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Restaurantville s e k a h S Fries y n n Na te Sta MAG AZI NE

From

CO N N EC TI N G THE TEXAS R ES TAUR AN T CO M MU NIT Y

and

To

How California usurps parents’ rights with its new Children’s Meal Beverage Law

TXRestaurant.org

November 2018

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PUBLISHER Richie Jackson, CEO Texas Restaurant Association VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING & INNOVATION Anna Tauzin Rice Texas Restaurant Association EDITOR Rebecca Robinson, Communications Manager Texas Restaurant Association ART DIRECTOR Janio Rodriguez L., Graphic Design Manager Texas Restaurant Association RESTAURANT VILLE MAGAZINE is published quarterly by the Texas Restaurant Association

For advertising information contact Miles Pequeno Senior Corp. Relations Manager communications@tramail.org

Editorial questions can be directed to Rebecca Robinson at 512-457-4100 or rrobinson@tramail.org

P.O. Box 1429 Austin, Texas 78767 512-457-4100 800-395-2872

It is the mission of the Texas Restaurant Association to be the advocate and indispensable resource for the foodservice and hospitality industry in Texas.

txrestaurant.org


Contents 5

y a d i Hoglift

WORD FROM THE PRESIDENT

7 WORD FROM THE CHAIRWOMAN 10

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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FROM FRIES AND SHAKES TO NANNY STATE

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PROSTART COMPETITION

24 TRAEF & CHILI'S GIVE BACK NIGHT

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GUIDE a

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MEMBER SPOTLIGHT BRIGHT KITCHEN

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COMMUNITY NEWS J O IN T E MPLOYE R

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INTRODUCING TRA JOB BOARD

CL ICK HERE TO SUBSC R IB E

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' quench¡

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We are seeing this across the country, and all business owners are affected, no matter how large or small. It seems like we are all working on finding new and innovative ways to serve our customers and to give our team members the tools and knowledge they need to be successful. Retention of good talent is a major concern to all, and some great ideas were shared among the operators.

Word from the

President Jimmy Hasslocher President of the Texas Restaurant Association President & CEO, Hasslocher Enterprises, Inc.

R

ecently my wife Tracie and I visited North Carolina, her home state, where we were privileged to accompany TRA CEO Richie Jackson and his wife Cheryl, to attend the Richard E. Marriott 22nd Annual Fundraiser for National Restaurant Association Education Foundation (NRAEF). Along with our Texas group were TRA PastPresident, Mark Davis Bailey and his wife Judy, and TRA Former President, Scott Plowman, and his wife Melissa. We were able to engage with different operators from across the country and discuss many areas of common concern. Most like many of you, our great members, are continually trying to find staff for our restaurants, while labor costs continue to grow, not to mention food cost and freight.

Being able to brainstorm with operators from all around the country was an opportunity to gain new insight and a fresh perspective. We then traveled from Pinehurst to the Leadership Roundtable Conference in Sarasota, Florida, along with many of our friends. Although we had to work our way around a hurricane to get there, the challenge was yet another reminder that there are solutions to all of the issues and obstacles that happen on a daily basis. Tracie and I were fortunate enough to spend time with National Restaurant Association’s Dawn Sweeney, whose leadership is keeping NRA strong and relevant. Our conversation revolved around what TRA from a state’s point of view meant to the NRA. Several association executives paid tribute to our own Richie Jackson for mentoring them. Richie has done a great job chairing the NRA PAC. It was wonderful to see that what we are doing in our state is recognized at the national level, and it gives me a sense of pride to be a part of our association, and to be participating in the TRA’s successes. The two trips were very fulfilling and being able to visit with large chain executives along with smaller ones was very beneficial.

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I was able to meet so many industry leaders, and be able to exchange ideas and benefit from their experiences.

With the arrival of November, the Thanksgiving and Christmas seasons are fast approaching, and Tracie and I want to take this opportunity to wish each of you and your families a very happy and healthy holiday season, and a bright, successful New Year.

Challenges lie ahead and we must be at the forefront. Your TRA works hard every day just to do that, and I’m committed to doing my part to make sure that we are representing all of our members throughout the great state of Texas.

Find Your Next Step in the

Jimmy Hasslocher TRA President 2018-2019

I NDUSTRY

Announcing the best new destination for Texas restaurant jobs! The Texas Restaurant Association has launched a new job board built specifically with the entire foodservice industry in mind.

All positions are FREE to Apply!

