Page 1

Restaurantville MAG AZI NE

CO N N EC T I N G THE TEXAS R ES TAUR AN T CO M MU NIT Y

TOURISM AND THE TEXAS RESTAURANT INDUSTRY TEXAS PROSTART WINNERS NRA PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONFERENCE

FOOD TRUCK "HOW TO" FACES OF DIVERSITY AWARDS

TXRestaurant.org

May 2018

1

Q

Spring


PUBLISHER Richie Jackson, CEO Texas Restaurant Association VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING & INNOVATION Anna Tauzin Rice Texas Restaurant Association EDITOR Rebecca Robinson, Communications Manager Texas Restaurant Association ART DIRECTOR Janio Rodriguez L., Graphic Design Manager Texas Restaurant Association RESTAURANT VILLE MAGAZINE is published quarterly by the Texas Restaurant Association

For advertising information contact Miles Pequeno Senior Corp. Relations Manager communications@tramail.org

Editorial questions can be directed to Rebecca Robinson at 512-457-4100 or rrobinson@tramail.org

P.O. Box 1429 Austin, Texas 78767 512-457-4100 800-395-2872

It is the mission of the Texas Restaurant Association to be the advocate and indispensable resource for the foodservice and hospitality industry in Texas.

txrestaurant.org


Contents 4

WORD FROM THE PRESIDENT

7 LETTER FROM THE CHAIRMAN 9

TEXAS PROSTART WINNERS

10

TRAEF FULL CIRCLE

12

NRA PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONFERENCE

14

KEEP ON TRUCKING

25

FOOD TRUCK "HOW TO"

26

FACES OF DIVERSITY AWARD

12

28 TOURISM AND THE TEXAS RESTAURANT INDUSTRY 32

9

THE NEW DOL PAID PROGRAM

34 MEMBERSHIP SPOTLIGHT 36

SAN ANTONIO MARKETPLACE 2018 KEYNOTE CONVERSATIONS

CL ICK HERE TO SUBSC R IB E

24 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

3


• TRA is filled with passionate, resourceful stakeholders who care about our future... it’s ubiquitous, and that shouldn’t be surprising considering we’re the 2nd largest private enterprise employer in America. • The world stood up, took notice and learned from Texans about how to provide disaster relief. Texans didn’t hesitate to cross boundaries for Hurricane Harvey victims. We presented resources on a world-class basis (approximately $17 million).

Mark Davis Bailey President of the Texas Restaurant Association

Word from the

President H

ello friends! Welcome to another terrific edition of Restaurantville, where we focus on food trucks, tourism and the upcoming TRA Marketplace. It’s been an honor and a privilege to serve TRA this year… by the time my term ends, I will have visited 96% of TRA’s active chapters (some more than once). Below are some highlights of what I’ve learned. • As usual, our industry is challenged with current issues/concerns including changes in workforce, 3rd party delivery, market segmentation, demographics, and technology, and it is our job to help stakeholders identify these dynamics, and shape relevant, adaptable solutions accordingly.

4

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

• Capitol Hill deadlock - while both sides of the aisle claim victories, TRA remains a pragmatic, non-partisan voice with respect to our industry, and we must continue to advocate on behalf of our stakeholders. • Heraclitus reminded us that ‘change is the only constant.’ This year, TRA took great steps to initiate three important ‘change agents’. • Succession Workgroup For four decades, Richie Jackson has led TRA to be among the most respected restaurant association organizations in America (if not the world) and has earned our highest respect. As he steps down in 2019, we must rise to the challenge of recruiting a similar worldclass leader that is able to understand, lead our association, and break barriers for another generation. • Governance Workgroup This is a critical multi-year exam of our structure, designed to improve organizational m a ke - u p , d e c i s i o n - m a k i n g , a n d accountability - please be engaged.


• Conscious Capitalism Workgroup and “Great Place to Work” certification Free market capitalism is the greatest force to positively impact peoples’ lives that this world has ever known. Let us learn more from conscious, mindful organizations that have harnessed this formula. Once again, let me recognize TRA staff and executive leadership - without their support and commitment, none of the above would have been possible. I’m very appreciative. In closing, I often mention that people will forget what you say, but they will remember how you made them feel. I hope we have helped you feel encouraged. TRA continues to work hard to be the indispensable resource for you and your associates. Thanks MUCHO…!

Mark Davis Bailey mdb@ophdfw.com 214.704.8495 (cell)

5


Glenda Dawson High School in Pearland represented Texas for restaurant management, marking the first time the school has made an appearance at nationals after years of competing at the state level. On the culinary side, Rockwall High School made its third appearance, securing a thrilling second-place victory. Rockwall won the national championship title in 2013 for restaurant management and snagged third place last year in culinary. I am now even more passionate about doing whatever I can to continue the success of the ProStart program and the TRAEF.

David Cea, TRAEF Chairman

A letter from the

Chairman A

s my year as chairman of the TRAEF winds down, I look back in total amazement. I had the great fortune of being a concept judge at both the Texas ProStart regional and state competitions. I was also able to attend the 2018 National ProStart Invitational in Providence, Rhode Island. The competition was held at the Rhode Island Convention Center April 27-29. More than 400 fired-up students gathered from across the country to compete. What I witnessed at these competitions was the nation’s premier high school culinary arts and management teams exhibiting their best learned skills. The passion and quality of work that was shown by all the teams was simply inspiring! I am very excited for the future of the hospitality industry because of the quality of future employees the ProStart program is creating.

David Cea TRAEF Chairman 2017-2018

Tag Us! @TXRestAssoc

I want to congratulate the two Texas teams that made it to the national competition.

R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

7


NOW OPEN

A BETTER WAY FOR RESTAURANTS TO SHOP ™ EASY FOR RESTAURANTS.

WHOLESALE PRICES.

GREAT FOOD. Innovative products, trusted brands and fresh selection.

Everyday value and weekly specials.

Everything you need with fast, friendly service.

Over 5,000 products in our 47,000 square-foot store, with walk-in coolers for fresh meat, produce and dairy. Easy payment options of cash, credit or US Foods® payment terms*. *US FOODS DELIVERY ACCOUNT REQUIRED.

M E AT

SEAFOOD

Ara p a h

GROCERY

r

Coit Rd

4240 ALPHA ROAD, FARMERS BRANCH, TX 75244 214.647.4500 FIND US AT MIDWAY AND ALPHA ROADS, NEAR GALLERIA MALL 635

635

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

289

VISIT US AT: USFOODS.COM/CHEFSTORE © 2018 US Foods, Inc. 4-2018 FOF-2017092001

Hillcrest Rd

Nuestra Dr

y ollwa rth T s No

Dalla

8

Hillcrest Rd

l

Montfort D

ok

635

CONVENIENT HOURS TO HELP YOU SAVE MORE: 7 AM-7 PM MONDAY - FRIDAY Spring Valley Rd 7 AM-6 PM SATURDAY 8 AM-5 PM SUNDAY Alpha Rd

Alpha Rd Galleria Mall

lley View Ln

EQUIPMENT

Mean dering Way

d

od R

Preston Rd

Inwo

Midway Rd

Br o

Dr ub

Belt Line Rd

Spring Valley Rd

ven C

DISPOSABLES

d oR

Belt Line Rd

ha


T

................................. ................................ ................................. ................................ ................................. ................................ ................................. ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ Texas Students Shine at ................................ National ProStart Invitational ................................ ................................

