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COVER STORIES For 32Prepare The Worst

NOVEMBER 2017

Proactive and reactive tips for dealing with natural disaster. By Myra Basham

Vol. 29 • No. 8

DEPARTMENTS

20TLBAA Special Awards Nominations Meet the nominees and cast your vote!

6 Editor’s Note

36

28

Daily Champions of the Longherd Breed: The Fort Worth Herd

Affiliate News

37 News on the Trail

By Myra Basham

38 In The Pen

FEATURES

39 Herd Management

10 Time To Nominate Division C Directors 12

Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction Results

and Shelter for the Fall-Calving 14 Windbreaks Herd

40 Board of Directors

41 TLBT Letter

47 Index/Just For Grins

By Heather Smith Thomas

26 Registration Matters: Private Herd Numbers

48 Calendar

The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $105 per year; foreign per year $180. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817)  625-6241. Fax (817) 625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.

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EDITOR’S NOTES BEFORE DISASTER STRIKES….

It seems that 2017 has had more than its fair share of disastrous natural events. From wildfires in the Western states to Hurricanes in Southeast, many Longhorn owners have been faced with difficult situations and serious aftermath. Since natural disasters are a part of everyone’s lives, we take a look, starting on pg. 32, at measures one can take to better prepare themselves in dealing with the circumstances before and after a severe natural event occurs. Windbreaks play an important role in cattle safety, especially in areas with low winter temps or anywhere that you have periods of cool temperatures and wet weather. Wind chill and hypothermia are especially threatening to young calves and older or sick animals. For ideas on constructing effective windbreaks turn to pg. 14. Our update on the Fort Worth Herd gives a little insight into their need for “disaster preparedness” as well. Turn to pg. 28 to learn more about the Fort Worth Herd originated and some of the unique issues they face presenting a herd of Texas Longhorn Steers to the public 7 days a week, 365 days a year! Your nominees for the TLBAA Special Year-End Awards can be found on pgs. 20-24 with the ballot appearing on pg. 25. To be counted your votes must be on the official ballot and include your member name and active membership number. Don’t assume everyone else will vote for the folks you want to win. Get your ballot in! Texas Longhorn Weekend on January 12-15, 2018 will be here before we know it. Take advantage of the opportunity to be a part of the ONLY Longhorn sale held in conjunction with one of the largest stock shows! The Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale will be held on January 13, and will feature 70+ top consignments from programs across the country. There’s plenty of time to plan a family vacation and be a part of all the activities – the sale, the shows, the Hall of Fame & Awards Banquet, general membership meeting, Board of Directors meeting, fellowship and more. And if that wasn’t enough, you can take in the sights of the legendary Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo! Eager to see our Horn Showcase winners and measurements? The December issue will feature full results of the horn measuring, futurity and special awards. If you can’t wait until then, complete measuring and futurity results are available on tlbaa.org. If you have any suggestions, comments, ideas or news you want to email me or give me a call. I am always open to suggestions, story leads and critique.

DEADLINE: January 2018 Issue:

November 27th

Blessings,

Editor in Chief: Myra Basham Ext. 104 • myra@tlbaa.org trailseditor@tlbaa.org Advertising: Lindsay Maher • Ext. 106 lindsay@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Joshua Farias • Ext. 103 joshua@tlbaa.org Administrative Assistant: Raborn Sprabary • Ext. 100 raborn@tlbaa.org

Registrations Rick Fritsche • Ext. 101 rick@tlbaa.org Dana Coomer • Ext. 102 dana@tlbaa.org Special Events Lindsay Maher • Ext. 106 lindsay@tlbaa.org Accounting Theresa Jorgenson • Ext. 105 theresa@tlbaa.org

Myra Basham Myra Basham Editor-in-Chief

CASH COWS

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(817) 625-6241 • (817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 trails@tlbaa.org • www.tlbaa.org

Printed in the U.S.A. Member

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Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 S. Rosemary Dr. • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com

Beadle Land & Cattle Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA 95032 (408) 834-0110 Ray.Beadle@gapac.com

BPT Longhorns Ben & Phyllis Termin Weatherford, TX 817-374-2635 luvmylonghorns@gmail.com

Christa Cattle Co. Jason & Louis Christa 2577 FM 1107 • Stockdale, TX 78160 christacattleco@msn.com www.christacattleco.com Louis (210) 863-7003 Jason (210) 232-1818

Dalgood Longhorns Malcolm & Connie Goodman 6260 Inwood Dr. • Houston, TX 77057 (713) 782-8422 dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com

Jack Mountain Ranch Hal & Betty Meyer 8000 Mount Sharp Rd. • Wimberley, TX 78676 (512) 422-4681 cell (512) 842-1116 halmeyer@hotmail.com

Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467


Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety Little Ace Cattle Co. P.O. Box 386 • Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 ketyfolsom@aol.com

LL Longhorns Neil & Cynthia Hall 1414 Thorton Rd. • Houston, TX 77018 (206) 574-8950 www.lllonghorns.com cynthia@lllonghorns.com

McLeod Ranch Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 CR 3031 • Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155

Brennan & Michele Potts Rocking P Longhorns P.O. Box 579 • Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com bpotts1@verizon.net

Rio Vista Ranch Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane • Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 Cell: (512) 422-8336 e-mail: elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com

Triple R Ranch Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Rd. • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

Westfarms Inc. Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450 • Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 Cell: (985) 515-3172 e-mail: westfarmsinc@gmail.com

This space is available for your ranch listing! Call Lindsay Maher: (817) 625-6241


4 ELECTIONS

Time To Nominate Division C Directors TLBAA will be seeking nominations soon for all Division C directors, two At-Large positions and directors to represent Regions 13-18. Nomination forms will be mailed 90 days prior to the TLBAA Annual Membership Meeting in Fort Worth, TX, January 12, 2018. 1. Nomination Ballots were mailed out to Division C Members October 12, 2017 2. Nomination Ballots must be returned to the CPA postmarked no later than November 14, 2017 3. In order for an individual to be placed on the final ballot, they must receive at least 5 nominations from Active or Lifetime members of the TLBAA. 4. The final ballots will be mailed out November 29, 2017. 5. Final ballots must be returned to the CPA postmarked no later than December 23, 2017. 6. Newly elected Directiors will be announced January 12, 2018 at the General Membership Meeting during Longhorn Weekend in Fort Worth, TX. The TLBAA By-Laws, Section 2-D, Membership, state: “At least ninety (90) days prior to the annual Membership Meeting, the TLBAA office shall mail to the Active and Lifetime members a request for nomination of individual or individuals for Director in the member’s representational region. Such member nominations shall be received in the Association’s office no later than sixty (60) days prior to the Annual Meeting. In order that any member nominee be eligible to be placed on the election ballot, he must receive write-in nominations from five (5) members who are Active or Lifetime members. Should there be no members nominated by the membership for a particular region, or should a nominee decline to have his name placed on the election ballot, the Board of Directors will appoint an Active or Lifetime member in good standing domiciled within the division to fill the vacant position at the same meeting as the election of TLBAA officers.

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Division C Highlighted in Yellow No less than forty-five (45) days prior to the annual meeting of the membership, the TLBAA Office or designated CPA firm shall mail official printed ballots to each qualified Active and Lifetime Member in good standing of that region and division. This ballot shall contain the names of the candidates, if any, who were properly nominated by members. All written ballots must be returned by U.S. mail to the CPA with a postmark not less than twenty-one days prior to the Annual Meeting in order to be validated and counted. All ballots received will be validated and counted by an independent CPA firm or other organization experienced in voting tabulation as designated by the Executive Committee. The nominees receiving the most valid votes shall be elected. All newly elected Directors shall be installed at the Board of Directors meeting prior to the general membership meeting. A tie vote will be broken by the Chairman of the Board drawing one of the names by lot.” Division C TLBAA members, watch for your nomination form in the mail. For a complete set of TLBAA By-Laws, including all sections regarding the election of Directors, visit www.tlbaa.org/tlbaa/official-handbook/

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Sale Results

FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS LONGHORN AUCTION RESULTS September 22 &23, 2017 • Fort Worth, TX Sale Hosts: Hudson/Valentine Auctions Auctioneer: Bruce McCarty Sale Commentator: Dale Hunt Results submitted by H/V Auctions • Photos by Lindsay Maher & Hired Hand Websites

HIGHLIGHTS Lots Sold: 92 • Gross Sales:$1,103,400 Total Sale Average: $11,993 36 Heifers grossed $398,400; Averaged $11,066 55 Cows Grossed $540,000; Averaged $9,818

Sale hosts Lorinda Valentine, Bill & Elizabeth Hudson

Bull: $165,000

Volume Buyers: Jeanne and Richard Filip Judy and Bill Meridith Tyson Leonard Matt and Heidi Shepherd Missy Nowell

Pete Kourtis Debbie Bowman Bill Hudson John Viscup Ricky McLeod Debra & John Helm, Helm Cattle Company

Bob & Pam Loomis, Loomis Longhorns

HIGH SELLING HEIFER: $ 80,000

CV TUFFS LEZAWE Sire: Cowboy Tuff Chex Dam: EOT Outback Lezawe Consignor: Todd & Kelli McKnight • Buyer: Judy & Bill Meridith

HIGH SELLING COW: $ 63,000

RJF IMAGINE Sire: Cowboy Tuff Chex Dam: M Arrow Cha-Ching Consignor: Jeanne & Richard Filip • Buyer: Judy & Bill Meridith

HIGH SELLING BULL: $ 165,000

COWBOY TUFF CHEX Sire: Cowboy Tuff Dam: BL Rio Catchit Consignor: Pam & Bob Loomis • Buyer: Jeanne & Richard Filip

Rick & Tracey Friedrich, River Ranch; Mike Willinger, Hudson Longhorns

Mikeal Beck & Brandi Shukers, Holy Cow Longhorns

Toni & Larry Stegemoller, TL Longhorns

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Terry & Sherri Adcock, TS Adcock Longhorns


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Herd Health

By Heather Smith Thomas

Windbreaks and Shelter for Fall-Calving Herds In climates where wind chill can be an issue during colder months, planning ahead for winter weather can save stockmen money (in reduced feed costs, reduced illness and health costs, and less loss of body condition—and better growth for young animals). When cattle are stressed by wind and cold, they seek shelter. If there are no natural windbreaks available, stockmen can provide artificial wind barriers to give protection from wind and drifting snow. Dr. Joseph Darrington, Ag Engineer, South Dakota State University, says shelter is important for fall-calving herds, depending on when they are calving. “This could be anywhere from September through November. The later the calving season goes, the more likely you might run into winter storms. There are two main types of windbreaks-- natural shelter such as trees or

to the windbreak and if there is snow with the wind it tends to dump a lot more of it right behind the windbreak.” This cuts down on the protected area for cattle to bed or stand behind the windbreak. It’s better to have a porous windbreak, so you don’t end up with a big snowdrift behind it, reducing the shelter area. “With 30% open and 70% solid you can expect the protected zone behind the windbreak to extend 10 to 15 and sometimes up to 20 times the height of the windbreak. The protected area is always estimated based on the height of a windbreak. An example would be a 10 foot tall fence slowing wind for about 100 to 150 feet behind it. If it’s a straight windbreak and the wind is coming head on, perpendicular to it, this creates a triangular protected zone behind it,” he says. Windbreaks are usually constructed to face prevail-

Constructed windbreaks should not be a solid barrier, rather have open spaces.

