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PATRIOT

THE

shawnee mission south | november 2009 | volume 44 | issue 3

NO FUN WITH

H1N1 students reveal the pg. 16

actualities of having swine flu

STEAMIN’ UP THE HALLS pg. 13

pg. 12

SEEING DOUBLE

pg. 5

40 YEARS OF SMESL


ADS ADS PTA REFLECTIONS PROGRAM The purpose of the program is to give students an opportunity to express themselves artistically. This year’s theme is Beauty is......Students may enter in any or all of six arts areas: literature, musical composition, photography, visual arts, dance choreography, and film/video production. Deadline for submissions is December 1, 2009. Rules for each arts area as well as student entry forms can be found in the office. Judging will take place in December and students whose submissions are chosen as winners from SMS will then be submitted for judging at the state level. Questions can be referred to Ellen Sommi,

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November THE

PATRIOT

Editor-in-Chief MARSHALL MILLER News Editor KAVYA THYAGARAJAN Opinions Editor JOSHUA KNOWLES Features Editor MEGHA GARG Arts & Entertainment Editor DANIELLE PHAM

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THE PERFECT BOYFRIEND

Theatre presents fall musical set in 1920s France

Sports Editor MARSHALL MILLER Staff Writers DAVEY JACKSON SARAH SALMON TERRISS FORD ZACH FINKELSTEIN Photography Editor EMMA HARDWICK Staff Photographer ELLIE CARTER Design Editor DANIELLE PHAM Ads Editor ASHLEY BLACK Website Design PATRICK WEAVER Adviser LINDA BARBER

GOT A QUESTION? E-mail us at smspatriot@gmail.com

canned 6 Getting Students nominate boys for first Mr. AmeriCAN pageant

and bake 7 Jake Q&A with junior

drum major Jake Ilten

a twirl 12 InA closer look at the girls behind the flags

Cover: Taking precautions to protect yourself can prevent you from getting the H1N1 virus. South will provide a vaccination for those with parental consent.

business 24 Fishy Local band Mr. Fish

Right: Dancing in The Boyfriend, Seniors Molly Allison and Samantha Morrow strike a pose. The musical is about a teenage girl who finds love in France. photos by Emma Hardwick

Gravity 29 Defying Gymnastics places fourth

composes song for local horror movie

at state meet


NEWS NEWS

South SHORTS

STUDENT WINNER ROB WILLIAMS, sr as

MARGARET RINGWALD, A 79-YEAR OLD, PREGNANT GRANDMOTHER

KSMS ANNOUNCES 2009 COSTUME CONTEST WINNERS photos by Slade Burns and Ellie Carter

GROUP WINNER RICKY JENNINGS, sr, DARRICK HILBURN, sr, ANDY OTT, sr, AND ZACH ELLER, fr as KISS

BLOOD DRIVE COLLECTS 190 PINTS, EXCEEDS GOAL

Kate Chattee, jr, donates blood at South’s annual Blood Drive. There was a total of 222 donors this year. photo by Emma Hardwick

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TEACHER WINNER 1ST PLACE NICHOLAS PLATKO as LEGO SUB 2ND PLACE DREW BARANOWSKI as A ZOMBIE

Students lined up at the gym and gave blood for South’s Annual Blood Drive on October 21. The blood collected was used for seventy local hospitals in the area, and will be used mostly for blood transfusions. “This is the most we have ever collected at South,” said Niki Dosland, Student Council sponsor. By lunch time, South reached their goal of 150 pints by sixth hour, but they exceeded their goal and collected 190 pints overall. Every pint of blood collected will potentially save two lives; this means that the blood that was donated from South will save about 380 lives. Students had to be at least 16 years old to donate. Students couldn’t donate if they had been sick during the week, if they were anemic, or had taken any illegal drugs. This only affected about ten people who volunteered for the blood drive. There were 222 donors who signed up; of these donors, 160 were donating for the first time.

-SARAH SALMON


NEWS NEWS

Environmental Education students, Sam Edwards, jr , Jackie Faltermeier, jr, and John Davis, sr, teach a group of elementary school students about animal homes. The tours for elementary schools was created by Dr. Dean Jernigan in the mid 1970s and are now offered in October, April, and May. photos by Ellie Carter

INTO THE WILD

Students and teachers gather for SMESL’s 40th anniversary It’s hard for most students to imagine South without SMESL, but if it weren’t for a mysterious phone call sparking the imaginations of a few former science teachers, the Shawnee Mission Environmental Science Lab wouldn’t exist. During the spring of 1967, former Biology teacher, Jerry P. Murray received a phone call from a woman, whose identity is still unknown to this day, who supported using the twenty four acres east of South as an environmental lab, because she thought environmental science would become a big issue. “At the time of the call, it didn’t strike me as important,” said Jerry Murray Back in the 1960s, the Biology teachers at South thought biochemistry was the new up-and-coming

science field, and planned to develop many science programs like Chemical Bond, Chem Study, and Biology. “The first year or two

farm in the country and said he appreciates how SMESL lets students experience what nature is really like. Originally the school’s vice The founders of SMESL, Jerry P. Murray, Richard Dawson, and Gene Hampton joined students and staff on the 40th anniversary of the lab. Not pictured: Dr. Dean Jernigan

you could walk out into the field and couldn’t hear any mechanical noises,” said Dr. Gene Hampton, former Biology teacher and science department chairman, “It was a high for me.” Hampton grew up on a

principal and athletic director wanted to put a football stadium on the land because of its natural bowl shape. As they fought with strong support from parents for the survival of the SMESL, the biology teachers began to

plant trees, wild flowers, and tried several times to build a prairie dog colony while beginning to hold a few classes in SMESL. Murray insisted on teaching the visiting elementary school students outside unless the teacher requested otherwise. “As they [the elementary school students] left SMESL on the bus, I wanted their last thought to be of SMESL, not the classroom. They see classrooms all the time.” said Murray. “I like running into grown up students who remember and appreciate SMESL.” said Richard “Dick” Dawson, one of SMESL’s founding fathers and creator of the acronym “SMESL.”

-DAVEY JACKSON

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NEWS NEWS

WHO C AN? Mr. Ameri-Can candidates rehearse for their pageant. Fifteen senior boys were nominated to compete for the title of Mr. Ameri-can. photo by Ellie Carter

MR. AMERI-CAN! Fi r s t b e a u t y p a g e a n t fo r g u y s k i c k s o f f S t u C o ’s t r a d i t i o n a l c a n n e d fo o d d r i ve STUCO put a twist to the average pageant and presented the first Mr. Ameri-Can pageant on November 10th to help raise money and collect more cans to donate to the Johnson County Christmans Bureau. Tickets to the pageant were $3 or nine cans. The winners were not available at press time. STUCO asked sponsors from every club to have students nominate one senior boy to take part in the pageant. “An email was sent out to the teachers who were asked to pick ten boys from the list,” said Niki Dosland, STUCO sponsor. The fifteen with the most votes competed in the pageant. At the pageant, contestants competed in four categories: evening wear, spirit wear, interview, and talent. The contestants were judged by a panel of faculty who included Dustin Cates, Ryan McQueeney, Ryan Flurry, and special guest Jodi Rinehart, Deb Rosenthal’s, attendance personnel’s sister, who has judged actual pageants. There were winners in each category

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as well as an overall winner and Mr. Can-geniality. “Mr. Can-geniality is the candidate who has the most fans there” said Sara Busby, sr and Student Body President. All candidates performed a choreographed dance, put together by Busby and Becca Dunn, senior and Student Body Secretary, at the start of the competition. “We got the idea from Miss Congeniality,” said Dunn. They danced to Party in the USA, Ricky Bobby, and Dancing Queen. The penny drop kicked off the Can Drive which started on October 30. The students could choose from five songs they wanted to hear in each passing period. They could choose from Party in the USA, International Harvester, Ice Ice Baby, Play That Funky Music, and Build Me Up Buttercup. The Can Drive continues until November 24. The second hour that collects the most cans will receive an IHOP breakfast for their class.

