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Restaurantville ‘13

spring

MAGAZINE

CONNECTING THE TEXAS RESTAURANT COMMUNITY

How Does Your Garden Grow? The How-to’s and Why’s of Local Sourcing

Photo by Shayda Heath, Phoenix Farms, Bastrop


Restaurantville MAGAZINE Connecting the Texas Restaurant Community PUBLISHER Richie Jackson, CEO Texas Restaurant Association EDITOR Wendy Saari, Vice President, Marketing & Communications Texas Restaurant Association CONTRIBUTORS Rebecca Ann Robinson Matthew Mabel ART DIRECTOR Joanna King, Graphic Design Manager Texas Restaurant Association ADVERTISING Joanne Pantaze, JP Solutions Restaurantville Magazine is published quarterly by the Texas Restaurant Association. It is the mission of the Texas Restaurant Association to be the advocate and indispensable resource for the foodservice and hospitality industry in Texas. For advertising information contact Joanne Pantaze, 512 -273-2639 or jpantaze@pvco.net. Editorial questions can be directed to Wendy Saari at 512-457-4100 or wsaari@tramail.org.

P.O. Box 1429 Austin, Texas 78767 512-457-4100 800-395-2872 www.restaurantville.com

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‘13

spring

contents

F E A T U R E S

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HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW?

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FOCUS ON GROWTH IN 2013

D E P A R T M E N T S

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TEXAS 360

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COMMUNITY NEWS

C L I C K H E R E TO SUBSCRIBE

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How Does Your Garden Grow?

The How-to’s and Why’s of Local Sourcing

By Rebecca Ann Robinson

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Photo by Shayda Heath, Phoenix Farms, Bastrop


“I don’t want this to be a trend, I’d love to see local sourcing become the new norm.” – Valerie Broussard, Forager & Food/Beverage Buyer, W Hotel, Austin

It’s no wonder that local sourcing came up as the number one trend in the National Restaurant Association’s What's Hot in 2013 survey. Local bounty is showing up everywhere, and not just farm to table restaurants. Local sourcing has gone corporate with large hotel chains, retail stores and now schools. People are much more aware of, and concerned about, their food and where it comes from. They are more health-conscious than ever before. They are sensitive to growing environmental stress and reducing our ‘carbon footprint’ on the planet. It’s a top trend because customers are now demanding it.

Bison burger, Boiler House Restaurant, San Antonio

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It’s ironic that what used to be a normal way of life (imagine explaining ‘local sourcing’ to a Pilgrim) is now a trend. After decades of industrialization, population boom, two World Wars and geographical spread which led to mass food processing and packaging, people are finally getting back to their roots. The many great reasons to go local are obvious; positive economic effect on local communities, the wonderful taste of fresh product (who can dispute the flavor of a freshly picked Texas peach?) and of course, attracting customers. The positive environmental impact has also been proven; the closer a product is to home, the less fuel, packaging and waste. However, at the end of the day, business is business. When survival in a tough economy means paying strict attention to the bottom line, how practical is it to source locally and what is the best way to go about it?

Mythbusters: COST Valerie Broussard is a professionally trained chef with a degree in Food and Nutrition from Florida State University and a Master’s Degree in Food Culture and Communications from

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While it’s true that in some cases locally grown products can be slightly higher, prices have dropped dramatically over the years as consumer (and chef) demand have increased. the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy. She’s devoted her career to conscious cuisine. Her title at the W Hotel in Austin speaks to her and the hotel’s philosophy: ‘Forager, Food & Beverage Buyer.’ It also befits the philosophy behind the hotel’s restaurant, TRACE, which refers to the traceability of ingredients. What does that mean exactly, a ‘forager’? “I have a hybrid position,” Broussard says. She operates much like a director of purchasing, but shops and sources locally. As a professional forager, Broussard states that one of the most common misperceptions (and therefore barrier) to local sourcing is cost. While it’s true that in some cases locally grown products can be slightly higher, prices have dropped dramatically over the years as consumer (and chef) demand have increased. Many local farmers and purveyors will often offer a bulk discount. Texas is very fortunate to have John Lash, owner/operator of Farm to Table, LLC, one of only

three people in the United States who makes his living serving as a middleman between chefs and local farmers. Located in Austin, and working with his son and about a dozen employees, Lash is able to order from numerous local producers and is competitive, if not less expensive, than traditional distributors. He sells to mass market customers including PTerry's, Threadgills, Kerbey Lane Cafe, Taco Deli among many others. He helps those on the restaurant side by delivering local product from many different locations and helps farmers, who may not be able to sell (or deliver) on their own. If there is a slightly higher cost on certain items, some customers are willing to pay for the extra effort. Erica Beneke, Executive Chef at Max’s Wine Dive in Austin observes, “There may be some higher costs associated with purchasing local foods but in my experience, customers are willing to pay that extra amount to know that their food was

John Lash, Owner/Operator, Farm to Table, LLC

Farm to Table delivery truck

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grown with love, treated with respect and that much of that money is going back in to the local economy.” Beneke does business with Lash and also gets some of her produce from Johnson's Backyard Garden, an organic farm in East Austin. She and her staff volunteer on the farm from time to time, and “…they pay us in vegetables!”