planted shelterbelts, and constructed windbreaks. One problem with a shelterbelt of trees is that they don’t have much foliage in winter/spring to stop the wind,” he says. “If you plant a shelterbelt windbreak, it’s best to have a couple rows of tall trees and a couple rows of smaller trees. If you need the windbreak in the fall, there is a lot of vegetation still under the trees during early storms and you may not need to include evergreens in your tree planting.” If you want more protection during winter and spring, it helps to have some evergreens because the other trees will have lost their leaves. Constructed windbreaks are generally made with boards (often placed vertically), leaving spaces between them rather than a solid barrier. “The target porosity, according to several studies, is from 20% porosity (open) and 80% solid, down to 65 or 70% solid. If you have more than 35% porosity (and 65% solid) or closer to 50-50, you lose some of the benefits of the windbreak; you’ll have more air velocity coming through rather than being pushed up and over,” explains Darrington. “The reason you don’t want a solid windbreak is because it significantly reduces wind speed right next 14 | November 2017

ing wind direction. If the wind tends to come from several directions some people create a curved/cornered windbreak. “In our region the predominant cold wind comes from the northwest, about 60 to 70% of the time. The best position for a windbreak here would be to run it from southeast to northwest, to be perpendicular to the prevailing wind. If ranchers want a larger protected area, they sometimes run another windbreak from northwest to southeast, creating an arrowhead shape pointing to north. This gives the greatest protection,” he explains. “When planting shelterbelts we situate them north-south and east-west. With constructed windbreaks or planted windbreaks they have their corner in the northwest.” Some ranchers also create shelters with roofs, especially for the baby calves to get into, so they can stay dry as well as out of the wind. “According to USDA studies, a young calf’s thermal-neutral zone (where it is comfortable and can do well) is about 50 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit. They can do fine below that temperature if they are out of the wind,” he says. After the newborn calf is dry and has nursed (gaining “fuel” to stay warm from the colostrum, which contains a higher level of fat and

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Herd Health – continued from pg.14 energy than regular milk) he can handle colder temperatures. “While that young calf is growing, as long as the mother is producing a good quantity of milk, calves can handle very cold temperatures. They just consume more milk—to create heat energy to keep warm. The trade-off in cold weather (below the lower critical temperature of their thermal-neutral zone) is that the extra milk they consume goes for maintenance and body heat rather than growth.” They can stay healthy and be comfortable during the cold, but won’t grow as fast. Thus one of the potential benefits of providing protection from wind is that the cows and calves won’t need as much extra food just to keep warm and the calves will grow more. “Shelters for young calves will be helpful, especially if temperatures drop quickly in the fall. A three-sided shed works well, with the opening facing to the south—away from the cold winds.” This also gets some morning sun in those calf houses. “Make sure you keep fresh bedding in shelters, and have some vents high on the side wall, end wall or roof ridge to allow for some ventilation,” he says. For baby calves, make sure shelters stay clean, to

avoid contamination from scours; it helps if the shelters are on skids and portable. Then you can regularly move them to clean ground and put in fresh bedding. “You can figure about 10 calves per shed, so you should provide enough sheds for the group—and move them around as needed. Calf shelters need 12 to 15 square feet per animal,” he says. The bedding doesn’t get as dirty as if would they were more crowded. “It may seem strange giving baby calves more space for their size than we do for confined finishing beef animals, but with scours being a problem in calves it pays to give them as much space and clean bedding as is economical.” Congregating the calves (and possibly concentrating contamination from scours) is the downside of shelters, but this can be alleviated greatly by moving the shelters around and putting in fresh bedding. The calving cows generally don’t need more shelter than brush/shelterbelts or windbreaks, but it helps to have a shed or barn where you could bring one in if you have to assist a birth. “It’s nicer for the cow (and newborn) and the human. It’s no fun to deal with a calving problem out in the wind or sleet, with your hands freezing,” he says. continued on pg. 18

CONSTRUCTING WINDBREAKS “If you build a windbreak 6 to 10 feet tall you need to set the posts deeply enough to hold it, or build it on skids for portability. If you use 1-by-6 inch boards (which are actually 51/2 inches wide and ¾ inch thick) the spacing would be 1 ½ to 2 inches apart. This would be 7 ½ inches on center (from the center of one board to the center of the next) for spacing,” says Darrington. “Some producers make solid windbreaks using vertical metal roofing. A 30-inch wide piece of roofing metal is enough space for calves to nestle right against it and be completely protected. You need a bigger gap, however, to create adequate porosity, so snow won’t collect right behind it. For cows, these types of windbreaks are a little less effective because air speed coming through those larger cracks is enough that if they are right next to it they may still get cold and are not protected as much, but once you get one a little distance away from the windbreak, there is decreased velocity of air. The calves, however, can be very snug next to those 30-inch sections so you might be able to get the benefits of both (solid windbreak plus some porosity). These are also faster to build, with fewer total pieces to put vertically. The spacing, if it’s a 30-inch piece of roofing metal, would be 5 or 6 inch gaps between them, or about 36 inches on center,” he explains. Portable windbreaks are handy when rotating pastures or strip grazing fall and winter pastures, moving the windbreaks when cattle are moved. “The main thing for portable windbreaks is to make the base heavy enough and wide enough that they don’t tip over in the wind. Or you need to stake it down with two foot lengths of rebar or T-posts to help stabilize it,” he says. You can make these in sections so they can be moved with a tractor—either pulled around or picked up with a loader and repositioned as needed. If you have to take them very far, you could lift them onto a flatbed truck to haul to the next pasture, making sure you strap them down securely for hauling. 16 | November 2017

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Herd Health – continued from pg.16 Wetness accentuates wind chill for cattle, making windbreaks a necessity. Cattle hair coats are very good insulation against the cold when the hair is dry, standing up fluffy with air spaces between the hairs. “When the hair is wet and flattens down, it changes their thermal-neutral zone. A cow with full winter coat that’s wet has the same insulation capacity as if she merely had a summer hair coat,” says Darrington.

to handle it. Calves are even more sensitive and vulnerable. If you know the weather will be wet (rain or rain changing to snow) and then drop in temperature, they definitely need shelter to keep from becoming chilled.” Often after a storm, the weather clears up and temperature drops. Calf shelters make a huge difference because those babies can stay dry. This is better than just a windbreak. “If cattle are in a pasture with access to trees so they can get out of the rain, this may be adequate, if the foliage is still there.” In some regions fall calving has drier weather and drier, cleaner ground for calving than spring calving, depending on how early in the spring the cows are calving. February, March and April can often be stormy as well as muddy, depending on the region, though there can be occasional fall storms, as well. There are challenges to every calving season and a person has to fit the season to what best fits their own situation. In the South, hot weather can be a challenge. “In some climates, windbreaks and shelters can be a useful tool for winter management, especially for fallcalving cows, to help protect young calves from winter storms. The important thing is to manage them, just like you manage anything else on your operation,” he says.

Wetness accentuates wind chill for cattle, making windbreaks a necessity. “This is one of the things we saw with the Atlas storm a few years ago. One of the reasons we lost so many animals in that storm was that it rained on them first and then got cold. Their hair was wet and they were not able to stay warm. It didn’t get terribly cold; it just got cold enough that they couldn’t maintain body heat without the insulation of a dry hair coat.” They were chilled too much, too long, and couldn’t survive. “That same storm, if cattle hadn’t gotten wet just before temperatures dropped, they would have been able

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TLBAA SPECIAL AWARDS The TLBAA special awards will be presented Friday evening, January 12, 2018 as a part of Texas Longhorn Weekend. Nominators provided background information on each nominee. All active TLBAA members in good standing are encouraged to vote for one fellow breeder in each of the categories for the special honors. Votes can be emailed to awards@tlbaa.org. If unable to email you may fax to the TLBAA office, and it will be forwarded to the awards committee. Deadline for votes: December 20th, 2017, 5pm CST, no late ballots will be accepted. Only the official ballot with member name and TLBAA # included will be accepted.

Dave Evans Breeder of the Year Award Carla Payne I’ve known Carla for many years, She has bred some of this breed’s outstanding cattle during this time including the great bull, Boomerang CP - and the “CP” brand is something to look for when buying high quality longhorns. Carla is exceptional in the show ring and exhibits her cattle in many longhorn shows thru out the year in Texas and several neighboring states. I was really impressed with her success at the recent 2017 World Show in Ft. Worth where she either won or placed in many very competitive classes. We had seven entries - and she was the one to beat every time. Carla is also a consummate cattle woman. She actually artificially inseminates her cattle herself - a very complicated process that we (and most longhorn breeders) depend on our vets to do. It gives me great pleasure to nominate this deserving person for this award! Please give her your consideration.

Please take the time to vote! Ballot on pg. 25 20 | November 2017

Bill Hudson Through the years, Bill Hudson has been a major contributor to the breed. He has participated in sales for years but now he is producing the kind of cows that will impact the industry. He has evolved from a collector of cattle to producer. Those having the opportunity to spend time at Hudson Longhorns and being exposed to the strategy of where the program is headed have seen the operation shift to a serious breeding program. This has resulted in his nomination for Breeder of the Year.

Richard Filip The contributions that Richard has made to the industry through the purchasing of outstanding individuals has been felt by the entire industry. But having the ability to do so doesn’t not make you a great breeder. What you do with the animals you have purchased and raised is what we are referring to with this award. When you review sale catalogs you will find the prefix RJF in many wonderful animals scattered through the industry today. He has many partnership bulls that are bred by him that impacting numerous programs in our industry. In the past he as received the Exhibitor of the year at the Millennium Futurity as well as participating in a plethora of events from Futurities, horn contest, Sales, and field days. Richard serves on the TLBAA Foundation BOD. He is a great humanitarian, with giving to many charities as well Jeannie and himself founding the Texas Sentinels Foundation. He is not only deserving of this award with everything he has done for his program, TLBAA, and the Breed but he is an amazing individual.

George & Cindy Dennis One of the most important attributes for any breeder is consistency. For 20+ years George & Cindy Dennis have produced top of the line, World Champion genetics consistently. Over the past year the quality of their cattle and depth of quality in their herd was unparalleled. They continue to take their herd, and all those around them, to the next level. Year-in and year-out animals that feature their HD Cattle Co. genetics continue to lead the way for new and established breeders alike.

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NOMINATIONS Jack Phillips Award John & Christy Randolph The Randolphs have been conspicuous leaders of the longhorn industry as breeders of outstanding cattle, prominent in the show ring, as financial sponsors of longhorn events, as leaders of the South Texas Longhorn Association and active volunteers at TLBAA events. At every longhorn show or sale I’ve been to this year (including the 2017 World Show) Christy worked the office and handed out awards and John handled our cattle. Christy has done an outstanding job as president of the STLA - making it a most active Longhorn association. They deserve recognition for their dedicated work for our Longhorn world. I’m proud to nominate the Randolphs for this award!

Terry King Terry’s contributions to the breed are immeasurable. He has traveled all over the country promoting this breed and participating in shows and futurities. He has been instrumental in the success of shows and futurities hosted by his local affiliate, the Southeastern Texas Longhorn Association. The first year they had a futurity in Colorado, Terry travel to Colorado Springs to help them. He has been a TLBAA member for several years and has also served on the TLBAA Board of Directors. He is quite, a good listening and thinks before he speaks. He is always willing to serve, never expecting the spotlight. I know no one who has contributed more.

Justin Rombeck My nominee has been working behind the scenes for the past 20 years. He has been helping breeders new and experienced by answering questions, offering advice and volunteering. His actions have made a huge impact on the breed. He continues to volunteer for seminars, judge futurities, read commentary, measure at satellite locations, produce the “How to measure horns” demonstration video, manage sales and serve on committees, most recently serving as the Horn Showcase Chairman for a couple of years.

It has been a pleasure to watch him help others win futurities, bronzes and plaques or for them to market world class Longhorns. My nominee also volunteers as a sounding board as members discuss new events, new venues or just a different twist on how things are done. He is very passionate to see this breed continue to grow and flourish. I am fortunate to get to witness these achievements a little closer than the rest of the membership. I am proud to nominate my son Justin Rombeck for the 2017 Jack Phillips Award.