-KAVYA THYAGARAJAN

CONTESTANTS Slade Burns Zach Finkelstein Marshall Miller Mikhail Yakhnis Alex Lynch Michael Day Brian Hagstrom Kyle Little DeAundre Kurney Nick Zuk Nick Czarnecki Danny Lamping Christian Beardall Zach Donovan Ben Prueter


JAKE ILTEN

Q A

OP-ED OP-ED

Junior Drum Major

&

Q: What are your extracurricular activities? A: Band, StuCo, Pep Club, and Tennis.

Q: What is the most challenging part of being a drum major? A: The responsibility. Everybody’s looking up to me.

Q: What are your plans for next year as field captain? A: Just to be a role model to all the freshmen and to improve the band.

Q: Why do you believe the band placed fourth in Warrensburg? A: We had a really good performance. There was just good competition. Q: What was your proudest moment of the marching season? A: I got to be the main field captain when Preston and Jordan were nominated for Homecoming. Q: What is your toughest subject? A: Math because I really don’t want to try in that class, and it comes back to haunt me. Q: Which superhero would you want to be? A: I want to be Violet from The Incredibles, so I can be invisible and use force fields... except I’d be a man. Q: What is your favorite verb? A: ‘To play’ because I love sports and being active is always a good thing. Q: What would be your dream job? A: To be a professional soccer player. Q: What is the best pizza place? A: I like Pizza Hut because it has the most cheese on its pizza. Q: What is your favorite Coca-Cola product? A: Is Mountain Dew a Coca-Cola product? Q: What is your best card game? A: Blackjack because I know how to count cards. Q: Who is your celebrity crush? A: Megan Fox because she looks really hot in Transformers. Q: What is your strangest nickname? A: Jacobo. And that’s my Spanish name that was given to me by Mrs. Guillén. Q: What is your favorite microwavable food? A: Those pancake-sausages that are like corn dogs. Q: What wild animal are you most like? A: Panda bear because I’m cute and cuddly.

Interview by Joshua Knowles

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OP-ED OP-ED How should DARE improve its low success rate?

“They could focus more on the immediate negative affects, instead of long term.” Tom bolton, sr.

Illustration by Clare Dolan

Truth and DARE The drug prevention program fails to keep students drug-free “Have it go on longer than elementary school because people aren’t going to run into drugs in kindergarten.” gabe guild, fr.

“They should show how it ruins people’s lives, like people with drug abusing parents.” Nolan Allen, soph.

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Daren the Lion, black T-shirts, police officer visits, and balloon pledges have all proven to be a waste of time. Drug Abuse Resistance Education, also know as DARE, is the familiar drug prevention program that almost all students can remember from elementary school. But looking at the results, the only benefit DARE provided was an extra thirty-minute break to inattentive sixth graders. According to research and multiple organizations such as the organization of Common Sense for Drug Policy, DARE continually fails to make a difference when it comes to future drug use. In fact, as the organization observed, students never exposed to DARE are just as likely or less likely to use drugs. Contributions from major corporations such as AT&T, KFC, and Warner Brothers and even some government funding have gone in to this ineffective program. Yet DARE does not use this money wisely enough to prevent students from drug abuse. DARE needs to face the reality that fifth and sixth graders probably are not smoking

weed or popping pills by the swings during recess. Though teaching the students at a young age may seem like a good tactic on the war on drugs, it is clearly not working. DARE should focus its attention on the older students who are much more likely to participate in drug activity. According to KidsGrowth Child Health, the average age for a student to start experimenting with drugs like marijuana is at age fourteen during a student’s freshman year. So why does DARE not address that age group? DARE’s problem not only lies with its choice to target elementary school students, but its teaching approach. Simply directing students’ attention on the short-term and direct consequences could steer them away from drugs. With all of DARE current shortcomings, the organization should seriously consider a new method of operation or simply abolish itself for the sake of the youth.


OP-ED OP-ED

By Hannah Strader

Forty Foster Sisters

Sophomore girl finds former family members unforgettable Christine absolutely hated my father because her trust in men had completely vanished. Christine was one of the worst cases of abuse that Illinois had ever seen. Badly beaten by her father, she experienced being locked in closets, forced to eat live snakes, and sold to men for poker debts. I was exposed to this story at the age of two when Christine moved into my home as a foster child. After my parents adopted me at twenty-three hours and raised me for a few years, they decided to foster teenage girls with varying histories of abuse. At different times of my life, up to five teenagers stayed with us at our house for varying amounts of time. The first night a new girl moved into our house, my parents sat her down to explain the rules. The expectations were simple, but my parents were very adamant because the rules were primarily enforced to protect me. If my new sisters were caught with drugs or alcohol, they were automatically removed from our home. If a foster child was caught sneaking out, lying intentionally, or starting a fight more than once, she was moved. Most girls, however, did their best to stay with our family. The relationship between me and my foster sisters seemed very normal. Many of the girls would often gave in to my begging to play Barbies or “house” with them. They always treated me like the little sister. Once, when I was about four or five years old, Maria, one of my sisters, asked me to get her a Pepsi. To this, I replied, “Yes, your highness,” and ran into the kitchen to do so. Though my parents had a good laugh over what Maria had taught me, they knew they had to put a stop to it. Maria found herself in our home after her father locked her out of the house for dating men of a different race. After turning eighteen, the legal age when kids are released from foster care, she went to find her father, seeking forgiveness. He opened the door, took one look at her, and shut it in

Maria’s face. She left the house and returned to her new home, never to bother with her father again. Maria frequently visits us today with her two daughters and still considers us her family. In September of 2006, there were 510,000 children in foster care within the United States. In Illinois, there were 257,481 calls to the State Central Register for child abuse and neglect. The age group of 10-17, the ages we took in, made up 43.3% of these calls. The process to become a foster parent is very thorough and demands a lot of time. My parents took two-hour classes once a week for twelve weeks and underwent finger printing, history checks, and drug tests. A common misconception is that foster kids cannot see their real parents, which is not always true. I spent many afternoons in state buildings while my sisters with less severe cases visited their parents. Sometimes this could make a situation even worse, like with Morgan, who had many problems after visiting her mother. Morgan arrived at our house with her older sister Jessica after their mom locked them out of the house. After living with us for a while, they began visiting their mom. Their mother always gave her daughters false hope of her returning to pick up her girls and start a new life. She told them that she was coming to get them or going to clean up her act to get them back, but never would. Jessica eventually stopped listening to her, but Morgan was always faithful and found herself disappointed in the end. Having had forty sisters during the last twelve years of my life, I’ve been exposed to some horrible stories. I’ve baked brownies with victims of sexual abuse, sat next to girls with emotional scars at the dinner table, and played Uno with sisters who have never been sure love exists because all they have ever known is pain. My parents and I always made it our goal to show them the love they never had.

In September of 2006, there were 510,000 children in foster care within the United States.