Categories Include:

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Take Your Next Step Now!

Hourly/Front of House

Suppliers & Industry Vendors

Hourly/Back of House

Hospitality Education

Salary/Corporate

And more!

TXRestaurant.org

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TXRestaurant.jobs


Word from the

Chairwoman Jessica Delgado, TRAEF Chairwoan Owner, house. wine. & bistro., SALT-New American Table, Salome on Main

A

s we approach the holidays and your busiest season, it is critical that we have our “aces in their places” and that our teams are ready for the increase in guests. You will experience your highest volume in these next few months and I’d like to share a bit of what we do to prepare our staff for their busiest season and their greatest earning potential. My husband and I operate our two, soon to be three restaurants, in McAllen. As the leaders of our restaurant company, Delgado Collective, we are always encouraging sales growth as well as professional growth within our team. We often say, “you will give yourself a raise”, when it comes to exceeding the guest expectations, or the ability of a line cook to learn more stations, or help reduce labor, which allows the award of a potential raise. Your staff should have a great opportunity to earn more this season, but you must also re-invest in their continued success.

It’s a two-way street. As you provide a great career for your team, they must also provide excellent service, as they are ambassadors for your brand. As proponents of lifelong learning, we are always challenging our staff to excel and grow their passion for hospitality. After all, there is no room for anyone in this business, who does not think that they are in the hospitality industry. In fact, I find myself saying “restaurant industry” less & less and saying “hospitality industry” more. People dine out for an experience, no matter what the style of restaurant, and it is up to the restaurant to provide that. Whether fast food, fast casual, food truck, take away, sit down or fine dining, there must be continuous training from great leaders. This industry is constantly evolving and so are our guests, so we must stay relevant. There are more competitors now than ever with delivery services and food at the click of a button. Today’s customer is not tolerant of sloppy mistakes. We know this by the world of Yelp, Trip Advisor, FB, and other social networking sites. Daily staff training should take place from the beginning until the end of your shift. I am not saying that you are facilitating a meeting, but always be open to providing praise, feedback and coaching. Your people directly represent your brand which can be a blessing but can also be detrimental to you. We start each shift with a “huddle up” with the full staff talking about features, in-house events or promotions, service techniques, food and quality needs, wine or beverage. This meeting sets the pace for the entire shift, gets your team ready for what is to come, and allows you to hold your team accountable. Accountability is the area where it is easiest to drop the ball. We may have expectations, guidelines and training, but if your leaders are not holding your team accountable, then R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 8

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The President’s Circle is an endowment for the Texas Restaurant Association Education Foundation. The President’s Circle is the Foundation’s highest Honor.

$75,000

$50,000 Claire and William L. Hyde, Jr. Greater Austin Restaurant Association Greater Dallas Restaurant Association Rio Grande Valley Restaurant Association San Angelo Restaurant Association $25,000 Chef Sharon Van Meter Chef Charles Duit Jessica Delgado

Carmelo Mauro David Cea Roger Kaplan

all that effort is null and void. Hold daily or monthly contests to get your team excited about a certain product or upselling. We have monthly contests and weekly/monthly awards for selling certain wine, gift certificates or other items. Or have a MVP contest for the full team, having them vote at the end of the shift. No one wants to be the underperformer. Your guests will always benefit because their drinks will always be full, tables perfectly manicured and plates pushed out at the right time. This keeps your atmosphere fun and encouraging, while increasing the sales you need in this most profitable season. I also love to bring other experts in the industry in to host a huddle up. Bring in your wine, beer or spirits rep, your produce guy, farmer, service specialist or social media guru. Have them take a few minutes to inspire your team. It is always nice for your team to hear selling techniques, product specs or other interesting industry topics by someone other than their everyday leaders. As we prepare for this wonderful season that every restaurateur looks forward to, I encourage you to invest personal time in your team, so they can gain the benefits of your coaching and decide to follow their great leaders. Great leaders gain great results! My hope for you, is that this season will bring you much success and prosperity, and that you will be filled with pure love and joy that spreads into the hearts of your team, your guests and your family!

Nikky Phinyawatana Jimmy Hasslocher In Memory of G. Jim Hasslocher

T XRESTAUR AN T.ORG/ FOUNDATION

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Sincerely, Jessica Delgado Chairwoman TRAEF 2018-2019


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Hugo Ortega’s Restaurants

y a d i l Hogift

GUIDE a T

his holiday season treat the food lover in your life to something extra special. Take a look at our handy gift guide that showcases just a sampling of the creative stocking stuffers and foodie gifts available from various Texas restaurants. From cookbooks to T-shirts to mugs, you can find all the restaurant swag you need. Browse their online stores and see what they have to offer! Happy Shopping!