Keith & Tina DuBose Keith and Tina DuBose are long-time supporters of the Texas Longhorn Industry. They should be recognized for their continuous offering of time and knowledge to multiple affiliates. Keith is president of the East Texas Longhorn Association and Director-At-Large for Division B of the TLBAA. He is a fifth-generation Texas Longhorn breeder, for years encouraging others to take interest in the breed. Tina is President of the Ark-La-Tex affiliate and Chairwoman of the Affiliate President’s Committee. She has helped encourage growth and participation within the TLBAA by instituting president’s meetings in Billings, Montana and Grand Island, Nebraska. This has increased involvement throughout the nation. The above qualifications are just a snapshot of the generosity Keith and Tina DuBose have given the Texas Longhorn Industry. I can think of no one else who is more deserving of this award. We are lucky to have two people who are so committed to seeing this breed thrive.

Tom Matott Tom Matott is a long time active TLBAA member. He is extremely active on the sale circuit and is a consistent advertiser in various ways with the TLBAA. He is committed to the TLBAA. He promotes the TLBAA and Longhorns in Colorado and abroad. He and his son have put a futurity on in conjunction with the Rocky Mountain Sale. Tom has been on the Board of Directors for three years and Chairman for two years. Currently acting as both the TLBAA Chairman and CEO, he has improved our financial situation and spearheaded improvements in our website and office operations. Most of the membership is unaware of

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how much time and effort Tom has given to the TLBAA over the past two years. As the current Chairman of the Board, he has had the courage, wisdom, tenacity and leadership skills to help move the TLBAA to the next level in numerous areas. He has given time and money, selflessly to help the TLBAA and its members. He has also put a lot of hours and money into the Foundation to try to get a building built. He has and continues to put the breed first and tirelessly serves the membership to meet their needs without recognition. There’s a lot more he has done behind the scenes as well!

Chad Smith Chad is the Chairman of the TLBAA Horns Showcase/ Sales Steering committee as well as the 2017 HSC Chair. Myself holding both of these positions in the past myself I know the immense amount of time that this takes away from an individual’s time with his family, work, and livestock. There are very few thank you to the 100’s of hours that go into preparing for an event this size. Chad and his wife have only been in the Longhorn Breed for about 7 years but the large steps they have taken deserve a pat on the back with a job well done given. Chad has filled a BOD vacancy for the remainder of a term when he was needed. Hosted TLBAA HSC satellite locations as well as participating in multiple events across the country. To receive this award would be a small think you to the work he has put into making this breed better.

James Culpepper James Culpepper has been an important part of the Texas Longhorn industry for nearly 30 years. Always behind the scenes, never seeking the limelight. James has helped guide some of the top Texas Longhorn herds and top Texas Longhorn events. James has fit, fed and exhibited more World Champions than anyone else, while always advocating for the owners of the ranches he managed. Although his own herd is small, the quality is unmistakable. He raised three kids through the Texas Longhorn show circuit, makes himself available any time, and is always on the lookout for a new breeder or youth member to help. His stewardship of the Bob & Linda Moore and Sand Dollar Ranch herds pushed them to the forefront of the breed. A servant to the breed and its members, James Culpepper is the embodiment of the spirit of the Jack Phillips Award.

Please take the time to vote! Ballot on pg. 25 22 | November 2017

Mike Willinger When I think of the Jack Phillips award, I think of someone in the breed who goes above and beyond for a fellow breeder or to further the breed in the right direction. I can think of a person who does both and sits in the sidelines never wanting recognition. Mike Willinger is ranch manager in Indiana for Hudson Longhorns. Since Mike has joined up with Bill Hudson, you can see Bill’s vision coming alive in his herd. The total package animal is something we all say we want, but Mike is helping Bill in leaps and bounds to strive for this. Mike is the type of guy who will walk up to anyone at a sale and greet them and make sure if they need anything at all he will help. He’s the last one to leave a sale, always making sure the people form out of state have loaded and leave first as they know they have the long drive home. I had known of Mike for a while, and after our first rifle at the Winchester Futurity of the North, on our way home I received a call from an Indiana number. It was Mike saying that he never got to say congratulations to me before we left. That meant the world to me and since then he and I have been great friends. Mike worked for many years on large ranches in Montana. He knows the importance of a good mama cow who can milk and raise a calf. In the Longhorn industry today, too many programs have their horn blinders on and forget the basics of these great cows. I commend him, and Bill’s program, for what they strive for and plan to help in any way. For Mike’s willingness to put everyone else ahead of himself and to help in any way, I would like to nominate him for this year’s Jack Phillips Award recipient.

Elmer Parker Lifetime Achievement Award Dr. Frank Anderson, Jr. Frank Anderson’s 30+-year career in the Texas Longhorn community exemplifies the qualities the Elmer Parker award honors. He knows the breed’s history and has added to its legacy. Anderson was a consignor at the first TLBAA Horn Showcase, hosted the meeting where the decision was made to have the first Butler Invitational Sale, and has been a Winchester Futurity judge. In 2013 he served on the panel that developed the Longhorn Code of Honor. He has given gifts of Longhorn cattle. A heifer given to a TLBT teenager became the 2005 TLBAA Summer Horn Showcase high-selling cow. During the 20th century Anderson focused on Butler cattle, moving into Blend cattle in the 21st. His program produced a number of outstanding cattle. In 1999 the Texas Longhorn Journal’s extensive evaluation of horn length at various ages placed the Anderson herd in the

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


highest category with five other programs. In the 1990s, the decade in which the first 80” TTT cows were born, Anderson produced four of the 16 or so cows in this category. They were Sabrina 115 (Butler 1997), Brush Country Queen (Butler 1997), Stephanie 177 (Butler 1999), and Full Credit (Blend 1999). Coach (Don Juan of Christine-Miss Redmac 256, 1994-2008) is the best known bull produced by Anderson to date. He was the longest horned Butler bull in the breed in the 20th century at 65 ½” TTT, a top ten horn length bull who went on to 69 ¾” in the next century. In 2010 Coach was recognized for having produced the most 75” TTT cows of any bull in the breed to that time, a recognition that was repeated with 80” TTT in 2012. Coach’s sons include FA Field Marshal (DOB 6/19/1999), the first born bull to be a 70” TTT Butler bull and a sire of 80+” TTT cows. Anderson initiated his Blend herd by breeding his 81” TTT Butler cow Stephanie 177 to the Horn Showcase repeat champion Blend bull Bar-B-Q. They produced daughter Tilda May (82 ¼” TTT) and Toosie (93 1/3” total horn). Anderson Ranch’s senior Butler sire is FA Super Star (SCC Centaurus-FA 169). His grandsires are Coach and Unlimited. He measured 77 1/4” TTT three weeks before his 4th birthday (owner, son Frank lll). Blend herd sires are FA Bulldozer (Cowboy Tuff Chex-Madison Leigh 722) and M Arrow Bullion (Chance 53/13-M Arrow Copper Penny, co-owner Ron Marquess). They combine the genetics of the longest horned bull in the breed, the longest horned TTT cow in the breed and the full sister of the longest horned Total Horn cow in the breed. At age 89 Dr Anderson continues to manage both Anderson Ranch herds.

Dale Hunt Dale Hunt is an icon in the Longhorn Industry. He is one of the main reasons we have a Horn Showcase. Dale has been a positive influence in the business for years. His breeding program is among the best in the breed. Even though he is relatively young, he has spent many years trying to make the longhorn breed better. From the Horn Showcase concept to his vast knowledge of pedigrees, Dale exemplifies the friendly attributes of the longhorn community. He always has a big smile on his face and seems to be everyone’s friend.

Doug Hunt Doug Hunt is a long time TLBAA member. He has dedicated his life to preserving and promoting the Longhorn Breed. You can see his passion for the breed in the amazing program he has built all these decades. Doug has raised Longhorns most of his life and is the breeder of one of the greatest bulls ever in the Longhorn breed, Hunts Command Respect.

He is always a gentleman. Doug and Dianne have seen the best and worst of time. They lost their grandson in an accident working cattle a few years ago. Doug served the TLBAA Board of Director. He is a mentor and friend to so many breeders and an example to all.

Dr. Gene Berry Dr. Berry has been in the longhorn breed since 1981. He has bulls that have been showed in the Show circuit over the years as well as having two of his sires win Get of Sire at the World Show. He has also had a bull that won the HSC. Dr. Berry built a strong cow base with Emperor, Dixie River, and Coach Tommie genetics. For the last 5 years he has been aggressively leasing top young sires from El Coyote Ranch and Bentwood Ranch. For the 2018 Breeding seasons he will be using bulls from Rockin I Longhorns and Bentwood Ranch. Dr. Berry has served on the TLBAA BOD and is currently Chair of the Hall of Fame Committee. His service and dedication to the breed are greatly appreciated.

Lee & Linda Ragains The Ragains longhorn program began in 1979. They have been lifetime members in good standing all these years. Their program has won numerous awards, ribbons and trophies including many horn showcase bronzes over the years. The Lone Wolf Ranch has been a beacon in the industry which symbolized quality longhorns, honesty, and a 38 year commitment to the breed and its members. The Ragains have been instrumental in starting new longhorn affiliates and have served on various boards in different capacities. They have hosted meetings and events at their ranch over the years in an effort to promote the longhorn and to encourage people to be actively involved in the industry. Their efforts in promoting the corkscrew horn trait in the longhorn is one reason the trait still exists in the breed today.

John T. & Betty Baker John T. & Betty Baker are the epitome of Texas Longhorn ambassadors for a lifetime. With nearly 50 years of active participation, filling every roll possible as a breeder within the association, and some of the most premier animals in the breed, it is an understatement to say the TLBAA and Texas Longhorn breed would not be the same without them. Their list of contributions would fill a book, but does include past TLBAA President, creation of the Gold Merit Program, TLBAA Board Member,

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Darlene Aldridge

breeding World Champion cattle, and 20+ years of the Sunrise Showmanship Camp. The Bakers have dedicated much of their life to the betterment and increased visibility of the Texas longhorn breed.

She has bred & raised some high selling and big horned cattle. She participates only with the TLBAA, with Trails ads and registrations.

Darol Dickinson Not at all unlike Elmer Parker, who this award is named for, both Parker and Dickinson have been associated with the Texas Longhorn Breed for over half a century. The Dickinson Cattle Company started in 1967 and 2017 is the half century mark. In addition to serving on the Board of Directors of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America for many years he further expanded his breed involvement by serving as President and Board of Directors member for the International Texas Longhorn Association. To think of the contributions of Dickinson, one must consider some of the truly significant animals that he has either bred or owned. These significant animals include the bulls; Tempter, Zhivago, Winchester, The Shadow, Super Bowl, Senator, Over Kill, Drag Iron and Clear Point. Significant cows include; Shadow Jubilee, Field of Pearls, Jam Packed, Unattainable, Pretty Lady and Jester. Countless thousands of Texas Longhorn cattle can be traced back to Dickinson breeding. Today Dickinson Cattle Company continues to be a leader in the Texas Longhorn Breed. Dickinson operates the “Longhorns Head to Tail” store on the ranch grounds were thousands of people have had the opportunity to tour the ranch and purchase longhorn products each year. It is difficult to envision what the Texas Longhorn breed would be today without the contributions of Darol Dickinson and the Dickinson Cattle Company.

MEL RALEY RISING STAR AWARD John & Lauren Clark This fun and energetic couple have only been in the Longhorn Industry for 4 years. It is phenomenal the progress this couple has made in just a few short years. They do an immense amount of research on animals coming into their operation and just as much homework on what sires to use in AI and who to use in their ET program. Their partnership bull Tuff and Rowdy won several futurities, a Superior Award, and top JR Champion bull at the World show 2016. They own Pacific Mermaid who as a young female is proving to be one of the best producing Longhorn females of all time. If the rest of their Longhorn career continues like the first four, we are sure to see them receive Breeder of the Year down the road.

REMEMBER: You must use the official ballot and include your member name and TLBAA number. Please return your ballot by December 20th. Friday, January 12 • Social Hour 6:30 p.m. • Banquet 7:30 p.m.

