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Texas Longhorn Trails

NOVEMBER 2013


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Texas Longhorn Trails


NOVEMBER 2013 VOL. 25 NO. 7

Cover Stories:

24 Breeder Profile:

Richard Carlson

About the Cover:

A cool fall day with mist hanging among the trees provides an appropriate Fall backdrop for a grazing Longhorn. Thanks to Kristina Bent of Weatherby, MO for sharing this Fall scene with us.

by Henry King

32 Tracking Down A

Killer: Cows Need Salt to Avoid Grass Tetany

44 TLBAA Special Awards Nominations Due November 1!

by Heather Smith Thomas

Features: 12 Affiliate Prince & Princess Contest

40 Deworming Cattle on Pasture by Heather Smith Thomas

16 A Closer Look At The Magnificent 7Lady Butler by Craig Perez

42 Division B Election Update 51 The Consignment Sale –

Shows & Sales:

An Important Marketing Tool

53 Meet the TLBAA Staff:

08 Mosser Sale Results CEO Mike Coston 28 Hill Country Heritage Sale Results 62 Registering and Transferring Longhorns with the TLBAA – Easy Step by Step Instructions 65 California State Fair Show Report 63 Wind-Chill Chart 4

Texas Longhorn Trails


Departments: 14 Officer & Directors 20 A Moment in TLBAA History 22 TLBAA Announcements 36 Events Update with Scotty O’Bryan 38 Board Bio: Bernard Lankford 42 Board Bio: Terry Fuhriman 46 New Members 49 News On The Trail 50 TLBT Letter 52 Affiliate News 58 Herd Management 64 Save the Date 68 Movers & Shakers 71 Ad Index 71 Just For Grins

Notesfrom the Editor We have been speaking of coming changes for the Trails Magazine for a while now and some steps have been taken in that direction. In order to keep your magazine in your mailbox in a timely manner, the changes are being introduced gradually with the goal being a fresh, innovative publication that continues to be the industry-leading magazine that most Texas Longhorn breeders turn to. Based on survey results, consultations with marketing experts and our own expertise and knowledge of what appeals to our readers we have gradually modfied layout and editorial content. Ads and editorial are mixed throughout, keeping readers interested in browsing the whole magazine and spending more time on every spread. The results? Your advertising gets better exposure regardless of position in the magazine and readers enjoy both editorial content and advertising to a greater degree More historical, general health and care and marketing articles are being included. We’ve also added columns such as Events Update and the Notes from the Editor. With this month’s issue we roll out a new approach to the mast, or table of contents, page, expanding it to allow us to feature our cover stories and to make it easier to read and more attractive to view. Keep watching – next month the progression continues as we introduce more elements to move our magazine ever closer to our vision. Thank you to all of our readers for your continued encouragement and please don’t hesitate to let us know what you think of your Trails Magazine.

– Laura Standley (817) 625-6241• (817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 E-Mail: trails@tlbaa.org • www.tlbaa.org Editor in Chief: Laura Standley • Ext. 105 • laura@tlbaa.org • trailseditor@tlbaa.org

President/CEO: Mike Coston Ext. 102 • mike@tlbaa.org

Contributing Editor: Henry L. King Advertising: Ashley Loos • (217) 653-8403 • ashley@tlbaa.org

Show & Sales: Scotty O’Bryan • Ext. 104 scotty@tlbaa.org salesandevents@tlbaa.org

Phil Norwood • (713) 294-0139 • phil@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Myra Basham • Ext. 108 • myra@tlbaa.org • artdirector@tlbaa.org

Registrations: Dana Coomer • Ext. 116 dana@tlbaa.org registrar@tlbaa.org membership@tlbaa.org

Graphic Artist/Multimedia Design: Anna Hendry • Ext. 109 • web@tlbaa.org Regional Correspondents: Lori Beeson • Nolensville, Tennessee | Bonnie Damrow • Roca, Nebraska | Paige Evans • Kiowa, Colorado | Deb Lesyk • Outlook, Saskatchewan, Canada | Wanda Moore • Sulphur Bluff, Texas | Bodie Quary • Prague, Oklahoma

Rick Fritsche • Ext. 107 rick@tlbaa.org registrar@tlbaa.org

Deadline: December 2013 deadline is October 22nd. The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 2315 N. Main, Ste. 402, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $60 per year; foreign per year $75. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 2315 N. Main, Ste. 402, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817) 625-6241. Fax (817) 625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.

Accounting:

Donna Shimanek • Ext. 121 donna@tlbaa.org

Receptionist/ Adminstrative Assistant:

Cynthia Guerra • Ext. 100 Printed in the USA

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“We reach every TLBAA member”

cynthia@tlbaa.org

Texas Longhorn Trails


Mosser Longhorn Absolute Auction Submitted by Ron Marquess

AUGUST 17, 2013 BEN WHEELER, TX AUCTIONEER: RON MARQUESS SALE HOST/MANAGER: REX & NORA MOSSER RON & BARBARA MARQUESS

Great friends, food & cattle Buyers from 9 states kept the auction brisk and exciting. Thanks to everybody that participated!

High Selling Bull: GENE LEE

High Selling Steer: JS LEGACY

High Selling Cow: FEISTY LEIGH

High Selling Heifer: RHF SHARPCHEX

Dr. Frank Anderson III, Houston, TX; Bruce Ollive, Big Sandy, TX

Ron & Barbara Marquess, Ben Wheeler, TX; Rex & Nora Mosser, Midway, TX

Danny Phillips, Colleyville, TX with Rex Mosser

High Selling Jr. Bull: DARVIN LEE

Dan & Lee Tisdale, Bowie, TX

Dan Tisdale, Bowie, TX; Ron Asbill, Tyler, TX; Wayne Windham, Eustace, TX; Kevin Asbill, Tyler, TX; Cody Moore,Stonewall, OK

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Texas Longhorn Trails


Great friends, food and cattle at one event on August 17, 2013 • Sale average $1,881.75 Keeping the Mosser Scholarship in full swing, Lot 8, DO Phenomenal Passion, sold 5 times for a total of $8,400.00 with Kasi Dick being the final bidder to take her home. High selling Bull, Gene Lee $7,500.00 - Doug & Sandy Stotts. • High selling Steer, JS Legacy $3,600.00 - Ron Garison High selling Cow, Feisty Leigh $5,750.00 - Doug & Sandy Stotts • High selling Heifer, RHF Sharpchex $5,400.00 - Bill Hudson High selling Jr Bull, Darvin Lee $4,750.00 - Melvin & Alice French • Buyers from 9 states kept the auction brisk and exciting. Thanks to everybody that participated! Larry Johnson Gene Murphy William Marquess Ron Skinner Chase Vasut Doug & Sandy Stotts John Payne Ron & Kevin Asbill Dora Thompson Billy Anderson Ohlendorf Land & Cattle Co.

Joe Tillman Liberty Longhorn Ranch Mike Crawford Don Gibson Tommy Mulhollan Charles Spencer Stephen Head Rick Brooks Johnny Ray Ron Garison Dr. Frank Anderson

Terrell & Penny Miller James Wilkins Glen Clinard Lonnie Clinard Wesley Watson Bob Weaver Patti Gilbreath Kasi Dick J.R. Ramos Colt & Katy Hall Dean & Belinda Frank

Jeremy & Sarah Edwards Danny & Carol Phillips Doris Snyder Melvin & Alice French El Coyote Ranch Ron & Barbara Marquess Boyd Karcha (High Caliber Ranch) Hudson Longhorns Andy,Tiffany & Stacy Martinez James Miller


Give your breeding program Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 South Rosemary Drive • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com

Beadle Land & Cattle - Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA (408) 834-0110 • (408) 656-6266 e-mail: rlbeadle@longfibre.com

Box Z Ranch - Steven Zunker & Louis Christa 1506 Harwood Road, Luling, TX 78648 Ranch mobile (210) 827-3940 www.boxzranch.com

Buckhorn Cattle Company - Buck & Sharon Adams 110 N. Broad, Guthrie, OK 73044 www.buckhorncattle.com (405) 260-1942 • (405) 282-9800

Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety - Little Ace Cattle Company P.O. Box 386, Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 e-mail: ketyfolsom@aol.com

PJ’s Cattle Company – Jim Swigert or Lance Swigert 2130 CR 100, Caldwell, TX 77836 Jim: (979) 224-2861 or Lance (979) 219-4902 e-mail: jim@swicoauctions.com or lance@swicoauctions.com www.pjslonghorns.com

McLeod Ranch – Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 C.R. 303A, Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155

Brennan & Michele Potts - Rocking P Longhorns

P.O. Box 579, Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com • e-mail: bpotts1@verizon.net

Rio Vista Ranch - Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane, Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 Cell: (512) 422-8336 e-mail: elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com

Westfarms Inc. - Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450, Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 Cell: (985) 515-3172 e-mail: westfarmsinc@gmail.com

This space is available for your ranch listing!


a boost with Butler genetics! DALGOOD Longhorns - Malcolm & Connie Goodman (713) 782-8422 • Waller, TX e-mail: dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com

Eagles Ridge Longhorns - Paul & Judi Sellers 3245 Sugarloaf Key Rd, U21A, Punta Gorda, FL 33955 (941) 979-2419 or (443) 624-0792 e-mail: ancop5@me.com

Kent & Sandy Harrell

15 W 6th St Ste 2510, Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 299-6402 • (918) 733-4008 www.harrellranch.com • e-mail: Kent@harrellranch.com

Moriah Farms - Bernard Lankford Weatherford, TX (817) 341-4677 • (817) 319-9198 cell www.moriahfarmslonghorns.com

Rocking G Ranch - Mrs. Ramie Griffin 5005 Callais Road • Beaumont, TX 77713 (409) 892-2662 • Fax (409) 838-6926 Cell (409) 790-6565 e-mail: dayamisrockingranch@yahoo.com

Showcase Your Butler Program Here!

Rockin I Longhorns - Nancy Ince & Tony Mangold 30 FM 3351 N, Bergheim, TX 78004 (830) 237-5024 • e-mail: tmangold@sbcglobal.net www.rockinilonghorns.com

Sidewinder Cattle Company - Ed Shehee, Jr. 1007 Airport Blvd • Pensacola, FL 32504 (850) 572-6595 www.sidewindercattleco.com

Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. - John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467

Triple R Ranch - Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Road • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 • e-mail: r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

This space is available for your ranch listing!

For more information, contact the Trails advertising department today at

(817) 625-6241


PRINCESS CONTEST DOB: 5/4/12

These are the semifinalists for the 2013 Prince and Princess competition. Thank you to the judging panel of Dr. Bob Kropp, Marshall Ruble, Ethan Loos, Don Constable, Jace Bolen and Shelby Coats. It is never an easy job to judge by only one picture. To decide the winners for 2013, each of the eleven participating affiliates will be receiving a ballot and will need to rank the semifinalists from 1st-3rd. Those votes will then be added to the judges’ votes to determine the overall final placings. The eleven affiliate ballots must be received by Laura at the TLBAA office no later than December 2nd. The winner will be announced at the annual meetings in January and the presentations made to the owners and the affiliates at that time.

