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Taking a Stand

4

Teacher Philosophies

Patriot the

shawnee mission south | DECEMBER 2010 | volume 45 | issue 4

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December Contents Issue 04

05

12 Editor-in-Chief Opinions Terriss Ford

Photos Emma Hardwick Ellie Carter

0 4 | NEW S BRIEFS

News Jimmy Langton

Web Design Patrick Weaver

05 | ON THE WEB

Features Davey Jackson

Staff Writers Alma Velazquez Hunter Young Hannah Strader

Design A&E Danielle Pham Sports Casey Lee Ads Ashley Black

Current happenings in and out of school

Web-only new and upcoming features

06 | AIRPOR T IN-SECURITIES

Full-body scanners put Staff Photographers into perspective Grace Pritchett Emily Jackson 07 | BREAKING Adviser Jennifer Funk

BOUNDARIES

Staff member urges her peers to branch out

06

07

08

10

11

13

14

15

08 | TEACHER FEATURE

Discover the teaching methods of some South educators

10 | BUNDLING UP

13 | SPOR T S B R I E F S A recent update on winter sports

Patriot

8

15

14 | RISE O F T H E WRES TLERS

11| WINTER W ONDERL AND

15 | ROCKIN G O U T

The latest in movies and music

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SHAWNEE MISSION SOUTH | DECEMBER 2010 | VOLUME 45 | ISSUE 4

Wrestling team begins season with high hopes

12 | REVIEW S

4

Teacher Philosophies

the

Hot styles for cold weather

Prairie Village house displays holiday spirit

Taking a Stand

An intimate glimpse into the life of a school mascot

16 | SPO TLI G H T

Headstart participant bonds with local child

O N T H E CO V E R :

Senior Tre Humphrey prepares to pin his Olathe South opponent. photo by Ellie Carter

CONTENT S |DECEMBER 2010 | 3


x-ray

craze

TSA imposes new invasive security measures

Changes in national security measures taken by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) have given rise to a storm of discontent among airline travelers. Seemingly intrusive body scans and enhanced pat downs have caused many to question the lengths that must be taken to ensure safety in the skies. Last March, the TSA began issuing new machines capable of producing high-quality full-body images, which can detect weapons and other dangerous materials during airport security screenings. According to the TSA, the purpose of the scanners is to help provide a safe traveling experience. Since the installation of these scanners, people have debated whether they are a necessary precaution or simply invasive. Along with concerns regarding the images there has also been discontent with the way TSA employees have carried out the measures. While standard procedures are supposed to govern the way employees use the scanners and administer pat downs, reports of misconduct have sprung up. In 2009, U.S. Marshalls in charge of body scanners at a Florida airport leaked nearly 35,000 images produced by the scanners. While the images did not show anything revealing, the incident did prove that because the

photos could be saved and viewed by the public, the system is prone to misuse. Government teacher Tony Budetti said if the TSA does not respond appropriately to concerns, they will face continued anger from the flying public. “I just went through security on my way to Tampa and noticed a young child being frisked aggressively,” Budetti said. “I thought common sense had left the building. The system is not working, and poor TSA practice will lead to less cooperation from the public.” Despite initial resistance, however, a recent Washington-Post-ABC News poll showed 64 percent of Americans support the new scanners. Though half continue to maintain the pat downs go too far. Even so, the TSA maintains the measures are just another step in ensuring public safety. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said in a recent press release, “Deploying advanced imaging technology at these airports strengthens our ability to protect the traveling public in the face of evolving threats to aviation security.” by Terriss Ford

take a

STAND

New activism club speaks out against genocide

When senior Sam Reichman’s dad mentioned the Genocide Intervention Network over the summer, Reichman knew he wanted to do something. But, like many students, he was busy with activities, like cross country. After the season ended, however, he knew it was time to make a change and organize STAND, the student led division of the network. He registered as a member online, held an informational meeting, and began trying to make an impact. “[STAND’s] goal is to create a lasting and responsive anti-genocide constituency, meaning that we are working with all these students across the nation in order to get them informed and mobilized so that when genocides occur, we can advocate to our elected officials,” Reichman said. Junior Daniel Kusko attended the informational meeting and joined because of the group’s broad focus. “I just felt like it was a good group because it covers all the areas of human genocide and not just a specific area,” he said. Sponsor and Arabic teacher Anni Hasan feels as passionate about the cause as the students. Though STAND meetings are student-led, Hasan felt sponsoring a group with an anti-genocide message was a great idea and wishes she could have been part of a similar group in her high school. “I’m always passionate about peace and humanitarian work, so this is the type of organization 4 |NOVEMBER 2010 | NEW S