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OP-ED OP-ED

SHOW Should On-Campus

BY KAVYA THYAGARAJAN

P R O

When students come to school, they should feel safe. After all, they are spending seven hours or more in a building where more than half of the people are strangers. The rules that apply to students should be more strict in school than out of it because school is a public place where everyone’s safety should be a major priority. Students can stand to have some rights taken away for seven hours a day if it is to protect them and their friends. Administrators are allowed to search students if they have reasonable suspicion. As teenagers, students in high school may let their emotions rule their judgements over their reason. This could lead to a bomb threat scrawled on a bathroom wall or, even worse, a school shooting. For example, Columbine and many other school shootings

“If they have reasonable suspicion and they are looking out for everyone’s safety, it’s fine.” -Neil Buie, soph.

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occurred because of this tendency. Violence in schools should not be left up to chance. If a student is searched and is found to have a weapon, he or she faces the consequences of being charged with having a weapon on school property. If the crime did go unpunished, the student will feel that he or she can get away with doing it again. Statistics from the National Education Association show that every day 160,000 students skip classes because they are afraid of physical harm, forty students are hurt by firearms, and 260 teachers are physically assaulted, and at least 135,000 guns are brought into school, throughout the United States. Also, a survey by the Center for Disease Control shows that eighteen percent of the country’s students bring some type of weapon to school once a month. With numbers this high, why wouldn’t it be reasonable for officials to search lockers or students? By law, lockers are allowed to be searched because they are school property and cars in the school parking lot, backpacks, and purses are allowed to be searched as well. In 1990, five schools in New York City were introduced to metal detectors. The number of serious incidents went down from the five hundred fourteen incidents in 1987-1988 to two hundred sixteen in 1990-1991 in this school district. Security measures such as locker searches and bag searches reduce the number of fatalities in schools. High school students should be grateful that the administration cares so much about the students’ safety.

“I think they should only be able to a very light search.”

“If it’s for everyone’s safety, then they should be able to.”

-Casey Keller, jr.

-Bethany Axe, sr.


DOWN

OP-ED OP-ED

Searches Be Allowed? How would you react to being frisked by school officials in class or having your car unjustly searched by campus police officers simply because they suspected you of a crime? Should a teacher’s suspicion warrant violating a person’s rights? If a teacher has “reasonable suspicion” that incriminates a student, the student can be subject to frisking or various types of searches by administrators. Administrators with reasonable suspicion can legally search a student’s purse, backpack, body, locker and even their car. These measures are put in place primarily to ensure the safety of students, an action which is understandable under certain conditions, but the conditions schools have to meet are not so just. Reasonable suspicion may seem like a good idea, but it is not as reassuring as probable cause. If a teacher feels a student is behaving strangely or there is a possibility a student is in possession of something dangerous, school officials have the right to perform searches on said student and basically strip them of their natural rights. In the real world, it would take certain rare circumstances for someone to search a person’s car without a warrant. A police officer would need legitimate reasons to search a person’s possessions without legal documentation. Why should high school officials be the exception to such important laws?

C O N

BY TERRISS FORD

The issue of safety should not be the determining factor in the infringement of a person’s rights. If schools are allowed to exercise these practices to keep students safe, then this should be allowed anywhere. With this logic, police officers would be able to frisk and search the possessions of customers at a grocery store or shoppers at a mall to ensure the safety of others around them. While the intentions behind such actions are good, it is still unethical to subject citizens to blatant invasions of privacy. High school students should receive the same rights as they would under any other circumstances and retain the rights guaranteed to them as Americans.

“No. I feel like they could use other things than frisking.”

“No, I think it’s a violation of rights.”

“We should be protected from being not treated fairly.”

-Cheyenne Lindemen, jr.

-Hannah Sears, fr.

-David Cantwell, soph.

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FEATURES FEATURES

Dances With Flags

Twirl that Rifle!

Southettes dance to difficult beat using rifles, sabers, and flags A couple of bloody noses, bruises on legs and arms, and calloused fingernails are commonplace for these girls. They spin, throw, and catch various props: flags, rifles, and sabers. The girls are known as the Southette Color Guard. The Southette color guard performs at pep assemblies, half-time shows at basketball and football games, Winterguard, and Extravaganza. On October 24th, the color guard, along with the band and Pacesetters, took fourth place at Warrensburg. Lisa Carson, coach, said, “I think you have to have a desire to perform. For someone who loves it, it doesn’t feel like a lot of work. It has to be polished and sharp.” The team comes in every morning at seven to practice. A typical morning includes basic stretches, then equipment warm up with spinning and tossing props, and finally practicing for upcoming assemblies and competitions. Shelby Minton, sr. and co-field captain said, “I don’t think they (the student body) realize how hard some of the stuff we do. We’re constantly trying to perfect everything we do. You can spend twenty minutes on a small section trying to get it right.” According to Carson, the girls average about 600 hours in practice a year. A big aspect of their year is Winterguard, an annual competition, when they perform a single performance using all their equipment: flags, rifles, and sabers. Ashley Lohuis, sr. and co-

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performance captain, said, “When Winterguard starts we have practices before school, Thursday after school practices, and sometimes Saturday practices. It takes a lot of dedication and commitment.” For Extravaganza, the Southettes, Pacesetters, and Cheerleaders end of the year performance, the Southettes perform ten routines in a single night. Michelle Arnold, sr. and co-performance captain, said, “I think people see the hard work we put into it. I hear a lot more praise than I did last year. I also attribute some of the praise to the Pacesetters. They tell people how hard it is to do field

shows and they acknowledge how hard we work.” Carson has high hopes for the girl’s futures in colorguard. “Of all the spirit girls at South, I have more Southettes that compete at the college level than any other group. My hope is that a lot of the senior girls this year will go on and continue it in college,” said Carson. Last year the girls placed fourth at championships in Springfield. This year their goal is to take the gold. Arnold said, “We’ll hopefully get some outstanding guard awards. We have a lot of Raiderettes that moved up to Varsity. I think we’re going to have a really good strong team this year.” For upcoming years, Carson would like to see more girls join the team. “I hope they come and look at the activity, and if it’s something they think they might be interested in but they might not be capable then I would encourage them to try it at least,” said Carson. Lohuis felt that when she tried out for the team she needed little previous experience. She said, “You can come and not be very experienced with the equipment because usually people don’t start color guard until high school. You just practice so much that it just comes to you.” -MEGHA GARG The Southette Colorguard practices about 600 hours per year. In October they competed at a competition in Warrensburg.

Step 1: Stand with legs apart and push down rifle with left hand.

Step 2: Flip rifle with right hand on rifle’s neck and keep spinning.

