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The Field Guide to Hacking BY MICHELLE POON

F o r e w o r d   b y  M i t c h   A l t m a n


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Copyright Š 2018 by Michelle Poon ISBN-13: 978-988-78713-0-9 Any other trademarks or trade names mentioned are the property of their respective owners. Unless otherwise stated, this work is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit creativecommons.org (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by-nc/3.0/) or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California 94041, USA. Unless otherwise stated, source code is licenced under the GNU Lesser General Public License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/LGPL/2.1/) as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2.1 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

The Fi el d Gui de to Hac k i ng


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T h e   F i e l d   G u i d e t o   H a c k i n g

MICHELLE POON VERSION 1.0 GENERATED ON 01.05.2018 This project is supported by DESIGN TRUST, an initiative of the Hong Kong Ambassadors of Design


The Fi el d Gui de to Hac k i ng

“If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” Carl Sagan, opening episode 9 (“The Lives of Stars”) of Cosmos: A Personal Voyage, 1980

Hacking has many different forms and flavours, so naturally the products of these exercises run the gamut. Therefore, to make identification slightly easier, the projects have general labels applied to designate the overall context of which they exist within: • • • • •

Coding / Software Electrical Engineering Fabrication (Digital / Analogue) Recycle / Upcycle Open-source1 / Shanzhai

The first three categories are rather straightforward and physically evident in most hackerspaces. The standard activity of coding, engineering and making is what brings each of these projects to life, and thus hopefully those who attempt these projects will have some basic understanding of each, to a certain degree. This assumes that if one were to tackle a Fabrication project, there would be an inherent technician who could further demonstrate the intricacies of woodworking, 3D printing, laser cutting and what not far better than it could in here. The last two categories are more conceptual, in that their purpose frames the context of which these ideas were seeded—Recycle / Upcycle focuses on repurposing found objects beyond its original intent (emphasis on "found"). Shanzhai (山寨) is within the notion of hacking, though within the Chinese cultural context whereby most positively could be described as the rapid and flexible ecosystem of reiteration and negatively described as knock-off clones. So to conjoin the term into the category of Open-source / Shanzhai, this refers to the concept of democratising innovation, or opening up access to particular technologies that are unnecessarily bound to certain statuses. In general, the projects documented within this book are personal endeavours that were pursued for the sake of curiosity and exploration and as such were governed by rather sporadic work schedules, leading to the point where documentation itself has become, at times, another project in itself. These works by various engineers, designers, artists and scientists—active in the Dim Sum Labs and surrounding community—are intended to serve as a representative overview on the subject of hacking and a source of inspiration. So for the sake of simplicity, projects that require additional software will be noted, along with the requisite libraries, but will assume you have done a local install. They consist of instructional projects, anecdotal narratives, incomplete explorations and divergent discussions—the variety of experiences that you would normally encounter in our community space. 1 There can be an extended debate on the usage of this term versus “FOSS” (free and open-source software), just as much as “hackerspace” can be debated with “makerspace”, but for the purpose of this particular label, “open-source” merely refers to “opening the source of something” and not inclusive of all the political nuances. To that extent, technology also refers to a broad field which includes general equipment and knowledge, rather than simply “computing”.


§

Each project in this book begins with an introductory circular image; also indicated here with a coloured label on the right side (explained on the opposite page). The bold text below indicate essay chapters, which serve as interludes between different project themes, setting the tone for: general electronics, artworks, recyclables, inclusivity, science, and unfinished business. They also serve as brief respite for those who wish to learn more about hacking, but not necessarily in the physical, empirical way.

open-source / shanzhai

recycle / upcycle

fabrication (digital / analogue)