A

fter months of practice and emerging victorious at regional and state competitions, two Texas ProStart teams traveled to Rhode Island to compete at the 2018 National ProStart Invitational – the nation’s premier high school culinary arts and restaurant management competition hosted by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Glenda Dawson High School in Pearland represented Texas for restaurant management, marking the first time the school has made an appearance at nationals after years of competing at the state level. On the culinary side, Rockwall High School made its third appearance, securing an exciting second-place victory. Rockwall won the national championship title in 2013 for restaurant management and snagged third place last year in culinary.

“Rockwall High School’s Culinary Arts team was honored to represent the great state of Texas at the National ProStart competition,” said Cody Hayes, chef instructor at Rockwall High School. “Finishing second in the nation solidifies my team’s college and career goals, as they received multiple scholarships, including a full-tuition scholarship to Sullivan University. This program has truly set these young aspiring chefs up for success. Each of them is humbled by everyone’s support and thankful for the opportunity provided by Texas ProStart, the

................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................

TRAEF and the National ProStart competition. This program truly changes lives, and for me personally, I am blessed beyond measure to be a part of it.”

The competition was held at the Rhode Island Convention Center April 27-29. More than 400 student competitors gathered from across the country to put their skills to the test in front of industry leaders, state restaurant associations, friends, family and fans. Teams competed with the hope of earning coveted scholarships from the nation’s premier culinary and restaurant management programs.

............................... ............................... .............................. .............................. .............................. .............................. .............................. .............................. .............................. .............................. Glenda Dawson High School Restaurant Management Team

With surprise appearances from Ted Allen, host of “Chopped” on the Food Network and author of “In My Kitchen,” and Nicole Silva, entrepreneur and founder of Crumbles by Nicole and a finalist on ABC’s “The Great Holiday Baking Show,” all attending students had the opportunity to interact with more than 80 industry leaders throughout the competition weekend. Herndon Career Center from Raytown, Missouri won first place in culinary arts and Wilbur Cross High School from New Haven, Connecticut won first place in restaurant management.

AS T EX

ot urb eT ot turb lad de s vi ach sa bles u a So spin veget uce ted n sa sted Wil roa ductio n a P d re 21 $ foo Sea

Sou

s Vid

Winners’ scholarships can be used at the college or university of their choice to continue their restaurant/foodservice educations. Past National ProStart Invitational winners have gone on to establish careers at some of the best restaurants in the world, including Blue Hill at Stone Barns in New York and Alinea in Chicago.

o f Tri B ee de ula loin f ro bee tender filet ed f pp ee sted b -wra ed cru toes s con poach rcini ta a gu B e po d po ara sp win and hippe ns da w ry Red nio an ma do Gold beets an ce Rose kon d ms sau Yu laze shroo ion g ct u m tter du Bu e re 37 sted $ Roa ed win R am Cre an vari eam Ba t n cr nu ria ava te Coco B t nu mpo ue coco rus co ering zed Cit s m ile is Gla e Sw ut tu Lim ocon eleé C eg Lim 12 $ Tex

an

Rockwall High School Culinary Team – 2nd place 2018 National ProStart Invitational.

R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

9


........................................................................................................ ........................................................................................................

..... . . . . . ...... .......... . . . . . ..... .......... ........ . . . . . ...... ........... ........... ........ . . . . . ...... ........... ........... ........... ...... . . . . . . ..... ........... .......... ........... .... . . . . . .. ....... ..... .......... .......... .. . . . . . . . . ... ......... ........ ......... ........ ...... ............ ........... ............ ......... ...... ............ ........... ............ ........ .. ........ ....... ........ ... lyssa Muckelroy is a Texas ProStart graduate .... ... ......... ........ ......... . . . . . . from New Caney High School, and her . ... ......... ........ ......... . . . . . restaurant management team won 1st place ..... ..... ........... .......... ....... . . . . . in the National ProStart Competition three years ago. ...... ........... ........... ........... ..... ...... ............ ........... ............ .... She now has come full circle, and will be doing her ...... ............ ........... ............ ... summer internship program with the Texas Restaurant ..... ........... .......... ........... . . Association Education Foundation for her degree at ..... ........... .......... ........... . . Stephen F. Austin State University. .. .. .. ...... ............ ........... ...... ............ ......

Full Circle A

........................................................................... ........................................................................... .......................................................................... .......................................................................... ..........................................................................

10

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E


. .. ... .... ..... ...... . ...... . ...... . . ...... .. . ...... ... . ...... .... . ...... ..... . ......

ARE YOU

COMPLIANT WITH THE LAW? Food Handler certification is required in Texas

Keep your team trained with

servsafe.com

ServSafe

512.457.4166

ACCEPTED EVERYWHERE IN TEXAS E S TA U R A N Tof V I LState L E M AHealth G A Z I NServices E SPRING ANSI-accredited; approved by the Texas RDepartment

2018

11


Texas Restaurant Leaders Travel to Capitol Hill

The National Restaurant Association 32nd Annual Public Affairs Conference 1

O

2

n April 17-18, 40 Texas restaurateurs joined more than 550 others from around the country in Washington, D.C. for the 32nd annual National Restaurant Association Public Affairs Conference. The Texas Restaurant Association, along with 45 other state restaurant associations, led its restaurateurs to Capitol Hill to speak with its Congressional delegation to relay real life stories, successes and challenges to their elected officials. The group of restaurant leaders met with several members of the Texas Congressional Delegation, including Senators John Cornyn and Ted Cruz, along with other legislators from Houston, Dallas and San Antonio. These meetings provided the chance for policymakers and their staffs to hear directly from Texas job creators to ensure they have Texas’ best interest in mind when working on future legislation.

In addition, the Texas delegation urged Senators Cornyn and Cruz to pass the ADA reform legislation that has passed the House. H.R. 620 will provide a 120-day right to cure for businesses before a lawsuit can be filed. The Texas Restaurant Association was very successful in passing a 60-day right to cure in the 2017 Texas Legislature relating to state ADA lawsuits, but further action is needed on the federal level to stop frivolous ADA lawsuits.

The conference focused on a few priorities that remain a focus for the industry. Those issues include a fix to the restaurant depreciation provision in the 2017 tax bill to ensure that restaurants maintain the 15-year depreciation schedule; further adjustments to the Affordable Care Act relating to burdensome reporting, seasonal workers clarification, and a repeal of the 30-hour workweek provision for full-time employees; and urging Congress to pass meaningful immigration reform.

During the conference, attendees heard Representatives Rodney Davis (R-IL) and Stephanie Murphy (D-FL) talk about Congressional successes and challenges for the restaurant industry, the current political climate, and other business issues that Congress is tackling. The conference attendees also heard from NRA officials about the 2017 Tax Bill that was beneficial to the restaurant industry and the challenges ahead on immigration reform.

3 1- TRA President Mark Davis Bailey 2- Senator John Cornyn with Houston members 3- Senator Ted Cruz with Dallas members 4- Greater Houston Restaurant Association executive director Melissa Stewart and Houston president Jon Horowitz 5- San Antonio Restaurant Association

12

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

4

5


Proud of the company we keep To learn more, contact Wayne Stewart 713.906.0593 or wayne.stewart@e-hps.com heartlandpaymentsystems.com All logos and trademarks are property of their respective owners

Š 2016 Heartland Payment Systems, Inc.