Join us in Fort Worth for the presentation of these Special Awards and the Hall of Fame Induction Contact the office today to purchase your tickets and be a part of Texas Longhorn Weekend events. A complete schedule can be found on pg. 18 24 | November 2017

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TLBAA SPECIAL AWARDS BALLOT All TLBAA members are encouraged to vote for one fellow breeder in each of the categories for the special honors. Votes can be emailed to awards@tlbaa.org. If unable to email you may fax to (817) 625-1388, and it will be forwarded to the awards committee.

Deadline for votes: December 20th, 2017, 5pm CST, no late ballots will be accepted. ­––DAVE EVANS BREEDER OF THE YEAR AWARD––

r Carla Payne, Slidell, TX

r Bill Hudson, Corydon, IN

r Richard Filip, Fayetteville, TX

r George & Cindy Dennis, Coupland, TX

––JACK PHILLIPS AWARD––

r John & Christy Randolph, Smithville, TX

r Terry King, Westville, FL

r Mike Willinger, Marysville, IN

r Justin Rombeck, Frankfort, KS

r Keith & Tina DuBose, Ben Wheeler, TX r Tom Matott, Castle Rock, CO

r Chad Smith, Killdeer, ND

r James Culpepper, Sunset, TX

––ELMER PARKER LIFETIME AWARD––

r Dr. Frank Anderson, Jr., Bryan, TX

r Dale Hunt, Ardmore, OK

r Doug Hunt, Saint George, UT

r Dr. Gene Berry, Baton Rouge, LA

r Lee & Linda Ragains, Sallisaw, OK r John & Betty Baker, Liberty Hill, TX

r Darol Dickinson, Barnesville, OH

r Darlene Aldridge, Somerville, TX

––MEL RALEY RISING STAR AWARD–– r John & Lauren Clark, Abilene, TX

Member Name _____________________________________

TLBAA Member # ______________

ONLY THIS OFFICIAL BALLOT WILL BE ACCEPTED - Printable version available at www.tlbaa.org

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Registration Matters

Understanding Private Herd Numbers The Private Herd number, or PH number, as it is more commonly called, is often misunderstood. While it is required for all registered animals, the TLBAA office does not assign these numbers. The PH number is your own personal identification system to assist you in keeping each individual animal’s records. Any system can be used. A common practice is the “Three Numeral System”. The first number is usually the last numeral of the year (9 for 2009, for example). The next two numbers are usually in sequence of the arrival of the offspring. For instance, the first calf born in the  year  2009 could be numbered 901. With a simple odd/even number modification, a breeder can add more information to his PH numbering system. A common method is to assign bull calves odd numbers and heifer

26 | November 2017

calves even numbers. For instance, a PH number of 903 could tell a breeder that the animal number he is referring to is the third  offspring bull calf born in 2009. The third female offspring would  be  904. Roman numerals or letters of the alphabet are not accepted for use as private herd numbers. The PH number is the animal’s permanent number and cannot be changed. The number must be branded on the animal, along with the breeder’s holding brand, before application is submitted to the TLBAA office for registration. A breeder is not allowed to duplicate the same number on two different animals within the same herd. Anyone requiring assistance with a PH numbering  system should contact the TLBAA office for assistance. If you have made an error in assigning a PH number, you can get assistance from the office in correcting the problem.

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Feature

D A I LY C H A M P I O N S O F THE LONGHORN BREED

BEGINNINGS

: THE

thousands of people each year to the significance and the beauty of the iconic Texas Longhorn, helping keep interest in the breed high.

Never underestimate the impact a herd of Texas Longhorns can make, especially when they’re being driven down a brick street twice daily in the Historic GOALS Stockyards district of Fort Worth, Texas. Kristin Jaworski, Trail Boss of the Fort Worth Herd The seeds for today’s Fort Worth Herd were planted since 2002, has a simple goal that involves a lot of planon June 12, 1999 as the City of Fort Worth celebrated ning and work to execute. “Our goal is to constantly inits 150th birthday with a public “trail drive” of 15 Texas crease our reach, and to increase our exposure to help Longhorn steers from downtown Fort Worth’s Sunsupport the Longhorn breed. As other entities push dance Square up North Main to the historic Fort Worth their initiatives about qualStockyards. ity beef, we don’t want the The first public appearTexas Longhorn to be forance of the Fort Worth Herd gotten. We’re really trying to actually occurred the night make sure the Texas Longbefore, during the 12th Anhorn is recognized.” nual Longhorn ExposiThe education program tion. During a special Texas gives 17,000 – 18,000 kids Longhorn Legacy presentaper year a chance to see tion celebrating the 35th anLonghorns and learn Texas niversary of the Texas Longhistory in an up-close and horn Breeders Association of personal, hands on learning America (TLBAA), the lights experience. They also make in the arena dimmed. Then, public appearances. according to the August The real impact though, 1999 Trails Magazine “Sudcomes through consistendenly into the ring, burst the cy and availability. “We are Fort Worth Herd. Trailed by truly an attraction” explains their drovers dressed in auJaworski. “There is enterthentic 1880’s clothing, these tainment value in actually magnificent trophy steers being two or three feet from brought the crowd to their these Longhorns. Having feet.” the cattle drive every day at That same enthusiastic 11:30 and 4:00, seven days a response was seen among week all year long means no the thousands of spectators matter where you are from that lined the streets the next in the world you can come day for the drive up Main here and see these LongStreet. The group of 15 steers and the drovers was followed (top) The original 15 steers stepping out in Sundance Square horns. It’s free. It’s a familyoriented experience. Even if by roughly 300 history buffs, in 1999. (bottom) The herd on a recent drive. Note the two you’re not here during one cowboys and ranchers on youngest steers, Chisholm and Goodnight, side by side. (photos courtesy of the Fort Worth Herd) of the drives, you can still horseback. see these Longhorns.” The success of that drive She adds that the whole program is made possible led to the inception of not only the twice daily cattle by the support and involvement of the Fort Worth Condrives, but educational programs and public appearvention and Visitors Bureau, The City of Fort Worth, The ances involving the Longhorns. The authentic garb of Texas Longhorn Breeders Association and its members, the drovers, the Texas Longhorns, and the history of the the community and Friends of the Fort Worth Herd. JaStockyards not only draws tourists to the city, it exposes 28 | November 2017

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By Myra Basham

FORT WORTH HERD

worksi emphasizes that the program benefits go beyond tourism, and hopefully will spark more kids showing Texas Longhorns, and more interest in Western heritage and the overall cattle industry. TLBAA members have been involved in the drives from the beginning. Since those first 15 head in 1999 to the current herd of 22 Texas Longhorns, the majority have come from past and current TLBAA members. Jaworksi appreciates the generous donors and enjoys the opportunity to meet breeders. She even enjoys a little friendly competition during the Fort Worth Stock Show Texas Longhorn Show and the TLBAA World Show trophy steer classes.

MAKING IT HAPPEN While the whole drive seems like such an easy task to perform, the behind the scenes planning and preparation is non-stop. “Because the Longhorn is such a majestic, impressive animal with these gigantic horns and beautiful color patterns that attract so much attention, safety is paramount.

THE CURRENT FORT WORTH HERD ROSTER

STEER NAME AGE JOINED DONOR

Sheriff Smitty Lucky Dallas FW Freckles Reata Whelming Thunder Valentino Pugsley Rojo Imperial Chex Tex 120 Texas Red Norman Brown Sugar Red Hot Tamale Gyspy Rusty II Chisholm Goodnight Matterhorn Sundance Hail Damage TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

15 16 14 15 9 14 14 9 14 9 15 5 5 6 15 3 12 2 2 3 6 8

2004 2006 2009 2010 2011 2011 2011 2011 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2015 2015 2015 2016 2016 2017 2017 2017

T.M.Smith Larry & Gala Johnston Rich & Linda Spooner Raymond Wilkinson Ed Roberts Stephen Head Larry Smith, II Beth Moore Fort Worth CVB John & Rebecca Wampler Butch Evans Johnston Legal Group Kristin Jaworski Mark & Judy Blanchard Kevin Rooker B & H Longhorns Fort Worth CVB John & Rebecca Wampler John & Rebecca Wampler John & Rebecca Wampler John & Rebecca Wampler Dennis Urbantke November 2017 | 29


Feature Animals can be so unpredictable at times – it’s just their nature – that you have to take every precaution. Always prepare for the worst and expect the best in every situation. Protect your animal, first and foremost, but you also have to protect your assets, whether it is employees, owners, family, children or spectators. There is a LOT of thought that goes into that, from the minute you are taking them out of their pasture or pen, loading them onto a trailer, hauling them, setting up a display, or participating in a parade or event. Even simply having them on display at your facility with visitors.” While Jaworksi applies this every minute of every day in her job, she says the same forethought and caution applies to anyone displaying their Longhorns. She recognizes, however that her level of caution is heightened by the fact that steers participating in the drive are not the same as steers along Exchange Avenue that you can sit on and get your picture taken with. In order for the drive to work those steers are not accustomed to being handled by people. While calm on the drive, driven by the horses, the steers would not react well to a person running into the street to try and touch one. In addition to unexpected human interaction, sudden loud or unusual noises like sirens, horns, B-52 planes and even a rocket man flying over them have been encountered. Jaworksi relates there are so many everyday possibilities of problems that could arise and public perception of an event is very different from someone accustomed to cattle. “I think ahead about things like a horn getting stuck in the trailer, an animal tripping and going down or getting a bloody nose. To a visitor, a bloody nose can be perceived as a much more dramatic thing than it really is. You have to be aware of the sensitivity of your audience and know how you can take care of potential issues.” Jaworski credits Dr. Temple Grandin for helping her understand how animals perceive things like sights, smells, reflections, and light. But she emphasizes, no matter how much you prepare or how cautious you are she says, there’s still times it’s not going to go right. Efforts to prepare have paid off so far for Jaworski. The Herd’s Longhorns have traveled to New York City and appeared in Times Square, they been on a pier in Galveston commissioning the USS Fort Worth and so far there have been no major incidences with the public during 17 years of drives. As a part of awareness and planning, Jaworski and the Drovers need to get know the steers’ individual personalities and take them into account as well. She used 30 | November 2017

Children and adults alike get an up close experience that not only entertains, but educates as well.

some of her favorites as examples. “Rojo is my buddy.” She explains. “He’s very different from the steers that go down the street because he’s gentle and halter broke – he’s an exhibition steer. He loves it when you rub his eye and he leans on you and he’s sweet.” “One of my favorites in the cattle drive is Texas Red. He came into the program spunky and full of grit and fire. He ran us all up the fence he was so feisty. But as soon as he hits the street he is a perfect gentleman, he’s never once misbehaved and he is just absolutely gorgeous.” “We’ve had some really good animals from great bloodlines come from wonderful farms and ranches from all over the United States. People donate to us because they are proud of that animal and it shows. You can really tell when we introduce a steer into the herd that the animal has a good mind and good conformation. He may not be perfect. He may not have been a grand champion steer, but he’s going to hold up, he’s going to have a long useful life here to be shown to hundreds of thousands of visitors from all over the world and thousands of kids in the education program.” Each steer in the program today has its own trading card with his name, photo and a few facts to introduce him to the public. The cards allow visitors to realize the uniqueness of each Longhorn and have a souvenir to remember them by. The longevity of the steers in the program varies and they are guaranteed to be retired to a comfortable life in a pasture in a good home where they will be well cared for. So, if you’re visiting Fort Worth, come by the Stockyards and meet the steers that are full-time ambassadors for the Texas Longhorn breed. You can learn more about the Fort Worth Herd and their educational programs at www.fortworth.com/the-herd.

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Feature

PREPARE FOR THE WORST Proactive and Reactive Tips for Dealing With Natural Disaster Natural disasters have been a part of life since the beginning of time. However, 2017 has had a multitude of events with wide-reaching impact, not only in the U.S., but the world. While there is little you can do to be ready for something unpredictable like an earthquake or sudden tornado, you can be prepared to handle the aftermath. Other events that can be forewarned, like a spreading fire, rising floodwaters or forecasted blizzard allow more time to take steps to ensure the safety of your livestock.