Acknowledgements   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7 Foreword   |  Mitch Altman  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8 Introduction   |  Michelle Poon  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14 Button Badge  |  Lionello  Lunesu  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20 Uranium Marble Ring Oscillator  |  Wilhelm  Klein  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   26 Kilowatt Counter  |  Tom  Tobback  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  32 DIY 3D Scanner  |  Nicolas  Ziegler  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  40 Maneki-neko  |  Manolis Perrakis  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  48 Tokywatch  |  Eduardo Alarcon  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .  54 Saccharin City: Hong Kong, Part 1     |  Michelle Poon  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   62 Skin-Mount Technology   |  Folkert Saathoff  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  74 Lasercut Lanterns  |  LiLMiPMaP + Brian Tang  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .  76 WiFi Lights  |  Lionello Lunesu  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  82 You Have Pressure, I Have Pressure: Hacking, Art & Activism in Hong Kong     |  Daniel Howe  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   92 WiFi Shredder  |  Manolis Perrakis  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  100 Qualia  |  Luca Bertini  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  106 F I E L D  |  Michelle Poon + Savio Woo  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  114 Sound Swarm  |  LiLMiPMaP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .  120 Reconfiguring Culture/Tech: Feminist Approaches to Design and Engineering     |  Sarah Fox  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  134 Blinkini  |  Naomi “SexyCyborg” Wu  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  140 Inclusive Young Maker Education  |  Brian Tang  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  148 Genomes: The Next Hacking Frontier in the Land of the Bauhinia     |  Scott Edmunds  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  158 Laser Quadrat for Coral Reef Mapping  |  Cesar Jung-Harada  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  170 Anthroponix  |  Markus Wernli + Sarah   Daher  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   178 Open Hardware Experimental Physics  |  Sébastien Bourdeauducq  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   186 Eye-Deep  |  Mathis Antony + Stephan Brüggemann  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  192 Dim Sum Labs Memories: Joys and Tribulations of an Open Lab     |  Luis Felipe Murillo  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  202 Epilogue   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  222

coding / software

C O N T E N T S

electronic engineering

Stay tuned to this symbol for more thematic meta-text!


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The Fi el d Gui de to Hac k i ng

Limited Edition versions of The Field Guide to Hacking contain an outer sleeve embedded with F I E L D, a collaborative project by Michelle Poon + Savio Woo. The source of inspiration is two-fold: to be meta about a book on hacking, it should be literally hackable (or at the very least, interactive); secondly, the Dim Sum Labs logo1 features a 5552 IC timer, which is the core of F I E L D3.  Why Dim Sum? We’ve heard many metaphors using this quintessential culinary adventure of Hong Kong—turning food bloggers into poets, lauding pillows of bao, bouncy morsels of ha gao, and slippery cheung fun in pools of sesame-soy sauce. Likely because the whole event is a little circus of abundance and technical prowess, of many bits and bites served up in bamboo baskets, that goes on as much or as little as you take. So Dim Sum Labs, of many bits and bytes, come together somehow with our different philosophies, characters, and therefore, projects, for the same reason: to hack.

1 The logo, designed by Manolis Perrakis, is the silhouette of a BBQ pork bun (叉燒包) on top of a 555 IC timer. 2 The image (left) was taken during the 2015 Microwave New Media Arts Festival, joint-exhibtor/artist Nicholas Hanna rode his Water Calligraphy Device with the message, 叉燒包555, which is be the textbased version of the Dim Sum Labs logo. 3

Further details can be found in the F I E L D project chapter.


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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The ideas for and within this book have been bubbling and simmering within all the dirty, fantastic explorations that have bounced around the walls of 100/F Jervois Street—but of course, we strive to play, explore and educate—not document. And frankly, the official Dim Sum Labs GitHub repository is a bit of a mess, but that is the product of a self-organisational community. So of course there has been a lot of help along the way, consisting of research, inspiration and execution. Fundamentally, this points to the members of Dim Sum Labs who continuously challenge the status quo and ask questions (sometimes the questions no one wants to hear). In particular, Mathis Antony, Manolis Perrakis and Wilhelm Klein, who have been my most trusted fellows throughout the experience at this nebulous community, providing intellectual, emotional, and administrative support. Thank you for all those memories, along with the Rolodex of emotions and bizarre situations that we laugh about now. The characters who planted the seeds also deserve notable mention, this includes Sunny Cheung, Tom Grek, Alex Hornstein, Julian Lee, David Leung, William Liang, Alex List, and Stewart Mackenzie (sorry, if I forgot someone). Without all of their efforts, there wouldn’t have been a community to join in the first place. I am thankful to those who provide perspective and outside commentary to all that I do. So a big hearty thanks to Kai Sun Luk and Wilhelm Klein for critical feedback, providing (in)sanity and keeping things real (tangible). As well to Tobias Klein, for initiating this snowball. You didn't quite open the door, but you showed me where it was. I am extremely grateful to Design Trust for their support, not only for their patience and generosity, but to their sheer enthusiasm in making more space in the world to develop ideas like this one, to run an active platform that encourages and supports the greater design ecosystem, and making it all possible to engage with a wider public audience. Thank you for heating up those molecules of creativity to bounce and crash into one another and the support from Marisa Yiu, Mavis Wong, Joyce Li, et al. Finally, this publication wouldn’t exist without its contributors, those within and surrounding the Dim Sum Labs community. For better or for worse, our colliding personalities and characteristics is what fills the space with its infinite liveliness. To all the contributors and collaborators, of both spirit and content, I am particularly appreciative towards for their patience, knowledge, support and development of this project. In alphabetical order: Eduardo Alarcon, Mitch Altman, Mathis Antony, Luca Bertini, Sébastien Bourdeauducq, Stephan Brüggemann, Hamish Coleman, Sarah Daher, Scott Edmunds, Sarah Fox, Cesar Jung-Harada, Adam Höse, Daniel Howe, Wilhelm Klein, Lionello Lunesu, Luis Felipe Murillo, Manolis Perrakis, Folkert Saathoff, Brian Tang, Tom Tobback, Susanna Trumpf, Markus Wernli, Savio Woo, Naomi Wu, and Nicolas Ziegler. ^__^