PRINCE CONTEST DOB: 5/15/12

DOB: 2/12/12

DOB: 1/3/12

DOB: 5/15/12

DOB: 2/6/12

DOB: 10/7/12


Alaska

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

17 13

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

Chairman of the Board: Todd McKnight • (620) 704-3493

Secretary: Robert Richey • (325) 942-1198

Executive Vice Chairman: Jim Rombeck • (785) 562-6665

Treasurer: John Parmley • (281) 541-1201

1st Vice Chairman: David Roberts • (573) 406-9868

Director: Tom Smith • (616) 293-0977

2nd Vice Chairman: L.D. McIntyre • (308) 750-8384

Director: Bernard Lankford • (817) 341-2013

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

Lana Hightower

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18 At-Large Director

(903) 681-1093 glcattleco@aol.com

(620) 704-3493 chairman@tlbaa.org

Todd McKnight At-Large Director

Ken Morris

(704) 361-6035 khaoslonghorns@earthlink.net

John Parmley

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

(573) 406-9868 info@robertslonghorns.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

(780) 966-3320 jeffj91@hotmail.com

Region 13 - Director

Jeff Jespersen

Region 2 - Director

David Roberts

Donnie Taylor

(936) 414-1401 longhorn4t@msn.com

(308) 750-8384 or (308) 246-5600 tejas@mcintyreranches.com

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

L.D. McIntyre

Nelson Hearn

(484) 638-0228 nel_tam_hearn@yahoo.com

Bernard Lankford

(817) 341-2013 MoriahFarmsBL@aol.com

(785) 562-6665 jl.rombeck@outlook.com

Region 3 - Director

Region 9 - Director

Region 15 Director

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

Tom Smith

Region 4 - Director

Jim Rombeck

Robert Richey

(325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com

(979) 906-0043 cperz1@hotmail.com

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

Craig Perez

Scott Hughes

(828) 287-4257 shughes@partonlumber.com

Gary Bowdoin

(254) 640-0844 Tonkawacattleco@aol.com

(435) 275-2112 ddlonghorns@hotmail.com

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Doug Hunt

Nancy Dunn

(334) 318-0887 nancydunn2010@windstream.net

Larry Smith

(281) 935-2811 texasslonghorns@aol.com

(208) 860-7430 terry@fuhrimanins.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

(501) 690-0771 k.kittler@hotmail.com

(210) 827-3940 stevenzunker@msn.com

Region 18 - Director

Kathy Kittler

CHARLES SCHREINER III* 1964-1967 WALTER G. RIEDEL, JR.* 1967-1969 J.G. PHILLIPS, JR.* 1969-1971 WALTER B. SCOTT* 1971-1973 JAMES WARREN* 1973-1975 J.W. ISAACS* 1975-1977 J.T. “HAPPY” SHAHAN* 1977-1978

Terry Fuhriman

Steven Zunker

JOHN R. BALL 1979-1980

RIEMER CALHOUN, JR. 1990-1992

BILL ANTHONY* 1981-1982

GLEN W. LEWIS 1992-1995

DR. L.V. BAKER 1982-1984

TIM MILLER* 1995-1998

DR. W.D. “BILL” CLARK 1984-1986

SHERMAN BOYLES 1998-2003

RICHARD D. CARLSON 1986-1988

BOB MOORE* 2003-2005

JOHN T. BAKER 1988-1990

JOEL LEMLEY 2006-2007 * DECEASED

(408) 834-0110 rlbeadle@longfibre.com

Ray Beadle

— MEMBER —

BEN GRAVETT 2007 DR. FRITZ MOELLER 2007-2009 MAURICE LADNIER 2009-2010 ROBERT RICHEY 2010 STEVEN ZUNKER 2010-2011 BRENT BOLEN 2011-2012 BERNARD LANKFORD 2012-2013

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Chairman: Dr. Bob Kropp – (580) 336-0220

Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351

Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083

Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659

Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331

John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730

Russell Hooks – (409) 381-0616

bob.kropp@okstate.edu

semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com

hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

doublehelix@att.net

fserna@elcoyote.com

jtb2@earthlink.net

russellh@longhornroundup.com

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Texas Longhorn Trails


2 0 1 3 T L B A A H O R N S H O W C A S E S P O N S O R S


By Craig Perez In the beginning days of the Longhorn industry, as the “Seven Families” begin to take shape and jockey for position, the Butler family was already surging ahead as a dominant feature. Even though horn measurements did not take the spotlight as much, horn was always a main focus. The Butler family line of cattle was still limited, and the breeders fiercely protected their genetics. Many would do so at the cost of their herds. Dispersals were almost common, and if you wanted a certain cow or bull, all you had to do is be in the STATS: right place at the right time. Lady Butler would be that kind of cow for Wiley & Esther Knight. Sire: BEVO Being in the right place at the right time, they purchased Lady Butler from Pauline Russell. Dam: BEAUTY Pauline Russell would keep Lady Butler as well Working with leading edge genetics for the as several siblings until she had to sell them time, Wiley & Esther Knight had one of the DOB: 1972 ~ UNKNOWN in 1977 due to the loss of a pasture lease. most impressive herds of Butler cattle with the Wiley and Esther Knight would purchase sevTLBAA # C15238 least amount of resources compared to many eral Longhorns from the Russell herd that they of the other breeders of this time. Wiley & EsOFFICIAL MAGNIFICENT 7 HORN had been wanting for some time. With the ther Knight would prove you don’t need to be reputation of Classic already taking off, the MEASUREMENT: 55 1/2” TTT the biggest or the best to raise some of the most Knight’s saw this as an opportunity of a lifelegendary cattle in the industry; you just need BREEDER: time to own the only full sister. a legendary passion for creating them! PAULINE & WYLIE H. RUSSELL Coming from a bull producing line, it was Virtually any breeder that has been in the clear that every bull produced could potenLonghorn business for a year or more has seen LAST OWNER: tially be a great one. As a full sister to Classic, or heard the name Beauty. She is one of the WILEY & ESTHER KNIGHT Lady Butler had a big shadow to work under. most famous cows that ever existed within the One of her first sons was a bull named Long Longhorn business. Her production is a testaPoint Butler. The creation of Long Point Butment to her ability to out produce herself. Lady ler may have been by accident. As Pauline Russell was getting ready to Butler is the only known registered daughter from Beauty. Like her disperse her herd, the cattle were all kept in a small area that is best dedam, Lady Butler had the same style of corkscrew horns that took years scribed as her backyard. Turns out, Classic was right there with the rest to develop the same beautiful shape. None the less, this trait is possiof the herd getting ready to be relocated. Like Greek mythology, one bly one of the reasons Lady Butler production lives on so strong and thing led to another and the Knight herd would welcome Long Point proud today. As a total Butler to the herd. package cow, she was Breeding a full brother and sister together turns out to be a great anything but perfect. mix for Long Point Butler. His ability to produce very solid full packOf the many people age animals helps him become a valuable commodity. At that time, interviewed about Red McCombs was the epitome of success in the Longhorn breed. If Lady Butler, all reRed wanted it or if he owned it, as a breeder if your name was associmembered the Magated with the animal, it was a badge of honor. After passing through nificent 7 cow as McCombs Ranches, Long Point Butler would make his biggest impact anything other than with the Carl Brantley family. Even though he produced mostly white, magnificent. She was his progeny would be the foundation for crossing with the Dewitt small, not just small, Meshell and Holman genetics they had already been using in the herd. but “tiny”. Her hide Long Point Butler Unfortunately, in a temporary dispersal, all of these genetics would be was a stark white, it spread thin throughout the industry. These cows pop up in herds across would “be hard to even call her a red roan”, as one historical breeder the country making the main impact of Long Point Butler hard to folrecalled. As for the conformation of this legendary cow, she had a deep low or track. In a conversation with Carl Brantley, he stated that Long sway back. This begs the question how does a “tiny” white cow with a Point Butler made such a difference in his program that he intends to sway back ever stay around long enough to become a Magnificent 7 go back with him on several of his cows to bring his influence back to cow? his herd. Being a straight Butler cow had its benefits, breeders that owned After Long Point Butler came a daughter named Grand Beauty ButButler cows at the time didn’t think much about selling them. They ler (F M’s Texan x Lady Butler) who would make a modest contribution loved their cattle, and many had a hard time even parting with one.

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Texas Longhorn Trails


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of four progeny, then a bull named Double Butler (Blue Horns x Lady Butler) who worked to create ten progeny, followed by Texie Butler (F M’s Texan x Lady Butler) producing seven progeny. These two cows and a bull create only 21 progeny, but Double Butler the legacy passes generation after generation in the Butler genetics. Unlike most blended cattle, the genetic properties of Butler cattle make the pedigree almost as important as the cow or bull itself. Many of the Butler breeders of this time had small ranches, some no bigger than the size of catch lots of bigger ranches, yet working with the genetic packages of Double Butler, Texie Butler, or Grand Beauty Butler it was easy to stake a claim and make big advances within the Butler market. The last calf out of Lady Butler was a bull named Super Butler (Superior x Lady Butler). Many Butler breeders say if Super Butler had more cows or been used more extensively in the industry he would have been the best producer of all the Lady Butler progeny. Michael McLeod recounts buying him at the Yellow Rose Sale in San Antonio. He knew he had to have him. At the sale, he won the bid for half interest for $2500. By the standards of today, that doesn’t sound like much, wind the clock back 25 years and that is a big chunk of money. Michael liked him so much that he would buy the second half of him for $3500. Michael successfully used him on his herd of Lepper cows, and the influence of Super Butler is still seen through many of his cows today. We’ve taken a look at five of the Lady Butler progeny, but there is a sixth one. Her first calf is also her most famous and biggest producer. His semen is still creating more progeny every year and his daughters still bring top dollar as straight Butler cows or used on blended cows. Oddly enough, he is a bull that was most likely a mistake. In reality, he was a combination of mistakes that created the most legendary line on Lady Butler. With land at a minimum, Bevo was forced to be pastured with his daughter Lady Butler. Bevo, being the bull he was, enjoyed his job and took great pleasure in it. Production wise, no one can fault Bevo. No one that is, except the neighbor that would endlessly make calls to have him picked up to go back home. In the end, that neighbor would buy Bevo, figured if he couldn’t keep him out of his pasture he might as well keep him in his pasture. As the story goes, Bevo was never heard from again! Despite his limited production time and quantity of cows that he bred, his legacy to the breed will last forever. His best son was Classic (Bevo x Beauty) whose massive syndication set the standard for promotion. His Watson 212 best daughter of course would be Lady Butler (Bevo x Beauty) who goes on to be one of the Magnificent 7 making Bevo the sire of the first bull to ever break the 60” tip-to-tip barrier, and sire to one of the longest horned cows included in the Magnificent Seven. Bevo’s second best son would be renown for his maternal production ability, being the sire of some of the greatest females and greatest producing females. Monarch 103 (Bevo x Lady Butler) may have been a mistake breeding due to a lack of extra pastures, but make no mistake his production of 663 registered Longhorns and still growing is proof that even mistakes can turn out to be the best thing that ever happened. Monarch 103 wouldn’t last long in the herds today. His stark white color, small body, and constant health issues should have sent him down the road. Once again, being Butler

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may have saved his life. With some amazing promotion, Monarch 103 has more semen available and is more widely used than any other bull of that time in breeding programs today. Monarch 103 provided some great finds as the research streamed through his progeny. He has two daughters out of Anita (Magnificent 7 member), Miss Mona and Miss Bar Anita 143, more about them when we get to Anita. He has a son named 1L Ronald Twist and a daughter named IL Miss Beauty out of Twist 21 (Magnificent 7 member), more on them when we get to Twist 21. Bridging the gap between the cows of yesterday and those of today is Delta Diamond (Monarch 103 x Pearl). Delta Diamond has been the most influential daughter of Monarch 103, making serious contributions to El Coyote Ranch through Don Julio (Phenomenon x Delta Diamond), Bolen Longhorns through Tabasco (Dixie Hunter x Delta Diamond), and many more through Johnnie Hoffman creating a herd of wonderful Emperor, Dixie Hunter and Dode’s Classic FM446 daughters that reach in to hundreds of programs today. As one of the first 70” tip-to-tip cows, Delta Diamond is the only cow of the Magnificent 7 lineup that is descendant of another Magnificent 7 cow, as the granddaughter of Lady Butler. Trixie Monarch FM 795 In the herds of today, Monarch 103 makes further contributions with daughters like Trixie Monarch FM795 (Monarch 103 x Miss Brazos 556, a beautiful mid 70” cow that has done fantastic work for End of Trail Ranch. FCF His Majesty (Monarch 103 x CK Overwhelming Signal) was the backbone for Star Creek Ranch for many years and paved the way for much of their foundation genetics. Wes & Wesley Watson created a pair of Monarch 103 daughters that both push over 70” tip-to-tip. The first is Watson 212 (Monarch 103 x Soapweed) who has sold as a cash cow several times and is now owned by Steve Jordan. The other is Watson 411 (Monarch 103 x Watson 182) measuring in at 72 ¼” (9/26/13) who proved to be a great cross with DH Red Ranger. Today, Watson 411 is owned by Brian Wallis, a relative newcomer that is working with some of the greatest foundation genetics to create new super genetics that will be perfect outcrosses for the power genetics being used today. Anyone looking for that straight Butler cross has no further to look than the mega horn producing Farlap Chex (Monarch 103 x Dark Star B R3) owned by Loomis Longhorns. The beautiful black and white paint color of this bull draws you in, but it is the shape of his horns that Bob Loomis believes to be the key that has helped him produce trailer loads of 70” cows to sell to the public. Beauty was the longest horned cow up until that time. As the dam of Lady Butler, she proves herself as a production cow. Going two more generations, Delta Diamond would not only earn a place in the Magnificent 7, but would also be the only cow of the line-up that would push to over 70” tip to tip. The legacy continues with several progeny and descendants that now measure over 80” tip to tip. Within five generations, a bull in the wrong place at the right time, the passion for straight Butler line cattle, and a number of great Registered Texas Longhorn promoters, Lady Butler has shown you don’t have to have the most color, the best conformation, be a heifer producer, or even have the most progeny to make a difference. Sometimes it just pays to be from the right family! Texas Longhorn Trails


2 0 1 3 T L B A A H O R N S H O W C A S E S P O N S O R S


A Moment in TLBAA History A look back at significant moments throughout the years since the foundation of the TLBAA.