32 | November 2017

DOCUMENT YOUR OWNERSHIP The result of almost every natural disaster is loose livestock. Often these livestock are rounded up together, whether by volunteers or local authorities, in any safe area where there is adequate fencing. While Texas Longhorns are somewhat easier to identify due to coat patterns and horn shapes, you still need to be prepared to identify your stock beyond a doubt with authorities. Fortunately, if you have registered your Longhorns they have a required holding brand and private herd number easily visible on their hide and registration papers to verify your ownership. If your Longhorns are not registered, or you have other livestock harder to identify, then make sure you have some sort of ear tags or tattoos along with records corresponding to those numbers. Keeping photos of your animals can help as well. Record keeping is also invaluable in the recovery of animals that escape their pasture or get stolen.

KNOW YOUR PROPERTY

Even if you have never seen your property during flooding rains or experienced deep snow, imagine it. If you have only owned the property for a short time, talk to long-time neighbors or to a county extension agent to find out where water tends to rise. If you’re in snow country, ask where large drifts tended to accumulate in past years. Remember, weather patterns change and while you may never have experienced flood waters or deep snow in the years you’ve been on a property, often there are records of such occurrences in the past. Many areas utilize floodplains for agricultural land. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), being in a 100 year floodplain means you have a 1% chance every year of flooding or 30% chance over the span of 30 years. There are county planning offices which can share information on floodplains in the community. Each state’s natural resources department also keeps maps

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By Myra Basham and risk assessments for floods. With this information property owners can get the help of a civil engineer on how to construct access to their property that is accessible during floods as well as choose the best sites for barns and paddocks. Natural features to make note of include: — Areas likely to flood — Areas that will stay driest in heavy rain — Natural windbreaks (tree lines, embankments, hills) — Areas that tend to stay free of snow drifts When constructing fences and buildings, or planning new fence layout, take potential hazards into account. Some questions to consider are: — Can I cross-fence in order to keep cattle away from hazards during times of flood or heavy snowfall/drifts? — Do I have water supply available in all pastures? — Is there easy access to all areas cattle may be in? — Do I have a holding area where I can quickly gather cattle to relocate if necessary? — Do I have shelters in place that can withstand strong winds, flying debris and heavy rains?

STOCK AN EMERGENCY KIT When livestock are in your care, you have to think a little beyond injury when stocking up on supplies you may need. Sometimes the Longhorns may be unscathed, but fences and buildings are severely damaged. Extra fence posts, extra fencing material, some lumber, sheet metal, fence panels – all are good to have on hand (stored securely) to make immediate repairs to fences and outbuildings, even if they are temporary. It is a good practice to keep extra feed and hay available on property or in an easily accessible location. When circumstances change quickly there may not be time to run to a feed store and, if you can get there, urgent situations sometimes cause supplies to run short quickly.

THINGS TO CONSIDER… WIDESPREAD POWER OUTAGES If you live in a rural area, you may be further down the priority list when it comes to power being restored. Often the heaviest populated areas are restored first. If, for example, caring for your animals requires electricity to power water wells, then have a plan in place to keep them watered. That could mean owning gas powered generators or have reserve water storage that you can access without power. If using electric fence opt for solar or battery powered operations vs. plug-in. Even those in suburban areas could go days or weeks without electricity depending on the severity of the disaster.

PANIC No matter how prepared you are mentally to deal with unexpected natural events, keep in mind that panic is a basic natural response that can affect anyone. It is also an extremely strong response in the animal world. Do not hesitate to allow trained first responders to help with a situation, even if you think you have it all under control. They are trained to see the big picture and may alert you to hazards you were not aware of because your focus is simply on taking care of your livestock. Dealing with a group of panicked cattle may stop you from realizing that your own life is at stake. Did you realize a live power line was in the water not far from where you are? Did you know a flood swell was headed your way at a rapid speed? Did you know that the fire has shifted and you need to travel in another direction? If emergency personnel instruct you to handle a situation differently, then heed their warnings.

TRAFFIC JAMS One must be prepared to deal with traffic blocking roads. If you know a forecasted event is coming that may warrant evacuation, go ahead and move those cattle and/or leave. Panic and waiting until the last minute often results in miles of stacked up traffic. Another less commonly expected cause of traffic issues is volunteers who want to help. There have been cases where trained first responders and livestock rescue teams could not get in an area to help because of good-intentioned folks with trailers blocking the roads because so many turned out to help.

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Feature Lariats can come in handy for everything from a quick fence repair to pulling animals from rising water or snow drifts. Lead ropes and halters should be on hand as well. First aid supplies such as bandages, towels, medications, syringes, and cleaning solution should be in a kit and checked periodically to make sure any materials that may expire are still good. The first aid materials, extra feed, tubs, ropes, halters and leads should be easy to grab and load in case of an evacuation as well.

Then those call two or three more until everyone has been checked on. The contact lists will need to be updated periodically. Research the property’s history. “Help” or “OK” signs – Visible from the road, these signs County planning offices can give simply let others know your information about floodplain areas. status immediately. Neighbors of the property can give This year saw evidence of the effectiveness of social meinsight as how the area fares during dia as calls for help and offers storms, especially heavy rains and of assistance were freely communicated among Longhorn excessive snow or ice. While you community members durcan’t base all property decisions on ing Hurricane Harvey. This resulted in updates on rising the possibility of extreme conditions, waters and routes that were it will help you see how much work COMMUNICATIONS clear, rescue efforts for both you may have to do to deal with such humans and cattle, as well as SYSTEMS coordination of the needed FEMA describes three of ways a situation. food for all. to both reach out for help and to It also served as a reminder know where help is needed. The Buddy System – This is simply having a net- of the events that the news media did not keep people work of friends and neighbors developed ahead abreast of nationally, like the wildfires raging through of time to determine who will check on and help the western states. Social media can sometimes alert you to impending threats quickly as those on scene give whom and how to share resources. Telephone Tree – Every person in an affected calls immediate updates. two or three people to see if they need help.

Planning to purchase or lease new property?

EVACUATION CONSIDERATIONS

There are two scenarios for evacuation: either you relocate and the animals stay or you relocate the animals as well as your family. While we normally think about evacuation as the government going around prior to a hurricane or flood and mandating people to leave, sometimes it simply may be in your Longhorns’ best interest for you to relocate them if there is a risk of severe weather, especially in the case of flood, blizzard or fire. The fact is, when a person has limited acreage and there is a risk of that property becoming unsafe, it is better to be proactive than to gamble on how bad things will get. Before the need to relocate arises, find some potential pasture or facilities that may be available to use. This may be a friend or relative at a safe distance or even a lease pasture in another area. Check with local authorities to see if there are fairgrounds or event centers in your area that take in livestock during emergencies. Make sure your trailers, hitches, trucks, atv’s - anything used in relocating cattle are in good working order, fueled up and ready to go if the need arises. FEMA credits vehicle accidents and breakdowns as a common issue when trying to relocate livestock during emergencies. If you are going to leave but you are confident that your animals are out of harm’s way, make sure they have plenty of access to clean water and food while you are away. While relocating early may seem like an extreme 34 | November 2017

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measure if you’re not sure it is necessary, keep in mind that as conditions worsen it may become much more difficult or even impossible to relocate the animals. Also, once conditions become abnormal, even the calmest of animals can become panicked and harder to move. The chances of injury for the handler and the animal both increase as does the chance of being unsuccessful in your relocation efforts. Those cattle that follow you around the pasture daily may be inclined to charge over anything in their path, people or fences, if they panic.

AFTERMATH

Whether an event is sudden onset, unexpected or forecasted, the aftermath is just as difficult to deal with. For livestock owners, the first task is to locate animals if fences are down. Once livestock are located and secured, all fencing needs to be checked for damage and repaired or replaced if necessary. If the animals were exposed to high flood waters, make sure they have a clean water source and watch feet and skin for potential issues from too much wetness or exposure to bacteria. If there was high wind and flying debris, check all animals for cuts or punctures. Keep in mind when handling cattle that they may still be nervous or unsettled by the traumatic event. For their safety and yours, remain calm and cautious when handling them during and after an unusual weather event. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AMVA) warns that livestock may continue to react to the stress even when the event has passed, especially in the case of fire. Be sensitive to the stress level and take appropriate precautions when handling the animals, especially when treating injuries. Once everything is safe and secure and the Longhorns have feed and water, assess the situation you just faced. If there are areas you feel you weren’t prepared adequately, take note and work on making improvements. While no one wants to be “experienced” at handling natural disasters, it is best to be prepared before it ever happens to you and then be better prepared if something happens again. If you are unfortunate

enough to have to learn from experience, then share what you have learned with other livestock owners so they may learn from it as well. There are many resources available to help you know what to consider when planning ahead for natural disasters. The USDA (usda.gov) has fact sheets available on their website, as do The AMVA (amva.org) and FEMA (fema.gov). All have specific information relating to livestock/large animals. The information for this article was based on their materials. Your local county agent is a good resource as well. They will have a wealth of information that relates specifically to the area you’re in.

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November 2017 | 35


Affiliates send us your news! Let people know what’s going on in your area and encourage others to join in the fun.

CANADIAN TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION DEREK OVERLID PRESIDENT 306-821-1800

The Colorful Calf Contest was borrowed from a successful competition in Australia and this year the CTLA introduced their version for members across Canada. There were 39 entries for the contest that featured  calves born prior to September 1st. Members submitted a picture and paid a ten

dollar entry fee. The first viewing of the entries occurred at Red Deer where visitors to the livestock barn were encouraged to vote for their favorite. At the national show, the votes were counted and Gus Joyes of Athabasca, Alberta was presented with the People’s Choice Award.  Many visitors commented that it was fun to be involved and the colorful display drew them to the Longhorn pens to ask more questions about the breed. Next step involved asking a community to select their favorite colorful calf entry.  For a week, the town of Consort, Alberta had the opportunity to view the entries and to vote for their favorite. Their votes were used to select the overall winner that was presented with an award and half of the entry fees at the Ponoka sale in October. As the contest was evaluated it met its objectives in the first year: 1. To involve more breeders in the activities of the CTLA 2. To promote Texas Longhorns at different events and locations. 3. To educate the public on the uniqueness of the breed. Thanks to the Australian affiliate for allowing us to borrow their successful idea. Thanks to Kristine Fossum for setting up the display and counting votes. Thank you to the Deb Lesyk for sponsoring both the People’s Choice Award and the overall awards And finally Congratulations to Gus Joyes and family for your colorful entry. And to Kristine Fossum whose entry received the runner up award.

TEXAS LONGHORN BREEDER GULF COAST ASSOCIATION RICK FRIEDRICH PRESIDENT RICK@RIVERRANCHLONGHORNS

The selection process is over and now we wait to see how our entrants into the Affiliate Prince and Princess Contest fare against the competition. We thank everyone who participated this year. The next big event for us will be the Winchester Futurity and the Cattle Baron’s Premier Longhorn Sale on February 23 & 24. Entry & consignment forms are being mailed to all of our members. They are also posted on out website at www.TLBGCA.com . For additional information please call (713305-0259) or email Rick Friedrich (Rick@RiverRanchLonghorns.com) .

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TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


NEWS On the Trail...