Step 3: After spinning a few times, stop rifle with right hand on butt and left hand on bolt. Southette performance captain Michelle Arnold presents how to spin a rifle. Arnold joined the guard her sophomore year in 2007.

photos by Emma Hardwick


FEATURES FEATURES

LOOK FAMILIAR? Is it time for Dr. Gilhaus’s hormone speech?

photo illustration by Emma Hardwick

Dodging make-out artists--tricky “What do you guys call it, lip lockin?” really bother her. She laughs about it said Pat Teegarden, substitute teacher but said that it isn’t necessary. and former faculty member. “They don’t need to be glued togethWhether it’s a kiss goodbye or “lip er, there’s no need for intense kissing, or lockin,” students admit that they’ve hands in places where they should not seen public displays of affection, or be,” said Teegarden. Teegarden adds, taken part in it. “If they’re doing this much in public, I Jordan Tripp, freshman, said, “It’s can’t even imagine what they’re doing pretty normal, everyone does it.” He in private.” fully admits that he engages in PDA Dr. Joe Gilhaus, principal, is fairly every chance he gets. close to pulling out his “Spring Hor“I do it within reason…” Tripp said mone” speech. with a crooked smile, “I don’t feel un“I was close,” he said, “I saw a couple comfortable, people producing so much “They block the halls, just friction they could don’t notice it.” “They block the going to town on each light up New York halls, just going to City.” He doesn’t other,” said Derek town on each other,” see PDA as a huge said Derek Kensingproblem because Kensinger, senior. er, senior. He views most students choose it every day and feels disgusted when the option of getting out of his way. He he sees what’s happening in the halls. said that oddly enough it varies upon Kensinger claims the worst he’s seen is the time of year. Like many, Gilhaus too graphic to tell anyone about, and agrees that school is not the time, or it’s just plain sick. “FRESHMAN… place, for students to engage in any they grow up and stop over-doing it “activities”. Gilhaus laughs, “I just eventually, but save it for after school,” don’t see the reason in uhm… trying to said Kensinger with great confidence. start a fire?” “Well I wasn’t the one that walked Gilhaus tries very hard to prevent into the weight room…” said TeegarPDA, but just expects students to stop den, referring to an incident that indoing it. He rarely has to punish anyvolved two students engaging in sexual one, but if it gets to a certain point, he activity in the weight room three years will step in. When it gets out of hand ago. She said she notices PDA daily he separately calls in each student and between passing periods but it doesn’t talks with them, and if it continues, he

calls their parents. “Students always tell me how bad it looks, how they don’t like it, and how it really offends them,” said Gilhaus, then laughs, “We need to stick them in a cold shower.” -CASEY LEE

HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT KISSING? •A typical French kiss moves 29 muscles in the face •A kiss can contain up to 278 of different bacteria •Couples transfer an average of 9 milligrams of water, 0.7 milligrams of protein, 0.18 milligrams of organic matter, 0.71 milligrams of fat and 0.45 milligrams of salt to each other with each open-mouthed kiss •One little kiss burns up to 3 calories. by Happyworker magazine

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More to

Love The three Litzlers are the only triplet siblings at South. Molly, Andrew, and Peter Litzler were born on October 14. photo by Ellie Carter

Twin telepathy: Does it exist? They were born on the same day, so does that mean they can read each other’s minds? “I do believe that twin telepathy exists, but I think that twin telepathy is only going to be found in identical twins,” said Megan Pyle, jr. The Pyles, Kelly and Megan, are fraternal twins. “It doesn’t happen to us a lot, but sometimes we say the same thing at the same time,” said Kelly, “Every once in a while we start singing a random song at the same time. More often, though, one of us says the same thing the other is thinking.” Megan feels that these occurrences aren’t caused by twin telepathy, but rather a similar upbringing. While the Pyles both believe in twin telepathy, identical twins Stephanie and Samantha Morrow do not. Stephanie said, “People have said to me, ‘but you sometimes finish each other’s sentences.’ Yes, sometimes, but that can also be said about any two friends who spend a good amount of time together. As for the Pyles, they believe that telepathy mostly exists in the media. “I wish twin telepathy could be more like it is in the movies,” said Kelly, “like how Fred and George finish each others sentences, but it isn’t.”

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Students share experiences of life as a double or even triple They are partners in crime. They can switch classes and seats without any notice. They know that if they forget their birthday, there’s always the other one to remind them. They are twins/triplets. THE LEMONS Todd and Shelby Lemon, jrs., came out of the womb on September 18, 1992. Todd came out one minute before Shelby. “Whoever is older will always hold that over the other’s head,” she said. “He pulls that out every now and again.” For the Lemons, the birth of twins was not unusual. Shelby said, “There’s a lot of twins in our family, so it wasn’t that much of a surprise.” There is a slight downside to having a twin. “Twins often are associated together and are not always viewed as individuals,” said Shelby.

She loves the companionship she shares with her brother, though. Shelby said, “Everything we’ve done, we’ve done together.” She even pictures the two of them possibly enrolling in the same college. “In the future, it would be really strange to go to where he’s not,” Shelby said. “It turns out we’re both looking into the fields of engineering and architecture.” After spending their lives with each other, Todd and Shelby have developed an occasional form of twin telepathy which usually let them know what the other is hungry for. Although ‘twin telepathy’ is a rarity with these fraternal twins, Shelby does have a peculiar recurring dream. She said, “I’ve always had dreams with basically the same story line of me saving the world. And Todd is always there helping me.”


THE HAGUES Marina and Muriel Hague, srs., were born on April 14, 1992, but their parents were in for a surprise that day. “They didn’t get an ultrasound,” Marina said, “so for the first two weeks Muriel didn’t have a name.” Since that time, the pair have always shared a room. “We’ve shared a room our whole lives. It can be hard at times especially when we try to get ready in the morning,” said Marina. “But it usually works out fine.” Marina is grateful for having Muriel, though. “It’s like having a best friend you live with,” Marina said. My most annoying twinrelated problem is being mistaken for the other on a regular basis. The identical twins have decided to take advantage of these mistakes for their own amusement. Marina said, “We tried to switch places on April Fool’s Day last year, but one of our teachers scheduled a test for that day. We’ve never switched classes but we’ve switched seats in classes,” Marina added. “For the first two weeks of school,

we switched seats in Mrs. Cobb’s class every day and it took her two weeks to realize.” Marina and Muriel’s antics do not end there. Marina said, “We have often pretended to be each other to our friends and even impersonate each other on the phone.”

FEATURES FEATURES

What do you share in common with your twin?

THE LITZLERS Molly, Andrew, and Peter Litzler, sophs., all share their birthday on October 14. “I think of it more as ‘our’ birthday, not ‘my’ birthday,” Molly said. But even back in 1993, the triplets did not go out of their way to wear adorable, matching outfits. “We’ve never matched. My mom was so opposed to matching,” said Molly. “We never really looked alike, so dressing alike would just be useless. Plus, it’s really tacky when people make kids dress alike. The Litzlers are the only triplets at South. “We just have a lot in common which I think is true for anyone with siblings that are close to them in age,” said Andrew Litzler. -JOSHUA KNOWLES

Whoa, there are multiples of them! 9th grade: Ryan & Sean Berrigan Celina & Cheyenne Garcia Ashley & Jordan Tripp Danny & Frances Vera Josh & Nicholas Watkins

11th grade: Ellie & Josie Bright Shelby & Todd Lemon Blake & Carson Moore Kelly & Megan Pyle

10th grade: Clare & Nora Bingaman Nikki & Tori Byrnes Andrew, Molly, & Peter Litzler Joseph & Matthew Slickman Cody & Stacy Stringer

12th grade: Marina & Muriel Hague Stephanie & Samantha Morrow

“We share the same opinions on almost everything.” Ellie Bright, jr.

“We like to draw: Japanese anime.” -Josie Bright, jr.

“...Our humor. We laugh at the same things and most people don’t laugh at them.” -Clare Bingaman, soph.

We finish each other’s sentences a lot.” -Nora Bingaman, soph.

“The most we have in common is the activities we do, like sports.” -Tyler Combs, jr.

We hang out with the same people and we do the same activities, like sports.”- Spencer Combs, jr.