Erica Beneke, Executive Chef, Max’s Wine Dive

Broussard also views local sourcing in terms of value. Price might not always be on par every time, but you’ve got a week longer shelf life. And if inventory is carefully organized and managed well, there can be a savings. “If you want the local food movement to grow and you want to have the resources available to you, you don’t want to undercut them.” She says that it is important to understand their process. “It’s labor-intensive. Most don’t have machinery. They plant by hand and they pick by hand. That’s why it’s so incredibly fresh.”

Mythbusters: LOGISTICS Another common barrier to sourcing locally is logistics, especially for smaller restaurants that are owner operated. Many chefs and restaurant owners don’t

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If you want the local food movement to grow, you don’t want to undercut them... They plant by hand and they pick by hand. That’s why it’s so incredibly fresh. have time to haunt the farmer’s markets during the week, if at all. However, with the demand for local product increasing, many farmers and purveyors now deliver, which was rare even just a few years ago. Sometimes once a week, sometimes multiple times per week and they vary on minimum order requirements. Jeff White, Executive Chef of the Boiler House restaurant in San Antonio says that local sourcing has gotten to the point where farmers will find you. “They are very resilient. They put a lot of energy into what they are doing. They have superior product. Even if you are not looking for it, it eventually is going to show up on your doorstep because they need your business and support. They really care.” Not close to a market or no time to visit? Lash recommends having a conversation with the


JOIN US IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CANCER!

From July 12 to September 28, 2013, when MasterCard® cardholders spend $10 or more for a meal on their card, MasterCard will make a one-cent donation to Stand Up To Cancer – up to $4 million.*

To learn how you can support this cause, go to mastercard.com/supportSU2C.

*Certain terms and conditions apply: From July 12 – September 28, 2013, MasterCard will donate to Stand Up to Cancer $.01 per qualifying restaurant transactions of $10 or more, up to $4 million. Promotional dates may change based on contributions. The promotion applies to U.S. qualifying restaurant purchases made by MasterCard cardholders with MasterCard cards issued by U.S. financial institutions. Stand Up To Cancer is a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF), a 501(C)(3) tax-exempt organization. EIF meets all 20 BBB Charity Standards. Stand Up To Cancer and the Stand Up To Cancer Brand Mark are registered trademarks of the Entertainment Industry Foundation. MasterCard and the MasterCard Brand Mark are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. Dine and Be Generous is a trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. ©2013 MasterCard. R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M AG A Z I N E

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GO TEXAN Restaurant Round-Up

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farmers and if they do not deliver, sometimes they will take orders during the week and have them packaged and ready for pickup at the farmers market on a Saturday.

GETTING 'INTO THE FIELD’ Finding out prices and delivery schedules starts with the first and most important step; getting out into the field (literally) and talking with local growers and purveyors. Like anything in life, ultimately, it depends upon relationships. The best and most obvious way to do that is to visit the local farmer’s markets or the farms themselves. When you do arrive, be ready to ask questions. • Is there a delivery schedule? If so, how often and what days of the week? • Is there a product availability list via email? Ask to be added. • Is there a minimum order requirement? What does Broussard look for when working with a farm? One thing she looks for when buying meat is the ‘never ever’ program. ‘Never ever’ refers to no growth hormones, and emphasizes the humane treatment of animals. She also looks for farms that grow their food naturally—no

Melvin Itz, Itz Garden, Fredericksburg, TX

chemicals. She asks about fertilizer. She says it is a good sign if animals are around, which usually means that manure is used. She also looks for on-site composting. To stay organized, Broussard also keeps a detailed spreadsheet of purveyors and product throughout the year.

The ‘Never ever’ program refers to no growth hormones, and emphasizes the humane treatment of animals.