COVER STORY

food trucks were operating in the United States, employing more than 13,500 people. This may seem like a drop in the bucket compared to the $799 billion in overall restaurant sales in 2017, but considering the food truck industry was practically nonexistent in 2008, the growth is remarkable. For the first time, food truck sales growth has exceeded brick and mortar sales growth by 1.1 percent.

The evolution & what lies ahead for the

texas food truck industry By Rebecca Robinson

T

he afternoon sun gleams off a silver airstream trailer while music blares. People wait in meandering queues amongst brightly painted picnic tables. The area is noisy with families; kids eating ice cream, and dogs tethered nearby, eagerly looking for crumbs. A couple of suit-clad businessmen nosh on green chile chicken empanadas, while a group of teenagers enjoy an assortment of tacos, teeming with fresh beef ‘Tinga’, while a woman hands out samples of freshly-made buttermilk biscuits and sausage gravy.

Nationwide, the food truck industry has grown nearly eight percent annually since 2011, with over $2.7 billion in sales in 2017. In 2016, an estimated 3,700

SPRING 2018

From chuckwagon to Airstream – a brief history Though hip and trendy, the modern-day food truck is nothing new. Selling food on wheels is as old as the restaurant industry itself. The first records of mobile food sales were in the late 1600s, when street vendors sold food from push carts in New York City. In the Old West, the legendary chuckwagon would travel across the plains, delivering food to cattlemen. With designated areas for cooking, storage and clean-up, the chuckwagon is most likely the closest relative to the modern-day food truck.

.. ........... .. ..................................................... .. .............................................................. .. ............................................................... .. ................................................................ .. ................................................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ................................................. .. ............................................................................ .. .......................................................................... .. ............................................................................ .. ........................................................................... ........................................ . ....... ....... .. .. ..

This isn’t a special event or street festival – it’s just another day at the Mueller Trailer Eats food park in Austin, Texas. Similar scenes are commonplace throughout the country – but particularly in Texas, where both the weather and the culinary scene is hot. Last year, the Austin food truck growth market was ranked first in the entire country, with a staggering 600 percent increase in just six years (2010-2016).

14

The mobile restaurant phenomenon has been a big win for consumers as well as entrepreneurs. Consumers enjoy the casual convenience, along with a wide range of regional and global cuisine at a relatively low cost. For aspiring chefs, food trucks offer an unprecedented opportunity to spread their culinary wings at a fraction of the cost of a brick and mortar restaurant.


Some credit Charlie Goodnight, the “father of the Texas Panhandle” as the inventor of not only the American ranching industry, but also the chuck wagon, and hence, the first food truck. In 1866, Goodnight purchased a government wagon and had it completely customized to his specifications, with a box at the rear that could be converted into a chef’s worktable.

Roach coaches are a far cry from today’s sophisticated food truck. Its modern-day renaissance is credited to chef Roy Choi, along with partners Mark Manguera and Caroline Shin, who launched Kogi BBQ in 2008, in downtown Los Angeles. Selling a fusion of highquality Korean BBQ with Mexican tacos hit a sweet spot with locals. It was innovative, inexpensive and convenient. The idea exploded, and it wasn’t long before cities like Portland, Denver and Austin followed suit.

.. . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ......... . . . ............ . . . ......... . . . .................. ..... The New York Times Magazine, however, claims that the entire industry can be traced back to Walter Scott, who, in 1872, “…cut windows into a small covered wagon and parked it in front of a local newspaper office in Providence, Rhode Island. Sitting on a box inside, he sold sandwiches with pies and coffee to journalists and pressmen working late.” With the advent of the automobile, a more recognizable icon appeared in 1936 – the Oscar Meyer “Weinermobile” which is still going strong today. In the 1950s, ice cream trucks were introduced, and in the ‘60s, at the height of suburban sprawl, construction workers, landscapers and other laborers were a popular market for what became commonly known as “roach coaches”. The derogatory moniker came from sketchy food safety practices at the time, greasy products and dirty worksites.

A perfect storm followed when the recession hit in 2008. Traditional brick and mortar restaurants were struggling as consumers increasingly turned to food trucks that were less expensive, delicious, adventurous and convenient.

The banner year for food trucks came in 2010, when a number of ‘firsts’ occurred. The National Restaurant Association (NRA) dedicated 1,500 square feet to a food truck exhibit at their annual show. The food truck industry’s first association came to life, the Southern California Mobile Food Vendors Association (SoCalMFVA), in order to “protect the rights of gourmet food truck operators”, and the first television show “The Great Food Truck Race” premiered, further reflecting the nation’s love affair with the food truck.

15


Five Stars. Our group feeds bigger dividends and a safer workplace for you. Have you prepared a safe workplace? Members of the Texas Restaurant Association Safety Group are eligible to receive extra dividends, a greater discount on their workers’ comp premiums and more. If you are committed to a higher level of safety, join other leaders in your field to maximize the rewards. Be part of a safer Texas. To learn more about becoming a member, contact your agent or Tim Sekiya at (800) 395-2872 or tsekiya@tramail.org.

16

While we can’t guarantee dividends every year, Texas Mutual has returned more than $2.5 billion to safety-conscious policyholder owners since 1999. © 2018 Texas Mutual Insurance Company

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E


............................................................... ............................................................... Challenges and Opportunities Rapid growth is never without its pains. Cities continue to struggle with regulation, which continues to be one of the top barriers for operators. In addition to the day-to-day challenges of running a restaurant on wheels, many food truck operators, especially those in urban areas, continuously work to set themselves apart in an industry that is becoming increasing saturated.

Regulations As the food truck sector surpassed brick and mortar growth for the first time last year, many cities are wrestling with a quagmire of regulatory issues - from location, to parking, to health and safety, to operating licenses and fees. To illuminate the issue, the United States Chamber of Commerce recently released its first index of food truck regulations in 20 different cities in a 64-page report, “Food Truck Nation.” It is the most comprehensive study ever conducted on local food truck regulations, covering three main criteria – permits and licenses, compliance with restrictions and food truck operations. The study found that on average, launching and operating a food truck for one year requires an operator to complete 45 separate governmentmandated procedures over the course of 37 business days, and spend $28,276 on permits, licenses and ongoing legal compliance. Many survey respondents reported that regulatory barriers for trucks often exceed those of brick and mortar restaurants. Houston and Austin, the two Texas cities on the list, came in sixth and seventh, respectively, for best places to open a food truck. Portland tops the list overall, but Denver ranked best when it came to lowest fees, fewest trips to government agencies and numbers of procedures to complete. In Denver, food truck operators only need to make eight trips to licensing agencies, follow ten procedures and pay an average of $811 in fees to get their trucks operational.

By contrast, Austin ranked sixth and Houston tenth in terms of the above criteria, with Houston having 21 procedures to follow, 17 trips to government agencies and $1,788 in fees. Jon Lindskog, owner of San Antonio’s popular Cheesy Jane’s started the food truck version of his brick and mortar restaurant in 2012. It was an immediate success, which led to a second truck in 2013. Navigating city permitting and regulations is part of what inspired him to co-found the San Antonio Food Truck Association (SAFTA) in 2012. Lindskog says that in the beginning, food trucks in San Antonio were still being categorized with ice cream vendors. Now, with all the growth, there has been a definite swell in regulations, including parking. Unlike Austin, where food truck parks are scattered throughout the city, San Antonio only has three. Lindskog became an activist, educating and working with city leaders to create a solution – a downtown food truck vending program, which is thriving. When Onel and Pam Perez, owners/operators of The Guava Tree Truck, and Sir Frank’s Fancy Dog and Sausage Truck, and board members of the North Texas Food Truck Association (NTXFTA), first started, they found that the city of McKinney charged $1,000 for a six-month permit. Pam then shared with city council leaders what standard fees were in other cities ($300-400 per year), and they ended up re-writing the regulations. The fee is now $300 per year. “They were willing to work with us,” Pam said. “It’s just a matter of partnering and educating them on best practices, industry standards and getting away from the old roach coach mindset.”