15


DONE WITH H Although children and few adults under sixty have antibodies against H1N1, the virus is no more deadly than any other flu strand. The only difference is that it is more infectious than strands that have existed in the past. Because this strand is new, there are few people who are immune to it, which allows it to spread more easily. Researchers conclude that the flu strand is a mixture of bird flu, human flu, and swine flu. They assume that pigs became infected with all three of these flu strands about ten to twenty years ago, and the strand has just been mutating ever since. According the National Association of School Nurses, anyone who wants the vaccine will receive it, but not necessarily when it is first comes out. The H1N1 vaccine will be available as an injection and a live-attenuated nasal spray. Jennifer Owens, health teacher, said that swine flu was also a problem in the late 1970s. Owens has been urging people to get the flu shot or the nasal spray to try to prevent the influenza from spreading. On December 20 a clinic will be held at South for pregnant staff and students with underlying health issues to recieve the H1N1 vaccine. At a later date the vaccine will be available for all students with permission of a parent. The consent form can be found on the right sidebar of of the SMSD website or in the office. Many schools in Kansas have had

cummulative cases of H1N1 1-10 11-50 51-500 > 501 information courtesy of the World Health Organization

outbreaks of H1N1, which has caused multiple shutdowns. South alone has had several cases of the flu. Courtney Robles, soph., took a light approach to the flu. “I was sad because I got sent home from camp,” said Robles, “I wasn’t really scared I would die.” Robles caught Swine Flu while attending Kanakuk Camp during the summer. “It’s really just like the regular flu,” said Robles, “You cough a lot, have sore throat and are achy. You just don’t want to move.” Robles was effectively treated with Tamiflu, a type of anti-viral medication that works similar to an anti-biotic in weakening the virus. Tamiflu needs to be taken within forty-eight hours of being diagnosed and can also be taken as a preventative measure when exposed to the virus. “It really isn’t that bad,” said Robles, “If you get the vaccine you won’t get sick, but if you do get sick, it’s not that bad. It doesn’t matter.” While Robles didn’t get very sick from flu, Kristen Jenson, soph., had a different story. Jenson caught swine flu from her dad after he was infected at work. “I had hot/cold flashes, aching muscles, cough, sore throat, a little nausea, zero appetite, extreme tiredness, and a fever,” said Jenson, “Compared to the regular flu, the achy feeling is worse. My whole body just ached.” Unlike Robles, Jenson didn’t take

Tamiflu, just over the counter medications. “I just took Tylenol to lower my fever and cough syrup. The Tylenol definitely helped,” said Jenson, “ I only had a fever for three days.” While Jenson’s symptoms didn’t last as long as Robles’, they were much worse. “I wasn’t worried or scared when I was diagnosed, I was just too miserable to care,” said Jenson. Jenson also thought H1N1 was comparable to a common cold or flu, even though her experience was bad. “Although having the flu is miserable, you can get a cold that is just as bad,” said Jenson, “I would only recommend vaccination to people who have other medical conditions that could cause the flu to be more serious or even deadly for them. Everyone else can just wash their hands and be really careful about germs; save the vaccinations for people at higher risk.” HINI has the greatest affect on people under twenty-five, people with asthma or diabetes, pregnant women, and minority groups such as Latinos and African Americas. While H1N1 isn’t likely to fatally impact a completely healthy person, fatalities have occurred. The percentage of people who suffer severe or fatal maladies, though, is very low.

-DAVEY JACKSON & ZACH FINKELSTEIN


DONE WITH H Although children and few adults under sixty have antibodies against H1N1, the virus is no more deadly than any other flu strand. The only difference is that it is more infectious than strands that have existed in the past. Because this strand is new, there are few people who are immune to it, which allows it to spread more easily. Researchers conclude that the flu strand is a mixture of bird flu, human flu, and swine flu. They assume that pigs became infected with all three of these flu strands about ten to twenty years ago, and the strand has just been mutating ever since. According the National Association of School Nurses, anyone who wants the vaccine will receive it, but not necessarily when it is first comes out. The H1N1 vaccine will be available as an injection and a live-attenuated nasal spray. Jennifer Owens, health teacher, said that swine flu was also a problem in the late 1970s. Owens has been urging people to get the flu shot or the nasal spray to try to prevent the influenza from spreading. On December 20 a clinic will be held at South for pregnant staff and students with underlying health issues to recieve the H1N1 vaccine. At a later date the vaccine will be available for all students with permission of a parent. The consent form can be found on the right sidebar of of the SMSD website or in the office. Many schools in Kansas have had

cummulative cases of H1N1 in 2009 1-10 11-50 51-500 > 501 information courtesy of the World Health Organization

outbreaks of H1N1, which has caused multiple shutdowns. South alone has had several cases of the flu. Courtney Robles, soph., took a light approach to the flu. “I was sad because I got sent home from camp,” said Robles, “I wasn’t really scared I would die.” Robles caught Swine Flu while attending Kanakuk Camp during the summer. “It’s really just like the regular flu,” said Robles, “You cough a lot, have sore throat and are achy. You just don’t want to move.” Robles was effectively treated with Tamiflu, a type of anti-viral medication that works similar to an anti-biotic in weakening the virus. Tamiflu needs to be taken within forty-eight hours of being diagnosed and can also be taken as a preventative measure when exposed to the virus. “It really isn’t that bad,” said Robles, “If you get the vaccine you won’t get sick, but if you do get sick, it’s not that bad. It doesn’t matter.” While Robles didn’t get very sick from flu, Kristen Jenson, soph., had a different story. Jenson caught swine flu from her dad after he was infected at work. “I had hot/cold flashes, aching muscles, cough, sore throat, a little nausea, zero appetite, extreme tiredness, and a fever,” said Jenson, “Compared to the regular flu, the achy feeling is worse. My whole body just ached.” Unlike Robles, Jenson didn’t take

Tamiflu, just over the counter medications. “I just took Tylenol to lower my fever and cough syrup. The Tylenol definitely helped,” said Jenson, “ I only had a fever for three days.” While Jenson’s symptoms didn’t last as long as Robles’, they were much worse. “I wasn’t worried or scared when I was diagnosed, I was just too miserable to care,” said Jenson. Jenson also thought H1N1 was comparable to a common cold or flu, even though her experience was bad. “Although having the flu is miserable, you can get a cold that is just as bad,” said Jenson, “I would only recommend vaccination to people who have other medical conditions that could cause the flu to be more serious or even deadly for them. Everyone else can just wash their hands and be really careful about germs; save the vaccinations for people at higher risk.” HINI has the greatest affect on people under twenty-five, people with asthma or diabetes, pregnant women, and minority groups such as Latinos and African Americas. While H1N1 isn’t likely to fatally impact a completely healthy person, fatalities have occurred. The percentage of people who suffer severe or fatal maladies, though, is very low.

-DAVEY JACKSON & ZACH FINKELSTEIN


H1N1

Students discuss the realities of having swine flu

SYMPTOMS PSYCHOLOGICAL NASOPHARYNX

Drowsiness Lack of apetite

Runny nose Sore Throat

GASTRIC

Nausea Vomiting

RESPIRATORY Coughing

INTESTINAL Diarrhea

photo illustration by Emma Hardwick


FEATURES FEATURES

BLASTto the

Past

Jane Distler, math teacher, has a special chair in her room called the “Baranowski chair”, after former student and current English teacher Drew Baranowski. Baranowski was kept in the chair to stay focused. photo by Emma Hardwick

Teachers reminisce about high school life as Raider students After graduation, many students vow never to return back to high school. Many vow that they will some day come back and visit, but for Travis Gatewood, Drew Baranowski, Nicholas Platko, and and Joseph Laurenzo, returning to school at South was their destiny.