It’s easy to get caught up in the fervor of local sourcing, but it is important to stay focused on product quality. Brooks Anderson is Co-owner of Boulevardier and Veritas Wine Bar in Dallas, one of Texas Monthly’s (and D Magazine’s) 10 best new restaurants of 2012. He cautions people R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M AG A Z I N E

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to make sure that the product they are purchasing measures up. In other words; don’t purchase something just because it is local. He strongly believes in using local whenever possible, but he makes sure that the products are outstanding. Fortunately, Texas has a lot of great product to choose from. “We had a killer grapefruit season this year,” he says, “… and Texas has a number of excellent purveyors. We use Texas cheeses, jerky, chocolates and even Texas spirits, which have expanded just over the last six months. Products have to resonate with customers.”

BE FLEXIBLE Texans are extremely lucky when it comes to locally grown products. Most places in the country have a June through October growing season. Texas has a variety of bounty year-round. However, sourcing locally does require flexibility because even with a year-round variety of product, availability can be affected by a number of factors, not the least of which is the notoriously unpredictable Texas weather.

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You can use variety to your advantage. Many chefs have switched to using a seasonal menu which not only adds nice variety but also allows for fresh ingredients year round. Seasonal menus also give restaurants yet another news item to ‘announce’ and market to consumers. Zach Lutton is the Chef/Owner of Zedric’s in San Antonio, which offers fresh and healthy takeaway food. He admits that sourcing locally does take time and patience. Flexibility is key, because a drought for instance, can affect an entire season. Availability of product greatly affects his menu and what he offers. “We’re a very different concept. Everything is pre-packaged, fresh and never frozen. We write labels, listing out where things come from. It can be a tough thing if you are depending upon a certain product, especially if you are small.” Lutton is committed to local sourcing whenever possible and although he would love to be 100% local eventually, he does (like everyone) have to reach outside of local sources to fill gaps in availability.

Even with a yearround variety of product, availability can be affected by a number of factors, not the least of which is the notoriously unpredictable Texas weather.


Zedric's, San Antonio

You don’t have to go all or nothing You don’t have to jump all in at once or turn your menu upside down. If you are just beginning to source locally, or even thinking about it, consider implementing changes incrementally. Starting small can be less overwhelming. For example, consider highlighting one special item on a dish. “You can highlight something like a baby rainbow carrot as a specialty item for which you might pay a little bit more, but you don’t need to spend that same amount on chopped carrots for mirepoix,” says Broussard.

January–July crop growing schedule, Farm to Table

Along the same lines, you can highlight one or two dishes seasonally, or eventually, most of the menu. Beneke did that with her menu when she began her job, “My first priority was to re-

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Rooftop apiary with 11 bee hives producing fresh, local honey at the W Hotel, Austin

design our menu throughout the year as the seasons change.” You can also get creative about the different types of local product you carry. Pick a handful of items to try. There are excellent Texas cheeses, honey, chocolate, spirits, beer, produce, meats, condiments, olive oil, spirits and over 500 Texas wineries!

TELL PEOPLE ABOUT IT Local sourcing efforts can add leverage to your marketing. Consumers are increasingly aware of where their food comes from and if they haven’t asked you already, they will. Tell people about your efforts and that you are supporting the sustainability of the local community food system, which builds goodwill and customer loyalty.

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Tell people about your efforts and that you are supporting the sustainability of the local community food system, which builds goodwill and customer loyalty. There are many creative ways you can share product information; list sources on menus or counter signs, develop a product/dish of the month or season, feature seasonal desserts, highlight them on place flyers, websites or social media. Cross promote with local producers in your social media strategies. Anderson says that when he wanted to do something to draw a crowd and call attention to Veritas Winery, they chose to partner with a local organic farmer, Kelly Farm, to host a special event. Events can be an

excellent way to cross promote and build relationships with the public. Anderson also enjoys the camaraderie. “It’s a lot of fun as a business owner to establish relationships with the people who provide our products.” Local products are so ubiquitous now that chefs and restaurateurs have had to become much more creative with how they utilize the homegrown trend. At Boulevardier and Veritas Wine Bar, Anderson does inhouse pickling, from local okra to quail eggs to watermelon rinds.


At the W Hotel in Austin Broussard talks about an herb garden on the fourth floor of the hotel and most recently, a rooftop apiary with 11 hives for fresh honey. “We are working with a nonprofit, Central Texas Bee Rescue that uses bees that have been rescued rather than exterminated,” she says. And on Trace’s beverage menu locally sourced beers are listed from ‘Texas, USA’. As for the rest? ‘Less Cool Places’.

CONCLUSION There are definitely still some challenges with sourcing locally; cost, availability, logistics and consistency. However with increased demand by both consumers, chefs and restaurateurs, the challenges have lessened over the years and for many, the benefits far outweigh them. Many chefs are seeing return on investment and sourcing locally has already become their new normal. Beneke is ok with the challenges. “In my eyes, they remind us that there are struggles associated with growing food, which teaches us to respect the land and those who work so hard to grow it.”