Marketing The best aspects of operating a food truck can also be the most challenging when it comes to marketing. Food trucks may travel to different locations on different days. They may be seasonal.

R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

17


*Results may vary

855.466.7359

18

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

855-466-7359 | www.detroitcustomcoach.com


The menu may change from week to week, or day to day. If an operator does not already have an established brand, a huge marketing budget or 500,000 Twitter followers, it can feel daunting.

................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ One of the biggest mistakes people make, according to Lindskog, is focusing too much on the culinary side without focusing on marketing. Food can be outstanding, but no one will come if they do not know who (or where) you are. Cody Fields, co-owner and operator of Austin’s Mmmpanadas, says that social media is still the best way to market. It is a free and immediate way to communicate with fans about changes in time, date and location as well as entice customers with photos, and quick, compelling narratives. “You can also get very specific with targeted ads around your area and demographics.” With marketing, ‘content is always king’ and it must be engaging. Successful food truck operators showcase their products and frequently interact with their fans. In the beginning of his business, Fields says that a lack of time and interest in social media prompted them to outsource Facebook and Twitter, but they quickly realized that was a mistake. “We didn’t realize how important social media really is, and outsourcing made the posts ring pretty hollow. Later, we discovered and incorporated Instagram, and brought the rest back in house. Now, we can personally tell our story. It’s authentic.”

Other marketing tips include: • Innovative cuisine – Matt Geller, cofounder and CEO of the SoCalMFVA and founding president of the National FWVood Truck Association says that “…innovation in cuisine is one of the main drivers of (food truck) growth.” One of the top national trends in food, whether brick and mortar or mobile dining, is ethnic cuisine. Consumers are more adventurous than ever before, especially Millennials, who now control the lion’s share of the restaurant dollar. • The Perez family’s The Guava Tree serves up Cuban fare, and though it was successful, they found that not everyone in the Dallas metroplex was familiar with that type of cuisine. For their next truck, they decided on an American classic – a hot dog truck, Sir Frank’s Fancy Dog’s and Sausage truck, but with a twist. They use 100% black Angus beef from 44 Farms, artisan seasonal sausages from local purveyors and creative combinations such as the ever-popular Sir Frank, with arugula, Brie, shallots, red cabbage, a bullet bourbon whole grain mustard and a Luxardo cherry drizzle. • Keep it simple – Keep your concept simple so that you can have time to focus on the execution and marketing of your brand. • Interact and Create Community – In an impersonal, corporate-dominated world, people crave connection. Get to know customers both at the truck, and online. You are your best marketer, and sharing your passion is powerful. “People like food trucks because they can interact with the owner and feel a real sense of community. It’s a one-on-one relationship and that’s important,” Lindskog says. • Get creative - Share your successes Attracting and retaining new customers requires work, creativity and putting yourself “out there”. Participate in festivals. Enter contests. Host contests. Share your milestones and successes –

............................................................... ...............................................................


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................................. ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................... .................................................................. .................................................................. .................................................................. ................ large and small. The Perez family auditioned for The Food Network’s “The Great Food Truck Race” in 2016, and within a week they flew to Burbank, and were serving up fare on the Santa Monica Pier and Lake Havasu. Since their appearance, they use the Food Network logo in their marketing and still get recognized by show fans.

Operations Many underestimate the work it takes to run a food truck. Not only are operators dealing with culinary issues, but maintenance of a large vehicle creates its own set of problems. There are many factors that come into play that are different from a brick and mortar situation, including: • Vehicle Maintenance Vehicle maintenance is critical. Due to the size and amount of weight on the truck, wear and tear is accelerated, and mechanics are not always available. The Perez’s say that truck maintenance is one of the biggest challenges. “I’ve learned so much about truck mechanics,” Onel laughs. “I even changed the speedometer cable in the middle of a CVS parking lot! You can’t afford to have the mentality of ‘oh, my truck’s broken I can’t go out’ and just wait for a mechanic. Sometimes you have to use your resources

20

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

and be motivated to find a way to make it work.” The Perez’s have a mobile mechanic on hand, and a special mechanic for transmissions and “…a lot of good YouTube videos.” Fields agrees, “Both my truck and my generator were in the shop last week. People talk about lower overhead with food trucks, but you still have pay for the maintenance and upkeep. You also have to consider the lost revenue if you can’t make an event and the damage it does to your reputation.” • Equipment Maintenance One lesson Lindskog learned early on, is that most equipment manufacturers do not warranty equipment on food trucks. This makes equipment maintenance even more important. Dirty, faulty and ill-maintained equipment will lead to faster breakdown and expensive replacements. • Technology Because of limited time and space, technology takes on added importance. 90 percent of food truck business is done by credit or debit card, and it is critical that the Point of Sale (POS) software work. A good POS system can keep you organized, process payments, send receipts, handle coupons, gift cards and analyze financial (and customer) data. There are several options, but Square payment system is most popular. It is quick, easy, and has its origins in serving artists and small businesses. Many food trucks also do catering events and Pam Perez swears by private event management software, Gather.

................................ .............................................................. ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ ...................... ..


....... ..... .... .... .... .... ....

HOT DOG PROFITS ARE GOOD

OWN THE VERY BEST IN TEXAS • $1,103,424 AUV - Top 25% of system sales* • SIX consecutive years, same store sales increase** • Simple operations and low food costs (24%)** • World’s Largest Hot Dog Franchise with little competition

FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 949-892-2629 franchising@wienerschnitzel.com

www.wienerschnitzel.com *This information is an average of unaudited gross sales shared by top 25% quartile of 317 open Wienerschnitzel restaurants for entire calendar year of 2016. **Same store sales and food costs are reflective of unaudited reporting shared by all Full and Limited franchisees in continuous operation from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2016. Your estimated sales and operating costs can and will vary depending on how you run your business, among other factors. Please read the GGI Franchise Disclosure Document in its entirety. This information is not an offer to sell you a franchise. We will not offer you a franchise until such time we have complied with FTC disclosure requirements, and you have met our application and pre-approval process to be awarded a franchise license.

R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

21


This software allows customers to enter their event date and pertinent details, and generates digital proposals, a task that used to be time and labor intensive. • Storage Brick and mortar restaurants have an advantage when it comes to storage and ordering, leftovers are not an issue. With food trucks, there are health laws (varying) about how and where you can store food. Many cities and states require food trucks to belong to a commissary – a sort of “home base” where trucks can be parked, food can be stored, equipment charged and even, depending on the commissary, prepped and cooked. Using a commissary can help save money with bulk purchasing and storage costs. Commissary pricing usually runs between $250 $1,000 per month. • Planning Many people do not realize that food trucks have seasons, even in warm climates like Texas. In Dallas, Pam Perez says that their season is six or seven months long. Many food truck operators will have bang-up months, forgetting that there will be slow times. She and Onel recommend squirreling away as much money as possible in preparation. “Anything below 50 degrees, it’s hard to get people to come out,” she says. “Expenses don’t go away in slow months.” People also shy away in triple digit weather. • Connect As with any industry, it helps to have support. In the relatively small food truck community, a network of friends can be invaluable. Both Jon Lindskog of SAFTA and the Perez family of NTXFTA appreciate the networking, sharing of resources and overall support. Pam says, “We’re only as strong as we are a community together.