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The Fi el d Gui de to Hac k i ng

M i t c h   A l t m a n

FOREWORD This book took a lot of time and energy to write! Lucky for me, I was merely asked to write this foreword. I’m a lazy bastard. That is why I love hackerspaces—I don’t have to be the one to do all of the work. Back in 2007, when I helped create Noisebridge, one of the early hackerspaces in the US, I knew I didn’t want to be the leader. That’s way too much work. Instead, everyone is empowered to do all the cool things. And, at the beginning, to help start Noisebridge, all I had to do was put out the word, say it was a cool idea, and help organize meetings. And give a bunch of workshops. And be the treasurer for the first two years. And build a bunch of stuff. And lots of other stuff. But so many others were doing everything else that was important to do, and the stuff I did was all the stuff I was good at! And all the stuff I thought was way worthwhile. And fun! This is what happens when people come together in community and support each other to do the cool things we do at hackerspaces. This is called “DO-ocracy”1. This shit works! Which is why we do it at hackerspaces all over the world. If we need help, or need to learn more to do it better, there is always someone around to ask for help. We can do a lot on our own. And in a community, we can do so much more. Here we are, over 10 years since the founding of Noisebridge, and there are now thousands more hackerspaces in the world. Of course, sometimes people might call them “makerspaces”, but whatever you call them, they are physical places with vibrant communities that encourage people to explore and do things that each person finds way cool, way meaningful, way wonderful. Obviously, making a thing is cool, but hackerspaces are about so much more than just making a thing—they are all about their communities. It includes the tools for making things, and the making of the things comes from people coming together. Since helping start Noisebridge, whenever and wherever I travel all over the world I visit local hackerspaces, or visit people wanting to start a hackerspace. These are some of the more delightful people on our planet. And so many cool things are going on in the communities they form. Each community is unique. Yet, all are supportive. And all hackerspaces continue to help each other. We teach, we learn, we share. And so many interesting projects come from hackerspaces as a result—from the magical combination of community and creative expression. When I give interviews I’m often asked, “What is your favorite project from a hackerspace?” This question, to me, misses the point. There are, indeed, lots of way cool projects at hackerspaces, but it’s not about ones that I think are the coolest. It’s about what each creator personally feels is way cool. Those people are highly motivated to learn all they need to learn to make their project as awesome as possible. And awesome projects are the obvious outcome.

1 Unlike democracy, this is not about (s)elected officials. This also is not meritocracy, since it’s not about being the best. Instead, you do it because it’s an idea you feel is worth DOing.


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I’ve been traveling to China every year since 2003 to manufacture TV-B-Gone universal remote controls2. In 2009, I thought it would be interesting for hackers from all over the world to join me and see what China has to offer, and Hacker Trips To China have been happening ever since. As our group travels around, we are often asked to talk about our projects and our communities to inspire people abroad to do cool things. The more we did that, the more we’ve been invited to do this more. Other communities started to get involved. And before long, the first hackerspaces in China and the rest of Asia were appearing, of course, including Dim Sum Labs. Now there are thousands around the world! Because of this, there are a growing number of opportunities for more people, everywhere. One of the wonderful things about this book is that it presents a lot of awesome projects, each created by someone who felt their project was way worth creating. Whether it is practical, helpful, just-for-fun, challenging, or simple—each person felt motivated to create their project, and share it. Most importantly, it all happened in the supportive community of a hackerspace: Dim Sum Labs, a way cool hackerspace in Hong Kong. – Mitch Altman, riding on a train approaching Berlin, December 2017

2 TV-B-Gone universal remote controls are an invention of mine. They are keychains that turn off TVs in public places. These became popular enough that 12 friends and I have made a living from this project for the past 13 years.


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Images (previous page): Photos of Dim Sum Labs from Hacker Trips to China (HTTC) 2015 and Beijing Tsinghua Makers' Day, Nov 2017. Courtesy of Mitch Altman. Images: On the rooftop of Dim Sum Labs from HTTC 2017. Courtesy of Savio Woo.