The Great American Cattle Drive Then End of The Trail Or Just The Beginning? Reprinted from October 1995 Trails Magazine By Carolyn Hunter

well (R), TX Smith, Bill Jo T.M. & Jean

Miles City Is Publicity Mecca for Texas Longhorns and TLBAA Reprinted from October 1995 Trails Magazine

The Great American Cattle Drive generated untold amounts of publicity for the Texas Longhorn breed and the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America. Articles appeared in big and little publications around the world, and countless spots were seen on television and heard on radio. Just prior to trail's end, articles appeared in the Southwest Airlines Spirit magazine, the American Airlines magazine, and Western Horseman, reaching millions of people. Numerous requests for information on the Association and the breed had been handled by the TLBAA staff throughout the year, and more were anticipated at Miles City. During the final celebration, an endless stream of visitors stopped by the TLBAA booth set up at the fairgrounds, picking up TLBAA literature and Texas Longhorn Trails. Available to answer questions during the three days were TLBAA's Vice President Tim Miller, Directors Bob Moore, Luann Crist and Rick Grundon, Executive Director Carol Dilley, Promotions and Public Relations Director Don L. King, Texas Longhorn Trails Editor Carolyn Hunter, and about 75 TLBAA members from across the U.S. and Canada. Tim Miller, TLBAA's liaison with the Great American Cattle Drive, was interviewed by NBC, the Rocky Mountain News from Denver, the Billings Gazette, Miles City Star, Channel 8 TV, Radio Stateion KIKC which covers 70 counties in Montana and which gave away TLBAA hats and T-shirts as a promotion, and two different video companies, among others. Don L. King, Bob Moore and Col Eddie Wood were also interviewed. Carolyn Hunter and Lois Dunbar from Baytown, Texas, appeared on Channel 4 (Fox) in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

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J

ust a little over a 100 years ago, cowboys thought they would never see the end of the great cattle drives, pushing thousands of Longhorns from Texas to railheads farther north. Then along came the fat European breeds of cattle, barbed wire fences, freight trains, and pickup trucks. It was the end as they knew it. The only way we today could experience the adventures of those early drives is through the stories told by our grandfathers or from books. So when Bud McCasland's idea of the Great American Cattle Drive came along, it caught the imagination of the entire world. Sure, there were doubters. First, the logistics of the trip were overwhelming. Today's trail boss had to deal with right of ways, health regulations, water and food supplies, and portable potties. Then skeptics said you couldn't put together enough Texas Longhorn steers for a decent trail drive in this day and time. Next came the problem of labor. Could you find enough qualified cowboys today willing to drive a herd to Montana? The biggest problem, everyone agreed, was money. Cowboys no longer work for $30 a month and found. Necessary supplies, gasoline, phone calls, all take money- lots of it! It can't be done, "they" said. Well, on September 1, 1995, Bud and Susan McCasland proved it could be done. That morning, some twenty cowhands and a hundred outriders drove 250 Texas Longhorn steers down the Main Street of Miles City, Montana, their final destination after leaving Fort Worth six months and 1500 miles before. The trails had not been an easy one, but noting worthwhile ever is. And the Great American Cattle Drive was worthwhile! It's success can't be measured financially, but in the renewed faith it gave a number of people that what you dream you can do! Many persons can stand a little taller as a result of the Great American Cattle Drive –Bud McCasland whose original dream came true though the help of investors, sponsors and hard work – Trails correspondent Annie Golightly, the oldest rider to go all the way despite doubts, sickness and hardships- the old outrider, whose chaps were older than anyone on the drive, relived his past for a few hours – the cowboys who drove the cattle 1500 miles, bringing them in in good shape without the loss of a single head – the young drover, who when the going got tough, called home to see what to do and was told, "Son, you hired on to do a job, to drive those cattle from Texas to Montana, so finish the job." (and he did). Texas Longhorn breeders can take pride in their cattle because they showed the world what makes the Texas Longhorn breed so great. Outriders, for a few hours or a few days, experienced the Spirit of the Old West, while the thousands who wished the drive well along the way took home the knowledge that they had seen history in the making. The success of the Great American Cattle Drive is in its Spirit. If you have a dream, and "they" say it can't be done, don't listen. Remember the Drive of '95! Texas Longhorn Trails


2 0 1 3 T L B A A H O R N S H O W C A S E S P O N S O R S

New and Improved Fence Sign!

$30

meled a n E lain e + tax and shipping Porce n Mor e v E – ! e l l e ab Ste Call the TLBAA Office to order: d Dur n a y d r u (817) 625-6241 St November 2013

21


The following are By-Laws changes proposed by the TLBAA By-Laws Committee in an effort to clarify the understanding of the By-Laws. These changes were approved by the Board of Directors on September 10, 2013 and must be confirmed by a majority vote of the members voting in person at the regular annual meeting of the Association on January 17, 2014 in Ft. Worth.

Article IV, Section 2, part D, paragraph 3:

The nominees receiving the most valid votes shall be elected. All newly elected directors shall be installed at the annual general membership meeting. A tie vote will be broken by the Chairman of the Board drawing one of the names by lot.

Article IV, Section 3, paragraph 1:

The meeting for the organization of the new Board of Directors shall take place at the annual general membership meeting after the election of the Board of Directors and before the election of the officers at which time the board shall ascertain that the Directors elected are qualified to serve as required by the By-Laws.

Happy Holiday Registration Special Deadline: December 31, 2013 Register any 36 month old and older animals during the holiday months of November and December 2013 and get them 1/2 off the regular price of $100! You pay only $50.00!

Happy Holidays from the TLBAA

EXTRA! EXTRA! TLBAA Announcements Recruit New Members

— Earn $25! — NEW and IMPROVED FENCE SIGNS! Don’t miss our new, heavier duty, high quality fence signs. The new sign has porcelain enameled steel, making it much more durable. Order yours today! $30 + tax and shipping. 22

We know our members love to introduce new people to the magnificent breed they love so much, and we want to reward those who bring those new people into our association. The TLBAA is offering an incentive for a limited time (September 1 – December 31, 2013) to those who bring in new members. Every time an active TLBAA member recruits a NEW Active Membership, they will receive a $25 credit that can be used for merchandise, registrations, memberships, etc. Junior Memberships are not included as a new Active Membership.

Texas Longhorn Trails


THANK YOU 2013 TLBAA HORN SHOWCASE SPONSORS

2 0 1 3

TWIST 21 HUDSON-VALENTINE SALE

T L B A A

DELTA DIAMOND BOB & PAM LOOMIS BILL & JUDY MERIDITH HUBBELL-SMITH-ROBERTS/COWBOY CATCHIT CHEX PARTNERSHIPS MIKE & DEBBIE BOWMAN

H O R N

LADY BUTLER MCKNIGHT/FILIP CV COWBOY CASANOVA SYNDICATE

S H O W C A S E

MEASLES 2849 CHRIS HERRON JOHN MARSHALL DARIN & DAWN DIVINIA STEVE & RENÉ AZINGER

S P O N S O R S

YO SAMSON ROSILLA 956 CLIFF BEGG MCKNIGHT-SMITH-CLARK PARTNERSHIP RICK & TRACEY FRIEDRICH TONY MANGOLD & NANCY INCE TERRY & SHERRI ADCOCK JOEL & SHIRLEY LEMLEY DOUG & SANDY STOTTS 4 GONE RANCH MERIDIAN LONGHORNS PHIL NORWOOD CRAIG PEREZ MIKE CRAWFORD & PAM WATKINS ALEXANDRA DEES & CR LONGHORNS HOOSIER LONGHORNS DICK & PEG LOWE WINCHESTER FUTURITY OF THE NORTH BULL CREEK RANCH

BRIAN & HANNAH WALLIS CRAIG BIDNER LARRY & GLEN SMITH RAY BEADLE BERNARD & BETTE LANKFORD BILL SMITH BEN LISKA WARREN & CATHY DORATHY JBR LONGHORNS DOUG HUNT DEER CREEK LONGHORNS LAZY J LONGHORNS DAN & DENISE HUNTINGTON KEITH & TINA DUBOSE

YO SAMSON JOSEFINA 706 TODD & MAGGIE GOLDINGER DORA THOMPSON TY WEHRING NICK & KIM NIKODYM DUSTY LEONARD DON & KATHY KITTLER

THANK YOU TO OUR CORPORATE SPONSORS! AMERICAN LIVESTOCK MAGAZINE BORN TO PULL P&C CATTLE PENS LONGHORN OPPORTUNITIES FARM FREUND CATTLE IMMOBILIZER

November 2013

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It

is not much of a stretch to say that ownership of Texas Longhorn cattle indirectly led Richard Carlson to national recognition for his leadership within the Kansas state legislature. The Kansas native has generational ties to the land dating back to 1868 when his great-grandfather emigrated from Sweden and homesteaded about two miles from where Richard and his wife Cheryl have lived the past 35 years. The area near St Marys, Kansas, has had members of the Carlson family resident in the area for nearly a century and a half. “I went to school in the St Marys’ school system,” Richard said, “then went on to get a degree in economics from Kansas State University. I met and married Cheryl while we were still sophomores in college and we have been married 48 years.” Richard went into the banking industry for about fifteen years; during that time he was also involved in the ownership of several Burger King Franchises including one in Leavenworth, Kansas, plus others in the Missouri cities of St. Joseph, Independence, and Belton. “We lived for a while in western Kansas,” said Richard. “We had a little bank out there several years in the little town of Alexander – out by Hays, Kansas. We had that for a few years then somebody offered us twice what we paid for it, so we sold it and moved back to Topeka. Then we moved back out here on the ranch about 1973.” Richard and Cheryl have two sons – Brian and R.D. – and both live within two miles of their parents. Both are married, with families. Brian has four children and R.D. has two young girls.