When we first started, the food truck community was insular. We made a promise that we would not be like that. Now, just four years later, through the NTXFTA we host events and all get together. We talk, catch up, share resources and information. Together, you have leverage.”

On the Horizon For success in the food truck industry, it helps to have a thorough understanding of the current business climate, special industry considerations and a working knowledge of the market. Food trucks offer a new frontier of entrepreneurship. Lindskog says, “So many chefs are coming out of schools and there’s a low barrier to entry to a food truck as compared to a brick and mortar. People can express their culinary passions by spending $30-75,000 instead of half a million.” And the freedom is tempting – creative freedom, schedule freedom, location flexibility, and fewer employees. The meteoric rise of the industry however, has led to increased competition and in some places, saturation. Oversaturation, along with overregulation is already beginning to temper the food truck fairytale. Expected growth is now only 0.4 percent per year through 2020, and some cities, such as Austin, are already feeling the pain.

22

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E


............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... Lindskog as well, now focuses on the catering side. He kept his original brick and mortar store, which is well-known, but sold three of his other locations “…because food trucks have less overhead than a 3,500 square foot restaurant.” Now, each truck does between 30-35 catering events per month, and his food truck sales are split evenly between street stops and catering.

He has also found a non-traditional location – apartment complexes. Since the arrival of food trucks as an amenity to residents, at many complexes, they are relying less on restaurant and meal-kit delivery. The low cost and convenience of freshly-made meals right outside their door cannot be beat. Lindskog feels that the industry will continue to grow, especially as nationally known brick and mortar companies will be concentrating on food trucks. National chains such as In-N-Out burger, Pizza Hut and many others already have trailers they are using for festivals and special events. The low overhead is irresistible, but it is not easy. An over crowded market has forced some operators to think beyond street sales and food parks to develop additional revenue streams, such as catering, festivals, and non-traditional locations. “Austin’s market has gotten very saturated – and at the same time we’ve also begun to lose real estate to development.,” Fields says. “It’s tough to make a living with the daily grind on the street. For us, it’s more about catering and private events.” Fields is even moving beyond food trucks to launching frozen food products, which are currently being carried in Wheatsville Co-op, Royal Blue Grocery and Thom’s Market in Austin. When the Perez’s first started, they mainly did street stops in front of office buildings and food parks, but have now swayed much more into corporate events, catering and private parties. Pam notes that even for catering gigs, however, clients still want the truck parked outside the building, even if they are serving inside. “It’s a novelty, and a great prop,” she says.

“It’s not as easy as people make it out to be,” Lindskog says. “It’s a commitment to make it work. Just as many food trucks close as the ones who are successful. Research the market, and work on the business side of things. Honor your commitments. If you accept a catering job or say you’re going to be somewhere, then do it.” Food trucks continue to offer everyone, regardless of degree, background and demographics the opportunity for the American Dream. Food truck owners are a wonderfully diverse group, enriching our communities while nourishing our bodies. Whether in a traditional kitchen or on wheels, quality food paired with hard work and good customer service will never go out of fashion. “I believe food trucks will continue to grow in popularity,” Pam says. “Some will come and go, but as long as you keep changing and evolving, you remain relevant.”

R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

23


... .. BY www.shepherdfilterstexas.com • 877-774-1465

What if you could keep your hood CLEANER... without the HOOD CLEANER?

Shepherd Filters capture grease before it enters the kitchen exhaust system, reducing grease build-up and risk of fire. Provides immediate savings by reducing required cleaning frequency. Fewer cleanings mean lower costs. Kitchen staff installs in seconds. Approved as a grease removal device by NFPA 96 and several other relevant fire safety associations.

24

SHIPPI

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

NG ALL OVER TEXAS


............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... Starting a food truck?

10

Top

quick tips

1

W

ant to start a food truck? Food trucks are the hottest food trend of the past decade, offering freedom, and flexibility with relatively low financial risk. However, it takes a lot more than a passion for food and a dream. A successful food truck is a blend of creativity, hard work, a strong concept, nerves of steel and an entrepreneurial spirit. We have compiled these top tips from industry experts – from truck maintenance to social media to help get (and keep) you on the road.

+

Understand permits and regulations – Since rules, regulations and fees vary drastically between jurisdictions, be sure to thoroughly research what is required in your area. Always be certain you are in compliance.

2

Find a commissary – A commissary is a “home base” for food trucks, and many state and local municipalities require membership. A commissary can offer parking, food and supply storage, charging facilities, and even cooking or prep areas. Pricing runs between $250 and $1,000 per month, depending upon location.

3

Connect with your customers – connecting and communicating with your fans through social media is still the best way to expand your customer base. People respond best to personal posts and interactions. Share your story and post relevant, engaging content, utilizing photos, video and humor.

4

Build community – Connect with other food truck owners/operators. Having a professional network can provide invaluable support, resources and leverage when it comes to advocacy. Look for local groups and associations.

8

Financial planning – Food trucks are seasonal and while you might be booming for weeks at a time, some months will be slow, if not completely stopped. Be sure to set aside funds for the slow times – even though business has slowed, expenses will not.

7

Research the market – Make sure you thoroughly research the market and location where you plan to operate. Is there foot traffic? Office buildings nearby? Are there other trucks selling the same thing you are? Researching up front can save you time

9

Organize your time – As an entrepreneur, you will be dealing with the food side of the operation, the business side, operations, and the truck side. You might be dealing with a flat tire, or washing your truck after a rain. Be sure to stay organized and remember to do a little marketing every day.

0 Go in with a plan – Every 1

business needs a solid plan and food trucks are no exception. Examine issues such as growth, what you want to serve, how much time and money you want to invest and for how long. What are your goals? What is your exit strategy?

6

Equipment maintenance – Most operators are unaware that equipment manufacturers do not warranty equipment on food trucks, therefore it is more important than ever to keep equipment clean and in top condition.

5

Maintain your truck – Maintaining your truck is critical. Mechanical problems lead to not only high repair costs but can cause a loss of revenue and damage to your reputation if you are unable to show up or fulfill an event commitment.

25


This honor is a celebration of the “best of the best” in diversity and inclusion, community service and hospitality leadership. Wasai was one of three winners selected from hundreds of nominations nationwide. There have been many famous individuals who have passed through the Dallas Cowboys organization — Troy Aikman, Roger Staubach and Emmitt Smith among others, but few have earned the love and respect of as many colleagues as Wasai. Now in his 27th season with the Dallas Cowboys organization, Wasai, then aged 14, came to the United States with his parents from Ghana in West Africa.

Award Faces of Diversity

,,

George Wasai of Legends Hospitality at AT&T Stadium selected for NRAEF’s top honor in diversity

I

never dreamed in a million years being a kid from Africa, that I would be responsible for all food and beverage aspects for the Dallas Cowboys,” says George Wasai, general manager for Legends Hospitality, and director of food and beverage at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Not only has he achieved that great accomplishment, but Wasai was recently awarded the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation’s (NRAEF) 2018 Faces of Diversity award.