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Backstreet Kitchen Cookbook: Seasonal Recipes from Our Neighborhood Cafe features more than 120 recipes from the restaurant's kitchen and bar, translated for the home kitchen and presented with inspiring photographs and personal stories.

Chuy’s Chuy’s have designed multiple creative and funny t-shirts and hats that would make a perfect gift! From Harry Potter to the Lion King, this restaurant got extra creative in promoting their great Tex-Mex cuisine.

Hugo Ortega’s Restaurants Street Food of Mexico Cookbook: From the tacos and masa-based treats of the central highlands to the cocteles and ceviches of the coast, each region has its specialties, and each dish conveys both deeply satisfying taste and a delicious feeling of place. In his warm way, Hugo shares the stories behind the dishes and provides recipes and instructions to make them accessible to cooks everywhere.

Rudy’s BBQ Handmade Leather Rudy's Driver Headcover! Rudy's Texas Bar-B-Q designed this headcover based on their famous sauce bottle. Each one is marked with "1 of 50" on the front side, and "Real Texas Bar-B-Q" on the back. This item is limited edition, with Rudy’s only supplying 50.


Whataburger

Taste of Texas

Whataburger offers a variety of whatagifts including a beach towel, condiment packages and sneakers designed in their iconic orange coloring and logo. This is a great place to find the patty melt lover in your life!

A pit masters dream! Get these quality Texas steaks shipped to you and on the grill for the holidays. Sent straight to your front door and accompanied by seasonings and instructions, this is a meat lovers perfect gift.

Lupe Tortilla

The Melting Pot

Give the gift of Lupe’s famous lime pepper marinated beef fajitas shipped right to your door. Each order comes complete with Lupe’s hand cut, premium USDA outside skirt steak, lime pepper marinade and preparation and grilling instructions. Includes handmade flour tortillas, fresh made guacamole, rice, frijoles a la charra, salsa, and chile con queso. All you’ll need is a smoking hot grill!

A beautiful serving platform for cheese lovers. Showcasing The Melting Pot logo, this cheese board is sturdy and dishwasher safe.

Pondicheri

The Salt Lick

Pondicheri offers an extensive variety of gifts for anyone who loves curry and spices. From apparel to ingredients to face and beauty products, this Houston restaurant provides a great set of gifts for your loved one who loves to “Keep Calm and Curry On.”

The iconic Austin area BBQ phenomenon offers a variety of gifts for the pit master in your life. Enjoy Salt Lick’s sauces, rubs, and salsas on your own grill, or support this great Texas restaurant with a t-shirt or coffee mug!

La Familia Cortez

Hugo Ortega’s Restaurants

Mi Tierra is famous for breakfast and they serve it up to 24 hours a day! These two concepts come together on your favorite childhood game "Lotería."

Special Gift Box Set: The gift box sets are the perfect gift for all of your foodie friends and family members! Each box set is packed with a personalized copy of “Hugo Ortega’s Street Food of Mexico”, a 9-oz tablet of our housemade Mexican chocolate, a molinillo for frothing the perfect cup of Mexican hot chocolate, and two Hugo’s mugs to serve it in!

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s e k a h S Fries From

y n n a N and

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e t a t S

How California usurps parents’ rights with its new children’s meal beverage law By Rebecca Ann Robinson

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alifornia is known for being aggressive when it comes to protecting the environment, as well as public health. This is an admirable thing in its own right, but many, especially those in the business community, believe that California lawmakers have become overzealous, in their efforts to “protect citizens from themselves,” particularly with their latest law regulating what parents order for their children at restaurants. The Golden State is making headlines with the “Healthy-By-Default Kids’ Meal Drinks” law which was authored by Senator Bill Monning (SD-17) and signed by Governor Jerry Brown in September of this year. It requires kids’ meals to offer only non-