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“R.D. owns and manages American Cash Exchange,” said Richard. “It is a sporting goods store and pawn shop. He is a great hunting enthusiast – he is probably out deer hunting this morning. He has been getting a bigger buck every year for the past ten years, and it is getting very difficult now.” “Brian, our oldest son, works at Jeffrey Energy Center, a power plant, just a mile and a half from our house. Brian runs some cattle, and our last two remaining Texas Longhorns are in the pasture with them.” “We pretty much dispersed most of our Longhorn herd in the late 90’s. I was getting older, in my mid-fifties, and couldn’t keep up with everything, so we sold most of our herd. Then three or four months later, I had open-heart surgery with three bypasses. That cured the problem. By then, we were involved in politics and other interests, so we kept a few head, maybe 10 or 15 for a few years. Then the last few years, we were down to just the two head.” Carlson’s involvement with Texas Longhorn cattle began about 1980. After living in western Kansas, and then moving to Topeka for a few years, they had an opportunity to return to St Marys. “In 1973, we moved back to the home place where we are now. We bought the land from my grandmother and were looking for some type of cattle enterprise to go into. We read about the Texas Longhorns and that spurred our interest. We got started in that, bought a few head and after about a year, got to know Walter Scott. Probably the heart of our herd came from Walter Scott, originally and through

the years, too. We had a number of his cattle in our herd. We always thought they were good-horned cattle, but they were also very well-balanced cattle, and we liked that.” “We got to know Dave Evans pretty well. He had Yellow Pine Ranch at Cuchara, Colorado. We got to know him well, and bought some cattle from Dave. He knew I had a banking background, and wanted to know, at the convention, if I wanted to run for treasurer of the national association.” “I said, ‘Well, I haven’t been in it all that long, just a couple of years.’ But he got up and nominated me anyway. I was a delegate at that convention and I was sitting in the room where they were doing the nominating and so forth. Dave nominated me, and sitting about three down from me was Charlie Schreiner III, and Charlie said, ‘Who the hell is Richard Carlson?’ He did find out after that, I guess. I got to know Charlie well over the years – quite an interesting individual, and of course, the fabulous YO Ranch.” “But that’s what got my interest sparked in the association. I served two terms, if I remember correctly, as treasurer, and then ran for First Vice-President – I believe at the San Antonio convention. We ended up with a tie vote with H.C. Carter – I think it was. It seems like there were about 500 votes cast each way – it was a huge convention. So we ended up with a tie vote, which had never happened before. They called a break for a half hour or something like that, and said we would come back and re-vote. Well, Walter Scott started going from table to table, visiting

Texas Longhorn Trails


with people about me, and when we came in and re-cast the vote, I won by 20 votes!” “I ended up as First Vice-President, and I served two terms of that. I don’t recall if I had any opposition for President – I served two terms as President, too – ’86 to ’88. At that time, all voting had to be done in person at the convention. I believed we needed more involvement by all of the membership so I proposed to the board the mail-in ballot system. We divided the country into regions with directors from throughout the United States and Canada. They served on a staggered re-election system. It is still the system being used today.” “As happens over the years on several occasions with TLBAA, we kind of expanded beyond our means. We really couldn’t wait. We went ahead and reduced the TLBAA staff and pulled back. When I became president, we had bills that had been outstanding three months and had not been paid. We got those cleaned up by reducing staff and getting on a much more efficient basis. We got it turned around and progressed from there.” “Roy Gregg was Executive Director then, and working with him, we designed the World Show system that is currently in effect. At that time, we did have the Youth Show. We had a pretty good system out there for it. But we redesigned the World Show system on a qualifying basis that they are still using. The affiliates could all have shows, and the first and second-place winners in each of those affiliate shows qualified for the World Show. I remember presenting that plan to the Board. They accepted it without any changes at the time. I told them whatever problems we have, we will just set up a Show Committee so that there would be people available anytime something arose in the World Show system. The people who were showing could work them out. I think it has been a tremendous program for the TLBAA over the years.” “After that, I think in my last year, the Board decided to publish our own magazine. We had a four- to eight-page newsletter that was going out. Of course, there

November 2013

was the Texas Longhorn Journal that was out there too, but we thought it was really important to have the Trails become a magazine. We voted as a board to go ahead and start our own magazine as the official one, and that was the Texas Longhorn Trails. The actual conversion into the magazine format was picked up by John T. Baker, who became President after me, and actually developed it into the magazine as it is today. But we started it off as

the official magazine and started the process.” “So the World Show circuit, the new magazine and the new mail-in ballot system were the most notable parts of my presidency.” “We did the Texas A&M research at that time, too – to define the leanness, low-cholesterol basis of Texas Longhorn Lean Beef. And of course, the show system just exploded almost immediately. It just became a huge success. Then Terry Kelsey created the bronze and delivered it too. What a great assert that is to the association. A deed restriction had been put on the property. We had that restriction at least modified so we could do some things with the property and have the TLBAA office built there. However, that

has been a long time coming. We had fund-raisers, but we just didn’t have the funds at that time to tackle a museum and office at the same time. It’s expensive, no doubt about it.” “I served on the TLBAA Board for more than 20 years, one of the longestserving Board members. I really had to get off the Board when I went into the State Legislature. It met at the same time as the Annual Meeting of the TLBAA.” Carlson’s experience in governance with the TLBAA got him interested in participation in local and state-wide politics. He ran for County Commissioner in his local county, Pottawatomie County, between Topeka and Manhattan, Kansas, and served in that capacity 12 years. “That worked really well,” he said. “When I had to go to Longhorn activities, you could kind of work it into your schedule. Then when our state representative retired ten years ago, I ran for his seat and was elected for a two-year term. I have been re-elected four times and am in my fifth term now. I went through redistricting last year, and over half of my district ended up being brand new, but I was still fortunate enough to be reelected.” “I have been very active on the committees in the state. I served on the Appropriations and Budget Committee for a number of years, and all the years I’ve been there, I served on the Tax Committee. I’ve chaired the House Taxation Committee the last five years. It will be six this coming winter. The last two years, we passed major income tax reforms in Kansas. Actually, a year ago, we passed a bill that on all Subchapter S, LLC-type companies, Sole Proprietorships – anything that has an income tax return that flows through and is filed on an individual basis – any of those companies -none of their profits will be taxed in Kansas. That’s been a huge benefit here the last year or two. We’ve had a number of small companies, especially service industries, companies that can move fairly quickly, move to Kansas. We think that is the first model type of legislation in the nation where small businesses would not have their profits taxed.”

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“We also reduced the income tax at the same time on the individual income tax, from 6.45 to 4.9, and over the next two years, we reduced that even further to 3.9 per cent, so we will have one of the lower tax rates in the Midwest. We also put an active provision in the bill that all revenues to the state over 102% of the previous year would automatically flow to a formula and reduce income taxes each year by the amount that is over the 102% of revenue, until all income tax is gone in Kansas. The last two years have seen major tax reforms in Kansas.”

tal policy, education, health care and state fiscal reform, among others. “What we are doing,” declared Carlson, “is slowing down the growth of government. We’ve pretty much stopped the growth the past three years and used the increased revenue that is coming out of the recession to reduce the income tax now. We did leave four-tenths percent of sales tax and used those proceeds to also reduce income taxes in the next three years.” “What we’ve done has created a lot of interest throughout the nation. Several governors have tried to do it in their individual states and have not succeeded because the lobbyists have just ground them down. We were able to circumvent that by using other means such as the sales tax and the growth as opposed to doing away with exemptions that the lobbying industry didn’t want to lose.” “We have an excise tax on fuel that is the major portion of the funds for public highways and roads; the rest of it is from a portion of sales tax dedicated to it. We have had several major road-building programs over the past 30 years. We are in the third one right now. They last ten years each. Kansas was noted as having the Number One roads in the nation last year. We’ve done a good job keeping our roads up. A lot of the core services of government are the things we want to fund. The school system never has enough money, so they’re not happy. Defining what is enough is always a difficult term and very relative if you are in the industry or not.” “I’ve also been very active in Second Amendment activities over the years. We passed Concealed/Carry the first year I came in. They had passed it several times previously, but the governors had vetoed it. The last time we were able to override the veto and put it into law. I carried most of the Second Amendment bills we passed over the years. We passed the constitutional amendment with the highest percentage of Kansans voting in favor of a constitutional amendment, almost 90% the highest percentage of any of the sixteen states that have been passed. This was

Carlson’s experience in governance with the TLBAA got him interested in participation in local and state-wide politics. “The ALEC organization, which is the American Legislative Exchange Council, a nationwide organization of about 2,000 legislators and about an equal amount in private industry companies, last year awarded me with the Legislator of the Year award, for which I felt very honored!” Carlson, who represents the 61st District, was honored with the award for his work in tax and fiscal policy promoting limited government and fiscal responsibility in Kansas government. His leadership role was instrumental in helping the state retain its fiscal integrity and moving Kansas toward a pro-job, pro-growth state. The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) is composed of state legislators, Republican and Democrat, from all 50 states. ALEC is a think tank run by and for state legislators. The nonpartisan, voluntary organization also includes businesses and foundations who share their belief in free markets and limited government. What makes the council valuable for the public is that ALEC provides a forum for the private sector to provide practical input on how state public policy decisions can impact jobs and the local economy. The organization fosters relationships between private and public sector members to develop best practice solutions to various state issues, including environmen-

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the amendment that guaranteed the Second Amendment rights of individuals.” “Last year I carried a bill that did away with all the restrictions on knives and put it under our Second Amendment rights to carry a knife. Surprisingly, there is a national knife-rights organization, which I wasn’t aware of until two years ago. That bill became law, and I got a legislator-of-the-year award from the national knife rights people. The year before, the Kansas State Rifle Association, which is the NRA affiliate here in Kansas, also awarded me their Second Amendment Legislator of the Year award.” “I certainly appreciate the acknowledgement of the awards, but it is mainly because of my strong convictions toward the Second Amendment and also for limited government. The awards are certainly secondary to the principles I believe in. I have equal enthusiasm for supporting all of our rights. It is just that those are the ones that have come to the forefront that need protecting at times.” Before statewide politics in Kansas demanded so much of his time and attention, Carlson would be present and active at major TLBAA activities, and his wellmodulated baritone was often the voice of the World Show, which he announced on numerous occasions. At the recent 2013 Autobahnanza, Larry Barker had invited Carlson to judge the speech competition, an assignment he willingly accepted. “I left a few days early,” he said, “and went to Goliad to visit with Walter Scott. We had a good visit, but Walter was awfully frail at the time. Then I went on to Fort Worth and judged the speech competition. Carla Jo Payne saw I was there, and she asked me to announce the TLBAA show, which I agreed to do. It was a long time since I’d done that, maybe ten years, but it was good to be back among Texas Longhorn friends.”

Texas Longhorn Trails


August 2013

1


Hill Country Heritage Sale Results SEPTEMBER 13-14, 2013 FREDERICKSBURG, TX SALE HOSTS: RICK & TRACEY FRIEDRICH JOEL & SHIRLEY LEMLEY SALE MANAGEMENT: LEMLEY AUCTION SERVICES

Highlights

"Tracey and I would like to thank everyone who came out to support our first annual sale. We look forward to making many more fun memories in the years to come and making our sale bigger and better year by year. Save the date for our 2014 weekend!"

THE TOP TEN HIGH SELLERS WERE;

Lot 23 Lot 31 Lot 10 Lot 66 Lot 43 Lot 106 Lot 15 Lot 22 Lot 102 Lot 101

6,500.00 4,750.00 3,800.00 3,750.00 3,750.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 2,750.00 2,700.00 2,600.00

Kyle Madden, Diana, TX; Kevin Asbill, Tyler, TX

Lee & Linda Blackwell, Fredericksburg, TX; Toni & Larry Stegemoller, Cleburne, TX; Curtis Ohlendorf, Austin, TX

Suzanne & Bill Torkildsen, Fayetteville, TX

Alan Sparger, Comfort, TX; Bob Loomis, Overbrook, OK

John Helm, Red Oak, TX; Ron Marquess, Ben Wheeler, TX

Photos by Laura Standley Consignor of the high selling lot John Parmley, Star Creek Ranch, Somerville, TX

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Dale Hunt and Joel Lemley working the heifer sale.

Texas Longhorn Trails


Ron & Kevin Asbill, Tyler, TX

The heifer sale

Ty Wehring, Houston, TX; Steve Azinger, Houston, TX

Betty & Hal Meyer, Dripping Springs, TX

William Marquess & Ron Marquess, Ben Wheeler, TX; Tiffany & Andy Martinez, Grandview, TX

David & Linda Mills, Cedar Park,

Marilyn & Donnie Taylor, Huntington, TX; Shirley Lemley, Blackwell, TX.