26

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

Starting his foodservice career as a dishwasher, and working hard up through management ranks, Wasai takes great delight in helping others through a partnership with DARS (Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services.) “George is proud to be a part of an organization that values diversity,” says Mike Stern, senior director of culinary innovation for PepsiCo Foodservice. “There is a wide range of staff having special needs, from hard of hearing and physical impairments to autistic individuals.” Wasai, too has an impediment — he stutters — but rather than let it negatively affect him, he started laughing at himself to put others at ease. Along the way he did more than that — he gained their admiration and loyalty. Now a pillar of his community with a work ethic second to none, Wasai is tireless in


Each year, the NRAEF awards scholarships to deserving students in the name of Faces of Diversity honorees. Cristina is currently a Freshman at the University of Houston, majoring in food business management. She received the Faces of Diversity scholarship in the name of George Wasai, general manager for Legends Hospitality and director of food and beverage at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Wasai is one of only three recipients in the nation to receive a 2018 Faces of Diversity award. George Wasai and TRA CEO Richie Jackson

his commitment to Legends’ employees and the DFW Metroplex.

“I want to thank the sponsors, and the committee in their efforts to help many students pursue their dreams in the culinary and hospitality industry,” Cristina said. “I am very grateful for this opportunity.”

“George’s career has spanned more than 35 years, starting as a bus boy at the Hyatt to running all food and beverage operations at the most prestigious sports venue in the world, all while remaining humble and dedicating his life to his passion for the Cowboys, his faith, family and community and never once expecting or asking for recognition of his work,” says Stern. Winners were honored during a special awards gala held in Washington, DC on April 17. For more information on the Faces of Diversity awards, visit: ChooseRestaurants.org/awards

2018 Faces of Diversity Scholarship Recipient – Cristina Tapia

C

ristina Tapia, a Texas ProStart alumna and Fort Worth native was recently awarded a 2018 Faces of Diversity Scholarship in honor of George Wasai – a National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) 2018 Faces of Diversity recipient.

Cristina is an active member of the Texas Restaurant Association Cougar Chapter and also participates at Greater Houston Restaurant Association events. When asked about what positive impact she would like to make in the restaurant industry, she replied, “I seek to use the food industry as a means to help people. I plan to use my business to help the community, from general education, to finding a budget for low income families. I truly want to make a change in my community by serving people.” R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

27


TOURISM A n d

t h e

Te x a s

R e s t a u r a n t

A

I n d u s t r y

s the school year draws to a close, families eagerly start planning long-awaited summer vacations, and thousands of people take to the Texas roads. Travel and tourism is the lifeblood of the hospitality industry, and from roadside cafes to five-star dining, it is a significant driver of restaurant sales. The National Restaurant Association (NRA) states that about one in every four dollars spent at restaurants comes as a direct result of travel and tourism.

In Texas, tourism brought in $74.7 billion, generating $7 billion in state and local tax revenues. There were 68.5 million travelers visiting Texas from outside the state, marking the seventh consecutive year of tourism employment growth.

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Travel and Tourism Office (NTTO), international tourism to the United States is alive and well, hitting a record high in 2017, with 78.6 million international visitors. By 2021, growth is expected to reach 94 million travelers – an increase of 28 percent between 2015 and 2021.

With these encouraging statistics, on the surface one might assume that the symbiotic relationship between restaurants and tourism is healthy and thriving. However, there are several policy issues hovering at the federal, state and local levels that can adversely affect tourism, which in turn, have the potential to greatly impact the restaurant industry.

28

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

Thanks to summer travel and tourism, restaurants are also the second-largest creator of summer jobs. Nationwide, restaurants add approximately 400,000 employees during the summer travel season.


Visas and International Tourism Despite the NTTO’s rosy long term outlook on international travelers coming to the United States, new data from the U.S. Travel Association indicates that in the first seven months of 2017 there was a four percent decline from the previous year, with a 3.3 percent drop in travel spending. Numbers from July 2017 show that inbound travel from the Middle East was down 40 percent, 32 percent down from Africa, and 15 percent down from South America. A dip in international visitors makes a big wave in the economy, as foreign visitors spend significantly more than domestic travelers do – in New York City, for example, it was found that foreign travelers spent four times as much as U.S. visitors. Some are blaming this dip - $4.6 billion in lost spending and 40,000 jobs, on President Trump’s tightening of immigration policies, along with a controversial travel ban on a select group of Muslimmajority nations. The new requirements for temporary visas are more stringent and affect approximately 14 million people each year (40 percent of overseas visitors to the U.S.). Visa-seekers must now disclose five years’ worth of social media profiles, travel history and other information, making the process considerably longer. To address this issue, in January, ten business associations, including the U.S. Travel Association, U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Restaurant Association, launched a new travel industry group focused on reviving the popularity of the U.S. as an international travel destination. The group, aptly named the “Visit U.S. Coalition”, is effectively working to change federal policy regarding travel visas, and border security along with implementing other travelfriendly measures. The Texas Budget The 2017 legislative session was a tumultuous time for the Texas tourism industry. The business, trade associations, and industry segments have come to rely on state budget funding to promote the tourism industry. State budget tourism dollars were slashed in half for 2018-19 to $34 million – down from $67.7 million in 2016-17.

Why the significant drop in the state’s commitment to fund tourism in Texas? Many states have seen their state tourism budgets cut in recent years. Texas policymakers have said that the tight state budget was the reason that the tourism budget was cut – just as many other state programs were cut. Some conspiracy theorists suspect it is due, in part, to the debate over the bathroom bill. Many tourism groups and business associations, including the Texas Restaurant Association, were opposed to the bathroom bill, as the most onerous version required all public facilities to only permit a person to enter the bathroom of their birth gender. State lawmakers worked hard to find a compromise by exempting tourist-related facilities, but the debate was polarizing. The tourism industry and business groups wanted to maintain welcoming, non-discriminatory business practices and felt that the bathroom bill, in any form, would be detrimental to group travel and events. Texas state tourism dollars are used to promote the state as a vibrant and welcoming destination. As restaurants directly benefit from tourism spending, it is important that the Texas Legislature continue to fully fund Texas tourism promotion so that restaurants, and the rest of the Texas economy, can reap the benefits of tourism spending. While it is still too early to tell how the budget cuts will affect tourism in Texas, some states, most notably Colorado, have seen tourism dollars and tourist spending decline when the state cut the tourism and advertising budget. Governor Abbott and Texas lawmakers have indicated a willingness to seek matching grants and other funding mechanisms to put more money into the state tourism budget. The Texas School Start Debate Every two years the Texas public school start date debate pits the education community against the tourism industry. The Texas legislature stands in the middle, attempting to craft a balanced solution. In recent sessions, there has been very little progress on a compromise that will benefit students and educators, while protecting the Texas tourism industry.