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flavored milk, non-dairy milk alternative (less than 130 calories) or sparkling, still or flavored water with no added sweetener. Restaurants may still offer alternative beverage options, but they must be ordered separately and cannot be included in the advertising (or pricing) of a kids’ meal. As a result, soda or juice will be the more expensive options. Failure to comply with the new law, which goes into effect January 1, 2019, can result in fines as high as $500. This troubling pattern of government overreach is no surprise when you consider that it wasn’t the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but California that first placed an all-out ban on trans fats in all restaurants in 2008. This, despite the fact that many restaurants were already moving away from trans fats on their own. Earlier this year, people in the restaurant/ beverage industry were stunned to learn that a judge in California sided with the Council for Education and Research on Toxics to have coffee-sellers like Starbucks and convenience stores place warning labels on coffee for a chemical called acrylamide, a substance produced when coffee beans are roasted (also found in virtually every food that has been cooked at high temperatures). Then of course, came the straw war. California became the first state to ban full-service restaurants from automatically offering customers plastic straws, despite research that showed that straws are a miniscule slice of the plastic-floating trash pie.

ranging from obesity (the bill cited that childhood obesity in California had risen 250 percent from 1990 to 2016), Type 2 diabetes, and heart disease, to low selfesteem and depression. No one is arguing that obesity is a problem in the United States. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that nearly one in five children, and one in three adults in the U.S. has obesity. Texas has the 14th highest adult obesity rate in the nation (33 percent) and the seventh highest for children ages ten to 17 (18.5 percent). It is well-known that obesity is linked to not only Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but is also linked to high blood pressure, certain cancers, and stroke. Also, recent research at the Harvard School of Public Health found that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases. People who consumed one to two cans a day of sugary drinks or more have a 26 percent greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than people who rarely drink them. What then, is the issue? As journalist Billy Binion puts it, an excess of sugary beverages can cause health problems, however, “… so does processed food. And red meat. And alcohol.” According to the CDC, edible fare has even more sugar than beverages. Where does it end? Ban sugar altogether? Desserts? Fried foods? Caffeine? It stands to reason that this government overreach could be the proverbial canary in the coal mine for the restaurant industry.

Ostensibly, the “Healthy-By-Default Kids’ Meal Drinks” bill was designed to protect children from a host of health conditions,

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............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... A tax on consumers for their beverage fries will stop obesity and ............................................................... choice (in this case a more expensive kill cancer,” she says. “The ............................................................... “alternative drink”), can easily become a ban answer to everything ............................................................... on a restaurant’s best-selling menu items. liberals don’t like is to ............................................................... What about a tax on chicken fried steak? ban it, under the guise ............................................................... of doing something noble. ............................................................... California Assemblyman Matthew Harper In this case it’s your little ones’ ............................................................... (R-Huntington Beach) remarked, “Seriously, like, what’s next? Are we going to insist that you have to have kale in our salad unless you specifically ask otherwise?”

health that’s on the line. Apparently you, mom and dad, are unfit to make healthy decisions for your kids. You need the nanny state.”

The bill is being touted as a new and easier way to help parents make healthier choices for their kids by placing healthy beverages as the default option. Margaret Wootan, vice president for nutrition at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, national authority on nutrition, and proponent of the new law, stated in an interview, “We make a lot of decisions on autopilot. You’re busy, you’re thinking about other things, and defaults have a lot of influence.”

Food selection is a deeply personal choice, particularly when it comes to what parents feed their children. The bill reads that nationwide, American children eat “…25 percent of their calories at fast food and other restaurants,” which means that the majority of calories are consumed at home. Going out to restaurants is still the exception rather than the rule, and soda is often a special treat that goes with it.

But do parents really need help in choosing what is best for their kids? The attitude that the government can do a better job than a parent in making decisions for our children might not work for Texas. Many Texans believe that the default beverage should be what the parent orders, not what the government orders. In a scathing editorial by writer and former U.S. deputy press secretary Lauren Debellis Appell, she argues that the California law is not a well-meaning initiative to protect, but rather, “calculated attempts to control.” “They’re drinking the sugar-free California Kool Aid if they think that banning kids from drinking soda or juice with their burger and

In the finance blog Zero Hedge, Meadow Clark states, “Food is the one thing people strive to have complete control over – three times a day – in regards to their personal liberty. Going to a restaurant is an “extra” that consumers enjoy at will. It’s all up to choice. So it shouldn’t be viewed by the government as a health need.” Many believe that the industry has already been responding voluntarily to the market. For years now, Americans have been trending toward healthier options across the board, and not just for children. In 2016, for the first time in history, bottled water surpassed soda as the most popular drink sold in the United States. That choice was made by American consumers without a government mandate.

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Proud of the company we keep To learn more, contact Wayne Stewart 713.906.0593 or wallace.stewartII@e-hps.com heartlandpaymentsystems.com All logos and trademarks are property of their respective owners

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Š 2016 Heartland Payment Systems, Inc.


