Page 1

THE COUGAR HUDl) /93~

lOc

WILLAMETTE vs. WASHINGTON STATE --~"'"70 4.!./~1

.

II'


IT IS HOPED THERE WILL BE LESS 01= THIS I AND .........

W HATIIII NO NEW RULES BY KENNETH PRIESTLEY

A football season without new football rules is like apple pie without cheese, beer without pretzels or hot dogs without plenty 9f mustard, but here one is and there's nothing to argue about, unless it's the ' rules already in the book. After a period of tinkering which began in 192 9 with the famous "fumble rule" and ended last year with the changing of the dimensions of the ball, the Rules Committee last winter met, decided football was a pretty good game as played in 19 34, made a few minor changes, and dispersed, receiving the congratulations of players, coaches and spectators. What they did can be stated briefly. The most important alteration merely qualifies the so-called "dead ball" rule, making it permissible for a runner who is on his feet but held by an opponent, to run (if he can), or to pass or kick until the whistle is blown. That means that your favorite halfback has a little more chance to break away from a loose tackle, whereas under the former rule, the whistle

should and would be tootled as soon as his forward progress ceased. The committee didn't say so, but it was evidently their hope that officials wouldn't be quite so quick with the whistle. The other changes: Clarification of .t he rule governing the interchange of positions by linemen and backs by defining the positions of the center, guards and tackles as those occupied by those players when they originally enter the game. The rule by which fouls committed by both teams offset each other now includes one exception: "Should a punted ball be illegally downed and then there be a personal foul by the opponents, the kicking team may refuse the offsetting penalty. In such case the ball belongs to the receiving team at the spot where it was touched." Now that you know all about the new rules, let's enjoy the game!


FEATS OF FOOTBALL

WELLITS A

FOOTBALL

.

AI NT IT (

Football's longest run from scrimmage - 11 5 yards, by Wyllys Terry, of Yale, against Wesleyan, November 4, 1884-could not be duplicated today; in fact, it has been impossible since 1912, when the old 11 0-yard field was shortened to the present I 00yard gridiron. Terry's run was made from kick formation, five yards behind his own goal line. Yale won the game, 3 1 to 0. The all-time greatest "thief" in football annals was Arthur Poe, of Princeton, who wrenched a ball from the arms of a Yale runner November 12 , 1898, and galloped 100 yards for the score that won the game, 6 to 0. But for sheer deceit, Charles Dillon, of the Carlisle Indians of 1903, holds the record. In a game with Harvard, Dillon received a kick-off, hid the ball under his jersey (which had been especially

prep;red for the ruse) and ran 1 0 5 yards through the Harvards, without detection. "Pop" Warner probably put him up to it! Harvard won the game. Arle Davis, of Okl;thoma, kicked 23 extra points from placement in one game-Oklahoma vs. Kingfisher, in 1917. Oklahoma won, 179 to 0. The longest field goal on record is one of 65 yards by J. T. Haxall, of :Princeton, which gave the Tigers a victory over Yale in 18 8 2. Including his famous five field goals against Yale in 1913, the great Charley Brickley kicked 2 6 field goals in one season. Alexander Moffat, of Princeton, went Brickley several better in 18 8 2 when he kicked 32 field goals in 15 games. In fact, at that time old statistics reveal that football was really football, the number of kicks in one game usually exceeded the number of scrimmage p}ays.

Full contents ond illust ra t ions co pyright 1935 by Lede re r, Street a nd Zeus C o., )rQ¡


THE LINEUPS

WASH. STATE

(Subject to Change) WILLAMETTE 25 44 24 17 22 39 13 11 45 37 42

POSITION WASHINGTON STATE Phillips ......................... ...... Left End ................................ ..... Brett Newhouse ........................ Left Tackle ............................. Scheyer 37 Hoyt ................................... Left Guard .............................. Oswaid 50 Williams ....... ,........................ Center .................................... Smith 72 Becken ........................ Right Guard ................... ........ Jones 66 Kahle .......................... .... Righ ~ Tackle .................................. Bley Versteeg .......................... Right End ................................. Terry 40 Oravec .................................. Quarter ................................ Goddard 28 Weisgerber ......................... Left Half .............................. McBride 23 Stone ................................. Right Half ....... .......................... Zuger 36 Olson ................................... Fullback .......................... Dougherty 34

OFFICIALS: Gale Mix, M.oscow, referee; Bill Martin, Walla Walla, umpire; AI McVay, Walla Walla, head linesman; Carl Quackenbush , Spokane, field judge.

Score Bearcats

Cougars

1

2

I

3

WILLAMETTE

Babe Hollingbery, Coach

4

~ I

I

This program published by Associated Students, State College of Washington, Oct. 5, 1935.