18

Becoming a teacher was more of an obvious decision for English teacher Travis Gatewood. Gatewood, who graduated in 1995, was a cadet English teacher his senior year. “I liked working with people. I started coaching my sophomore year in col-

lege, and that’s when I knew I wanted to work in a high school setting,” said Gatewood. Gatewood was involved in many activities like soccer, yearbook, peer mentoring, and literary magazine. “I tried to make the most of it [high school] by getting

involved in lots of activities,” said Gatewood. “I had a great English teacher my sophomore year,” said Gatewood, “and ended up cadet teaching for her my senior year. “ While great teachers may have been influential for Baranowski, Gatewood and


Laurenzo, social studies teacher Nicholas Platko figured out he wanted to be a teacher a very different way. “I watched the movie “Big Daddy”, and I realized then I wanted to be a teacher. I’m not sure how that works but it did,” said Platko. Platko, who graduated in 1998, originally went into engineering but couldn’t picture himself at a desk all day long and decided he wanted to work with people. “It’s different seeing from a teacher’s perspective. As a student, you don’t realize what’s going on beyond the four years,” said Platko,“You

times that I’m one of her favorite students. It’s her way of keeping a little of me in the room all the time.” When Baranowski attended South, he was involved in many activities such as baseball, soccer, and swim team. “[South] was more homogenous back then,” said Baranowski, “it was more sheltered, but a good place to grow up.” After Baranowski graduated in 1999, he went into advertising in college. “I had a moral dissagreement with marketing for companies I don’t agree with,” said Baranowski, “I worked

“It was intimidating being back at South with some of my former teachers”- Drew Baranowski don’t see the big picture.” Platko said he enjoyed high school. He was a drum major in band and a member of both Latin and Pep club. “First it was weird being back, but it’s cool to have a feeling for the school,” said Platko, “and to give back to a school that gave me a lot when I was here.” For Drew Baranowski, English teacher, it was easy for him to leave a mark at South: the “Baranowski chair” in Jane Distler’s, math teacher, room. “Drew was always an active student,” said Distler, “He was really smart but all over the room.” To address this problem, Distler had to set up a special chair to keep him focused in class. “He was basically in front of my face,” said Distler. However, Baranowski has somewhat of a different opinion about the chair’s existence. “It’s not so much a chair of dishonor. It speaks of my legacy with her,” said Baranowski, “She’s told me many

for Hallmark for a year in Chicago and realized an office job wasn’t my style.” It was then that Baranowski drew his inspiration from his high school and college teachers. “Mrs. Hermreck was my senior English teacher, she was the most influential,” said Baranowski, “I had always liked English, history and psychology. I liked the subjects where opinions mattered.” Baranowski said that he drew inspiration from the way his teachers taught him and thought he could replicate their ideas. “It was intimidating being back at South with some of my former teachers,” said Baranowski, “but it’s really interesting to see how different the student body is.” -DAVEY JACKSON

How was What was high school your student back as a like in high student? school? Students

Teachers

“I tried to make the most of it, get involved in lots of activities.”- Travis Gatewood

“He was a great writer. You could always depend on him to write a good story.”Linda Barber

“I was a rule follower. My students wouldn’t be surprised to hear that.”Joseph Laurenzo

“He was a pretty quiet guy but a very good student.”Sally Guillen

“I had a good time, I should have done more though.”- Nicholas Platko

“He had a great sense of humor but was a serious student”- Steve Adams photos by Emma Hardwick

19


FEATURES FEATURES How well did you read this issue?

IHOP

17. This constitutional amendment protects any US citizen from an unlawful searches and seizures. 19. 382 lives may have been saved by this South charity event.

20


ADS ADS Support the Canned Food Drive! Turn in cans or $$ to your 2nd hour class through November 20.

ADVERTISE IN

THE PATRIOT CALL 913-993-7605 TO PLACE YOUR AD

Call Safeline to report school-related crimes or tips ---ANONYMOUSLY 913-993-7672

21


SM E ast senior Kaevan Tavakolinia plays

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Riding on octopi, buying whole quarter machines, and “sea to shining redundant sea” can only mean one thing; local “colorcore” student band Mr. Fish. Mr. Fish consists of SMS senior Kyle Little, SME seniors Kaevan Tavakolinia and Nathan Goldman, Bonner Springs High School senior, Tyler Kelly, and UMKC sophomore Fish Friend. Unlike most high school bands of this generation, Mr. Fish tries to capture their own original sound with doo-wop and soul influences instead of trying recreate the sound of their favorite bands. “I feel like a lot of bands rip off their favorite artists like, ‘Oh I want to sound like the Red Hot Chili Peppers,’ or ‘Oh let’s make a really generic emo band,’ but… we always just made our own music,” said vocalist, guitarist, and lyricist Little. “I think stylistically we’re just trying to do different things.” “When I look back on even our earliest songs, they may not be that good, but they still sound original to me,” said Nathan Goldman, guitar and vocals. “...Especially for a bunch of twelve and thirteen-year-olds.” Mr. Fish is unique in that each band members’ goal is to

22

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photos by Emma Hardwick

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Local high school band Mr. Fish emphasizes unique sound

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create a new and original sound. “A while ago one of the guys in the band… came up with the term “colorcore” to describe our sound, and I think it’s pretty accurate,” said Goldman. “We try to make our songs as vibrant as possible -- not necessarily happy and sugarcoated -but strong and emotive; never dull.” Mr. Fish’s main focus is sticking to originality and creating a distinct sound. “When someone asks these days, I usually just tell them our newest stuff reminds me of listening to a vengeful flock of beautiful bubbles,” said saxophonist Fish Friend. Along with a quirky and wistful sound, Mr. Fish try to keep the meanings of their lyrics fresh too. “Everything that you could possibly write about a relationship or a political issue... has been said before a million different ways; ways that are better than you could possibly say them so I don’t write a lot about my own personal life,” said Little. “I try not to get dramatic or lovey dovey at all. I like to write about people’s brains exploding and quarter machine toys and animals.” The unanimous vote of the band on the best part of being


Senior Kyle Little sings

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in Mr. Fish is the collaboration of all their creative minds. Goldman said, “We’re all so comfortable with each other’s tastes, strengths, and weaknesses that working up new songs, just jamming, and even playing old material is a very comfortable and fluid process.” “I love just being able to play music with a group of people that I know really well... and being in a similar place creatively with four other people all the time,” said Little. Mr. Fish has played live shows at various concert venues, festivals, Borders books, and released a full length album, Soft Serve Assault, which can be purchased at local Borders books or digitally downloaded on iTunes. At a Mr. Fish concert, audience members are on their toes dancing, bombarded with free toys by a generous “Gatorman,” and are able to let loose. “Our shows are so energetic--Full of color and life,” said drummer Tyler Kelly. “We just want to make you happy.” Their most recent show was at KC Creep Fest, a horror film festival in Westport that showcased films from local filmmakers Mr. Fish’s song “Zombie Babe” was written for the film Cadaverella, a modern-day horror retelling of Cinderella which

played at the film festival. The song “Hillbilly Death Cry” was also featured in the trailer and end credits of the film Bonnie and Clyde Vs. Dracula. Both films were made by Friend’s parents, Jennifer and Tim Friend. Mr. Fish is currently working on a new album that they hope to record this winter and release in the early new year. “We’re really hoping to start work on recording the new album this winter because I think we’re all extremely proud of them,” said Goldman. “These songs are our best yet.” However, in the midst of all of Mr. Fish’s great success, one aspect might put a stopper to all of it. College. All but one member of the band are seniors in high school with the latter already in college. All of the members are uncertain as to what the future holds for Mr. Fish. “After high school, it might be hard to keep things together with everyone, but I definitely want to play with those guys for as long as possible,” said Little. “At the very least, I want to get one last good album and a bunch of great shows in before we call it quits.”