TIPS ON GOING LOCAL From Valerie Broussard, Forager, Food & Beverage Buyer TRACE, W Hotel, Austin 1. Visit farms and farmer’s markets on a regular basis. Develop relationships with growers and purveyors. 2. Do your research and ask questions. Do the farmers make deliveries? How often? Will they offer a bulk discount? 3. Market your efforts, share your sources with your customers. 4. You don’t have to revamp your entire menu or source everything locally all at once. Start with a few products at a time or try rotating seasonal dishes into the menu. 5. Be flexible. Understand that weather and other factors will affect availability.

HELPFUL LINKS www.ediblecommunities.com www.localharvest.org www.organicconsumers.org www.gotexan.org

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Write a Better Job Posting, NOW!

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CHOOSE YOUR JOB POSTING SERVICE

Would you like: A. A ton of emails clogging your inbox with under-qualified looky-loos? If so, go to Craigslist.com. B. A source of experienced candidates, with resumes organized and hosted for you? If so, go to PoachedJobs.com.

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WRITE YOUR JOB POSTING

Job title Name the position(s) that you’re looking for. Company Don’t even think about being coy and mysterious and leaving out the restaurant name. It’s annoying, and it reduces the effectiveness of your ad. Job description Be specific, be enticing, but don’t sugar coat. Include: • Shifts/hours • Minimum years of experience • Salary • Special requirements (drug testing, bilingual, lift 50 pounds, etc.) Sweeten the pot Make sure you get the cream-ofthe-crop by enticing them with a few niceties, such as: • Room for upward mobility • Competitive wages • Medical benefits • Discount programs • Vacation • Paid sick leave

Describe the restaurant Just a sentence or two is fine, not a dissertation. Submission requirements Let the applicant know exactly what you want and how you want them to apply. • Cover letter, resume, references, salary history • Apply online, no calls/no walkins, or apply in person

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LASTLY Don’t be tempted to include your company email address. Unless you enjoy getting spam.

Spell check, grammar check, punctuation check, and give it to someone else to read. Use proper English, fer cryin’out loud.

PoachedJobs.com is an elegantly intuitive job hosting site for the food and drink industry. PoachedJobs is headquartered in Portland, OR, with additional job boards for Seattle, San Francisco, New York, Austin, Dallas, Houston, and Chicago.


Food Drinks Jobs

The best job listings for the Texas Food & Drink Industry. The best hiring tools for Owners & Managers. AUS / CHI / DFW / HOU / NYC / PDX / SEA / SFO

PoachedJobs.com R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M AG A Z I N E

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Focus on Growth in 2013 By Matthew Mabel, Surrender Inc.

Who knows you better than the vendors who serve you? Maybe nobody. That’s why it’s interesting that your vendors rate the growth of same-store sales as the biggest issue and challenge they see for restaurateurs in Texas. And the second-biggest issue is a tie between finding real estate for new units and obtaining necessary financing. These priorities were revealed by a survey of Texas Restaurant Association allied members conducted by Dallasbased Surrender, Inc., a 20-year-old hospitality and organizational development consulting firm, in partnership with TRA.

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“At Surrender, we notice that too. All of our clients are pursuing growth, reflecting the belief that conditions for business will be positive and that the positive indicators outnumber the negative. I also believe this represents the entrepreneurial spirit held by so many restaurateurs. After a few years of recovering from the Great Recession, it is in an entrepreneur’s blood to grow businesses—you can only keep them down for so long.

"Every day they hear stories about operational challenges and the perils of coming healthcare expenses..."

Many TRA members have had trusted relationships with their vendors for decades. Together, they have been through the ups and downs of economic cycles, eating trends, and shifting consumer tastes. It is not surprising that TRA allied members have a clear perspective on issues that are important to their customers.

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“You might not have expected that vendors are most focused on the growth of their customers’ businesses. Every day they hear stories about operational challenges and the perils of coming healthcare expenses, yet they still say that growth is their most important emphasis,” commented Surrender Inc. President Matthew Mabel. “We believe this is an indication of positive economic conditions here in Texas. There is a good chance that vendors in other parts of the country might not have the same perspective.