Name Position Wt. H. Town I ] oe Caldwell , e 170 San Diego 2 John B ley, t 194 Spokane 3 James Agee, q 168 Dayton 4 W. Bennett, q 160 Seattle 5 H. T. Ball, g 187 Hollywood 8 Paul Bates, 185 Yakima 9 Edwin Brett, 194 Lewiston, Ida. 10 Jerry Sage, e 185 Spokane 12 D. Allen, e 172 Huntin gton Park, Calif. 13 T . Christoffersen h 195 Honolulu 14 D. Springer, g 190 P ortland, Or. 15 Merle Power, t 181 Boise, Ida. 16 E. Holmback, t 205 Monroe 18 B. D. Campbell, g 195 Enumclaw 21 R. Anderson, t 190 Spokane 23 C. McBride, h 173 Puyallup 24 H. Thompson, t 206 Spokane g 25 Kay Bell, 208 Seattle c 26 W. B. Gibson, 177 Eldorado, T. q 28 Ed Goddard, 180 Escondido, C 31 L. Haynes, Pullman 176 32 B. Grimstead, 225 Tacoma 34 R. Dougherty, 186 Portland 3 5 H. Harrison, e 180 Monroe 36 Walt Zuger, h 17 5 Waitsburg 37 D. Scheyer, t 211 Granger 38 Hal Jones, q 171 Spokane 39 Joe Sienko, f 193 Pe Ell 40 Floyd Terry, 180 Exeter, Cal. 41 H. Smith, 175 Wapato 42 Max Tatman, q 155 Spokane e 44 John Grahek, 186 Ely, Minn. g 45 AI Hoptowit, 18 7 Wapato 46 Chris Rumburg, c 186 Spokane 47 L . Hildebrand, e 178 Sp okane h 48 Bud Sanders, 165 Dayton g 49 F. Stannard, 185 Spokane 50 A. Oswald g 188 Walla Walla 53 Keith Simon, q 158 Billings h 55 John Rosano, 17 5 El Cerrito g 57 Oscar Schaaf, 180 Oakesdale 58 L . McCormack, h 178 Clarkston 61 L. Suckling, 190 Arlington 62 Mel Johansen c 17 5 Enumclaw 63 C. Semancik, g 188 Tacoma 66 Bpd .Tones, g 205 Spokane 67 ]. Wilkinson e 195 Bremerton 71 E . Veltman, g 18 5 Portland 72 Stanley Smith, c 192 Abilene, T. 1 7 Tex Magness, h 167 Breckenndge

Roy S . Keene, Coach No.

N ame Posttion W ..

I 0 F.

Hediger

H. Town

h

155

11 J. Oravec

Q

155 Newark, N.].

12 C. Rhoda

q

165 F. Scott, Kas.

13 C. Versteeg

e

195

h

180 Versailles, 0. 180 Astoria

14 D . Brando n 15 J.

Hogg

16 Burnett

h

158

17 B . Williams

c

165

20 M. Viken

g

160

21 Commons

e

174

22 E. Becken

g

182

23 G. Erickson

e

190

24 H. Hoyt

g

161

25 C. Phillips

e

17 5

26 D . Patterson

g

180

27 G.

e 165 e 195

Abbott

28 B. M cAdams 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

K. Beauchamp e G. Billings H. Woodbury Hall t N. Shaffer g D. Baptist t N. Hogenson g R. Vagt t W. Stone h V. Urell c K. Kahle t Tats Yada g F. Shepard c M. Olson f Peters c D. Newhouse t R. Weisgerber h

160 190 190 185 182 185 175 214 185 185 185 204 200 210 230 221 210 E .

Tillamook

M c M innville


PLAYS THAT MADE HISTORY

•

THE "FLYING WEDGE"

That awesome juggernaut of the otherwise Gay '90s, the Flying Wedge, now outlawed by the rules, was the invention not of a football player but of a chess expert and military tactician, Lorin F. Deland, of Harvard. Deland conceived of the maneuver in 1892 and helped to prepare it for the Harvard-Yale game of that year. The fact that Yale won the game 6 to 0 is more or less beside the point, because the Flying Wedge made football history, and most fans have forgotten scores as old as that one. The Wedge really evolved out of what was known as the "V trick," a Princetonian invention. The Princeton players were wont to form themselves into a human letter "V" with the ball-carrier inside the apex. This cumbersome mass of humanity would then roll forward, theoretically crushing all opposition before it. The "V trick" was a standard opening play used by many teams. Deland conceived the idea of a "V" traveling at high speed before the ball was put into play, in order to take advantage of the bonecrushing momentum of ten beefy footballers running at full tilt. History does not record that Deland first worked out his idea on the chess board, as certain modern tacticians of football are reputed to do, but at any rate he broached his plan to Captain Bernard W. "Bernie" Trafford, who was coach as well as leader of the team. Trafford was so enthusiastic he appointed Deland assistant coach! In deep secrecy, the fearful Flying Wedge was perfected during the summer of 1892 when the Harvard team gathered on a farm for preseason practice. Polished and ready, it was reserved as the "ace in the hole" for the Yale game. When Harvard met Yale the Elis won the toss, so the use of the Wedge was necessarily deferred until the second half. Then the great moment came. The teams lined up for the opening of the second period. Captain Trafford stood motionless in mid-field, holding the ball ready for the "touch-off" while the other ten men divided into two squads, one on each side of t he fie ld. Trafford signalled, the two squads ran forward, precisely and in perfect stride, converging on him. As the two squads approached Trafford they veered to form a perfect "V," flying up the field at full speed with Trafford carrying the ball in the apex, and ploughing to the Harvard 20-yard line, where Charles Brewer, who had been handed the ball by Trafford, tripped over a team mate. Before he could recover he was tackled by Frank Butterworth, of Yale. Harvard was held on the line, tried a field goal and missed, and Yale won the game. But the Wedge became standard equipment for virtu ally all teams as the opening play of a game, until 1905 when it and most other mass formation plays were banished from the gridiron.

LET ME.

iE.Ll YOU Ar>OUT THE.

FLY\N&-

WED&t


Hit the line hdrd and hit it square Play the game and play it fair Crash right thr9ughdo or die You've got to be good to SATISFY.

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1935willametteatwashingtonst  
1935willametteatwashingtonst  
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