that I would want to be a sponsor of,” Hasan said. “Really, I’m just extremely impressed with our student body to even think of something like this. It was on their own. I didn’t approach the students, the students approached me.” One of the motives behind such student involvement may be the commonly used term that genocide has become. Students hear this word frequently, whether from history class or on CNN. One of the most recent genocides is the Rwandan genocide of 1994 in which 800,000 citizens were killed over the span of 100 days. It was this particular genocide that put the STAND movement in motion. STAND, which currently has 31 members, has met twice so far, during which they came up with ideas for events and fundraisers. But Reichman said their current goal is to contact state senators in the hopes of getting them to co-sponsor senate concurrent resolution 71, which states that it is in the national interest of the United States to prevent human genocide. “We’re a bit more focused working on advocating to elected officials, meaning that instead of doing mostly fundraisers and awareness [...] we also want to get legislation through our government,” Reichman said. Kusko said that although fundraisers are not the main focus, ideas have been circulating. “We talked about what kind of fundraisers we

could have, like bake sales or activities like calling senators and talking about congress bills to help prevent genocide,” Kusko said. Hasan has a hopeful attitude toward the group and the awareness its raising. “There’s a lot of different things they’ve been thinking about and going about planning, like sending out letters, petitions, making phone calls, putting out posters, a lot of that,” she said. Keeping such a large group motivated for a cause that doesn’t specifically involve them seems like it would be a big challenge, but Reichman is confident in what he started. “What keeps us motivated is the fact that the world still has a lot of problems, basically. As long as there are going to be human rights abuses, we are going to be actively trying to stop them,” he said. “I would encourage anyone who is concerned about human rights abuses or really just anything they see wrong with this world to talk to a STAND member or to me and join up.” by Hannah Strader


Take a picture of yourself, friends or family during Winter break while you’re on vacation or just relaxing in Kansas, and you could get featured online on the front page! Just send your picture on an attachment via e-mail to smspatriot@smsd.org with a brief description of the photo and your name.

SOUTH TALENT A display of the most talent South has to offer. The photo essay is a collaboration of photography done by Grace Pritchett and Emma Hardwick. The winner for 2010’s show was the South drumline. Be sure to check out more shots from our photographers on our website www.smspatriot.org.

OUR WHAT’S ON THEIR If you gotta... SHOP ETSY SITE: http://www.etsy.com/ A site for quality hand-made goods and other merchandise ranging from art to pet items.

GROUPON SITE: http://www.groupon.com/ Sign up to receive a daily e-mail offering 50 to 90 percent off local goods and services.

RETAIL ME NOT SITE: http://www.retailmenot.com/ Search for coupons at more than 65,000 stores across the globe. Popular stores are listed, helping you sort through the site easily.

*

PICTURE WITH A PATRIOT

WEB

KNOW WHAT’S APPIN’IN ANGRY BIRDS Seek revenge on the green pigs who have stolen the Angry Birds’ eggs. This app is available for all Apple handheld devices and on the Android market.

CUT THE ROPE A fun puzzle game where the objective is to get a piece of candy into a mysterious green creature’s mouth. Available for all Apple handheld devices.

INFINITY BLADE Go on an adventure to overthrow the God King in his dark citadel. This app is available on all Apple handheld devices.

CRAM

KHAN ACADEMY

SITE: http://www.khanacademy.org/ This site has videos on any subject of math. Perfect for an emergency study session for tomorrow’s test.

QUIZLET

SITE: http://quizlet.com/

Useful for learning vocab terms and studying foreign languages. The site is extremely interactive.

SHMOOP SITE: http://www.shmoop.com/ Helpful for those who are studying for the SAT or ACT, but has a large array of subjects to explore.


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1 1. Mrs. Hilty presents a visual Powerpoint to her physical science class. 2. Madame Gehr uses games to help her students learn French vocabulary. 3. Mr. Allen leads his honors English class on a discussion over A Tale of Two Cities. 4. Ms. Anderson and her former student, Elizabeth Allen, sr., discuss one of their favorite books before school. 5. Mrs. Hilty carefully demonstrates an experiment for her class. photos by Grace Pritchett

5


art teaching the

of

A

quick glance around a typical high school classroom sparks many thoughts. Most classes have a blend of several types of students: the two guys yelling across the room, the quiet girl who writes in her journal, and the gossiping best friends. In the middle of it all, stands the teacher, just as different as the students. The teacher however, is rarely thought of. While some are chatty and social, others incite laughter, and others stick strictly to teaching. Just like each class holds a diverse group of students, the school itself is home to a variety of different teachers, each with his or her own style. New research from the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory shows that there are several teaching methods with proven success such as creating orderly classroom settings and providing opportunities for group work and to apply learned skills — all tactics utilized by several SMS teachers.