-DANIELLE PHAM

23


CLASSROOM

couture 1 1

Guys can still look sharp and casual with the simple use of a button-down shirt, dark denim, and clean sneakers. “I like bright things,” said senior TYLER JENKINS. “I like to stand out and be noticed.” 3

3

1 Plaid Button-Down

2 2

Plaid shirts are extremely trendy this season for both guys and girls. If you’re going plaid, be sure to choose colors that compliment each other, not clash. Old Navy

2 Dark Straight Leg Jean

Dark denim is a sophisticated way to wear jeans but still stay casual. The give the illusion of wearing slacks without actually having to. American Eagle

3 Handy Rubber Bands

Rubber bands are the new Livestrong? I think so. They can be found in any teacher’s desk and they come in handy if you want to put away an unfinished bag of chips! Teacher’s Desk

4 High-Top Sneakers 4

4

These crisp, clean canvas sneakers are classic shoes that will never go out of style. They can be paired with jeans or even a tuxedo! Journey’s

photo by Ellie Carter


A&E A&E

try it

BEFOREYOU by Sarah Salmon

PANCAKES

buy it

Pumpkin Products

LATTE

Serving seasonally at IHOP, pumpkin pancakes are doughy in the middle and crispy on the outside. The nutmeg sprinkled on top has a slight numbing effect to the mouth but that is supposed to be common. The butter pecan syrup is recommended for these pancakes. $7 for 4

This beverage from Starbucks was delicious as well as very filling. Not only did it taste like pumpkin, but there were pops of different spices like cinnamon and nutmeg with every sip. $4.25 for medium

CONCRETE

CANDLE

This Sheridan’s frozen pumpkin pie concoction had big chunks of crust in it, but did not have actual pieces of pie in it. This actually made me happy because I am not that big a fan of pumpkin pie. The portions given were also well worth the money. $5 for regular

Shortly after lighting this candle from the Yankee Candle Company, a strong pumpkin fragrance filled my room. The smell made my mouth water, and I was hungry for some pumpkin bread or cheesecake. The candle was very potent, filling my room with the fragrance even when it was not lit. $10 for small jar photos by Ellie Carter

25


A&E A&E

(From left) Lindsay Kana, jr., Kaitlyn Landes, Samantha Morrow, and Molly Allison, srs., energetically surround Sarah Hines, jr., who plays Polly. There will be two more showings of The Boy Friend tonight and tomorrow night. photo by Emma Hardwick

Won’t You Charleston With Me? Theatre presents witty romantic comedy set in 1920s era France

What’s more exciting than waltzing, tap dancing and the Charleston all thrown together? Nothing but South’s latest theatre production The Boy Friend. The Boy Friend captures the true nature of teenage love, with its enthralling comical story of a young girl named Maisie and her romantic efforts to find that special someone. While this plot may seem like any other mushy love story it has interesting twists thrown throughout the plot. “A lot of things turn out differently than you expect them to,” said sophomore Maureen Berry, a Boy Friend crew member. One unique feature of this musical is its 1920s France setting that serves as the perfect place for this relatable romantic adventure. The excitement begins at Madame Dubonnet’s School for Young Ladies with the arrival of a named Polly, played by Sarah Hines, Jr. “Our characters want boyfriends and pretty much all the girls are freaking out about finding dates to this dance they have coming up,” said Samantha

Morrow, sr., who plays Maisie, another “It was a little funky at first because school girl. she had so much scheduling to do with Maisie’s search for love intensifies choreography and songs, but she’s dowhen she meets Bobby, an American ing a really good job,” said Morrow. boy at the school. “The choreography is really up beat “We meet and it’s pretty much love and exciting,” said Meredith. “There’s at first sight,” said Charlie Meredith, waltzing, tap dancing, the Charleston jr., who plays Bobby. This will be Mer- and a lot of partnering.” edith’s first time starring in a produc“Everything we do is SING, DANCE, tion. POSE,” said Morrow. “It’s one of those “I’m really nervous because it’s my things that looks complicated but actufirst show,” said Meredith. “But I love ally isn’t too difficult.” being in it and I’m really excited for The production also contains musiit.” cal numbers ranging from “cute love The Boy Friend is also drama teacher songs” to high energy 20s music. Lynette Williams’ first time directing a The Boy Friend premiered on major theatre production. Wednesday, November 11 and “We’ve got a great cast and will be performed tonight I’m really glad to be able to and tomorrow night at work with all of them,” seven. AdThat’s one hotsysaid Williams. “Things mission totsy drugstore are going well and I think is seven cowboy if I’ve ever we have a great show on dollars. seen one! our hands.” -TERRISS FORD According to the cast, William’s has done an exceptional job presenting the choreography and musical numbers.

Maisie’s School of Roarin’ Jargon Daddy - a young woman’s boyfriend or lover, especially if he’s rich

Don’t take any wooden nickels! - don’t do anything stupid! Gams - a woman’s legs Drugstore Cowboy - a guy that hangs around a street corner trying to pick up girls

26

Hotsy-Totsy - pleasing Rag-A-Muffin - a dirty or disheveled individual Now you’re on the trolley! - now you’ve got it!


A&E A&E

REVIEWS A Christmas Carol

Everyone knows the eye-opening tale of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, but never before has it been portrayed with such vivid detail and heartwrenching reality. Disney’s A Christmas Carol does justice to the classic story line by successfully dramatizing Ebenezer Scrooge’s stubborn journey toward self-realization while adding the perfect balance of comedy, action and stunning graphics. The visual quality of the film is a step up from other animated films, such as Polar Express and Beowulf. The 3D effects are nothing but impressive as they give more depth and reality to the characters rather than giving the audience the impression that they will fly out of the screen. And finally, Jim Carrey masterfully brings Ebenezer Scrooge to life in a way that will draw emotion and praise from any audience. -TERRISS FORD

The Vampire’s Assistant

Weezer

Shwazye

This isn’t your ordinary Bella and Edward vampire love story. The Vampire’s Assistance is an exciting tale of a young man, Darren Shan [Chris Massoglia] who is fascinated by a circus show where he sees a wolf-man, bearded lady, and vampire. Larten Crespley [John C. Reilly] convinces Darren to become a halfvampire and become his assistant. The Vampire’s Assistant is a very exciting movie because it encoporates magic, fantasy, and you get to see Salma Hayek with a beard. The movie portrays lost friendships and new adventures into the world of the supernatural.

With a range of songs that sound like 50’s jukebox tunes to dance pop, Weezer’s new album, Ratitude, is bound to have something for all listeners. This album is full of happy songs with quirky lyrics that only Weezer could pull off. Any listener who wants deep meaningful songs aren’t going to find it on this CD. The songs are generic and lean more toward mainstream pop. It’s nothing special; it’s like anything you’d hear on the radio. The album even featured Lil Wayne in “Can’t Stop Partying,” although they didn’t quite pull it off.