John Helm, Red Oak, TX; Gary Huddleston, Rochelle, TX; Nathan Helm, Red Oak, TX

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Allen Weihrich, Fredericksburg, TX

John & Ursula Allen, Harper,

Christina & Chris Clark, Taft, TX; Bob & Pam Loomis, Overbrook, OK

Bubba Bollier, Llano, TX; Troy Robinett, Rhome, TX; John Parmley, Somerville, TX

Nancy Ince, Bergheim, TX; Chris Franklin, Bergheim, TX Texas Longhorn Trails


cattle Baron's Premier Longhorn Sale & Winchester Heifer Futurity Hosted by the TLBGCA

February 28 & March 1, 2014 Nomination Deadline: December 1, 2013 Consignment Fee is $350, plus 5 % commission per animal lot (commission is waived for purchasing consignors). Check out our Sale and Futurity packages along with the consignment special for over 75” TTT Longhorns.

Sale Catalog will be a delivered with the Texas Longhorn Trails February issue. Sale Catalog and Sale and Futurity consignment forms will be listed online at www.tlbgca.com. Multiple E- blasts will be sent to advertise the Sale.

The sale will be held at the Mid Tex Livestock Auction, 5105 Highway 90S, Navasota, Texas 77868 Phone-936-825-3970, Located on Hwy 90S @ 3.75 miles east of Hwy 6.

Exhibit pens available, & space for transit cattle, and vendor lease spots available for sale day

Futurity and Consignment cattle can be unloaded at Mid Tex Livestock Auction starting at 7:30 AM on Friday, February 28. On Friday Night after the Futurity there will be a social event.

Viewing of sale consignments will be Saturday morning before the sale. 100 lots to be sold. There will be a noon time meal at the sale barn facility by a catering company.

For questions or more information, contact:

Cattle Baron’s Sale

Futurity

Rick Friedrich

Donnie Taylor

rick@iseinc.cc 713-305-0259

Longhorn4t@msn.com 936-414-1401

Futurity & Sale

Steve Azinger

Cattle Baron’s Sale

Marion Woolie

s_azinger@lazyaranch.org marionwoolie@aol.com 713-823-5371 713-898-4972


The cause of grass tetany (grass staggers, milk tetany, lactation tetany, winter tetany, wheat pasture poisoning, crested wheatgrass poisoning, barley poisoning) has been poorly understood, yet annual death losses cost stockmen millions of dollars. It affects mature cattle grazing lush forage, after weather changes like freezing early spring pastures or sudden growth after rainfall following drought. This disease was first described in Britain in 1930, associated with magnesium deficiency and calcium deficiency (“milk fever”) and excess potassium in the blood of affected animals. During cool, wet conditions or regrowth after frost or drought damage, sodium levels in certain forage plants plummet, while nitrogen and potassium levels spike. The dead cattle have high levels of potassium in their eye fluid. Recommended prevention has been supplemental dietary magnesium. Standard treatment has been to give affected cows oral and/or intravenous magnesium. After examining cattle lost in 2001 following spring frosts in the Midwestern U.S, and analyzing the Dr. Thomas Swerckzek (a vetFeeding magnesium pastures, erinary pathologist in Kentucky) found about the cause and prevention of proved inneffective clues grass tetany. “When I came to Kentucky in 1969, against grass tetany. people were trying to prevent it by feeding more magnesium. Cattle wouldn’t eat it free choice, because it’s bitter. So farmers mixed it with corn or other feed,” he says. “Each spring, farmers were advised to get magnesium into their cattle when pastures were growing fastest. Stockmen tried this, but it didn’t work,” recalls Swerczek. Then nutritionists said farmers should start 4 to 5 weeks before peak pasture growth. “That didn’t work either. By the 1980’s they advised year-round supplement, to get it into the animals’ bones.” Theoretically, cattle could pull it out of bone storage when blood levels dropped due to sudden pasture changes. As a pathologist, Swerczek did diagnostic necropsies on livestock until the early 1970’s. Then for 15 years he worked as an equine diagnostic research pathologist. In 1986 he continued his necropsy research on all classes of livestock. When he resumed doing necropsies on cattle, he was shocked to see how much worse the grass tetany situation had become. “The dead cattle were arriving in a wasted condition I’d never seen before. When I’d stopped doing cattle necropsies in 1971, the dead cattle were in good shape, so I noticed how much they’d deteriorated,” he explains. After coming back to cattle necropsies in 1986 he hated to be on necropsy duty after a cold spell because so many dead cattle came in.

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Texas Longhorn Trails


By Heather Smith Thomas “By 1995 I started seeing adult cattle with salmonellosis, coccidiosis and other calfhood diseases, which didn’t make sense. Perhaps the cows were eating something the calves were not,” he says. He began lookat diets and mineral mixes, beCattle often ing cause that’s what had changed over the years. overeat mineral Some pathologists observing poor condition of cattle coming in mixes, to get the for necropsy thought the farmers weren’t feeding enough protein. little bit of salt “But when grass tetany problems peaked in 1995-96, purebred breedthat ers were hit hardest. I began evaluating mineral mixes and visiting some of these purebred herds,” recalls Swerczek. He collaborated with a bovine veterinarian, Dr. William McCaw, who was working with several purebred herds trying to find answers. “He thought there was something related to diet that was causing wasting and opportunistic diseases. We asked several producers if they’d be willing to stop feeding minerals awhile, to try to figure this out. Mineral feeding was so ingrained in their idea about proper management that they thought the cattle would die without magnesium to prevent grass tetany,” says Swerczek. Some agreed to do it, however, since they were losing cattle anyway. When Swerczek started looking at herds throughout the state, he found a farm with very healthy Hereford crossbreds. The owner was feeding loose salt rather than mineral mixes. Most farmers in that area fed mineral mixes and salt/mineral blocks instead of loose salt. Cattle often overate mineral mixes, to get the little bit of salt that was in them. The farmer with the crossbred cattle had a salt house in every pasture. “He wasn’t feeding any magnesium. He’d been in the cattle business more than 40 years and hadn’t had a case of grass tetany,” says Swerczek. “This was a hint that maybe it wasn’t necessary to feed magnesium to prevent grass tetany. Later, when I got several herds off the mineral mix, they quickly started to turn around. Most of the cows had been suffering from diarrhea, wasting away, and within 24-48 hours they improved, after giving them plain loose salt instead of mineral.” He was working with a herd of about 1000 Angus and driving through that farm with the manager. “We came across a cow that had been down for several days in spite of multiple

is in them

November 2013

treatments with magnesium and calcium.” Swerczek had some sea salt, and put it in front of that cow. Three hours later she’d gotten up and wandered off, and then went down again. The manager put more salt in front of her. By the next morning and she’d gotten up and rejoined the herd. There were other cattle in the herd showing signs of grass tetany and going down. “I told the manager to put a handful of salt in front of them or get it into their mouths. Those cows came out of it. I asked if he’d be willing to take away all the minerals and just feed salt. He was afraid to do that, but agreed to put a small group in a different pasture and try it. The next cold spell, cows in the pasture where he had the salt were not affected.” “We had massive losses in Kentucky one year, due to an unusual winter with many warm spells. Grass and clover grew early. Then we had a hard freeze in April. Cattle went down by the thousands with grass tetany and bloat. People were using bloat blocks but this didn’t help. Cattle were actually dying while eating those, because they didn’t have salt,” he explains. “The same thing happened in 2010. We had a lot of clover and the farmers using bloat blocks said their cows

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were eating them like candy and it didn’t help. The farmers who had salt out didn’t lose cattle,” says Swerczek. “The reason cows go down with grass tetany is that they are short on magnesium and calcium, but I didn’t know why salt worked.” So he used horses as a research model because they also suffer nitrate toxicity when grazing frostdamaged pastures, and nitrate is involved with magnesium deficiency. Horses don’t get the tetany syndrome, but mares abort. Swerczek fed horses extra If there’s enough protein, to get protein and nitrogen levels higher in their salt available, the blood. “I knew nitrate was inso I measured nitrate in body can grab onto volved their blood and put some of

the sodium and

cows don’t go down

with grass tetany or milk fever.

them on salt and some on no salt. I found that when they don’t have salt the nitrate spikes. When horses had an adequate amount of salt, blood nitrate went down to very low levels,” he explained. “We’d been taught for many years (and people still believe) that nitrate is not toxic—that nitrite is the problem. In the 1940’s when nitrate was discovered as the cause of cornstalk toxicity, it was nitrites causing shortage of oxygen in the blood. But I found that nitrate is 100 times more important in grass tetany syndrome than nitrite,” he says. The body must get rid of the nitrate and it does this through the cations, especially sodium. “When there isn’t adequate salt in the blood, the body grabs onto the most

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available cation, which would be magnesium and then calcium,” he explains. When the spike of nitrate occurs— when the cow consumes frost-damaged forage—the body immediately uses magnesium in the blood to get combine with and get rid of the nitrate, which depletes the body, and this is why the cow goes down. “If there’s enough salt available the body can grab onto the sodium and cows don’t go down with grass tetany or milk fever. If you don’t have salt out on the day this hits, they go down. It has to be there all the time and it can’t be hard salt blocks because cattle can’t eat enough when they suddenly need it.” Another piece of the puzzle fell into place after Swerczek found that on some farms—even though farmers supplied salt—cattle weren’t eating enough of it. Potassium level in grass was spiking (15 times higher than normal) after hard frost, especially when it was lush and highly fertilized. “Since the cation potassium and sodium are so close together, the body can’t always differentiate between them. These minerals can substitute for one another. I theorized that when potassium spikes, even though cattle have salt available they won’t eat it because the body thinks they already have enough.” They are actually sodium-starved but their bodies didn’t know the difference between an excess amount of potassium and too little sodium. The body usually has the ability to keep sodium levels within normal range, but when it drops lower, you only have a few hours before that animal dies. “If you feed salt, however, and the animals eat it, they’ll be fine—as long as they have plenty of water. British scientists in the 1930’s noticed that salt could prevent grass tetany, but no one put it all together. Grass tetany should be called nitrate toxicity/salt deficiency leading to hypomagnesia/hypocalcemia,” says Swerczek.

Texas Longhorn Trails


July 2010

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BY SCOTTY O’BRYAN

events update

What a month! October has brought us the TLBAA Horn Showcase and Sale event. Entries were up over 100 animals this year from last year’s event. A huge thank you goes out to the committee who worked tirelessly on this event to make it a success. This year, we were able to witness the milestone of the first 90” tip-to-tip bull be measured; congratulations Bob and Pam Loomis! It was a pleasure to attend Bob’s satellite measuring he hosted for the Horn Showcase, and it was top notch! It is nice to see breeders gather together and to just enjoy the day. Also a big shout out to all of our satellite measuring hosts! With their participation, we were able to measure cattle from Pennsylvania to California, South Texas to Canada and everywhere in between; all in one weekend! If you attended one of these, make sure to thank our hosts one last time. Other events we are eagerly looking forward to are the many fall shows that are already under way. I’ve talked with several of our affiliate show chairs, and they are all planning new exciting things for you to take part in. At the affiliate shows, you will see the TLBT members who have come to town, and you’ll be able watch the show. I know these kids have put time and effort into their calves. Attend a show and support them! One TLBT member gave me the low down on their “cow patty bingo” project. I cannot wait to attend my next show and take part in this fun project. Speaking of our TLBT, ON THE SCENE! I highly encourage everyone to support this great group of kids. They truly are the fu(Top to bottom): ture of this breed. Many adults that now are movers and shakers in this industry are for- Ryan Culpepper, Scott Schumacher & Scotty. mer TLBT members. For example, Hired Hand’s Molly Clubb is a former TLBT Michigan Mafia photo from the Horn ShowPresident, Horn Showcase Measuring Chair Russell Fairchild is a former TLBT Presicase Satellite Measuring. dent, Texas Longhorn Judge Maggie Pfeiffer Salem is a former TLBT President, World Show Steering Committee member Cody Himmelreich and his siblings were former TLBT members and the list goes on as many TLBT members become breeders. Attend a cattle show, event or sale and support the TLBT. You won’t regret it. I do hope that you are planning on attending the General Membership meeting held January 17th in Fort Worth, Texas. This is a part of “Longhorn Weeked” that includes the board and committee meetings, Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale and the Texas Longhorn show at the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo. This is a great time of gathering and fellowship. We also will have our ‘End of Year’ Awards banquet the evening of January 17th. Send your nominations in for who you think is deserving! See information and award criteria on pages 44-45. Till next time, remember: a gate is just another part of the fence until you open it.

