of opportunities for mothers to break down, says leadership expert Jamie Woolf. Not a lot can be done about that. But what is important is that we have the resilience to snap back. “Every mother falls apart sometimes,” says Woolf, author of Mom-in-Chief: How Wisdom from the Workplace Can Save Your Family from Chaos. “The question is how do we rebound and find the resources to deal with whatever life throws our way?” She points to a recent online survey conducted by Working Mother, which found that an astounding 91 percent of the respondents suffered some symptoms of depression. “I think this survey illuminates the stress and difficulty of working motherhood,” says Woolf. “It’s the nature of the beast. Working mothers rarely get a break, and we’re really hard on ourselves. Add economic hardship to the mix, and it can be easy to spiral downward to a very dark place. When you have resilience, you can stop that spiral and even reverse it.” Here, adapted from the principles in her book, are her business-inspired strategies for what you can do for yourself and your kids to boost resilience during the economic downturn: What Moms Can Do for Themselves Clarify your big picture goal or purpose: With their desired result clearly in sight, leaders focus on what they can control to move them closer to their goals. Decide what your goal is—staying out of the poorhouse? Reducing stress at home while you experience extra stress at work due to staff cutbacks? Making your kids feel emotionally secure while you’re financially insecure? Identifying your goal will help you stay on course to achieve it. Convene your support team: Don’t suffer in silence. Talk to your friends, extended family, therapist, minister or rabbi to express your feelings and worries. But be selective: Don’t call up doom-and-gloom downers and glass-half-empty cynics. Whom do you know who maintains a healthy attitude in the face of misfortune? These are the people to reach out to in challenging times. Prioritize the challenge into small and manageable steps: Focus on what you have control over and leave the forces outside your control alone. Figure out what you can cut back on. Create a budget and stick to it. If your goal is reducing your debt, commit to paying $10 more per month on each credit card, stop using credit cards for anything but absolute necessities or, if you want to really remove temptation, cut them up. Find actions that yield quick, high-impact results. Transform crisis into opportunity: Getting your family to work as a team to get through the downturn can help take the load off you and can bring everyone closer together. The silver lining of having less disposable income to spend on going out is that you spend more time at home. Maximize that newfound family time by getting entertained the old-fashioned way by playing board games, reading books and watching TV together. Come up with creative ideas for outings that cost very little: hikes, picnics, walks on the beach. Deprogramming your kids from addictive consumerism is a gift that will last a lifetime. Next month: What Moms Can Do for Their Kids.

La maternidad es dura. Es dura incluso en las mejores etapas, cuando todo el jaleo de la escuela-trabajo-tarea-cena-baño-hora de la cama, va absolutamente bien (lo cual, aceptémoslo, va raramente así de bien). Pero si lo añadimos un problema financiero—usted o su pareja pierden su trabajo o su casa va a ser subastada o un recorte de su salario le fuerza a cancelar esas vacaciones familiars que tanto necesita- entonces todas las cartas en la baraja amenazan con caerse desmoronadas. Sí, nuestra pobre economía facilita muchas oportunidades para que las madres se hundan, dice la experta en liderazgo Jamie Woolf. No se puede hacer mucho sobre esto. Pero lo que es importante es que tenemos resistencia para recuperarnos. “Todas las madres se derrumban alguna vez,” dice Woolf, autora de “Mom-in-Chief: How Wisdom from the Workplace Can Save Your Family from Chaos.” (Madre a cargo:como la sabiduría del lugar del trabajo puede salvar a su familia del caos). La pregunta es cómo nos recuperamos y encontramos los medios para ocuparnos de lo que la vida nos ponga en nuestro camino. Ella señala una entrevista online llevada a cabo por Madres Trabajadoras (del inglés Working Mother), que mostró que un sorprendente porcentaje del 91 por ciento de las personas que respondieron sufrieron síntomas de depresión. “Creo que esta entrevista muestra el estrés y la dificultad que las madres trabajadoras sufren,” dice Woolf. “Es la naturaleza de la bestia. Las madres trabajadoras raramente toman un descanso, y somos realmente duras con nosotras mismas. Si añadimos dificultades económicas a la mezcla, puede ser fácil el caer de cabeza a un lugar muy oscuro. Cuando usted tiene resistencia, usted puede parar esa caída y volverla a favor suyo.” Aquí mostramos sus estrategias inspiradas en los negocios, adaptadas de los principios en su libro, para que sepa lo que puede hacer por usted mismo y sus hijos para aumentar su resistencia durante la crisis económica: Lo que las mamás pueden hacer por ellas mismas Clarifique la meta o el propósito a largo plazo: con los resultados que desean a la vista, los líderes se enfocan en lo que pueden controlar para acercarse a sus metas. Decida cuál es su meta—¿permanecer lejos de una casa de pobreza? ¿reducir el estrés en la casa mientras usted experiencia estrés extra en el trabajo debido a recortes de plantilla? ¿Hacer sentir a sus hijos emocionalmente seguros mientras usted está finacieramente insegura? El identificar sus metas le ayudará a permanecer en el camino adecuado para conseguirlas. Reúna su equipo de apoyo: No sufra en silencio. Hable con sus amigos, su familia, terapeuta, pastor o rabbi para expresar sus sentimientos y preocupaciones. Pero sea selectivo: no llame a personas que le depriman que ven todo negro y a personas cínicas que siempre ven el vaso medio vacio. ¿A quién conoce que mantiene una actitud sana cuando se enfrenta a las desgracias? Estas son las personas con las que tiene que contar en tiempos de desafios. Dé prioridad a este desafio y descompóngalo en pasos que pueda manejar: enfóquese en aquello sobre lo que tiene control y deje aparte aquellas fuerzas que no pueda controlar. Averigue de lo que puede prescindir. Cree un presupuesto y aténgase a él. Si su meta es reducir su deuda, comprométase a pagar $10 dólares más al mes para cada tarjeta de crédito, deje de usar las tarjetas de crédito y sólo úselas para cosas que sean absolutamente necesarias, o si quiere realmente resistir la tentación, anúlelas. Encuentre acciones que produzcan resultados rápidos y de gran impacto. Convierta la crisis en una oportunidad: el hacer que su familia trabaje como un equipo durante los tiempos duros puede ayudarle a aligerar la carga de usted y puede acercarlos a todos ustedes. La cara positiva de tener menos dinero del que disponer para salir es que puede pasar más tiempo en la casa. Maximize el nuevo tiempo que ha encontrado con su familia entreteniéndose a la manera antigua, jugando juegos de mesa, leyendo libros y mirando la televisión juntos. Invéntense ideas creativas para salir que cuesten poco dinero: excursiones a la montaña, picnics, paseos en la playa. El desprogramar a sus hijos del consumismo adictivo es un don que durará toda la vida. El próximo mes: Lo que las mamás pueden hacer por sus hijos.