............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... McDonald’s removed snacking to create new, healthier snacking ............................................................... ............................................................... soda from their Happy habits. Using the kid-created recipe books, ............................................................... Meals back in 2013 the program allows kids to make snacks ............................................................... and several other large themselves, with parent supervision. ............................................................... chains followed suit, Currently, 14 North Texas school districts are ............................................................... including Wendy’s, behind the venture, and a whopping 38,000 ............................................................... Burger King, Dairy parents have signed up their kids, finishing Queen, Jack in the Box and Applebee’s. In Texas, an innovative program began to take shape in 2010 when Medical City Children’s Hospital recognized the need to educate children and their parents about healthy eating habits, beginning with more fruits and vegetables at snack time. Medical City, along with the Greater Dallas Restaurant Association (GDRA) partnered with Texas ProStart® culinary programs in high schools across North Texas to launch the kids teaching kids program. Through this program, hospital dietitians teach Texas ProStart students about basic nutrition, how to read food labels and calculate nutrition facts for recipes. Then the students, using the nutrition criteria set by the dietitians, create fun-to-make, fun-to-eat snack recipes featuring fruits and vegetables. With the help of high school graphic design and photography students, photos are taken of the recipes and a recipe book is designed - created by kids, for kids. Medical City Children’s Hospital prints and distributes more than 300,000 books to elementary school students across North Texas. Elementary students can then sign up to take a “21-Day Challenge,” for after-school

out the latest round. Part of the intention behind the program is that healthy snacking habits will also translate to healthy meal choices - both at home, and in restaurants. Building even further upon the program’s success, the Texas ProStart’s students healthy recipes are now appearing on restaurant menus throughout the country thanks to the Kids Fit Menu program which is an extension of kids teaching kids program. Kits Fit Menu assists restaurants in providing healthful dining options for their family customers. The program has been a tremendous success thus far and rapidly expanding. Ryan Eason, community relations director at Medical City Healthcare says it’s not that restaurants don’t care about nutrition – that is a misrepresentation. “It’s just like any business, if you don’t have the sales, you can’t stay in business. Several of our restaurant partners were saying that very little sales were being generated from their kids’ menus, so they couldn’t realistically invest a lot into it. The great thing about the Kids Fit Menu program is that it’s free to restauranteurs. Ryan Eason, Community Relations Director at Medical City Healthcare All they have to do is

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............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... open their doors and their recipe books.” students. To me, I really enjoyed seeing ............................................................... ............................................................... what the teams had created; seeing how ............................................................... Restaurants have opened their doors. hard they had worked; and being able to ............................................................... Partners include, La Madeleine, Fish City give them feedback and advice on the day ............................................................... Grill, Cristina’s Fine Mexican Restaurant, On they presented the dishes. I think it is truly ............................................................... the Border Mexican Grill & Cantina, Snuffer’s awesome that high school students have ............................................................... Restaurant & Bar, The Original Pancake had direct influence creating a dish that House, Asian Mint, Café Brazil and El Fenix Mexican Restaurant. Currently, the program is operating in 202 locations, but by the end of the first quarter in 2019, it will reach more than 350. In just the Dallas/Fort Worth area, there have been more than 315,000 orders of KFM meals. “All of the Kids Fit Menu meals feature at least two servings of fruits and vegetables,” says Eason. “Adding healthier menu items gives parents and kids options to make healthier choices. Sometimes the best part besides making a healthier choice is that the menu items has been created by their peers. Texas ProStart kids are revolutionizing kids’ menus at restaurants. Brian Campbell is director of culinary research and development at On the Border in Dallas, and a restaurant partner in the Kids Fit Menu program. Though his restaurant has offered healthier kids’ menu options for a number of Brian Campbell, Director of Culinary R&D, On the Border years, he wanted to get involved. “The main reason was that we really liked the idea of having an item on our kids’ menu that was created by

is on menus nationwide,” he says. “These young cooks are the future of our industry.” To further involve students with the restaurant community, the Kids Fit Menu program hosts an “Invitational” event whereby Texas ProStart students learn about a particular restaurant’s concept, then go into research and development to develop healthy kids’ menu options. The students (in the most recent case, four different culinary programs/schools) then present a live demo of their items to a restaurant, and the restaurant selects two items to put on their menu. For those students who have already graduated and have confirmed plans to attend culinary school, there is a new Kids Fit Menu summer internship program. For eight days, students immerse themselves in restaurant operations, and create Kids Fit meals from an insider’s perspective. Both Original Pancake House and Matt’s TexMex participated in this new part of the program, with great success. Eason says that they hope to continue to expand their footprint through restaurant partnerships that branch out beyond North Texas. Current partners On the Border has 145 nationwide locations, and La Madeleine will have 85 locations nationwide next year. “It’s an easily replicable, sustainable model working with the trifecta of the hospital,