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“Growing same-store sales is a constant focus of business, whether that be internal training and education to better bond with guests and sell at the table or embarking on smart marketing and branding

campaigns. Top restaurateurs are taking advantage of triedand-true methods of building sales in their dining rooms and increasing guest frequency. “It may initially be surprising to think that finding locations for new units is seen as such a challenge by vendors. But the Recession-era real estate bargains are gone. A sites and even B sites are in demand. We see restaurateurs being smart and patient in considering locations that are available and considering how much they are willing to bend from their site criteria in order to build units. “It is no surprise that obtaining necessary financing is a big topic. Credit markets are not what they were. On the other hand, we see a continued interest in both bank financing and venture capital for long-standing established operators and companies. There is private venture capital available from people who understand the business and know that the restaurant industry is going to continue to be an important focus of the lives of all Texans. 86% of survey respondents said they were optimistic about the future of their business. They value the strong partnerships they have with their restaurant customers and hope to help them achieve their growth goals.

www.surrender.biz


Health Care Reform: Guidance and Solutions  Guidance

The TRA is committed to helping you understand what the regulations mean to your business and what you need to do to comply.

 Solutions

The TRA trusts UnitedHealthcare to develop health care solutions for the hospitality industry that comply with the Affordable Care Act.

To discuss UnitedHealthcare’s solutions for your business, contact Kimberlee Vandervoorn at (301) 865-7058 or kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

Š2013 United HealthCare Services, Inc. Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare of Texas, Inc. UHCTX638981-000 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M AG A Z I N E

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Š 2013 Texas Mutual Insurance Company

Reduce Your Costs and Workplace Injuries.

Get A Full Serving of Savings. Texas Restaurant Association combines your business with other restaurants to provide workers’ comp premium discounts and job-specific safety resources. As a member of the Restaurant Association Safety Group, eligible businesses may also qualify for both group and individual dividends and receive a discount for choosing the healthcare network option.

Contact your agent or Scott Lea at (800) 395-2872 or email slea@tramail.org.

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Dividends are based on performance and are not guaranteed.

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ADVERTORIAL • ADVERTORIAL 70% OF ALL ONLINE CONVERSATIONS ARE ABOUT FOOD This is pretty incredible. It’s also not really surprising when you think about it. Food is life and we share our life online with our friends, co-workers even strangers. Savvy restaurant operators know we are now all part of an economy powered by online conversation. The Era of Social Media Word of mouth advertising is great, but it doesn’t scale the way we want it to. As operators, we have always relied on the power of the referral; deliver a good dining experience and “hope” that a satisfied guest will tell someone and then “hope” that someone will decide to make a visit. Well, “hope” is not a strategy that can be relied on. Running a restaurant is hard work. We are reviewed and rated, We are evaluated and judged for both FOH and BOH performance every guest, every meal, every time. We need feedback to improve and innovate and compete. However, prior to 2006, word-of-mouth didn’t have a platform.

compete, operators need to be educated and be smarter about social media practices and engage with their guests interactively and frequently. They must connect, communicate, engage, and leverage social media and the array of tools and technologies that will help them manage a brand in the 21st century. Foodservice Social Media Universe (#FSMU) Social media just makes sense and is a huge gift to the restaurant industry. As operators, we have seen how food has become a favorite American pastime over the past 15 years. Social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google +, Instagram, Foursquare and hundreds of other apps and technologies, help restaurateurs engage with their customers, find new customers and develop better relationships that can drive consumers into restaurants. That is why FohBoh (Front of the House, Back of the House), an interac-

tive online community for restaurateurs developed Foodservice Social Media Universe. FSMU is about education and discovery in a forum that is all about restaurant social media best practices and technology. Join us in Austin! 3rd Annual Foodservice Social Media Universe Conference September 15 – 17, 2013 Sheraton Austin at the Capital Special offer to Texas Restaurant Association Members TRA members who register before June 15th receive a $400 discount off the $799 registration fee for operators and $400 off the $1,599 registration fee for non-operators. TRA believes that social media is that important. So do we. For more information, please visit http://fohboh.com/profile/FSMU or http://fohbohfsmu.eventbrite.com.

The era of social media, and its multiple platforms has shifted control from the operator to the consumer. Your restaurant and its image is what the social media crowd says it is, not what you say it is. So, how does any restaurateur manage guest satisfaction in a hypersocial world? The Era of Social Media Management The foodservice industry has traditionally been late to the technology party; adopting and investing only when necessary. That has to change. We live in a world of smartphones and apps that consumers use to talk, text, search. They discover restaurants and read reviews on their iPads and iPhone. They make reservations and check-in sharing location and photographs of where they are, and what they are doing. To

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TEXAS 360

Healthcare: Are You Ready?

Stabilization Period

SAFE HARBOR Affordable Coverage Individual Mandate

SUBSIDIZED COVERAGE

PENALTIES

Full-Time Equivalent

EMPLOYER MANDATE

Exchanges

We are also offering four sessions at the Southwest Foodservice Expo June 23–24 at the Dallas Convention Center. These seminars are FREE to attend.