THE FUTURE TLBT!

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Texas Longhorn Trails


t n e m n g i s Con Deadline 13 20 , 1 r e b m Nove January 18, 2014 – 11:00 a.m. – West Sale Arena – Will Rogers Memorial Complex – Fort Worth, Texas Name of TLBAA Member: ________________________________________________ Membership # _______________ Name of Animal: ___________________________________________________________ TLBAA # _______________ Heifer _____ Pair _____

MATURE STEERS CONSIDERED FOR CONSIGNMENT

PICTURE OF ANIMAL ____INCLUDED ____EMAILED

OCV VACCINATED Yes _____ No _____

CONSIGNMENT FEES PER LOT ($200 per head + 7% commission)_______________________ DUE AT TIME OF CONSIGNMENT

ABSOLUTELY NO EXCEPTIONS: Must have completed transfer application, original TLBAA certificate or dual registration certificates, completed consignment form and quality photo in TLBAA office. Consignment fees will not be refunded on animals pulled from the sale. The committee will select the top animals. BREEDING INFORMATION Cow Exposed to __________________________________________ From ______________ To ________________ Bull’s Name Cow Exposed to __________________________________________ From ______________ To ________________ Bull’s Name Calf at Side Information: Sex _________________ Date Calved ________________________________ Sired by _________________________________________________________

COMMENTS _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

WAIVER/CONSENT FORM (This form must be signed and returned in order to complete your consignment.) The Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic (EWCC) assumes no responsibility or liability for any guarantee made by the consignor. All guarantees are strictly between the consignor (seller) and the buyer. EWCC or the Will Rogers Complex is not responsible for the health or safety of any animal consigned to the sale. This includes loss of life, loss by theft or other perils. All consignors must comply with all the rules and regulations. The undersigned hereby agrees to conditions of the sale and agree that all guarantees are between seller and buyer. The undersigned further agrees to indemnify and hold harmless EWCC, sale employees, the Will Rogers Complex, and duly authorized representatives from any and all claims, demands, causes of action or liabilities of any nature which may arise from or are in any way related to The Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic. The undersigned agrees that if the buyer is unable to accept delivery because of Interstate health requirements, the consignor, not EWCC or its management, shall be responsible for refund or adjustment.

_______________________________________________________ Owner of Animal/Consignor’s Signature

__________________________ Date

THIS FORM MUST BE ATTACHED TO ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE WITH COMPLETED TRANSFER FORM AND PICTURE. THE DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS NOVEMBER 1, 2013. P.O. Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 817-625-6241

Sale Chair: Kathy Kittler – 501.690.0771 – k.kittler@hotmail.com Scotty O’Bryan – 817.625.6241 – scotty@tlbaa.org www.tlbaa.org


Please send an acknowledgement to: Name ________________________________________ Address ______________________________________ City ____________________ State _____ Zip _______ My Name _____________________________________ Address ______________________________________ City ____________________ State _____ Zip _______

Enclosed is my gift of ___ $25 ___$50 ___$100 __$_____

___ In memory of: ______________________________ ___ In honor of: ________________________________ Name of person to be remembered. Please print. Please mail form and donation to the Texas Longhorn Breeders of America Foundation, P.O. Box 4430, Ft. Worth, TX 76164.

T L B A A BOARD OF D IRECTOR BIOGRAPHIES

Bernard Lankford Birth Date and Place: 12/12/1937 in Austin,Texas Residence: Weatherford, Texas Occupation: Raising Longhorns, Oil and Gas Family: Wife Bette, five children, eleven grandchildren Business / Volunteer Experience: Owned and operated: oil and gas consulting firm, oil and gas well drilling company, oil and gas operating company, fitness center, double AA baseball franchise. Volunteer service: President of Midland Lutheran Church, Board of Directors Midland YMCA. Founding member and initial Church Council member Messiah Lutheran Church Weatherford Texas, Treasurer and other financial positions First United Methodist Church Weatherford. Organizations: Life member American Quarter Horse Association, Life member Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America. Ranch Location: Weatherford Texas How Long Raising Longhorns: Since 1991 Member of TLBAA: Since 1994 Elected to BOD: January 2011, elected Chairman of the Board in January 2012. Reason for Serving on BOD: To help maintain the viability, purpose and continued success of the TLBAA. Remarks: Serving on the TLBAA Board and as Chairman has been one of my highest honors. While serving on the Board my entire focus has been on what I thought was best for the Association. I believe that anyone, serving on any board, has a fiduciary duty to represent and support that organization one hundred percent. We have a great organization and very bright future ahead.

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Texas Longhorn Trails


Calhoun Wins Awards at 4-H Banquet Henderson County 4-H award banquet held September 8 awarded Haley Calhoun with a 4-H Livestock Show team shirt for exhibiting Registered Texas Longhorns at several shows outside the county show. She also received a bag and judging notebook for Dairy Judging. Calhoun has been exhibiting Longhorns for three years and is the niece of Jacob and Amy Weatherholtz and granddaughter of Troy and Joy Calhoun. (Pictured left to right:) Amy Weatherholtz, Haley Calhoun, Monnette Petty Chandler 4-H leader, and Timothy Roddem. Weatherholtz and Roddem serve on the ETLA Youth Advisory Committee.

TLBAA Member Wins Photo Contest TLBAA member Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM entered the photo above in the adult amateur photography competition at the Socorro County Fair and won a blue ribbon. The entry was named "Peace On Earth". November 2013

Native Texan, 16 x 7 x 11.5, Bronze on Granite, edition of 50 $1800

Douglas B. Clark Sculptor - Painter

doug@douglasbclark.com www.douglasbclark.com

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Internal parasites (stomach and intestinal worms) rob cattle of important nutrients, reducing growth rate and weight gains in young animals and hindering optimum production in all classes of cattle. Heavy infections create health problems. Worms are an added stress and can make the host animal more vulnerable to disease. Deworming cattle at the proper times of year, at the most appropriate stage in the life cycle of a certain parasite to eliminate egg-laying adults in the tract—to most effectively minimize re-contamination of pasture with worm eggs—can keep reinfection to a low level.

Deworming Cattle on Pasture

D

r. Bert Stromberg, Professor of Parasitology, University of Minnesota, says we have to be careful that we don’t deworm too often, since some populations of worms are now developing resistance to the drugs we use. “It is still important to do some strategic deworming, however, determining which cattle you need to deworm, and when. One of the things that becomes important is the region where you live, since timing may be different,” he says. “Up here in the northern tier of states, we usually turn beef cattle out to spring pasture in mid-May, which is quite a bit later than the pasture greenup in Louisiana and Texas. I like to make sure the cows are free of worms when they go out to pasture. Some people are now talking about not treating the whole herd, just treating the groups that need it,” he says. “When you are looking at a cow-calf operation you are looking at basically two classes—cows and calves—unless you break down the cow herd by age. I generally suggest leaving the calves untreated and just treat the cows. Some people would argue that you don’t need to treat all your cows, but we don’t really have a good way to make that decision,” says Stromberg. The next question is when to first deworm the calves. “In the studies we’ve done, if we deworm calves and their dams in mid-summer, we end up with a significant weight gain on the

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By Heather Smith Thomas calves as well as improving reproductive efficiency in the cows. Today, I would probably just recommend treating the cows if they look like they need it—but often that’s not practical. That’s where some of these compounds like fenbendazole that come in a molasses block—so the animals can deworm themselves—is a nice way to treat them during the summer. But then you are treating all the cattle and we are not sure that’s a good thing anymore,” he says.

that time,” says Stromberg. Producers wonder what to use for deworming the cows. “If it was my herd, I would run a few fecal samples to see if there are enough worms there to worry about. From a practical standpoint, if you have much over 100 head, collecting fecal samples becomes time consuming, but the number you need to sample, no matter what size your herd, is 20. This gives a good snapshot view of whether there are any parasites there and if they present in large num-

If you are rounding calves up to run them through a chute for vaccinations, deworming should be done at that time “Another time to think about deworming is in the fall at weaning. It’s a good thing to deworm the calves when they are being vaccinated. Some studies have shown there are benefits to deworming at least a couple weeks before vaccinating, so the calves are able to mount a better immune response to the vaccine. But on many operations it’s not feasible or practical to do this,” he says. “But you certainly want to deworm all the calves in any preconditioning program. If you are rounding them up to run them through a chute for vaccinations, deworming should be done at

bers. This technique was determined in a published study (done by Louis Gasbarre and colleagues), coming up with the best number to use. We used this method when we were doing the NAHMS study a few years back.” This holds true whether you have 50 cows or 500, and if you have fewer than 20 cows you’d just check them all. “I always used to think we should sample 10% but 20 animals (this number was determined statistically) is actually the maximum you need, to see what’s there in terms of worms. But this does not address the question of individual animal treatment. Some Texas Longhorn Trails


people deworm every other animal going through the chute. With sheep it’s easier because you can tell whether they have worms—by checking their gums and eyelids to see if they are pale. This works for sheep, because their primary parasite is Haemonchus, which is a bloodsucker. For cattle, we worry more about Ostertagia (brown stomach worm) and Cooperia (intestinal worm),” says Stromberg. “Those don’t suck blood to the point that they would induce anemia. You can often eyeball the poor doers, and may think about culling them anyway because they are probably not going to be pregnant,” he says. The number of worms in a group of cattle may be different if they were on dry rangeland all summer versus wet irrigated pastures, but they will all have worms. “I used to think we wouldn’t have to worry about parasites during a dry summer, but they are always there,” he says. If there are any green areas or swamps, the cattle will graze those if everything else is dry. Sometimes in a drought they will graze areas they might not be attracted to otherwise. “This becomes part of the problem, in trying to regulate where you allow them to graze. This becomes even more of an issue when dealing with liver flukes. I knew one producer raising sheep who lost nearly half the lamb crop one year to liver flukes when they allowed them to graze a marshy area down by the river. We told him what he needed to do so he fenced it off. The next year he didn’t lose a single lamb. The third year they were short on feed and he let them back into the marshy area and lost a whole bunch of lambs again,” says Stromberg. Dealing with worms is always a numbers game. Most cows, as they get older, have fewer parasites and fewer eggs shed, due to the immunity they develop. “With Ostertagia, which was for a long time the predominant parasite in cattle, we see some suppression of the egg counts before we see a reduction in the number of worms in that cow, but in older animals there is a

reduction in worms as well,” he explains. “Now the most prevalent parasite is Cooperia, which can have a significant impact on productivity, especially in young cattle. We did a study in yearlings and found these worms had a 7.4% impact on weight gain and the parasitized animals consumed 1.4 pounds less per day. The worm issue becomes a numbers game, to some degree, and you never really know what’s inside the animal. And when you take a fecal sample and see eggs, you don’t know which worms they are—whether the eggs are from Ostertagia, Cooperia, Oesophagostomum, etc. They are hard to tell apart,” he says.

whatever drug they used for deworming, and then have them send us a fecal sample from 20 of those animals 14 days later.” This post-treatment analysis can help assess whether the drug was working or not. “Most of the time when we deworm cattle we just assume that it works. Now it becomes much more important to figure this out.” We may be wasting time and money treating the cattle and not doing them much good. “We found that in a significant number, about 31.2% of the animals that were treated, the drugs had efficacy of less than 80%. These drugs were all pour-ons. While we have the convenience in using a pour-on, we also have the potential of having not as much drug getting into the system for the worms.” The pour-ons might be better for lice, but not for worms. “If we see the lice (or whatever other external parasite we’re treating) reduced in number, we assume that the worms inside are also controlled. These studies also found that the drugs (pour-ons, injectables, orals) were efficacious (at more than 90%) in 55.7% of the operations,” he says. Stocker cattle are the age in which we tend to find worm resistance to the drugs. “Often people run stockers down south and then bring them to northern states for summer grazing. Often they bring animals that have been treated so many times that they have resistant worms, and thus bring resistant worms to these northern pastures. Parasites travel with their hosts. When you buy cattle you need to determine their parasite status. They need to be dewormed upon arrival and you need to make sure that the dewormer worked,” he says. “People up here sometimes asked about resistance but if they weren’t deworming their animals very often it wasn’t a problem. But now, if they are buying cattle from somewhere else and contaminating the pastures with resistant worms, they may have a resistance problem.”