Forget the laid back music style of Shwayze’s first self-titled album, his newest album Let It Beat sounds like something you would hear at a club. Excitement pulsated through my veins when I heard that their new album was coming out, but once I heard it I was disappointed. They completely abandoned their old sound; the sound that made them so popular in the first place. The best song on the album is definitely “Livin’ It Up” featuring Snoop Dogg. Shwayze should have stuck with their old sound.

-KAVYA THYAGARAJAN

-SARAH SALMON

-MEGHA GARG

Raditude

Let It Beat

27


ADS ADS

28


Staff

PICKS

Basketball

SPORTS SPORTS Kansas VS. Nebraska

K-State VS. Mizzou

Chiefs VS. Oakland

Kansas VS. Hofstra

Nebraska 31-17

Mizzou 24-20

Chiefs 16-6

Kansas 89-43

Nebraska 21-17

K-State 31-24

Oakland 14-10

Kansas 93-62

Nebraska 38-24

Mizzou 30-17

Oakland 17-13

Kansas 89-47

Marshall Miller The Patriot

Justin Smith KSMS

Jack Hochman Yearbook

SOME SECRETS AREN’T WORTH KNOWING

Andre Agassi. Eight time Grand Slam tennis champion. Olympic gold medalist. The only tennis player to ever complete the Career Golden Slam. And as it turns out, also a former meth addict who hated the game of tennis with a fiery passion. I feel very confident that I would have lived a happy life without

knowing that last part. Agassi has always been one of my favorite tennis players. He’s one of the top five players ever to play the game. His farewell speech at the 2006 US Open was one of best good-byes I’ve ever heard. He never once spoke about himself and his achievements, but instead he addressed the fans and thanked them over and over again. It was impossible not to cry as he walked off the court for the last time. But that was 2006. This is 2009 and Andre has written an

autobiography titled Open. In this book, Agassi admits to taking crystal meth for more than a year. He eludes to having lost matches on purpose. And most importantly, he talks about how he hates tennis, not just hates it, but loathes it with every ounce of his being. I have no idea how a fan like myself is supposed to react to such unexpected honesty. It is obvious that these things have been haunting Andre. With every thing that he admits to having done, one can only assume

that this is a complete soul cleansing. Part of me is hurt and disappointed. I never wanted my image of Agassi to be tainted. He “was” the model tennis player. Charismatic, humble, and incredible. Imagine it coming out that Will Shields and Tony Gonzalez were involved in some triple homicide or that they cheated somehow. It’s the same sort of scenario on a smaller scale. Shields and Gonzalez are two of the most loved and respected local sports figures in recent years,

and it would potentially taint their images forever. But back to the crux of the controversy, the autobiography. In reality this book can’t be solely about making money. One can only speculate to Agassi’s true motives for coming clean. But if I had to put money on the table, I would think, check that, hope that this is Agassi’s way of telling us the truth, whether we wanted to know it or not. -MARSHALL MILLER

29


SPORTS SPORTS Girls’ Golf

Last meet: Kansas State Tournament, 4th place Statistic of the Week: For the second year in a row, the girls team qualified for state as a team with Laura Meschke finishing in twentieth place overall. Molly Schroeder, jr. said, “I think we did well this year. We didn’t do great, we lost a lot of people from last year. I think we did well for what we had.”

Boys’ Cross Country

Record: 95-8 Last meet: Fifth place, Kansas State Championship Meet Statistic of the Week: Senior Andrew Stevens placed second overall at the state meet, marking the highest result of his high school career. Sophomore Michael Gawlick said, “We had an off day for us. And we placed fifth in the state. We would’ve liked first or second but Lawrence had been undefeated all year and they ran really well.”

Girls’ Volleyball

Record: 7-31 Last meet: 25-11 25-17 Loss, Regional Tournament Statistic of the Week: The varsity team closed out their home schedule with a thrilling three-game win over Blue Valley Northwest in the Shawnee Mission South Quad on October 8th. Nicole Reddick, soph. said, “Overall it went pretty well, our team really bonded. We stayed together even during our struggles. Although our record wasn’t the best, we worked hard throughout the season, and there are many good memories for us to look back on.” Senior Will Dubois runs at the Kansas Cross Country State Championship at Rim Rock Farms in Lawrence, Kansas. The boys’ varsity team placed fifth at state and were also regional champions. photo by Emma Hardwick

30


Sports BRIEFS

SPORTS SPORTS Boys’ Soccer

Record: 11-7 Last game: Loss 6-3, Olathe South Statistic of the Week: The boys advanced to the second round of regionals, beating Blue Valley Northwest 1-0, before losing to top ranked Olathe South in the regional final 6-3. Senior Alex Walaszek said, “We’ve worked more as a team this year and have come together as more than just teammates, but as friends.”

Girls’ Cross Country

Record: 74-14 Last meet: 6th place, Kansas State Championship Meet Statistic of the Week: For the second year in a row, the girls team came within fifteen points of placing on the podium at the State meet. Hayley Cline, sr. said, “The season was good up until state. We improved a lot and placed high at all the meets, except for state.”

Boys’ Football

ABOVE: Senior Hayley Cline runs at the State cross country championship at in Rim Rock Farms in Lawrence Kansas. Cline finished seventeenth overall, leading the team to a sixth place finish. BELOW: South’s offense prepares to run a play in the second quarter against Olathe East. South lost 20-13 and finished the season 3-6. photos by Emma Hardwick and Ellie Carter

Record: 3-6 Last game: Loss 20-13, Olathe East Statistic of the Week: After beating Shawnee Mission North and earning its third victory of the year, the football team secured its highest record in over four years. Senior Christian Beardall said, “This year we were more competitive and had a better attitude. But we need to be more accountable, coming to all of the summer practices. That’s our biggest thing to work on. I’m proud of strides we made.”

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Sophomore Lauren Klein performs on the vault at the regional meet. The team placed second overall at regionals and qualified as a team for the state meet. photo by Slade Burns

On top of their game Girls’ gymnastics team finishes fourth at state Newton, Kansas. A town of approximately 25,000 people, 168 miles southwest of Overland Park. Newton also happened to be the site of the 2009 girls’ gymnastics Kansas State Championship. And Newton was the destination for South’s gymnastics team as they qualified for the State meet for the first time in over four years. The team placed fourth overall in the state with junior Kendra Martiny placing fourth on the floor exercise and freshman Monica Funk placing sixth on the vault. Senior Nicole Minardi said, “This is definitely the best team that I’ve ever been a part of. Personally, it was the best meet I’ve ever had. I was really proud of myself and it was a great way to end the year.” The fourth place finished wrapped up a successful season for the team, following up a second place finish at regionals and a third place finish at the league meet.

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Before state, third year head coach Jennifer Terflinger said, “Honestly, regionals was not our best meet. We have a lot more potential than what we displayed. I want us to place in the top three at state. We were just shy of qualifying as a team last year and we did it this year on not our best meet. We have also had the goal all year to break one hundred points and I think we have a lot of momentum to build on.” South finished at State with an overall score of 99.975, finishing just twenty five thousandths of a point short of their goal. But even though the team fell short, they’re not going to write the year off because of it. Funk said, “We were so close to our goals, but we are definitely going to come back strong next year. There are a lot of really good freshmen coming in, and we are just going to continue to grow from there. -MARSHALL MILLER

Senior Nicole Minardi performs on the uneven parallel bars at the regional meet. Minardi is the only senior on the team this year and qualified for state for the first time to end her senior season. photo by Ellie Carter

The Patriot Iss.3  

The Patriot is the voice and visual representation of Shawnee Mission Southd

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