Minimum Essential Coverage

Employee Notice Rule

The Texas Restaurant Association recognizes that this is an incredibly complex issue and is working to provide restaurant owners and operators with the tools and information they need to successfully navigate the myriad regulations and make informed decisions.

To help restaurateurs prepare, the Texas Restaurant Association is presenting Healthcare Solutions, a series of free regional seminars bringing a panel of local, state and national experts to cities around the state to answer questions on managing healthcare implementation for continued operational success.

LOOK BACK PERIOD

The January 1, 2014 deadline established by the Affordable Care Act is looming before the restaurant industry. Owners and operators are struggling to understand exactly how the law impacts their business and what strategic decisions they need to make now to comply.

FREE REGIONAL SEMINARS Dallas, Blue Mesa Grill | May 13 | Register Fort Worth, Hurst Conference Center | May 15 | Register The Woodlands, Lone Star College | May 30 | Register Austin, County Line on the Lake | June 5 | Register 2013 Southwest Foodservice Expo | June 23–24 | Register

What do these words mean to your business? Attend a Healthcare Solutions Seminar and find out!

Find more information at www.restaurantville.com/healthcare

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TEXAS 360 Take a Stand and be a Part of the Fight Against Cancer MasterCard and Stand Up To Cancer Kick-Off 2013 “Dine and Be Generous” Program This summer, MasterCard is once again supporting Stand Up To Cancer by offering the restaurant community and their patrons an opportunity to help raise money in support of cancer research. Dine and Be Generous is a national marketing campaign designed to raise funds for Stand Up to Cancer, a

charitable initiative that raises funds to accelerate the pace of groundbreaking translational cancer research that can get new therapies to patients quickly and save lives. HOW IT WORKS From July 16 to September 28, 2013, when US MasterCard cardholders use their card to pay for their bill of $10

or more, MasterCard will make a onecent donation to Stand Up To Cancer—up to a total of $4 million.* GET INVOLVED Restaurateurs can join this effort by simply supporting and promoting the program in their establishments using MasterCard-developed tools.

Go to www.mastercard.com/supportSU2C to learn more. We’ve proven that we can make a difference, one precious cent at a time. *Certain terms and conditions apply: From July 16 – September 28, 2013, MasterCard will donate to Stand Up to Cancer$.01 per qualifying restaurant transactions of $10 or more, up to $4 million. Promotional dates may change based on contributions. Promotion applies to U.S. qualifying restaurant purchases made by MasterCard cardholders with MasterCard cards issued by U.S. financial institutions. Stand Up To Cancer is a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF), a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. EIF meets all 20 BBB Charity Standards. Stand Up TO Cancer and the Stand Up to Cancer Brand Mark are registered trademarks of the Entertainment Industry Foundation. MasterCard and the MasterCard Brand Mark are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. Dine and Be Generous is a trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. ©2013 MasterCard. All Rights reserved.

Please join us for the

PRESENTING PARTNER

TRA PRESIDENT’S GALA SUNDAY, JUNE 23, 2013

OMNI DALLAS HOTEL

For more information and to RSVP, go to www.restaurantville.com/gala

benefiting R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M AG A Z I N E

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TEXAS 360 June 23–24, 2013 Dallas Convention Center | Dallas, Texas

Big Ideas. Big Results. Only at the 2013 Southwest Foodservice Expo. The restaurant business is ever-changing and you never know where you’ll find the next big idea. Whether you are a veteran or a novice to the restaurant industry, you will be motivated and inspired by the big ideas at Expo!

Special Guest Celebrity Chef Robert Irvine You know him as the host of TV's top-rated restaurant makeover show telling it like it is to save restaurants from imminent failure. His advice might be hard to hear, but the end result is worth it! Chef Irvine will share his expert insights as the featured

speaker at the Experts Forum on Sunday, June 23. These 30 minute sessions are open to all attendees on a first come basis. Show up early with your impossible restaurant questions. Then don't miss Chef Irvine when he takes the Culinary Showcase stage to share his vision, creativity and passion with the crowd.

Full event details and more information at www.swfoodexpo.com

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Robert Irvine sponsored by:


TEXAS 360

Buyer Incentive Program

Northwest Wine Expo

Follow the fork! This unique program encourages business transaction on the show floor. Participating exhibitors will proudly display the TRA Fork to indicate they have an Expo-only Show Special. Every attendee who makes a purchase or places an order will be eligible to enter a daily cash drawing! Look for and use #FollowTheFork at Expo.