When we worm cattle we just assume that it works. We may be wasting time and money treating cattle and not doing them much good.

November 2013

“There are two ways to identify eggs. One, you can culture the eggs and grow them up to larvae and identify the larvae. The other way is to do a molecular evaluation (PCR) of those eggs and run them out on a gel and determine which are which. It doesn’t take much more time, but it takes more money and isn’t practical for cattle producers. We’ve never done it on a herd basis, we just do it for research,” he explains. “The resistance issue is just arising. We know there’s some resistance in Cooperia to the macrocyclic lactones (ivermectin and moxidectin). In the study that we did with Cooperia, we chose a strain that we knew was resistant to those drugs, and when we treated cattle at the end of the study the efficacy of those drugs was only 8.8%—far from the 90 to 95% that we would expect. The benzimidazole that we used on those worms removed 98.1%, so it was still effective,” he says. “Another interesting thing, and we will eventually publish it (the parasitology aspect of the NAHMS study), was that we found Cooperia was now the most prevalent parasite. We also asked producers if we could take a fecal sample at the time they treated with

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T L B A A B OARD OF DIRECTOR BIOGRAPHIES

Terry Fuhriman Birth Place: Cottge Grove, OR Residence: Parma, ID Occupation: Fuhriman Insurance Agency, Inc. (42 yers) Family: Spouse - Dana, Six children, 15 grandchildren Ranch Location: Parma, ID How Long Raising Longhorns: My son Dan is 3rd generation. Member of TLBAA: 2005 Elected to the Board: 2009 Reason For Serving on Board of Directors: I love the breed and enjoy having a small part in directing their future..

t Ba_l_lo__

____

Division B Directors Elections

Along with R.J. Pickle, JSB Printing, the TLBAA staff has planned the Division B Elections with the following dates: November 18th – Nomination Letter to be postmarked. December 3rd – Ballot will be mailed out December 27th. Ballot must be postmarked by this date and returned to the CPA. The return envelope will be included with your ballot. Please remember that members must be active and in good standing with the TLBAA to be placed on the ballot after receiving five nominations. According to the TLBAA By-Laws, Section 2—D: At least ninety (90) days prior to the Annual Membership Meeting, the TLBAA Office shall mail to the Active and Lifetime Members a request for nomination of individual or individuals for Director in the member’s representational region. Such member nominations shall be received in the Association office no later than sixty (60) days prior to the Annual Meeting. In order that any member nominee be eligible to be placed on the election ballot, he must receive write-in nominations from five (5) members who are Active or Lifetime Members. Should there be no members nominated by the membership for a particular Region, or should a nominee decline to have

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his name placed on the ballot, the Board of Directors will appoint an Active or Lifetime Member in good standing domiciled within the division to fill the vacant position at the same meeting as the election of TLBAA officers. No less than forty-five (45) days prior to the annual meeting of the membership, the TLBAA Office or designated CPA firm shall mail official printed ballots to each qualified Active and Lifetime Member in good standing of that region or division. This ballot shall contain the names of the candidates, if any, who were properly nominated by members. All written ballots must be returned to the CPA with a postmark not less than twenty-one (21) days prior to the Annual Meeting in order to be validated and counted. All ballots received will be validated and counted by an independent CPA firm or other organization experienced in voting tabulation as designated by the Executive Committee. The nominees receiving the most valid votes shall be elected. All newly elected Directors shall be installed at the Annual Membership Meeting. A tie vote will be broken by the Chairman of the Board drawing one of the names by lot. If a nominee wants a recount of the ballots in their election race, they will have to

Ballo ___ t _____

Division C Regions 13 - 18

Division A Regions 1-6 Division B Regions 7 - 12

submit a formal request for a recount to the Board of Directors but not more than sixty (60) days after election results have been announced at the annual meeting. The contester or their representative would then physically go to the CPA firm and watch this recount at his/her costs. Active and Lifetime members in good standing, domiciled within a representational division or region may nominate an Active or Lifetime member in good standing, also domiciled therein for election to the Board of Directors. Only those Active or Lifetime Members in good standing, domiciled within the division or region, may vote for the nominees from that division or region. Elections are held annually by division, on rotating basis as selected by the Board of Directors. Texas Longhorn Trails


November 2013

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Deadline is November 1, 2013 for TLBAA Special Awards Nominations The TLBAA special awards will be presented Friday evening, January 17, 2014 as a part of Texas Longhorn Weekend during the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo in Fort Worth, Texas. All TLBAA members are encouraged to nominate fellow breeders for the special honors. Nominees must be active TLBAA members in good standing. Nominations should be in written format and can include reasons why/how the individual nominated fulfills the criteria of the award. Nominations should be emailed to awards@tlbaa.org. If unable to email you may fax or mail to the TLBAA office, and it will be forwarded to the awards committee. Continue reading for criteria and past winners of these prestigious awards.

The Dave Evans Breeder of the Year Award Perpetuation and Promotion of the Texas Longhorn Breed A native Texan, Dave Evans entered the Texas Longhorn industry in 1977, establishing the Yellow Pine Ranch at Cuchara, CO. He and his wife, Billicarole, quickly became enthusiastic about the breed and additional ranches were purchased to supplement the original ranch. Evans served on the Board of Directors of both the TLBAA and the Mountains & Plains Texas Longhorn Association. He also served terms as TLBAA Vice-President. He was a founding partner and host of the Colorado National Texas Longhorn Sale, a record-breaking event when it started in 1981, which continued to be one of the industry’s major events for many years. From the start, Evans realized the necessity of using the best bulls available in the breed in order to develop a top herd. His goal was to breed for consistent size as well as correctness and outstanding horns. He purchased Texas Ranger JP in 1980, and then Dixie Rebel and Major Investment. In 1986, Evans acquired CT Spoty Ruler, the bull he considered to be the best he’d ever owned. Before his untimely death, Evans had succeeded in breeding a herd of Texas Longhorns that were well recognized in the breed. It is therefore a significant honor to be a recipient of this award, named in honor of this dedicated Longhorn breeder. Past Recipients of the Dave Evans Award

1982 – Babs & Chico Wright 1983 – Jack Montgomery 1984 – Red McCombs 1985 – Ray Moore 1986 – Al Micallef 1987 – Glen W. Lewis 1988 – Dave Evans 1989 – Jerry & Martha Gillespie 1990 – Bob & Linda Moore 1991 – Dr. Joseph Graham 1992 – Dr. L.V. Baker 1993 – Johnnie Hoffman 1994 – Wayne Rumley, Wes & Carrie Hill 1995 – W.O. & Patti Marquess 1996 – El Coyote Ranch 1997 – John T. Baker 1998 – Shady W Ranch

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1999 – Bob Coffee 2000 – John & Christy Randolph 2001 – Ben Gravett 2002 – Bob Loomis 2003 – John & Diann Chase 2004 – Mike Bowman 2005 – Johnnie Robinson 2006 – Robert and Kim Richey 2007 – Doug Hunt 2008 – Kaso Kety 2009 – Jimmy Jones Dora Thompson 2010 – Brent & Cindy Bolen 2011 – Darlene Aldridge, DVM 2012 – El Coyote Ranch

Jack Phillips Award The Jack Phillips Award is named after former TLBAA President Jack Phillips who was a quiet, yet forceful presence in the TLBAA. The award honors individuals who have worked selflessly for the Longhorn and breeders alike, without recognition. Past recipients of the Jack Phillips Award:

1994 – John & Silvia Gams 1995 – Kenneth Archer 1996 – Maudeen Marks & Eileen Day 1997 – Noah & Melba Oliver 1998 – R.L. Slater 1999 – Glen Lewis 2000 – Dorie Damuth 2001 – Charley & Doris Snyder 2002 – David Hartshorn 2003 – Ray Moore 2004 – Morgan Cook, Jr. 2005 – Ronnie Cruce 2006 – Albert G. “Pete” Boyce, Jr. 2007 – Trigg & Traci Moore 2008 – Steve & Bodie Quary 2009 – Steven Zunker 2010 – Donnie Taylor 2011 – Elmer Rosenberger 2012 – Kim & Robert Richey

Texas Longhorn Trails


Elmer Parker Lifetime Award

Mel Raley Rising Star

Lifetime Devotion to the Texas Longhorn Breed and Its Breeders

Mel Raley will always be remembered as a shining star for the TLBAA because of his ability to share his vast knowledge of the Longhorn breed with new members. This special recognition is awarded to those who have been a member for less than five years and through involvement and sustained enthusiasm have made a positive impact on their peers and on the Longhorn breed. Past Recipients of the Mel Raley Rising Star Award

Elmer Parker was a longtime employee and manager of the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge Longhorn herd. Parker joined the staff at the Refuge in 1946, learning from the previous Longhorn managers: Earl Drummond, Heck Schrader and Joe Bill Lee. In 1968, he took over the responsibilities of the Longhorns at the Refuge and continued until his retirement in 1981. Thus, the continuity of Longhorn expertise at the Refuge continued for more than half a century. The Parker Brown color designation on Longhorn registrations was named after Elmer Parker – the dark brown, almost black color, with a lighter dorsal stripe, was one of his favorite colors. Past Recipients of the Elmer Parker Award

1987 – J.G. “Jack” Phillips 1988 – Dave Evans 1989 – J.W. Isaacs 1990 – Charles Schreiner III 1991 – Eddie Wood 1992 – F.M. “Blackie” Graves 1993 – Dan O. Coates 1994 – Leonard Stiles 1995 – Johnnie Hoffman 1996 – Walter B. Scott 1997 – Col. Fraser West 1998 – Linda Moore/Harvey Rasmussen 1999 – Owen McGill 2000 – Charlene Semkin

2001 – Dan W. Coates 2002 – Bob Moore 2003 – Tim Miller 2004 – T.M. Smith 2005 – H.C. Carter 2006 – Sherman Boyles 2007 – Harvey Rassmussen 2008 – Dr. Bob Kropp 2009 – Michael McLeod 2010 – Joe & Lorinda Valentine 2011 – Maurice Ladnier 2012 – Dr. Joyce Kimble

1999 – Barry & Jeanne Carter Gray 2000 – Gary “Cowboy” & Kendra Kelly 2001 – Joel & Shirley Lemley 2002 – Zech Dameron, III 2003 – Glen & Larry Smith 2004 – Danny & Carole Phillips 2005 - Rebecca Rhodes 2006 – John & Brenda Oliver 2007 – Bruce & Susan Easterly 2008 – Randy Briscoe 2009 – Matt Westmoreland 2010 – Jay & Suzanne Faske 2011 – Danny & Merrilou Russell 2012 – Greg Franks

Come Join Us for Texas Longhorn Weekend! January 17-21, 2014 During the Historic Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo Will Rogers Memorial Complex ★ Fort Worth, Texas EVENTS TO INCLUDE: Friday, Jan. 17th – Member and Affiliate Meetings, Awards Banquet Saturday, Jan. 18th – Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale Monday, Jan. 20th – TLBT Youth Show Tuesday, Jan. 21st – TLBAA Open Show Watch E-Trails and Trails Magazine for more information November December 2013 2011 45 45


Since January 1, 2013 over 388 applications for membership to the TLBAA have been submitted. We would like to say, “WELCOME!” to each of you. You are in great company as you join the over 3,900 members that share the same passion as you…the Texas Longhorn. We are always mindful of our purpose, “to protect the unique heritage of the Texas Longhorn, to preserve the purity of the breed, and to promote Texas Longhorns as a distinct breed while encouraging its future through promotion, education and research.” At the TLBAA we have many established services to honor this purpose. Whether it is our registration department, special events such as shows and sales throughout the year or our award winning publication the Texas Longhorn Trails, we are here to serve you, our valued member. Once again, WELCOME. We hope to see you all soon!