R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

29


$

7. 9 5

online th Onlin rouggh throu h 12/31 12/31//2018 2016

Classroom training also available! (English or Spanish)

CALL FOR PROPOSAL

Phil Willis,

CCI, CFM, FMP, HBS

512.457.4166

Texas Requires Statewide Food Handler Certification Ge t C e r ti fi e d wit h S e r v S afe Food Han dle r Te xas on li n e

servsafe.com/txfoodhandler ACCEPTED EVERYWHERE IN TEXAS

ANSI-accredited; approved by the Texas Department of State Health Services


Current Texas law, passed in 2007, provides that a school district cannot start school before the fourth Monday in August. However, there is an exception to the fourth Monday rule if a school is deemed to be a “district of innovation.” The waiver was intended to accommodate an earlier start date required for other innovations, such as year-round learning. While well-intentioned, this waiver or exception has been widely used by school districts for the sole purpose of an earlier start date. By one count, 41 of the 50 largest school districts in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area have been designated “districts of innovation.” The tourism industry – resorts, amusement parks, hotels, and restaurants – all supported the current fourth Monday start date to give students, educators, and the tourism industry the chance to benefit from a full summer of rest, relaxation and business. Richie Jackson, CEO of the Texas Restaurant Association says, “While you might not remember the atomic weight of carbon or how to calculate the radius of a circle, we all have that special memory of the family vacation to the beach, an amusement park, or the great outdoors. Early school start is an attack on the memories our children will cherish.” School districts and educators have sought for an earlier start date – including the district of innovation carve out – because they argue it is needed because of the unequal number of school days in the fall and spring semesters, the increased state testing mandates that take away from classroom instruction, and the need to be innovative to compete with charter and private schools. The tourism industry argues that August is often its busiest and most profitable month, the time when most families take their vacations, and that an earlier school start date will reduce cities’ tax collections at a time when cities are facing budget issues across the state.

David Teel, president and CEO of the Texas Travel Industry Association says, “We’re unaware of any objective and measurable data that show earlier school start dates in Texas yield a better educated child - no direct, verifiable cause and effect. However, an abundance of data exists showing early school start dates directly alter family choices and behaviors in a way that cause business disruptions in the private sector, costing the Texas economy billions of dollars in economic activity and tens of thousands of jobs. It’s time policymakers begin to recognize that arbitrary, early school start dates provide little, if any, measurable educational value, but they create significant hardships for Texas families, Texas businesses and the Texas economy.” A 2017 Perryman Group study determined that for each week the school year is moved earlier, the cost to Texas would be around $300 million in direct tourism spending – translating to more than $1 billion in aggregate spending, 7,506 jobs, $62.1 million in state tax revenues and $24 million annually to local governments. The school start debate will likely continue into the 2019 legislative session. Renowned for its Southern charm and hospitality, the Lone Star State continues to rely on its legendary reputation for being an exceptional travel destination. Tourists continue to flock from around the world to explore, often with food and restaurants at the epicenter. While the Texas travel industry remains strong, it is important to note these headwinds of change have the potential to significantly impact restaurants. Working with policymakers at the local, state and federal levels to support appropriate school schedules, and travel reforms, reduce barriers to international travel, and actively promote international travel to the U.S. are among measures we can take to ensure continued growth and keep travelers “coming back y’all!”

31


................ .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .... .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .. .... .... ..A .. .... ..DOL ..Program .. .. ..to.. .... .... .... new .... .... .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. ..... wage and hour violations .... ..resolve .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .. .. .. .. .. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .. .. .. ................................

The PAID Program

T

ired of wage and hour violations? Tired of wage and hour lawsuits? Well, the Department of Labor (DOL) has a program to help resolve your issues before it is too late. When it comes to potential minimum wage and overtime violations, both employers and employees often face months, if not years, of protracted audits, investigations, litigation and settlement discussions. This means that employees are often left without their due compensation for long periods of time and for employers, it may mean long-term payroll uncertainty, business interruption, and the potential for significant fines and damages if bad faith is found. The Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the DOL has recently announced its new Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) program to help employers and employees navigate their way through the morass of minimum wage and overtime underpayment problems. We all know that the Federal Labor Standards Act (FLSA) can be a minefield of problems, so this new PAID program seeks to provide some clarity and certainty for wage and hour underpayments. PAID is available to any business that is covered by the FLSA, seeking to resolve inadvertent FLSA minimum wage and overtime violations, willing to

32

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

meet program requirements, acting in good faith, and willing to commit to future compliance under the FLSA. An employer starts the process by conducting a thorough self-audit to see if there are any wage and hour violations in its business. After the self-audit the employer contacts the DOL to request participation in the PAID program. The DOL will ask the employer for specific information about back wage calculations, persons affected, payroll records, and the alleged violations relating to FLSA issues, minimum wage, and overtime. Once DOL has reviewed the violations and determined that violations have occurred, then the employer is obligated to pay 100% of the waged owned to the employees no later than the next regulatory scheduled pay period. The PAID Program provides employers and employees with benefits that cannot be obtained through litigation or administrative settlement of wage and hour violations. For businesses, they will not be subject to liquidated damages or civil money penalties. In addition, the DOL will provide a form for employee signatures waiving their FLSA claims for the specific violations that were corrected. This will greatly reduce the likelihood of litigation or class action litigation. For employees, they will receive 100% of wages owed without having to pay for litigation expenses and attorneys’ fees. They will also receive their wages much quicker than if they had filed litigation. Not all employers are eligible to take advantage of the PAID program. If the WHD finds that a business is acting in bad faith, then the business cannot take advantage of the program. In addition, to be eligible, a business must self-report violations, cannot be a repeat violator, cannot use PAID to resolve recurring violations, and cannot use PAID to settle ongoing lawsuits. Click here for more information about PAID.

............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... .............................. ..............................


... .. ..

A NEW NATIONWIDE PILOT PROGRAM The Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) program expedites resolution of inadvertent overtime and minimum wage violations under the Fair Labor Standards Act, and provides a framework for employers to proactively resolve those violations without litigation. Employers that self-report may work in good faith with the Wage and Hour Division to correct mistakes and provide due compensation to their employees. These employers will not be subject to liquidated damages or civil money penalties as a condition to resolve the potential violations. WHD will oversee resolution of the potential violations by assessing the amount of wages due and supervising their payment to employees. The program requires employers to review WHD’s compliance assistance materials, carefully audit their pay practices, and agree to correct the pay practices at issue going forward. For complete information about the PAID program, please visit www.dol.gov/whd/PAID.

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

1-866-487-9243 DOL.GOV/WHD R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

33


ME M B E R S H I P SP OT LI GHT

............................... How does the culinary scene in San Antonio ............................... compare to New York, and other places ............................... ............................... ............................... you have experienced in the industry? ............................... ............................... New York City is an internationally ............................... ............................... ............................... recognized food mecca, of course, ............................... ............................... ............................... and I am so grateful for all I learned ............................... ............................... and experienced there. But San ............................... ............................... ............................... Antonio is definitely coming into its ............................... ............................... own as a food destination, and I’m ............................... ............................... ............................... excited to be a part of it. ............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... ...............................

............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... ............................... .............................. TIM THE GIRL - NEW MEMBER SPOTLIGHT .............. ................

TRA welcomes new member Tim the Girl - a multi-disciplinary company changing the face of the culinary scene in San Antonio. Founded in 2011 by owner Tim McDiarmid, she and her team source the best produce, meats and artisanal foods that San Antonio has to offer, translating them into dishes that are not only delicious, but aesthetically stunning. Specializing in catering and event planning, Tim the Girl was voted Best Caterer by San Antonio Magazine’s Best of City 2017. They pride themselves on offering unique, personalized menus using fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. Meet the woman behind the business, Tim McDiarmid. Who or what got you excited about joining the culinary industry? I grew up on a farm – fresh, local food was always a part of my life. When I moved to New York City in the early 90s the “farm to table” trend was exploding, so I felt really at home working in creative, visionary restaurants. I knew I wanted to use those influences in my own business.