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PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE The President’s Circle is an endowment for the Texas Restaurant Association Education Foundation. Members of the President’s Circle are the Foundation’s highest donors and are fully committed to its sustainability. Endowment gifts are designated for educational programming and workforce development opportunities produced by the Texas Restaurant Association Education Foundation and that impact tens of thousands of lives each year.

President’s Circle Members

$

$

75,000

50,000

Claire and William L. Hyde, Jr. Greater Austin Restaurant Association Greater Dallas Restaurant Association Rio Grande Valley Restaurant Association San Angelo Restaurant Association

$

Chef Sharon Van Meter Chef Charles Duit Jessica Delgado

25,000

Nikky Phinyawatana Jimmy Hasslocher In Memory of G. Jim Hasslocher

Carmelo Mauro David Cea Roger Kaplan

Steph Smith, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Texas Restaurant Association Education Foundation R E S TA RANTVILLE MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2018 stephsmith@tramail.org | 512-457-4183 | U www.txrestaurant.org/foundation

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............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................ restaurant association and ProStart program. It’s adaptable.” Similarly, in 2011, the National Restaurant Association (NRA) in collaboration with Healthy Dining Finder (an online restaurant nutrition guide), launched Kids LiveWell, another voluntary restaurant industry initiative to help parents and children select healthy menu options when dining out. Restaurants that participate in the program commit to offering healthful meal items for children, with a focus on increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables, lean protein, whole grains and low-fat dairy, and limiting unhealthy fats, sugars and sodium. At latest count, more than 42,000 restaurant locations throughout the country are part of the Kids LiveWell program. T h e K i d s L i v e We l l program benefits both restaurateurs and guests, in that restaurants get third-party verification

and promotional materials for qualified meals, as well as individual menu items. Parents and caregivers get accurate information to help them make informed decisions about their child's meal. These creative public/private partnerships are wonderful examples of how the industry can work effectively on improving nutrition with no government mandates, no dictation to parents, no threats of fines, or bullying of restaurant owners. Take straws for instance – many Texas restaurants are already pledging to reduce or eliminate single-use plastic straws thanks to assistance from organizations like Straws No Mas. The Texas restaurant industry, just as it always has, is simply and effectively responding to the ever-changing market. “When your chicken fried steak is your number one menu item for instance, you aren’t going to remove that,” Eason says. “But if customers are looking for healthier options, the restaurant industry will adjust. We want to help educate the consumer through our partnership with the restaurant association and the

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............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... work with the culinary students - educate These programs go beyond one meal, or ............................................................... the community on nutrition.” just meeting our responsibility of meeting ............................................................... healthy menu choices. The work being done ............................................................... While a handful of cities and states are through these programs help to develop ............................................................... working on similar legislation to that of healthy eating habits that will last a lifetime.” ............................................................... California, (Louisville, Baltimore, Hawaii, New ............................................................... Hampshire, Vermont and Rhode Island), it is highly unlikely that Texas would ever follow suit. Texas lawmakers value the rights of parents to make decisions for their families, and Texas business owners know how to quickly adapt and respond to change. That’s the nature of being in business.

For more information on the kids teaching kids program, or to become a partner restaurant visit https://kids-teaching-kids.com/home/ or email Ryan Eason ryan.eason@medicalcityhealth.com.

Richie Jackson, CEO of the Texas Restaurant Association believes that programs like kids teaching kids, Kids LiveWell and others are far more important, effective and farreaching than simply banning an item or dictating options. “You cannot blame the industry for what customers are ordering. What you must do is educate the customers.

............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ............................................................... ...............................................................