New in 2013! The Northwest Wine Expo is co-locating with Expo and you are invited to learn about the exciting developments and growing stature of this region while tasting the distinctive qualities of their wines.

Healthcare Solutions

Presented by the Texas Restaurant Association Restaurateurs need to be planning now for the changes resulting from implementation of the Affordable Care Act. The Texas Restaurant Association is bringing experts with extensive restaurant and healthcare knowledge to Expo to answer your questions. We'll present the big picture and the details at four sessions that are free to Expo attendees.

Registration for the Northwest Wine Expo is separate from registration for the Southwest Foodservice Expo. On-site registration is $50 per day. Visit www.nwwineexpo.com for more information and to register.

Experts Forum New in 2013! For the first time, Expo is offering one-onone and small group discussions with experts in the fields of restaurant financing, energy management and restaurant design. Sit down with an expert and get your business questions answered!

Register online before June 18 for $40 advance registration rate! www.swfoodexpo.com NOTE: Current TRA restaurant members can register online for free before June 18. Click here for the promo code. After June 18 everyone will have to pay $50 at the door.

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TEXAS 360

Moody Gardens Aquarium Pyramid and Moody Gardens Rainforest Pyramid are ranked among the best zoos and aquariums in the world.

(l-r) Gary Geddes, Director of Zoological and Environmental Education at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium and Northwest Trek Wildlife Park and Chair of the AZA Accreditation Commission; John Zendt, President/CEO of the Aquarium & Rainforest at Moody Gardens, Inc.; Greg Whittaker, Animal Husbandry Manager at the Aquarium & Rainforest at Moody Gardens, Inc.; and Kris Vehrs, AZA Executive Director.

AZA Grants Accreditation to Moody Gardens Aquarium Pyramid and Moody Gardens Rainforest Pyramid The Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) announced that the Moody Gardens Aquarium Pyramid and Moody Gardens Rainforest Pyramid were granted accreditation by AZA’s independent Accreditation Commission. “The Association of Zoos and Aquariums accredits only those zoos and aquariums that meet the highest standards,” said AZA President and CEO Jim Maddy. As proven leaders in in the care and conservation of wildlife and education outreach, the Moody Gardens Aquarium Pyramid and Moody Gardens Rainforest Pyra-

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mid are ranked among the best zoos and aquariums in the world.” To be accredited, the Moody Gardens Aquarium Pyramid and Moody Gardens Rainforest Pyramid underwent a thorough review to ensure they have and will continue to meet ever-rising standards, which include animal care, veterinary programs, conservation, education, and safety. AZA requires zoos and aquariums to successfully complete this rigorous accreditation process every five years in order to be members of the Association. www.moodygardens.com


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TEXAS 360

TRA Awards W. Price Jr. Scholarships Each year the Texas Restaurant Association awards the W. Price Jr. Memorial scholarship to students with a growing passion for the foodservice industry. The scholarship is named for W. Price Jr., the first executive director of the Texas Restaurant Association. This year, scholarships for $2,000 were awarded to four graduating high school students attending a post-secondary culinary program and two students currently enrolled in a post-secondary culinary program. Congratulations to these outstanding students! Jasmine Germiller St. Phillips College, San Antonio Giavanni Rosas El Centro College, Dallas Patrick Garcia Rockwall High School, Rockwall, plans to attend University of Arkansas Hailey Dallas Central High School, San Angelo, plans to attend Johnson & Wales Fisher Sutterfield Bowie High School, Austin, plans to attend The Culinary Institute of America Trenton Shank Byron Nelson High School, Trophy Club, plans to attend The New England Culinary Institute

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The 17 members of the first class to earn associate degrees in culinary arts from the CIA San Antonio celebrate their graduation.

The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio Confers First Degrees Philanthropist Kit Goldsbury Receives Honorary Doctorate Seventeen students at The Culinary Institute of America (CIA), San Antonio received their Associate in Applied Science (AAS) diplomas during commencement ceremonies at the Pearl complex on Friday, April 12. This graduation marks the first degrees conferred at the college's San Antonio campus. The commencement address was presented by Kit Goldsbury, a San Antonio philanthropist whose development company, Silver Ventures, is responsible for the development of Pearl. His gift to the college and generous support of student scholarships made the CIA campus in San

Antonio a reality. During the ceremony, CIA President Dr. Tim Ryan presented Mr. Goldsbury with an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters in Culinary Arts degree. "We are here to celebrate the realization of your dreams. You have persevered, thanks to the desire and drive to develop your culinary talent at The Culinary Institute of America, the best culinary college in the world," Mr. Goldsbury told graduates. "With good decisions and hard work you can make your stamp here in San Antonio, or wherever your dreams take you."