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ďťż

§

Here begins section one, a range of projects that involve the things one would probably come across in a hackerspace—general electronics including soldering, LEDs, Arduino, and maybe some dancing cats? Some projects might be a little more purposeful than others, but then again, making something cool is a purpose in itself.

O

N

E


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Image: Button badge (v.1) with and without LEDs Image (opposite): Members assisting junior workshop participants

The Fi el d Gui de to Hac k i ng


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L i o n e l l o   L u n e s u

DSL BUTTON B A D G E

Like many other hackerspaces, we run workshops from time-to-time not just for the purpose of expanding the community or sharing knowledge, but also as an additional source of revenue. Like most hackerspaces, we always have heaps of LEDs on hand—sometimes from donors, sometimes from misplaced orders, and at one time because a certain online DIY community sent us a giant boxful. In the past, we would encourage our junior visitors to decorate their drawings or laser-cut cardboard with LED throwies—simply an LED fixed onto a coin battery that can be magnetised and stuck anywhere. Eventually this matured into the quasi-official Dim Sum Labs Button Badge, where any one of the members could order a set and run the workshop themselves. Or even you could, since the PCB schematics (and much more) is completely open access.


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Image: Uranium Marble Ring Oscillator with 9V battery

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W i l h e l m   K l e i n

U R A N I U M MARBLE RING OSCILLATOR

What does it do? It glows blue/violet and green, looks like some sort of Iron-Man style Arc reactor and is just generally awesome. Using a bunch of simulated NOT-Gates, UV LEDs and an uranium-enriched glass marble, this pendant creates the illusion of a spinning radioactive element in the middle—completely analogue and without the need for any microchips. This project has a preliminary description on logic gates, as it uses an odd-numbered series of NOT gates. A ring oscillator is required to have an odd number of inverters so the last output is different from the first input, whereas if there were an even number, it would stabilise the signal and hold their value (thus not oscillation). A diagram for these explanations follow.


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The Fi el d Gui de to Hac k i ng

LIST OF PARTS A - 9V battery B - uranium-enriched glass marble C - (7) UV LED D - (7) 2N7000 MOSFET1 E - (7) 300 ohm resistor F - (7) 200K ohm resistor G - (7) 0.47 capacitor H - (1.5 m) 22 gauge copper wire I - battery connector EQUIPMENT • needle-nosed pliers • clamp • helping hands • soldering iron

B A

C E

D

DIRECTIONS  To give some background information on logic gates, there is a short lesson on the next page with Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 indicating how this all works.

F

But if you want to skip to the fun stuff, the circuit diagram is below that. At first, it might seem daunting to look at, but it’s really the same few components repeated into a loop. Also, as a word of caution, the last time we had this workshop, it took 12 hours. You’d better pack a lunch.

G I

Our hackerspace, like many others, typically have a junk pile lingering in the corner with a plethora of broken electronics and abandoned cables, we normally harvest our wire by finding suitable gauges and stripping off the insulation. 

1

Also referred to as a transistor.

H


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Urani um Marbl e Ri ng Os c illa t o r

(Refer to Fig. 1) A NOT gate (also often called Inverter) is a logic gate. It takes one input signal. In logic, there are usually two states, 0 and 1. The gate therefore sends 1 as output, if it receives 0 as input. Alternatively it received 1 as input, and sends 0 as output. Just to compare with the AND gate, where a 0 input presides over a 1 input. Conversely, the OR gate has a 1 input presiding over a 0 input. (Refer to Fig. 2) A ring oscillator is a device composed of an odd number of NOT gates whose output oscillates between two voltage levels, representing true and false. The NOT gates, or inverters, are attached in a chain; the output of the last inverter is fed back into the first.

Figure 1. Logic gates

At first, the diagram might be a bit overwhelming to digest, but it’s really the same group repeated 7 times and linked in sequence.

This is the battery. It’s 9V because this should be available to everyone, is quite safe, and without the need for anything else as fancy as LiPo chargers. In principle, any type of battery and voltage would work as well, you’ll just have to play with the right combination of resistor, and capacitor to get the desired speed of “rotation” and make sure your MOSFET works at whatever voltage you go for.

Figure 2. Odd series of NOT gates

2N7000 and the contents within the circle refers to the MOSFET, therefore S, G and D refer to source, gate and drain, respectively.

The marble sits in the middle, here we indicate it sitting on ground.

When you put a signal on the gate, then source and drain can conduct.