FFA Groups Offer Support to Flooded Areas Former TLBT member Sarah Galloway recently posted a call on Facebook to muster support for FFA students affected by hurricanes Harvey flooding in Texas. The response was overwhelming. Galloway is currently an Agricultural Science (Ag) teacher and floral design instructor at Irving Nimitz High School in North Texas. She credits a fellow Ag teacher, Austin Hannah at Bryson, for putting the idea out there and asking if she’d help. Her first step was a Facebook post and that really got things moving. The supplies collected were sent down to the Brazoswood FFA Chapter and distributed to Sweeny FFA, Columbia FFA and Brazosport FFA. Among those who joined the effort with their time, transportation help and donations were TLBAA members Dave Sullivan and Jeff Robinson along with Chris Neidhart, Celina TX; Scott Threet, Ennis, TX; Bethany Tucker, Ennis FFA Advisor; Ennis FFA; Stacy Allen, Ennis FFA parent; Ginger Mulkey, Waxahachie TX; and Boyce Feed and Grain, Waxahachie, TX. “After we sent our first load down, many other Ag chapters began collecting and sending supplies down,” stated Galloway. “As FFA members and Ag Advisors we are a family, when we need something everyone comes together to help. These students are a part of an organization that teaches them to have a giving servants heart, and it was very humbling to see the number of students and teachers that stepped up to help in the time of need.” Galloway added “We have been keeping in contact with the local Ag Science Teachers to see if students need additional assistance.”

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IN THE

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1. Craig Perez Cleburne, TX

1

2

3

4

5

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2. John Hinson Ennis TX 3. Theresa and Mike MacLeod Palo Pinto, TX 4. Viggo & Annette Mortensen Tistrup, Denmark. 5. Mike Morton Boyd, TX 6. Greg & Colette Smith Fairview, TX

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NOVEMBER

TLBAA Breed Advisory Committee’s

Herd Management Guide

SPRING Calving:

pounds of milk daily) requires 11.5 pounds of energy, 2 lbs. of protein, 0.06 pounds of calcium, 0.05 pounds of 1. As fall approaches and warm season grasses bephosphorus and 36,000 international units of vitamin come dormant, realize that the protein and energy A per day. Make sure that your females are receiving advalues of your pastures will decrease below levels necequate nutrition so that they will cycle at the first of the essary to satisfy nutritional requirements of pregnant breeding season. Feeding 3-4 pounds of a 40 percent females entering the last third of their pregnancy. Feed CP supplement, 4-6 pounds of a 30 percent CP supplepregnant mature females to consume adequate enment or 6-8 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement per ergy, protein, minerals and vitamins prior to calving. head per day should be adequate to meet most protein If pasture grass is limited due to overgrazing or poor and energy needs. Choice of appropriate supplement rainfall during the summer, then energy is your first (20 percent CP, 30 percent CP or 40 percent CP) should concern. Feeding a medium (8-10 percent crude probe based upon cheapest source of protein. Price per tein) to high quality (15-17 percent crude protein) hay pound of protein may be determined by dividing the free choice will provide an excellent source of energy cost per pound of protein for the females. If pasture supplement by the percentgrass is plentiful, but dorage of crude protein in the mant and poor in quality, supplement. A source of then protein is generally salt as well as a good comyour first concern. Asmercial calcium: phosphosuming that your cows are rus mineral mix with added in good body condition, Vitamin A should be availfeeding low levels of a high able on a free choice bacrude protein supplement sis. If your cows are thin in (32-40 percent crude probody condition, then feedtein) is your best alternaing supplemental hay plus tive. If your cows are thin higher levels of a low crude in body condition, then protein, high energy range feeding higher levels of cube (20 percent crude proa low crude protein, high tein) will provide increased energy range cube (20 intake of vital nutrients. percent crude protein) will Young, lactating females provide increased intake have 20-25 percent greater of vital nutrients. If winter supplemental needs than pasture or cool season vamature cows. riety grasses are available, 2. Provide supplemental then the females should feed for bulls grazing dry, not need additional energy Photo courtesy of Suzanne Perry dormant range grass acor protein supplementacording to age and condition. A source of salt as well tion of the bulls: (a) feed mature bulls 3-4 pounds of as a good commercial calcium:phosphorus mineral a 40 percent crude protein range cube daily; (b) feed mix with added Vitamin A should be available on a free young bulls 8-10 pounds of a high energy, 20 percent choice basis. crude protein cattle cube daily, and (c) supplement ad2. Evaluate the growth of your bred heifers. The goal ditional feed as necessary to keep bulls in good body should be to have your bred heifers weigh 85 percent condition as breeding season approaches. of their mature weight, including the weight of the fe3. If not already completed, conduct breeding tus, prior to calving at 23-25 months of age. Because soundness exams and fertility checks on all bulls prior of this threshold weight, bred heifers should be fed to to the breeding season. gain a minimum of one pound per day. 4. Typically first calving females require 20 to 30 3. Consider controlling internal and external paradays longer to return to estrus or heat after calving sites. Treating internal parasites as well as lice infestathan mature cows. As a result, begin breeding your retions are important management decisions. placement heifers 20 to 30 days before the rest of the cow herd. This management practice will allow the first-calf heifers additional time to return to estrus so 1. Continue the feeding program begun in October. that they can be bred following calving next year with The nutrient requirements for energy, protein, minerthe remainder of the cow herd. als and vitamins of lactating females increase substan5. Consider controlling internal and external paratially. During the first 3-4 months of lactation, a 1000 sites. Treating internal parasites as well as lice infestapound cow with average milking ability (producing 10 tions are important management decisions.

FALL Calving:

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November 2017 | 39


Alaska

17 13 18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

Chairman of the Board: Tom Matott • (303) 500-9465

Secretary/Parliamentarian: Alex Dees • (805) 300-4617

Executive Vice Chairman: Ken Morris • (704) 361-6035

Treasurer: Mark Hubbell • (269) 838-3083

1st Vice Chairman: Jim Rombeck • (785) 562-6665

Director: Todd McKnight • (620) 704-3493

2nd Vice Chairman: David “Nik” Nikodym • (405) 227-7127

Director: Tony Mangold • (830) 237-5024

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

Keith DuBose

Jim Rombeck

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

(979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com

(785) 562-6665 jl.rombeck@outlook.com

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Ken Morris

John Parmley

David “Nik” Nikodym Region 13 - Director

(704) 361-6035 khaoslonghorns@gmail.com

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

(405) 227-7127 bardies@hotmail.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

Jeff Jespersen

Cody Himmelreich

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

Nelson Hearn

Kevin Rooker

Todd McKnight

(780) 966-3320 jeffj91@hotmail.com

(484) 638-0228 nel_tam_hearn@yahoo.com

(303) 775-2034 hi5longhorns@att.net

(817) 692-7843 krooker@centurylink.net

L.D. McIntyre

(308) 750-8384 or (308) 246-5600 tejas@mcintyreranches.com

(620) 704-3493 tmck7@ckt.net

Region 3 - Director

Region9 - Director

Region 15 Director

Tom Smith

Russell Fairchild

David Edwards

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

(254) 485-3434 fairchildranch@yahoo.com

(918) 557-0364 dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

Aaron Adkins

Sandi Nordhausen

Tom Matott

(704) 490-9208 doublealonghorns@gmail.com

(512) 750-1350 sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com

(303) 500-9465 tom@rockymountainlonghorns.com

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Terry King

Stephen Head

Alex Dees

(850) 299-6875 tklonghorns@centurylink.net

(979) 549-5270 headshorns@hotmail.com

(805) 300-4617 atdees@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

Region 18 - Director

Kathy Kittler

Tony Mangold

Chris Herron

(501) 690-0771 k.kittler@hotmail.com Charles Schreiner III* 1964-1967 Walter G. Riedel, Jr.* 1967-1969 J.G. Phillips, Jr.* 1969-1971 Walter B. Scott* 1971-1973 James Warren 1973-1975 J.W. Isaacs* 1975-1977 J.T. “Happy” Shahan* 1977-1978 John R. Ball* 1979-1980

40 | November 2017

Bill Anthony* 1981-1982 Dr. L.V. Baker 1982-1984 Dr. W.D. “Bill” Clark 1984-1986 Richard D. Carlson 1986-1988 John T. Baker 1988-1990 Riemer Calhoun, Jr. 1990-1992

(830) 237-5024 tmangold@sbcglobal.net

Glen W. Lewis 1992-1995 Tim Miller* 1995-1998 Sherman Boyles 1998-2003 Bob Moore* 2003-2005 Joel Lemley 2006-2007 Ben Gravett* 2007

Dr. Fritz Moeller 2007-2009 Maurice Ladnier 2009-2010 Robert Richey 2010 Steven Zunker 2010-2011 Brent Bolen 2011-2012 Bernard Lankford 2012-2013 Todd McKnight 2013-2016

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

(909) 721-7577 chris@herronconstructioninc.com

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351 semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659 doublehelix@att.net Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331 fserna@elcoyote.com John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730 jtb2@earthlink.net Russell Hooks – (409) 381-0616 russellh@longhornroundup.com


Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow

President’s Message Dear TLBT Members, It’s November and Fall is here! Hello, I hope everyone’s show season has begun on a great start. I would like to encourage members to have a splendid time at each show and visit with one another. It was good to see everyone at the State Fair of Texas, where we had a general membership meeting. We approved a payment towards last years’ service project and looked into what this next year has in store for the TLBT. Our shirt fundraiser was a hit at the Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction; the generous people at the sale bought every spot on the shirt in the short time we were there. It’s started out as a good year for the TLBT, let’s keep the momentum going and continue throughout the year’s fundraisers with lots of participation. I hope you all are doing well and am excited to see all of you at the upcoming shows. Come say hi if you get a chance, you can’t miss me.

Matthew Wallace TLBT members Joseph Gerlach, Jacob Lowrie, Caroline Holson and Clara Holson working hard to sell T-Shirt sponsorships at the Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction

WE HOPE TO SEE YOU DURING THE FORT WORTH STOCK SHOW & RODEO LONGHORN SHOWS JANUARY 15-16, 2017 PART OF TEXAS LONGHORN WEEKEND!

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2017 | 41


SHOW RESULTS Haltered Female Grand Champion: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Greg & Kathy Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: SUNRISE SELECT, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX

DEEP SOUTH SHOOTOUT September 8, 2017 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. SUNRISE SELECT, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX CLASS 5: 1. MS RIDING HOOD SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. TL MINNIE PEARL, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: MS RIDING HOOD SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: SUNRISE SELECT, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX CLASS 9: 1. MS DUTCHESS SH, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX 2. GLAMOR GIRL 6/16, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 10: 1. MS SAUCY LADY SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. IVANKA 4/12, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 11: 1. CT SYDNEY, Joe Tucker, PARADISE, TX

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 24: 1. R4 EWOK, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: R4 EWOK, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX CLASS 27: 1. ACR GERONIMO, ACR Longhorns, RED OAK, TX 2. PONCHO VILLA 1/6, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX CLASS 28: 1. DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Senior Champion: DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: ACR GERONIMO, ACR Longhorns, RED OAK, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: R4 EWOK, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX

Haltered Female Senior Champion: MS SAUCY LADY SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: MS DUTCHESS SH, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

Haltered Female Grand Champion: MS SAUCY LADY SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: MS DUTCHESS SH, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX

Youth Female Junior Champion: SUNRISE SELECT, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: MS RIDING HOOD SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 9: 1. MS DUTCHESS SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. CHAPARRAL ENCHILADA, Sydney Jo Tucker, PARADISE, TX CLASS 10: 1. SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS 2. MS SAUCY LADY SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 11: 1. CT SYDNEY, Sydney Jo Tucker, PARADISE, TX

CLASS 24: 1. R4 EWOK, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: R4 EWOK, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX CLASS 27: 1. ACR GERONIMO, ACR Longhorns, RED OAK, TX 2. PONCHO VILLA 1/6, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX CLASS 28: 1. DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Senior Champion: DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: ACR GERONIMO, ACR Longhorns, RED OAK, TX

CLASS 4: 1. SUNRISE SELECT, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 5: 1. MS RIDING HOOD SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. TL MINNIE PEARL, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS

Youth Female Senior Champion: CT SYDNEY, Sydney Jo Tucker, PARADISE, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Grand Champion: CT SYDNEY, Sydney Jo Tucker, PARADISE, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: SUNRISE SELECT, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS

Haltered Bull Grand Champion: DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: ACR GERONIMO, ACR Longhorns, RED OAK, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