Creative Curriculum

Marissa Gehr, known as Madame by students taking French, describes her teaching style as adapting to the needs of her students in order to help them reach a final goal. Her approach begins with determining these needs. “I’m not going to reach every student in the same way. Some students respond to different things than others,” she said. Her class projects and activities reflect this idea, as she tries to mix games and group work into her curriculum. “I remember as a student myself, I always enjoyed when I could work in a group, or do something handson, or move around or play a game just to make the monotony of the day a little bit easier to handle,” she said. Studies conducted by neuroscientist Sara Bernard show that group work turns the classroom into a positive environment where kids are motivated to learn. Physical Science teacher Beverly Hilty, however, feels her situation is a bit different. Filled with large, bright, informative posters, her classroom demands hard work and serious thinking from her students; she doesn’t feel group work is an option until individual understanding is in place. “If they don’t work on it individually, then they don’t have the reality of what their job really is [in a group]. If they work cooperatively with someone, they’re going to take a free ride on what that person does a lot of the time. So I think the individual part is very important,” Hilty said. Aside from her classroom decorations, she also likes to incorporate visual elements in her assignments. An example of this is Hilty’s representation of ionic bonds

as a bride and a groom. She said identifying with a familiar concept helps students grasp new, abstract ones. Bernard’s research also shows that tying new learning to existing issues in students’ lives helps them situate themselves and create learning goals. Sophomore English teacher of 35 years, Keith Allen also strives to tie his teaching to real life. He prepares students for the future by incorporating what he feels are life skills into his curriculum. “I hope what we’re looking at would be lifelong learning. So if we go into a research project, we’re not doing it just for the sake of doing our research project; it’s about trying to show them [...] how to document articles. It doesn’t have to be re-taught to them, they can do this almost off the top of their head,” he said. He also recognizes the importance of both structure and enjoyment in the classroom setting. Describing his style as serious yet silly, he tries to show students how to have fun with English. “My kind of Golden Rule is I always take this job very seriously, but I never take myself too seriously,” he said. “Many teachers do; they don’t let their hair down. They can’t laugh at their own silliness. Kids are silly, so are adults.” Similarly, junior English teacher Amy Anderson utilizes her quirky enthusiasm to discuss life issues with students during class. “I would say my teaching style is inspiring, based on looking at something not just in an intellectual point of view but trying to make it alive. That’s my goal,” she said. Studies show that this type of learning, with light moods and discussions, helps challenge students in a positive way.

S t u d e n t - Te a c h e r B o n d s

Another aspect of teaching is how to deal with the students in addition to the curriculum. This is generally where students make the most distinction between their teachers. Hilty, who describes herself as traditional, waits until later in the year to establish a certain closeness with students. “The first of the year it’s pretty businesslike, and I’m not too friendly,” she said. “But when we get past Halloween then I kind of loosen up. I try to be a little more humorous and friendly with them.” She feels the relationship between student and teacher is much like that of a married couple. “Well, it’s just like [marriage]. The success of getting married [is based on communication]. How is that going to come down? There’s so many factors involved,” she said. In contrast, Anderson jumps right into the social atmosphere she feels high school has to offer. Though

Four South educators discuss their personal approaches toward teaching she admits her knowledge of current pop culture is relatively little, she doesn’t feel it affects her efforts to get to know each student. “I think that my students trust me as a person that’s kindhearted and really cares about them. So I do a lot to get to know students individually,” she said. However, Anderson also recognizes the dangers of becoming too social with students and losing authority as a consequence. “There’s a difference between being chummy and being friendly and kind,” she said. “And I think being chummy is dangerous, but being friendly and kind in a way that’s still commanding respect is necessary.” Gehr also hopes to establish strong, positive relationships with each student. She feels she is receptive to her students’ issues and helps as much as she can. “I would say the hardest thing is not being able to help them at home. I can only help them when I’m with them,” she said. “I can only give them positive vibes and send them off thinking, ‘Madame Gehr cares about me and what I’m feeling like.’” As a foreign language teacher, Gehr has opportunities to build ties with students outside of school such as international trips, French Club and French Honors Society. “A lot of those students don’t come after school to hang out so [extracurricular activities] give me a chance to get to know them more personally outside the setting with everyone in class. I definitely feel like I can connect with them in class, but I think that outside interaction helps,” she said. Allen has a somewhat different approach when creating bonds with students, preferring to stress the material taught rather than working to create more comfortable relationships. “I used to worry that the students didn’t like me, [but] now I don’t care. Liking me is not important; liking our curriculum to me is very important,” he said. “When you get old, you don’t feel the need to be liked. My own children might not like me, but they know that what I’m doing for them is the right thing. Now, students don’t come and tell me about their boyfriend or girlfriend problems, but they might come to me when they need help on important projects.” Differences like these highlight each teacher’s individual personality. With such variety, certain teachers are more prone to criticism than others, usually as a consequence of being misunderstood. Though at times difficult to see, all teachers care for their students and only act on what they feel is best for the student to learn as much as possible. Hilty said, “I try really hard to get around, to see as many people as I can, to call on them, to ask questions of them, to show them I care whether they’re getting it or not.” By Alma Velazquez