The squiggly arrow refers to the LED—without that, it would only refer to a diode. The zig-zag line refers to the resistor, with the annotation indicating ohm value. Capacitor


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The Fi el d Gui de to Hac k i ng

“When the  rules that 

bind

  y o u r   a c t i o n  are suddenly lifted, y o u   a r e   g i v e n   t h e 

f r e e d o m   to redefine  everything." 1


You Hav e Pres s ure, I H a ve Pr e s s u r e

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The background image and quote refer to the Umbrella Revolution (雨傘革命), the student-initiated sit-in protests in the Autumn of 2014, for electoral reform and civil liberties. A noticeable presence of art and collective cordiality born during the protests were afforded perhaps by the resplendence of free time (what else to occupy your time, while occupying the street?) and a particularly narrow message (focused collective vision). Art allows stillness of the moment, an intimate conversation with the zeitgeist, with a yellow umbrella distinctively marking the series of events. In this set of scenes, the aesthetic practise of public art holds the conversation for political and social change—the imagery of such productivity is neatly packaged to carry across communication channels, allowing the narrative to persist. If public street art is the apotheosis of accessibility, hacking is an alternative form of expression which naturally nurtures exchanges between technologists and artists2. Of the three elements—student activism, art and hacking—I’m not able to describe it any better than Daniel Howe, in “You Have Pressure, I Have Pressure”. 1 Artist Wen Yau to South China Morning Post, “Occupy sparks creative burst”, published on October 06, 2014. 2 Guthrie, Cameron (2014): "Empowering the hacker in us: a comparison of fab lab and hackerspace ecosystems." In: 5th LAEMOS (Latin American and European Meeting on Organization Studies) Colloquium, Havana Cuba.


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Image: Mapping corals with a laser quadrat in the water tanks at SWIMS.

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C e s a r   J u n g - H a r a d a

LASER QUADRAT FOR CORAL REEF M A P P I N G The interest in mapping coral reefs is the concern with any changes to coral formation (size, shape) and health (colour). Most structures that we call “coral” are, in fact, made up of hundreds of thousands of tiny coral creatures called polyps that live on the seafloor. They usually live in shallow water, where conditions are optimal for their growth. Coral reef scientists currently use a cumbersome, intrusive quadrat—physically dropping a plastic/metal frame—potentially damaging coral while trying to study and protect it. Corals take years to regenerate, yet can be damaged in mere seconds. What would be the purpose of measuring coral health when it is being damaged in the process of it? In conjunction with students from the HK Harbour School (http://ths.edu.hk), a prototype of a laser quadrat was developed as a proof of concept for non-invasive, lightweight, harmless coral study. It is expected that lasers are no more intrusive than a camera flash, whereby damage to any fish retina would be unlikely due to negligible contact time.   The Laser Quadrat is Licensed under the CERN Open Hardware License1. For the environment! 1 ohwr.org/projects/cernohl/wiki


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D EFRAG: Di m Sum L a b s M e m o r ie s

D E F R A G : Project Morgue

There is a bit of a joke that 3D printers go die in hackerspaces, to be shuffled around the equipment morgue with other bits and bobs of dismantled server racks, cannibalised laptops, a ludicrous tangle of cables with PS/2 connectors and perhaps the odd gumball machine. Such stereotypes only exist when there is the truth that inspires it—the residue I have personally abandoned1 at Dim Sum Labs includes 20 kilograms of cement, plywood sheets, 10 empty cardboard whiskey tubes and nearly unusable off-cuts of acrylic sheets. Most, if not all, projects are a work-in-progress, with ideas in perpetual development and the documentation merely a snapshot in time. Luis Felipe Murillo mentions this in Dim Sum Labs Memories, where the open-ended, unfinished projects allow for the freedom of a generative process to occur. The circulation and transformation by whoever stumbles upon it, is the organic richness that is so compelling of a community space. Sometimes, some projects, get a bit too rhizomatic in which any attempt to provide instruction behoves a show-and-tell/history tutorial; for example, the door locking system at Dim Sum Labs currently has four (4!!) separate repositories on GitHub (not even forked!), where it’s likely at least one person sat down to dissect the current implementation, then threw their hands in the air after an hour to start over with their own methodology2. This chapter, a project morgue, exists for them—the work that people have spent their time and effort upon, though not quite to the capacity where it has the metaphorical legs to walk on its own. 1

Or “wilfully hope to return to despite having disengaged for over a year”.

2

I joke, but I completely understand. I’ve done the same with CAD drawings. Sometimes it’s just less mentally polluting.

TFGTH _ sample  
TFGTH _ sample  
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