Youth Bull Grand Champion: R4 EWOK, , KRUM, TX

CLASS 4: 1. SUNRISE SELECT, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 5: 1. MS RIDING HOOD SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. TL MINNIE PEARL, David & Deborah Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Junior Champion: MS RIDING HOOD SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: TL MINNIE PEARL, David & Deborah Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 9: 1. MS DUTCHESS SH, Sydney Jo Tucker, PARADISE, TX 2. GLAMOR GIRL 6/16, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS CLASS 10: 1. SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS 2. MS SAUCY LADY SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 11: 1. CT SYDNEY, Sydney Jo Tucker, PARADISE, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: MS SAUCY LADY SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Grand Champion: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: MS RIDING HOOD SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 20: 1. R4 EWOK, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 21: 1. ACR GERONIMO, Sydney Jo Tucker, PARADISE, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: ACR GERONIMO, Sydney Jo Tucker, PARADISE, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: R4 EWOK, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 27: 1. 2LB FLAG’S BANDIT, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS Youth Steer Junior Champion: 2LB FLAG’S BANDIT, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS CLASS 32: 1. JTW HAMBURGER TOO 9/6, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Steer Senior Champion: JTW HAMBURGER TOO 9/6, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Steer Grand Champion: JTW HAMBURGER TOO 9/6, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: 2LB FLAG’S BANDIT, Jon David Pitts, LAUREL, MS

DEEP SOUTH SHOOTOUT POINTS ONLY September 8, 2017 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. SUNRISE SELECT, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX CLASS 5: 1. MS RIDING HOOD SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. TL MINNIE PEARL, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: SUNRISE SELECT, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: MS RIDING HOOD SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 9: 1. MS DUTCHESS SH, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX 2. CHAPARRAL ENCHILADA, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX CLASS 10: 1. SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Greg & Kathy Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR SMOKE’N DAWN, Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Greg & Kathy Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: MS DUTCHESS SH, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX

42 | November 2017

CLASS 20: 1. R4 EWOK, , KRUM, TX CLASS 21: 1. PONCHO VILLA 1/6, , SLIDELL, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 27: 1. 2LB FLAG’S BANDIT, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Steer Grand Champion: 2LB FLAG’S BANDIT, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 32: 1. JTW HAMBURGER TOO 9/6, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Steer Senior Champion: JTW HAMBURGER TOO 9/6, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Steer Grand Champion: 2LB FLAG’S BANDIT, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS

EXPO NEW MEXICO September 9, 2017 OPEN FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 5: 1. BLC FANCY’S HEART, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM 2. WINDY POINT SELA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Junior Champion: BLC FANCY’S HEART, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 9: 1. WINDY POINT ANNA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 10: 1. FOLSOM FALLS LUCY, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM 2. BLC MOMMA’S GOT A TWIST, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM CLASS 11: 1. BLC BIG CHEX 2 CASH, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM 2. FOLSOM FALLS SKY, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM Free Female Senior Champion: BLC BIG CHEX 2 CASH, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: FOLSOM FALLS SKY, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM Free Female Grand Champion: BLC BIG CHEX 2 CASH, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: BLC FANCY’S HEART, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM CLASS 16: 1. WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. FOLSOM FALLS JAYCEE, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM CLASS 18: 1. WINDY POINT PAWNEE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. GO GO GIDGET, Robert and Jenny Smoot, ARTESIA, NM CLASS 19: 1. WINDY POINT SHAWNEE RED, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. T-BONES ROYALTY CHEX, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM Free Mature Female Champion: WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PAWNEE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. LITTLE JOE 115, Robert and Jenny Smoot, ARTESIA, NM 2. FOLSOMS BIG ED, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM CLASS 2: 1. SCOUT 2, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM Steer Junior Champion: SCOUT 2, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM Steer Junior Champion Reserve: LITTLE JOE 115, Robert and Jenny Smoot, ARTESIA, NM

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


CLASS 5: 1. FOLSOM FALLS DANDI, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM 2. JULY JOHNSON 212, Robert and Jenny Smoot, ARTESIA, NM CLASS 6: 1. FOLSOM FALLS BOB, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM 2. FOLSOM FALLS CANDY MAN, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM Steer Senior Champion: FOLSOM FALLS DANDI, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM Steer Senior Champion Reserve: FOLSOM FALLS BOB, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM Steer Grand Champion: FOLSOM FALLS DANDI, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM

EAST TEXAS STATE FAIR September 29, 2017 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. OL STAR SPARK, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. SKH COPACABANA, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 4: 1. SUNRISE SELECT, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX 2. SKH BEAUTY MARKS, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 5: 1. MS RIDING HOOD SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. SYDNEY MOON, Justin Clements, TERRELL, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: MS RIDING HOOD SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: SUNRISE SELECT, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX CLASS 8: 1. TC3 MISS FARMER, Caroline Girard, DALLAS, TX 2. DG SITTIN’ AUTUMN, Chamelia Ray, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 9: 1. DIAMOND Q SONORA, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. 5SL MALIBU, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX CLASS 10: 1. OL LIKELY, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. MS SAUCY LADY SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 11: 1. SKH HOOK’EM LOLA, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX 2. JR’S WHITE CINNAMON, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX

OL OVERSWEET, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. TL MAGNOLIA, Brenna Casella, SOUTHLAKE, TX Free Female Senior Champion: OL OVERSWEET, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: TL MAGNOLIA, Brenna Casella, SOUTHLAKE, TX Free Female Grand Champion: OL OVERSWEET, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: TL MAGNOLIA, Brenna Casella, SOUTHLAKE, TX CLASS 17: 1. TH MISS CHA-VERRO, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX 2. OL ATHENA, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 18: 1. OL WINSTAR, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 19: 1. ECR HOUSTON’S GEM 327, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX 2. TH AWESOME’S FIRST LADY, Steven & Ruby Retzloff, SAN ANGELO, TX Free Mature Female Champion: OL WINSTAR, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: TH MISS CHA-VERRO, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. OL ROMEO, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. REDSTAR RADAR, Doug and Deborah Burkham, Red Oak, TX Steer Junior Champion: OL ROMEO, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: REDSTAR RADAR, Doug and Deborah Burkham, Red Oak, TX CLASS 5: 1. JTW BILLY GUN 03, J.T. Wehring, HOUSTON, TX 2. SS TEX RITTER 3/2, Mark & Kim Hammack, CAMPBELL, TX Steer Senior Champion: JTW BILLY GUN 03, J.T. Wehring, HOUSTON, TX Steer Senior Champion Reserve: SS TEX RITTER 3/2, Mark & Kim Hammack, CAMPBELL, TX Steer Grand Champion: JTW BILLY GUN 03, J.T. Wehring, HOUSTON, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: SS TEX RITTER 3/2, Mark & Kim Hammack, CAMPBELL, TX

Haltered Female Senior Champion: DIAMOND Q SONORA, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: TC3 MISS FARMER, Caroline Girard, DALLAS, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: DIAMOND Q SONORA, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: MS RIDING HOOD SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 16: 1. THE SHADOW MAKER, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX 2. RUNBELING DRAGON, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 17: 1. PK’S DARQUE ANGEL, Guthrie Creek Longhorn Cattle, DECATUR, TX 2. ECR SPICY RANGERETTE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: PK’S DARQUE ANGEL, Guthrie Creek Longhorn Cattle, DECATUR, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: THE SHADOW MAKER, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX CLASS 22: 1. OL ADONIS, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 23: 1. TL TWISTED SMOKE, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX 2. TL CHAIN BREAKER, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX CLASS 24: 1. OL DURATOR, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. TL RUGER, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: TL TWISTED SMOKE, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: OL DURATOR, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 27: 1. ACR GERONIMO, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. TL REVOLT, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX CLASS 28: 1. DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. HI 5’S HEATWAVE, Cody M. Himmelreich, DAYTON, TX CLASS 29: 1. OL OUTPLAY, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. HI 5’S THUNDERSTRUCK, Infinity Ranch Land and Cattle, BURLESON, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion: OL OUTPLAY, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: ACR GERONIMO, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Grand Champion: OL OUTPLAY, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: TL TWISTED SMOKE, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX

OPEN FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. STRIKIN’ R MINNIE, Cathleen Rangel, ALVORD, TX CLASS 5: 1. OL PLAYTHING, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. MS BLACK ROSE SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Free Female Junior Champion: OL PLAYTHING, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: STRIKIN’ R MINNIE, Cathleen Rangel, ALVORD, TX CLASS 8: 1. OL PLAYLIKE, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 11: 1.

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November 2017 | 43


ALABAMA

COLORADO

ARKANSAS

FLORIDA

INDIANA

CALIFORNIA

IOWA

KANSAS

KANSAS

LOUISIANA

MISSOURI

NORTH CAROLINA

Call in, ask for your H.O.R.N.S. password and take control of your herd inventory and membership information.

817-625-6241 www.tlbaa.org 44 | November 2017

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


OKLAHOMA

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTH TEXAS

SOUTHEAST TEXAS WEST TEXAS PENNSYLVANIA

CANADA ALBERTA

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

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November 2017 | 45


Classifieds Cattle For Sale

Auctioneers

Bruce E. McCarty Auctioneer Weatherford, TX 817-991-9979

Cattle For Sale Diamond A – registered Texas Longhorns-cows and heifers for sale. 830-992-9155 dewarner@ ctesc.net

OLIVER LONGHORNS www.oliverlonghorns.com

Cattle for Sale “To God Be The Glory”

joliver@mytocn.com

972-268-0083

Beaver creek longhorns - Check our new website with “Super Sales” and herd-reduction prices. Tazman (Gunman) genetics. Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK 580-765-9961, www.beavercreeklonghorns.com

Our herd has been closed to outside genetics for over a decade. The very best Butler quality available in the breed.

IT’S THANKSIGIVING TIME AT BOTH FLYING D LONGHORN RANCHES! • Thanks to the Good Lord for providing good pastures, water and an outstanding calf crop. • Thanks for the opportunity to create our new 2nd Flying D Ranch location in Gun Barrel City, TX. Give us a call or come on by for details. • Thanks to our Longhorn friends who helped us in so many ways this year. • Thanks to new and old breeders who chose our cattle for their herds. The Longhorn life just gets better!! Call or visit…we have outstanding bulls, cows, heifers and steers for sale at reasonable prices. Please call any of us to schedule a visit to each ranch. We love to talk Longhorns! Cattle always available at all times. Reasonable prices. For information or to schedule a tour at either of our ranch locations, please call: Dorie Damuth - Flying D Longhorn Ranch 40206 Community Rd. • Magnolia, TX 77354 281-356-8167 • fax: 281-356-2751 dorie27@sbcglobal.net • www.damuthflyingdranch.com Scott Damuth, Legal Counsel • Shery Damuth, Vineyard Consultant sdamuth@damuthlaw.com • Gun Barrel City, TX Law office: 903-887-0088 • Fax: 903-887-2925 Scott Cell: 214-546-3681 • Shery Cell: 940-393-0991

Robert King at 210-827-6700 or rking6700@gmail.com

LONE WOLF RANCH

Bob King Ranches

918-855-0704 • Sallisaw, OK

BUTLER

YOUR SOURCE FOR BIG-HORNED BUTLER CATTLE.

THATE Cattle Company

Your source for big-horned cattle in the North— utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

507-235-3467

Small Registered Longhorn Herd For Sale 1 Bull, 6 Cows, 1 Bull Calf, 1 Heifer Calf Call 409-382-3096 for more information.

RUIDOSO, NM - EAGLE CREEK RANCH – 3-in-1 package with heifer calf by Victory Lap cow bred back to Jet Black Chex; yearling herd sire prospect by Clear Point; yearling heifer by Over Kill. (806) 797-6358

46 | November 2017

Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

www.lonewolfranch.net REG. TEXAS LONGHORNS FOR SALE - Great selection of heifers, herd sire prospects, bulls, cows & pairs...... Offspring of Rip Saw, now 851/2” TTT. We offer lots of horn and color and a lot of variety in bloodlines because we have over 300 longhorns and we’ve been breeding up for a long time. We have over 40 really nice herd sire prospects and over 40 beautiful heifers available. We are using 7 top quality bulls. We’re about 20 minutes off the E TX line below Shreveport in NW LA. I also have straight BUTLERS. New Breeders Welcome!