SAVE THE DATE! JA N UA RY 1 8 – 1 9 , 2 0 1 9 Qu ali fy i n g Co mpetiti o n Conrad N. Hilton College University of Houston, Houston Texas

F E BRUA RY 8 – 9 , 2 0 1 9

Qu ali fy i n g Co mpetiti o n Collin College, Preston Ridge Conference Center, Frisco, Texas

M A RC H 8 – 9 , 2 0 1 9 S t ate Inv itati o n al St. Philip’s College San Antonio, Texas

GOT TIME? Volunteer for any of the 2019 Texas ProStart Invitational competitions! Just have an hour? We’ve got a time slot for you Have more time? Consider judging or being a timer

Contact Thomas Boyle at tboyle@tramail.org or 800-395-2872 to learn more

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Starting October 2018, Austin-area Chili’s locations will donate 15% to the Texas Restaurant Association Education Foundation and their flagship program, Texas ProStart, to support restaurant workforce education and development. Dine in and to-go orders qualify.

Every 3rd Monday of the Month See Participating Locations Learn More:

TXRestaurant.org/traef_chilis

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S U M M E R 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E


& Give Back Night Participating Restaurants Present this flyer or show a link on your phone to your server. Temple

3810 South General Bruce Drive Temple, TX 76502

North Round Rock At the Outlet by IKEA Round Rock, TX 78664

Round Rock

Near Dell Round Rock, TX 78664

Georgetown

401 S. IH 35 Georgetown, TX 78634

Hutto

614 W. HWY 79 Hutto, TX 78634

Stonehill

18901 Limestone Commercial Dr Pflugerville, TX 78660

Lakeline

11012 Pecan Park Blvd Cedar Park, TX 78613

I 35 N

6619 IH 35 North Austin, TX 78752

Crossroads

9070 Research Blvd Austin, TX 78758

Parmer

12901 North IH 35 Austin, TX 78753

45th and Lamar 4420 N. Lamar Blvd Austin, TX 78738

Hill Country Galleria 12713 Galleria Circle Bee Cave, TX 78738

Stassney

701 E. Stassney Ln, Suite A Austin, TX 78745

Southpark Meadows 9900 S. IH 35, Suite Z Austin, TX 78748

Buda

420 Old San Antonio Rd Buda, TX 78610

San Marcos

102 N. IH 35 San Marcos, TX 78666

Cedar Park

1205 N. Bell Blvd Cedar Park, TX 78613

Learn More: TXRestaurant.org/traef_chilis


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N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E


M EMB ERSHIP S P OT LIGHT The Texas Restaurant Association is pleased to announce our newest Preferred Partner, Bright Kitchen Power, an energy aggregation group purchasing program designed exclusively for Members of the Texas Restaurant Association. Our Members no longer have to go it alone when looking for an electricity provider.

market in search of finding a lower rate than the client is currently paying. • Concierge service: TRA Members will enjoy white glove service that takes care of the administrative headaches, including: • Billing Issues

Why is this a Member need?

M

ost people believe all they need to do is find the “best rate” for some fixed term (1-2 years), which is exactly why they often get hit with unexpected fees later. Some things they have not considered: • Ancillary fees from the energy supplier may be stripped from the rate and billed as separate line items by the utility. As a result, they get a “lower rate” but end up unknowingly paying for these ancillary fees anyway as surprise line items on their bill. • The danger in committing to a term with a favorable rate, but at a term beyond their lease term. This ends up costing them early termination fees if they don’t renew their lease. • Often, a busy restaurant owner will wait until the last minute to renew an existing contract, therefore giving up control to the market. Bright Kitchen Power’s consultants are always monitoring the forward rate

• Meter adds and deletes

• New construction development

• Contract responsibilities from closing or selling of a restaurant unit • Protection from fraud • The power of group purchasing. As in all areas of business, purchasing as a large, cohesive unit affords our members the favorable rates and crucial contract provisions/concessions from suppliers that they would not otherwise attain.

Who runs Bright Kitchen Power? This program is administered jointly by TRA staff and the energy brokerage firm known as Power Brokers, LLC. Vetted over the course of a year-long due diligence process and approved by TRA’s Executive Committee, Power Brokers brings to the TRA family 25 years of expertise - an eternity in the world of energy. Already they have

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ARE YOU

COMPLIANT WITH THE LAW? Food Handler certification is required in Texas

Keep your team trained with

servsafe.com

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ServSafe

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N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

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M EMB ERSHIP S P OT LIGHT

begun saving restaurants money, including Panera Bread, Del Frisco’s, house. wine. & bistro, and many more.

terms take effect immediately. You’ll receive a statement at the end of every contract term detailing your benefits.