34

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

What do you feel makes Tim the Girl unique compared to other businesses in the foodservice industry? I think it’s our staff – it’s not just a job for us. My staff are very knowledgeable and support the overall vision of simple food done well. What is your favorite restaurant or cuisine to enjoy when you’ve stepped out of your own kitchen? I lead a culinary trip to Cinque Terre, Italy every year – fresh seafood and the vibrant flavors of Southern Italian cooking are a must. At home, I still love the same kind of classic food I serve at Tim the Girl – Supper at the Hotel Emma and Clementine are both great new additions, and Cascabel in King William has been a favorite for years. How do you keep up with current food trends? What are your favorites? I’m terrible with trends! I never get tired of fresh, hearty, real food, served without a lot fuss. What cultures or key thoughts does your team value that allow your business to run successfully? We really try to be a part of our community and support a variety of causes. We’re also open to working with a wide range of budgets. A lot of clients think they can’t afford to have a small event catered, but we love to get creative and help make those more intimate gatherings special! Visit: www.timthegirl.com (210-439-0030)


FOR SALE OR CONSTRUCTION PARTNER/OPERATOR/INVESTOR FOR SALE OR CONSTRUCTION PARTNER/OPERATOR/INVESTOR

Destination restaurant site situated in the heart of the Texas hill country winery region The Texas Hill Country Winery region is quickly becoming the must-see travel destination for wine connoisseurs: Wine Enthusiast Magazine voted the Texas HiIl Country one of the top 10 wine destinations in America (2014) The Travel Channel says “Every wine connoisseur’s bucket list should include a trip to the Texas Hill Country region”

This is the opportunity you’ve been waiting for! 5.76 acre site with 3 historic buildings:

Stovepipe’s Barn (circa 1880) slated to be BBQ, Hamburgers, & Pizza Craddock House (circa 1906) slated to be Home Cooking Johnson House (circa 1884) slated to be Fine Dining The site fronts Highway 29- a major thoroughfare for west Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, & California with an average14,534 cars per day Would also make an excellent winery or craft brewery

Features:

• LCRA permit in place for site construction • City of Burnet building permits in place for building construction • Site engineering complete • Blueprints complete • Mechanical engineering plans complete • New PEC underground 3 phase utilities installed, transformers set • 8” city water main to site with fire plug and meter • 2” Atmos gas line to site • Lift station and city sewer installed to site

For more information

Call or text Stephen at (512) 638-7912 or email: Info@AiryMount.com R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

35


Keynote

Conversations: Johnny Hernandez & Hugo Ortega Join two award-winning and well-respected Texas chefs for an in-depth conversation on food, family, culture, and our industry. You won't want to miss this dynamic session! Chef Hernandez was born and raised in a community of first-generation Mexican-American families and grew up surrounded by the foods and traditions of interior Mexico that made their way across the border. Encouraged by his father to become a chef, he attended the prestigious Culinary Institute of America in New York. Johnny began his career at a number of exclusive resort destinations, including the Mirage Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada and the Four Seasons Biltmore in Santa Barbara, California. Upon returning to San Antonio in 1994, he opened his first venture, True Flavors Catering which earned national recognition for catering excellence.

Chef Johnny Hernandez

C

hef Johnny Hernandez is a celebrated chef, entrepreneur, and founder and President of Grupo La Gloria and True Flavors Inc. He is one of the premier Mexican cuisine chefs in the United States and a recognized authority on Mexican cuisine and culture. Chef Hernandez first garnered notoriety as a rising star on the culinary scene in 2010 with the launch of his acclaimed flagship concept, La Gloria. His culinary ventures have since expanded to become Grupo La Gloria, a diverse and growing portfolio of signature restaurants and culinary projects.

36

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

The most profound influence on Chef Hernandez’s culinary style has been his extensive travels throughout Mexico. His time spent exploring the cultural nuances of each region’s art, agricultural, and street foods has shaped his vision to create authentic and accessible interior Mexican cuisine for American diners. His mission is to celebrate and preserve traditional Mexican food, ingredients and techniques. This mission serves as the guiding principle for creating unique dining experiences that reflect the rich and diverse flavors and culture of Mexico. Chef Hernandez has received acclaim in publications such as Texas Monthly, Bon Appetit, Poder, Saveur, Travel & Leisure, Food & Wine, Martha Stewart Magazine, Garden and Gun, NBC Latino, Tasting Table and Southern Living. He has been featured as a guest judge on Bravo’s Top Chef and has appeared on the Cooking Channel’s Man Fire Food and Simply Ming, as well as Travel Channel’s Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern and Food Paradise. In 2016, Chef Hernandez showcased his culinary expertise and the flavors of Mexico at the White House as Guest Chef for President Barack Obama.


Tracy and Hugo are also investors in Origen restaurant in Oaxaca, Mexico and with their team created the menu for Hugo’s Cocina in Terminal C at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston. In 2017, Hugo was approached by celebrity chef Michael Mina to do a “pop-up” concept at his Mina Test Kitchen in San Francisco, and Mi Almita was born. The concept will become a brick and mortar restaurant in Los Angles in early 2019, and recently opened in The Street Food Hall by Michael Mina on Honolulu, Hawaii. Hugo was a James Beard Award finalist for six consecutive years, 2012-2017, and took the top prize in 2017. He has been invited twice to do guest chef dinners at the acclaimed James Beard House in NYC, has participated in numerous James Beard Celebrity Chef Tours across the country, and was recently asked to prepare the main course for the James Beard Foundation Awards Media & Journalism gala dinner in NYC.

Chef Hugo Ortega

Hugo is one of Houston’s most acclaimed chefs and believes that a chef is only as good as the last meal he cooked. He remains a fixture in his four restaurant kitchens, is an avid bicyclist, and enjoys spending time at the beach with his family.

T

he winner of Best Chef: Southwest at the prestigious 2017 James Beard Foundation Awards started with very humble beginnings but is now considered a premier Mexican/Latino chef. Hugo was raised in Mexico City and Puebla, Mexico, and learned his love of cooking from his mother and grandmother, a revered mole maker. At age 17, he left Mexico for Houston and began his career in the restaurant industry as a dishwasher and busboy at Backstreet Cafe before graduating from culinary school and later becoming its executive chef and owner, along with wife Tracy Vaught. His American Dream continued when they opened Hugo’s in 2002, featuring regional Mexican cuisine; Caracol, a Mexican coastal kitchen, in Houston’s Galleria area in 2013; and Xochi, celebrating the flavors of Oaxaca, in early 2017 in the Marriott Marquis Houston Downtown. Hugo has published two cookbooks: Hugo Ortega’s Street Food of Mexico (2012) and Backstreet Kitchen: Seasonal Recipes from Our Neighborhood Cafe (2013).

DATE Monday, July 16, 2018 TIME 1:00pm - 2:00pm LOCATION Big Bend Big Ideas Stage SPEAKER(S) Johnny Hernandez, La Gloria Hugo Ortega, Backstreet Cafe, Hugo’s, Caracol, and Xochi

R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

37


PRODUCED BY:

Where Food Means Business! TRADE SHOW • EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT • COMMUNITY GATHERING

JULY 15-16

Come add your voice to the second largest gathering of restaurant and hospitality professionals in the U.S. Interact with Texas and the U.S.'s leading chefs and restaurant owners, hear from experts, and meet with the vendors and partners who can increase your restaurant's productivity and profitability.

tramarketplace.com 800.395.2872 expoinfo@tramail.org

38

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

Profile for Texas Restaurant Association

Rvm spring 2018  

Rvm spring 2018