Jamie Woolf is a regular contributor to Working Mother magazine and founder of The Parent Leader and Pinehurst Consulting, an organization development consulting firm. In her book, Mom-in-Chief: How Wisdom from the Workplace Can Save Your Family from Chaos, Woolf addresses real-life quandaries and covers everything that career-oriented women need to know to unleash their parenting potential and navigate challenges with skill and grace.

22 KIDSVILLE NEWS

Printed on Recycled Paper

MARCH 2009


KIDSVILLE KITCHEN

Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

Easy, Tasty (and Healthy) Snacks March is National Nutrition Month, so we thought you would enjoy 20 ideas for tasty — and healthy — snacks that are easy to make and fun to eat! When a snack attack strikes, refuel with these nutritionpacked snacks. You may need an adult to help with some of these snacks. 1. Peel a banana and dip it in yogurt. Roll in crushed cereal and freeze. 2. Spread celery sticks with peanut butter or low-fat cream cheese. Top with raisins. Enjoy your “ants on a log.” 3. Stuff a whole-grain pita pocket with ricotta cheese and Granny Smith apple slices. Add a dash of cinnamon. 4. Mix together ready-to-eat cereal, dried fruit and nuts in a sandwich bag for an on-the-go snack. 5. Smear a scoop of frozen yogurt on two graham crackers and add sliced banana to make a yummy sandwich. 6. Top low-fat vanilla yogurt with crunchy granola and sprinkle with blueberries. 7. Microwave a small baked potato. Top with reduced-fat cheddar cheese and salsa. 8. Make snack kabobs. Put cubes of low-fat cheese and grapes on pretzel sticks. 9. Toast a whole grain waffle and top with low-fat yogurt and sliced peaches. 10. Spread peanut butter on apple slices. 11. Blend low-fat milk, frozen strawberries and a banana for 30 seconds for a delicious smoothie. 12. Make a mini-sandwich with tuna or egg salad on a dinner roll. 13. Sprinkle grated Monterey Jack cheese over a corn tortilla; fold in half and microwave for twenty seconds. Top with salsa. 14. Toss dried cranberries and chopped walnuts in instant oatmeal. 15. Mix together peanut butter and cornflakes in a bowl. Shape into balls and roll in crushed graham crackers. 16. Microwave a cup of tomato or vegetable soup and enjoy with whole-grain crackers. 17. Fill a waffle cone with cut-up fruit and top with low-fat vanilla yogurt. 18. Sprinkle grated Parmesan cheese on hot popcorn. 19. Banana Split: Top a banana with low-fat vanilla and strawberry frozen yogurt. Sprinkle with your favorite whole-grain cereal. 20. Sandwich Cut-outs: Make a sandwich on whole-grain bread. Cut out your favorite shape using a big cookie cutter. Eat the fun shape and the edges, too! Courtesy of the American Dietetic Association, www.eatright.org.

MARCH 2009

www.kidsvillenews.com/capefear

KIDSVILLE NEWS 23


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Sammy Seahawk is hidden in the picture below. Can you find him?

The internet can be a perilous place, especially for children. Here are some safety tips that will help keep your child safe on the internet: 9 Have your child show you what they can do online and visit his or her favorite sites. 9 Make sure your child uses child-friendly search engines when doing homework. 9 Be aware of any other computers your child may be using at friends’ homes, at school, and in the community. 9 Know who your child is exchanging e-mail with and chatting with, and make sure to supervise. 9 Keep the computer in an open area of your home where you can see the screen. 9 Make sure you child knows how to be safe on the internet too! These tips are from http://www.netsmartz.org/safety/safetytips.htm

Seahawk Science

Chameleon

Caterpillar

Polar Bear

Leaf Bug

Frog

Visit the Watson School of Education at www.uncw.edu/ed or call (910) 962-4142 for more information.

U n i v e rof s i t yNorth o f N o rCarolina t h C a r o l i nWilmington a Wilmington University

ages 5 – 17 summer academic enrichment programs hAlf-dAy

Sea Squirts • Sea Safari full -dAy

Sea Camp • Sea SI Coast Trek • Shore Shots ArtSea • Ocean Lab camp o.c.e.a.n.s. Oceans 17 • Camp S.E.A.S.

To register and for more information, visit Para información en español comuníquese con Jorge Trujillo al teléfono 910 296 1520 o al correo trujilloj@uncw.edu

www.uncw.edu/marinequest or call 910.962.3195

An EEO/AA Institution


KVN Bladen and Robeson Counties March 2009