Our Members may have already met Steve Hardy, President, and Tom Kinser, Manager of Aggregation Services, as they have been attending TRA events throughout the state in support of the launch of Bright Kitchen Power. They are especially active in the Greater Houston Restaurant Association and Greater Dallas Restaurant Association, where Member need is greatest.

Bright Kitchen Power, a joint partnership between Power Brokers LLC and TRA, is just the latest innovative effort designed to give your restaurant the savings and operational edge you need to do better business. Enroll now, and feel free to contact Tom Kinser with any questions at tkinser@ powerbrokersusa.com or (469) 533-7610.

Getting your restaurant in the Bright Kitchen Power program. 1. Go to www.BrightKitchenPower.org and upload your most recent bill. 2. Your Personal Energy Consultant will contact you to review your bill, and a Letter of Authorization will be prepared for your signature that will then be submitted to the utility as a request for your restaurant’s 12-month historical usage file. 3. Once the usage is received, you will either be scheduled as part of the next group purchase or, if usage is large enough, bids will be requested from multiple suppliers at that time.

Tag Us! @TXRestAssoc

4. Once the group purchase is complete, your savings and favorable new contract

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29

T


Five Stars. Our group feeds bigger dividends and a safer workplace for you. Have you prepared a safe workplace? Members of the Texas Restaurant Association Safety Group are eligible to receive extra dividends, a greater discount on their workers’ comp premiums and more. If you are committed to a higher level of safety, join other leaders in your field to maximize the rewards. Be part of a safer Texas. To learn more about becoming a member, contact your agent or Tim Sekiya at (800) 395-2872 or tsekiya@tramail.org.

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While we can’t guarantee dividends every year, Texas Mutual has returned more than $2.5 billion to safety-conscious policyholder owners since 1999. © 2018 Texas Mutual Insurance Company

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E


COMMUNIT Y NE W S

Quick Update: Joint Employer

I

n September, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register announcing the NLRB’s intent to restore the “direct and immediate control” joint-employer standard. Restoring the traditional joint-employer standard remains one of our industry’s top priorities after the NLRB was forced to reinstitute the Obama-era “indirect control” standard that continues to threaten and undermine the franchise model. Under the Board’s proposed rule, to be

jointly liable, “an employer must possess and actually exercise substantial direct and immediate control over the essential terms and conditions of employment of another employer’s employees in a manner that is not limited and routine.” As the Restaurant Law Center (RLC) noted in its most recent Petition to the NLRB, this standard provides “clarity and predictability for all stakeholders.” The RLC plans to submit comments that support the NLRB’s proposed rule, and explain how it will positively affect the restaurant industry, as well as the economy. Click here for more information.

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Texas Restaurant Association Education Foundation Partners EXCLUSIVE

DIAMOND

P L AT I N U M

GOLD

S I LV E R

BRONZE


Filters

Search Job Openings

Enter Keywords

City, State or Zip Code Go

Introducing the NEW

Texas Restaurants Job Board! W

e’re thrilled to introduce a new industry job board built specifically with our members and our industry in mind. Use this industry job board to find all kinds of opportunities - hourly and salary, FOH and BOH, jobs for students just starting out and jobs for industry veterans. Additionally, we welcome our restaurant education, vendors, and tech industry folks to add their jobs, too. Our goal is to be the best source for all industry jobs in Texas.

Add Your Jobs

J

ob posting is FREE for all of our Texas Restaurant Association members using the below link. There is a great option to boost your job posting while filing out the form, which will push out your posting to even more potential candidates. You can add your jobs manually, or work with our partner, Self Opportunity, to sync your existing job listings with our board. Get in touch with Brian Medina at brian@selfopportunity.com for more details.

With one post, save on boosting to these other sites!

Work in Texas

www.txrestaurant.jobs


7..9 95

$$9

online th Onlin Onlin rouggh throu gh h 12/31 12/31 /2018 12/31//2018 2016

Classroom training also available! (English or Spanish)

CALL FOR PROPOSAL

Phil Willis,

CCI, CFM, FMP, HBS

512.457.4166

Texas Requires Statewide Food Handler Certification Ge t C e r ti fi e d wit h S e r v S afe Food Han dle r Te xas on li n e

servsafe.com/txfoodhandler ACCEPTED EVERYWHERE IN TEXAS

34ANSI-accredited; approved by the Texas Department of State Health Services N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 8 R E S TA U R A N T V I L L E M A G A Z I N E

Profile for Texas Restaurant Association

Restaurantville November 2018 Q4-4  

Restaurantville November 2018 Q4-4