FEATURES | DECEMBER 2010 | 9


winter

lookbook beat the blustery blues in high style with these winter looks

peacoat - $70, Deliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s metallic scarf - $8, Forever 21 cable knit mittens - $13, Gap

peacoat - $90, PacSun flannel scarf - $10, Old Navy leather gloves - $20, Target

10 | DECEMBER 2010 | A&E

puffer coat - $149, The North Face cashmere cap - $20, Target leather gloves - $58, Nordstrom

cropped-sleeve coat - $150, modcloth.com felt cloche hat - $34, Urban Outfitters long button gloves - $12, Sears

puffer coat - $60, American Eagle peruvian hat - $13, JC Penney convertible gloves - $24, Urban Outfitters

military-style coat - $33, Aeropostale trapper hat - $20, JC Penney navajo scarf - $28, Urban Outfitters


feel electric

Think Vince and Associatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s light display is impressive? Instead of going corporate, try a local wonder. At 76th Street and Falmouth is a gem that has been around for more than 40 years. Prairie Village native Mike Babick, 69, spends a month decorating his house to create a Christmas display like no other, equipped with neon lights and more than 1,000 animatronic figures. photos by Emily Jackson


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Sports

Boy’s Basketball

Record: 1-2 Most Memorable Moment: Probably our

Briefs

victory on Friday when our best player Jake got hurt and our kids responded and showed a lot of resilience and fought through that horrible moment and just played together as a team. Stand-out Players: Dylan Christie and Jake Reid

Upcoming Games and What to Expect:

Olathe Northwest, Friday, Dec. 17 and Shawnee Mission Northwest, Tuesday, Dec. 21 and they’re both very good. Now with Jake out , we hope younger guys will step up and fill that void and hopefully we’ll be successful. -- Brett McFall --Friday Dec. 10, during the game against Mill Valley, senior Jake Reid was injured. We love you Jake, and you have our undying support.

Bowling

Record: First match on Tuesday, January 11. Most Memorable Moment: Lots of

talented freshman and sophomores trying out as well as five of the six top girls from last year and two of the top boys from last year. Stand-out Players: Girls- Shelby Byrnes and Jessie Steffee Boys- Eric Steffee and Nick Brown

Upcoming Games andWhat to Expect:

Tuesday, January 11, against Shawnee Mission North and Sumner Academy. I feel optimistic. Our goal this year is to get back to State for both boys and girls. Last year we placed eighth and this year, if we don’t get first, we want to be in the top three. -- Kent Thompson

Girl’s Basketball

Record: 1-1 Most Memorable Moment: I feel like we

got off to a really good start in the first game, probably the most threes that we’ve ever scored in a game. Stand-out Players: Mariah Marusak and Emmy Allen are kind of leading us.

Upcoming Games and What to Expect:

Monday, December 13, against Shawnee Mission East. If we go play well and play hard we’ll be okay. -- Ron Millard

Patrick O’Connor swims freestyle during a meet against Lawrence Free State. photo by Grace Pritchett

Swimming

Record: Third in the Lawrence Free State Invitational and winner of the dual against Shawnee Mission West. Most Memorable Moment: None stick out, but all of the members have been progressing well. Stand-out Players: Patrick O’Connor, Tommy Leach and Alex Brown

Upcoming Games and What to Expect: Monday at East Invitational. Most of the top teams in the state will be there and I am hoping we will get some qualifying times for State. -- Bruce Bove

Wrestling

Record: 4-3 Most Memorable Moment: Watching

wrestlers defeat someone who they have lost to before. Stand-out Players: Everyone on the team; returning state qualifiers and varsity letter-man.

Upcoming Games and What to Expect:

Johnson County Classic, to improve on last year’s finish. -- Joel Rios

S P O R T S | D E C E M B E R 2 010 | 13


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Photo by Emma Hardwick

“Headstart was fun and I think the kids really had a great time. I like to influence kids’ lives positively.” Senior Deaven Jensen shows off with his breakdancing Headstart buddy Tyree.


December Issue