Dora Thompson Tel 318-872-6329

echoofambush@aol.com•www.sandhillsranch.com

Trade & Barter TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breed’s top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days 512-454-0476 / Weekends 830-644-2380.

To place a classified ad call 817-625-6241 or email myra@tlbaa.org

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

Transportation

FMB Land & Cattle LLC Custom Hauling...Shows....Sales 8ft wide Trailer for Longhorn Care Ron Bailey 254.534.1886 Rodney Brown 682.220.8501


Advertising Index —A— AA Longhorns....................................... 15, 23 Anderson, Frank Jr. and III...................... 8, 9 American Livestock.....................................34 Apache Hotel & Casino.............................. 31 Arch Acres.................................................... 44 Astera Meadows..........................................45 —B— Bar H Ranch................................................. 44 Beadle Land & Cattle.............................8, 44 Bentwood Ranch .....................................2, 3 Big Valley Longhorns................................. 44 BPT Longhorns..............................................8 Bright Futures............................................. 43 Buckhorn Cattle Co....................................45 Bull Creek Ranch...........................................5 Butler Listings........................................... 8-9 —C— Caballo Bravo Longhorns......................... 44 Callicrate Banders...................................... 38 Cattle Baron’s Sale...................................... 17 Cedarview Ranch....................................... 44 Champion Genetics....................................35 Christa Cattle Co...........................................8 Cowboy Catchit Chex................................ 15 —D— Dalgood Longhorns......................................8 DCCI Equipment........................................ 38 Diamond Q Longhorns..............................45 Dickinson Cattle Co...................................BC DK Longhorn Ranch.................................. 44 Double A Longhorns........................... 15, 44 —E— El Coyote Ranch............................................ 1 End of Trail Ranch...................................... 44 —F— Four Color Press..........................................41 Flying Diamond Ranch.............................. 44 —H— Helm Cattle Co..................................... 19, 45 Hickman Longhorns...................................45 Horseshoe J Longhorns............................ 15 Hubbell Longhorns...............................15, 19 Hubbell’s 20 Gauge....................................19 Hudson / Valentine Auctions..............12, 13 Hughes, Scott............................................... 15

—H— Husky Branding Irons.................................36 —J— J.T. Wehring Family Ranch........................45 Jack Mountain Ranch............................ 8, 45 —K— Khaos Cattle Company.............................. 15 King, Terry & Tammy............................ 15, 44 Kittler Land & Cattle................................... 44

JUST FOR GRINS HAVE A CUTE PIC?

Send us your photo with a funny caption included! Send your photo with caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails, Attn. Myra, • P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, Texas 74564 or myra@tlbaa.org (Email entries should include address.) Photo may be used in a future issue due to number of responses

—L— Lightning Longhorns..................................45 Little Ace Cattle Co...................................... 9 LL Longhorns.................................................9 Lone Wolf Ranch.........................................45 Longhorn Sale Pen..................................... 38 Lucas Ranch................................................ 44 — M— Mast, Andy....................................................19 Midwest Sale................................................27 McGuire Land & Cattle...............................45 McLeod Ranch...............................................9 Moriah Farms...............................................45 Northbrook Cattle Company....................45 —P— P & C Cattle Pens........................................35 —R— Rio Vista Ranch..............................................9 Rockin Hil Longhorns................................ 44 Rockin I Longhorns.....................................45 Rocking P Longhorns.................................. 9 Rocky Mountain Longhorns.................... 44 Rolling D Ranch.......................................... 44 Ross Ranch Horns.......................................45 Running Arrow Longhorns........................37 —S— Safari B Ranch..............................................45 Sand Hills Ranch..................................... 7, 44 Singing Coyote Ranch...............................45 SS Longhorns...............................................45 Star Creek Ranch...................................11, 45 Stotts Hideaway Ranch..............................45 Struthoff Ranch............................................45 Swift Six Ag Works.......................................36 —T— Thate Cattle Co.............................................8 TLBAA Merchandise ................................ IBC TLBAA Longhorn Weekend.................... IFC Triple R Ranch (TX)........................................9

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

“You might be a redneck if you have to mow your pasture before you can find your cattle.” Thanks to David & Margaret Underwood in Harrison, AR, for the submission —T— Triple S Bar Ranch.......................................45 TS Adcock Longhorns................................45 —U — Underwood Longhorns............................ 44 —W — Walker, Ron................................................. 45 Westfarms Inc................................................9 Wichita Fence Company...........................37

UPCOMING ISSUES: December: Horn Showcase Results January: Cash Cows February: Herd Sire Edition November 2017 | 47


SAVE THE DATE NOVEMBER 2017 NOVEMBER 3-5 • Cowtown Showdown, Will Rogers Memorial Complex, Barn 1, Fort Worth, TX. Open Haltered Show www. DixieTLA.com/ The-Source Ryan Culpepper - Culpepper.Ryan@ gmail.com Chris Lindsey - clindsey04@yahoo.com NOVEMBER 9-12 • State Fair of Louisiana, Fair Grounds, Shreveport, LA. Peggy Swindle, www.statefairoflouisiana.com or 318-635-1361. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth, Trophy Steers. NOVEMBER 17-19 Kaufman Police Association Longhorn Show, Henderson County Fairgrounds, Athens, TX. Entry Deadline Nov. 1st. Joel Norris, joel1983@embarqmail.com or 972-533-4945. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Free, & Miniatures. NOVEMBER 18 • Texas Longhorn Production, Consignment & Ranch Horse Fall Select Sale. Crossroads Centre, Oyen AB. Ron Walker 403-548-6684 or cell 403-528-0200 walkersu7texaslonghorns@ gmail.com www.walkerslonghorns.com. NOVEMBER 19 • Tri-State Longhorn Sale. Crawford, NE. Art or Haley Anders 308-665-2457

DECEMBER 2017 DECEMBER 8-10 • STLA Winterfest Weekend & Heifer Futurity, Edna, TX. Merrilou Russell at 361-781-4221. Qualifying Haltered, Free, & Youth; Points Only; Trophy Steers; Miniatures. DECEMBER 8-10 • Holiday Longhorn Extravaganza, Wise Co Fairgrounds, Decatur, TX. Entry Deadline November 24th. Contact Tina cook, trcook65@gmail.com or 940-399-7993. Qualifying Haltered & Youth.; Trophy Steers; 2 Points Only

JANUARY 2018 JANUARY 12-16 • TLBAA’s Longhorn Weekend, Fort Worth, TX, Lindsay Maher 817-625-6241 or lindsay@tlbaa.org. Friday 1/12- Annual Membership Meeting, Hall of Fame Ceremony, Banquet Saturday 1/13- 11am Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale Monday 1/15- 9am TLBT Youth Show Tuesday 1/16- 5pm TLBAA Open Show JANUARY 15 • TLBT Youth Longhorn Division Show, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Lindsay Maher 817-625-6241 or lindsay@tlbaa.org. Qualifying Youth. JANUARY 16 • TLBAA World Qualifying Open Longhorn Show, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Lindsay Maher 817-6256241 or lindsay@tlbaa.org. Qualifying Haltered, Youth, and Steer. JANUARY 19 • National Western Stock Show, Nation Western Complex, Denver, CO. Lana Pearson 719-740-0741 or lana14338@ gmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, and Youth.

TEXAS LONGHORN

Coming Events

FEBRUARY 23-24 • Cattle Baron Premier Longhorn Sale & Winchester Futurity, Navasota, Texas. Rick Friedrich 713-305-0259, Rick@RiverRanchLonghorns.com or www.TLBGCA.com

MARCH 2018 MARCH 4-6 • Houston Livestock & Rodeo, NRG Stadium, Houston, TX. Youth, Open, & Trophy Steer. Lindsay Maher 817-625-6241 or Lindsay@tlbaa.org. MARCH 9-11 • NTLBA Spring Show, Hopkins County Expo Center, Sulphur Springs, TX. Entry Deadline TBD. Contact John & Brenda Oliver 972-268-0083 or joliver210@yahoo.com. QualifyingFree, Haltered, and Youth. MARCH 10 • STLA Rodeo Austin Show, 9100 Decker Lake Rd., Austin, TX. Contact Christy Randolph (713) 703-8458 or lpinesranch@aol.com. Qualifying Haltered , Free and Youth, Trophy Steers MARCH 23-25 • OTLA Spring Shoot-Out, Payne County Expo Center, Stillwater, OK. Entry Deadline March 9th. Contact David Edwards, 918-557-0364 or dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail. com. Qualifying Free, Haltered, and Youth and Points Only Youth. MARCH 30 • B&C 40th Spring Longhorn Sale, Grand River Livestock Market, Tina, MO. Contact Shawn Sayre or Bill Sayre 660-734-8782, 660-734-0827 or visit www.sayreauction.com

APRIL 2018 APRIL 6-7 • Hudson/Valentine Bowling Green Sale, WKU Ag Expo Center, Bowling Green, KY. Lorinda Valentine panthercreekranch@ att.com 270-996-7046 or Lori McCarty hvauction@gmail.com 817991-8825. hudsonvalentineauctions.com APRIL 13-14 • Blue Ridge Ranch Sale Llano, TX. Buba Bollier 325247-6249 or bollier7572@yahoo.com. APRIL 20-22 • Rockdale Spring Show, Rockdale Fairgrounds, Rockdale, TX. Sandi Nordhausen (512) 898-2401 or sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com Qualifying Haltered, Youth & Youth Points Only (x2) APRIL 28 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield Livestock Auction, Winfield, KS. Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or jlem@camalott.com.

MAY 2018 MAY 4-6 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Miracle Farm, Brenham, TX. Stephen Head at 979-549-5270 or headshorns@hotmail.com. Qualifying Haltered & Youth. MAY 5-6 • Red McCombs Fiesta Sale, Johnson City, TX. Alan & Teresa Sparger 210-445-8798 or dodgeram52@yahoo.com. www.redmccombslonghorns.com MAY 26 • Red River Longhorn Sale, Overbrook, Oklahoma. Rick Friedrich 713-305-0259, Rick@RiverRanchLonghorns.com

FEBRUARY 2018

SEPTEMBER 2018

FEBRUARY 9-10 • STLA San Antonio Livestock Show & Rodeo, Bubba Bollier (325) 247-6249 or bollier7572@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth, Trophy Steers

SEPTEMBER 14-15 • Hill Country Heritage Longhorn Sale, River Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Rick Friedrich 713-305-0259 or rick@ riverranchlonghorns.com. Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or

FEBRUARY 16 • San Angelo Stock Show, San Angelo Stock Show Grounds, San Angelo, TX. Dennis Urbantke 325-656-9321 or dennis@longhorns.com. Qualifying Haltered & Youth, Trophy Steers

jlem@camalott.com

48 | November 2017

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

October 2017 | 25


DCC STEER HERD You have seen the DCC sires that lead the breed and great horned cows weighing over 1200 lbs - the size of real cows. Now check out the young DCC steers. They are expected to be over 6 foot during the 3rd year and bounce over 80" their forth. It is not a fluke. It is the new normal. Check the ranch site for Exhibition Steer inventory. Buy a drop-dead-work-of-art steer or buy a young one and grow your own. Plenty to select from.

DICKINSON CATTLE CO LLC

35000 Muskrat tt Barnesville, Ohio 43713 740 758 5050 information@texaslonghorn.com www.texaslonghorn.com

"Raising registered Texas Longhorns since 1967 - it's our 50th anniversary year." TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

24 | July 2017

Profile for Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine

November 2017 Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

November 2017 Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America