Your Recipe for Restaurant Success — Texas Restaurant Law.com —

TexasRestaurantLaw.com is your free onestop shop for all legal questions related to the restaurant industry. Provided by the attorneys at the law firm of Looper Reed & McGraw, the site offers advice on: • • • •

How to deal with landlords What to ask and not ask potential employees How to protect your trade secrets Buying, selling and franchising your restaurant • and much, much more. Looper Reed has experience in all levels and types of litigation issues, employment issues, liability issues, contract negotiations (both internal and external), real estate, transactional work, taxation and immigration issues. Our attorneys are always glad to answer your unique legal questions too, so call today at: 888.863.7157

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Byron Nelson’s culinary team placed sixth out of 43 teams and Rockwall’s management team placed 15th out of 40 teams!

Texas ProStart Students Shine at National ProStart Invitational The teams from the Academy of Culinary Arts at Byron Nelson High School (Chef Instructor Steve DeShazo) and Rockwall High School (Chef Instructor Cody Hayes) did the Lone Star state proud at the National ProStart Invitational competition. Byron Nelson’s culinary team placed sixth out of 43 teams and Rockwall’s management team placed 15th out of 40 teams! More than 350 top ProStart students from 43 states, territories and Department of Defense bases, competed for their share of $1.4 million in

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scholarships by demonstrating their mastery of restaurant leadership skills —culinary and management—in a fast-paced competition. Congratulations to our Texas ProStart teams and thanks to all of the volunteers, mentors, instructors, parents and staff that helped with the Texas ProStart Invitational competitions.


COMMUNITY NEWS

TRA Chapters & Members Step Up to Help West, Texas Members of the Waco chapter created a campaign that will benefit the community of West. Customers at participating restaurants and retail stores pay $1 and have their name placed on a decal that hangs in the

TRA President Scott Plowman Takes His Message to Chapters HOUSTON GALA

business to show their support. Egg & I corporate offices in Colorado created the image and campaign for victims of the Colorado fires last year and, thanks to local franchisee Mike Beheler, generously allowed Waco to adapt it for use locally. On April 29, Texas Roadhouse in Corpus Christi, owned by chapter president Mike Schmidt hosted an all-day fundraiser, donating 10% of all food sales to West relief organizations. Schlotzsky’s had a fundraiser on April 30. Participating stores donated 15% of sales from 4pm to close to the West, Texas relief program.

SABINE AREA SCHOLARSHIP DINNER

SAN ANTONIO GALA

BJ’s raised funds by contributing a portion of sales from all 28 BJ’s in Texas on Tuesday, April 30, with a commitment to make a minimum donation of $20,000.

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COMMUNITY NEWS

P: 713.802.1200 F: 713.802.2770 www.GHRA.com

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COMMUNITY NEWS

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT! BY: SYLVIA & SCOTT (WITH SPECIAL GUEST RICK CAVENDOR) RSVP: 210-734-7663 LOUIS BARRIOS “2008 CHILI PEPPER” CHAIRMAN

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR:

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COMMUNITY NEWS

PROPOSED TRA BYLAW AMENDMENTS The Board of the Texas Restaurant Association has voted to propose a number of amendments to TRA’s Bylaws for consideration for adoption by a vote of the membership at the Annual Meeting to be held at the Dallas Convention Center at 9:30am on June 23. The full text of the bylaw amendments, with notations on the proposed changes, is available to

members in the members’ only section of TRA’s website. The highlights of the changes are the addition of the Immediate Past President to the Association’s Officers, a definition of “emeritus member of the board”, limiting board members to two consecutive terms, folding the Pension and Retirement Committee into the Finance and Investment

Committee, clarifying that it is regular members that are used to determine the number of TRA directors for a chapter, various other amendments concerning application for membership and notice provisions.

Galveston Chapter Golf Tournament Benefits Francisco ‘Paco’ Vargas Scholarship Fund

ADVERTISING INDEX FOH-BOH................................................................................... 21 GO TEXAN................................................................................. 10 HEARTLAND............................................................................ 36 LOOPER REED......................................................................... 29 MARKETPLACE........................................................................27 FAZOLI'S

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POACHED....................................................................................17 SOUTHWASTE..........................................................................33 STAND UP TO CANCER...........................................................9

Paco Vargas pictured with scholarship recipients

TEXAS MUTUAL...................................................................... 20 UNITED HEALTHCARE........................................................... 19

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How Does Your Garden Grow? | Restaurantville Magazine, Spring 2013  

TRA's digital magazine is emailed to over 6,000 foodservices professionals quarterly. The content highlights industry trends, best practices...

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