Steve & Angela Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Sandra K. Powell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Kourteney Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Stotts/ Hinton Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Lindsey Parrish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rio Rojo Longhorns LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Don Burrows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bret & Ginger Eckhart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MI David Nix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Derek Winter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Benny Weaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Shelby Caputo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Dennis Handschke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WI Salem Cattle Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL "Good Life Ranch, LLC" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Chad Pyland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX M & M Cattle Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VA Chadwick & Loretta Rowe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX La Pistola/ Stewart Partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX David Gillian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Denise Boehme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Coy K. Weaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UT Michelle Voorheis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Clara Holson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bluff Cattlemen, LLC.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Jameson Tidwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jay D. Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IN Scott & Nichole Kruse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MN Dale and Linda Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Randy & Catherine Morris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Briscoe/ Hawkins Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Emma Allen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Helm Cattle Co/ Fairlea Longhorn Ranch. . . . . . . . . . . . TX Darren & Jessica Neal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX R.J. Brooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TN Charles and Mechell Griffin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Kelly Harper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK James or Janiece Pardue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IN "Carleton & DeJong, LLC" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CO Karin Duque. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Nathan & Rachel Geick. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Westfarms/Sidewinder Cattle Co Partnership . . . . . . . . LA Chris and Gina Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brandt Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX David R. Starkey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Crozier/Donovan Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dakota Roy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Michael A. Fine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Cashman/ Glasgow Partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS The Roddam Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Cahill Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ON Divinia/ Martinez Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX IM Rockin I, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bill & Molly Crozier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACR Longhorns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dalton Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Logan Ollive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX A B Walters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jerri Smitko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA

46

Max Byles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NSW John W. Cook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kathy Dale Tillman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Hackney/Hudson Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IN Linda McKinney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Willow Rock Farm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Peacock River Ranch, LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Travis & Angela Colvin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS G6 Longhorns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Terry Busby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Brock Murphy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Cinnstar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Michaela Barringer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Marek Brooke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OH Thompson/ Glasgow Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA JW Cattle Company/Twin Creeks Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Mike & Cattrina Lucas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CA Mattie Jo Sanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Ashton N. Weaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UT Josie Ann Blanchard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Charles L. Whitaker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Ron & Ellen Vandiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Mike McNamee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NM Carson & Nicole Renfree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Eric M. Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Hemps Hill Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Mrs. Wayne Greenlee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Neil Glasgow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Jarred Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Steve & Candy Roos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Christopher Fischer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Henry L. King. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX McKnight/ Smith/ Clark Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Lorie & Christopher Joens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NM Vincent T. Girolamo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Billingsley/ Jobe Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jarrett Kuhn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Crystal A. Avalos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kalie Bloom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Kenneth Roach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Wil & Vicky Birdwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Manford A Reichek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Juan Jose Guzman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX John Edwards III & Cattle Company, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . TX Susan Bolling Kopacz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Shawn Randolph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Chris & Charland Burton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX David & Melissa Hackney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IN Marjorie Sapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IL Kristine Fossum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AB Hubbell/ Mast Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MI Cynthia Leakey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rebekah Huddleston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Charlotte Sturm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Floyd Owens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Michael & Lorri Long. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Rebecca Small . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Green Planet Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX

4 H Cattle Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Osten O'Dell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Victoria Gibson & Kristen Hamm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Terry Scallan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Stacey & Linda Goodson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Howard & Carol Rockafellow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Gordon Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX R. Hargrave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Ernie Noey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Elidia Ramos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Sunny Mark Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kyle & Kyla Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Traci & Cody Thompson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AB Lindsay West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Leandro Gonzales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Tove & Jens Jacobsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hubbell/ Rosebrock Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MI Jason Clark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SD Sam Parker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Stilwell/ Stewart Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rawls Ridge Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TN William Marquess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Haynes Sugar Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Carter T. Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Donley & Carol Duerksen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Pierre & Nicole Caballero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OR Everette E. Jennings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Brandon Lewis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James R. & Shirley A. Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Larry & Meloney Ferguson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brook Ovitt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Hearn & Hearn Partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PA Jeffrey Roberts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Randy & Diana Paulson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Nathan & Krista Graber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Ashlynn Reed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Lazy J Ranch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Stephen Thomas & Jada Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Kyler Tucker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Armstrong Ranch @ Wolf Hollow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James & Lynette Haltom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KY Jim & Becky Rombeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Eddie Cross III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jonas Botz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX David & Kathleen Harrington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Texas Longhorn Austria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilkerson Cattle Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Suber/ Clinard Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TN Johnston Legal Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dreamweaver Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Tory Applegate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jedsen Goldinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Ricky McLeod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SC Paul Mullins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IL Dunn/ Ince/ Mangold Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Dreamcatcher Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Erin Kuykendall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rachel Grace Bradford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Breck & Alaina Hudson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX

Texas Longhorn Trails


M & R Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Tom & Mavis Van Pelt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IA John & Stacey Mavilia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OR Gary Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Allison Staley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Moore/ Burkham Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Lonzo Tomerlin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kevin Conlan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CA Isabelle Goldinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Monte Weeden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MT Brian Wallis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rob & Debbie Pinder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Taylor Starcher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Richard M. Campbell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Allen/ Filip/ Gravett Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Andy Mast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MI Harris Longhorn Ranch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NV Tanner Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Ronald A. Gates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX D'Andra Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Diamond Acres Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AR Mario & Bernadette Pedroza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bobbie Woodward Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Nikodym/ Jones Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Alan & Denise Mikell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL Ollive/ Wilkins Partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Austin Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bill and Karen Sledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IL Hubbell/Jones/Circle Double C Ranch Partnership . . . . MI Mike & Jamie Tomey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IN Larry L. Lemmon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Allan Finch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kevin Lance Posey, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Owen Merriman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Deana Lide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX F. Clay Tillman III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Dr. Daryl Currier. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dustin & Missy Cothern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IL Thomas L. Findley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL Robert and Lily Garst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kerry Van Metre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SK O'Dell/ O'Dell Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Amanda Schneider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dale & Gina Francisco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Wade & Robyn Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Garrett Ray Sanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James & Robyn Dyal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TN Snoqualmie Cattle Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WA Charles J Smetana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Henry and Lori Salas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Double L Ranch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CT Cowboy Catchit Chex Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Caitlyn Holson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kent Bladen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UT Jason Clark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Linda McKay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK David Nash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Ty Palmatier Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NY Conner Scheer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Brett & Teresa Krause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Gerry Gonnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AB Oscar Mooney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ID Girolamo/ Miller Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Stotts/ Craft/ Hinton Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX David & Melissa Smallwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Andy & Jeannie Drake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Billy D and Delynn Davis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Hudson Maverick Hughes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rick & Malissa Bailey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK S & S, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MI

Great Ideas, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OR Audrey McDuff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kurt Steele . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Bristol Goldinger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Sanquinity Pointe Ranch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bronson Baker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Mike & Lisa McClendon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Saddle Thorn Enterprises, LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX C 4 Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Stewart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TN Justin William Walker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Nick Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Brian Graves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Star Creek Ranch/ Sheryl L. Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bolen/ David Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jeremiah Roberts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Reck/ Hudson Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Gary & Ronnie Pease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Dan Boswell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX TL Longhorns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX William V. Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Anderson/Ince/Mangold Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Scott Edwards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Joe and Stephanie Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AR Kennedy Hudson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kate Godinez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Ashlyn Holson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Carley Pate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL James Cole Sanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Hector Vasquez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Allison Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rocking MDY Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Hannah Bunch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Keagan Espinoza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Andrea & Robert Waring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brian & Cheyanna Templeton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dan Gillett and Nancy Wood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bernie Keasler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX David Bohlmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MN Tuff Wright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VA Jimmy W. Gainey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL Wyatt Goldinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Victorea Luminary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Payton Jo Finn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Justin Risenmay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OR Allen-Filip-McCombs Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dan & Lynn Hall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Ray & Ann Wooldridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brenda Ann Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Clinton Bezan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AB Noah G. Esparsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NM Debra L. Crowson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Amber Huff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX McIntyre/ Dickinson Partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Douglas & Vickie Anderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SD Ronda Reagan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Clyde Peek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CO Don Gibson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Heather McDuff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Colt P Barnard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MT Joe & Mattie Timpson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AZ Mayden/ Hunt Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brianna Salsbury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Four C Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Mark Lilga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CA Kenzie Winter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Piney Ridge Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Charles Drexler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Cooper Kreider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KY Gary and Shana Spooner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL George & Kim Dillon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AZ

Gordon & Connie Pierson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SD Amillia Gannon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kathleen Winslow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Clark/ McIntyre Partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Stacy, Andy & Tiffany Martinez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Diamond G Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Ella Wieczorek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Jeremy and Pam Lay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Cooper Crow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Mona Raux. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL 4W Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX John Daniel Hasty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Lincoln Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Auggie Wulf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IL Tom Rabb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Travis Gene Rhoades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Frank & Christina Hefner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Gina & Christopher Crawford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Jim & Sharon Jolly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Stephen T. Milton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Shadow R Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TN Dan Hunter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Nathan Guzman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rebekah S. Cover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Randy and Susan Woods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James Todd Sanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Clint Dufour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Jade Merritt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Twin Creeks Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Felice Yarbough. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Devin Graves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Jeff Gannon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Cody Gustafson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ND Abigail Alejandro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX William C McGee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Fort Worth Herd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Harris Composites, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dianne & Jess Mills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Whispering Oaks Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Hollow Point Ranch, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX DJ and Danae Read, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Leon Shaw. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Johnston/ Murphy Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Doug and Cheryl Ackerman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NM Richard & Karen A. Fox. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX John Groda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Rosenberger/ Kety Partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jeff & Lynne Harder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AB Cade Boardman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UT Zoe N. Zgabay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX William & Laurie Goeken. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX B&H Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Boardman/ Bandley Partnership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UT Laney Hebert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Michael Pelletier. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL Curtis and Donna Hoskins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Salvatore F. Farina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL Joyce T. Bennett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VA Trinita Land and Cattle Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jerry & Jeri Johnson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WA Merrill Royer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IN Erin Cassity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Roger & Janna Snodgrass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jennifer Linn Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Anderson/ Mangold Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Peter Todd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NSW Lin Torgerson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MT Horn Creek Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Marlin Farm, LP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX MLC Cattle Co, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bart & LaCrecia Lestourgeon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX


NEWS On the Trail...

Texans of All Stripes Should Join Together to Protect Important Texas Longhorn Herd by State Representative Charles “Doc” Anderson

Waco, Texas — Unfortunately, an important herd of native Texas Longhorns currently under the care and management of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department are in jeopardy and need our help to protect a herd of Longhorns that have roamed for over half a century in the area that is now Big Bend Ranch State Park. These Longhorns are considered an integral part of Big Bend Ranch heritage and therefore have remained on the ranch as living exhibits of how the west once was and to maintain the genetic integrity of one of the purest of Longhorn bloodlines. Recently, the State of Texas has begun selling off drastic numbers of the Longhorn herd from Big Bend Ranch State Park. While it is normal for the Ranch to sell off its yearly calfcrop to help provide additional funds for the maintenance and upkeep of the herd, there needs to be limitations to the selling of this Longhorn herd to ensure that they remain a vital example of Texas Heritage before they are eradicated completely. Currently there are only 33 animals remaining out of the original herd which one time numbered in excess of 200. Ancestors of the Texas Longhorn date back to 1521 when Gregorio de Villalobos brought thirty heifers and three bull calves to North America from Spain. Longhorn cattle on Big Bend Ranch can be traced back to the 1860's, but it was nearly 100 years later when Robert Anderson purchased the land creating the Diamond "A" Cattle Company that the genetic integrity of the herd really started to blossom.

November 2013

Mr. Anderson began stocking the ranch with registered Longhorns from the Wichita Mountain Refuge bloodline, which is the genetically pure Texas Longhorn bloodline. Pedigrees for some of these cattle go back to the 1920's. In 1988 the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department purchased the land and the cattle from Diamond "A" Cattle Company creating, ultimately, the Big Bend Ranch State Park—an important state park adjacent to the federally owned and maintained Big Bend National Park.

Although the state's posture in the matter of the longhorns should be one of stewardship and protecting these animals, it has become readily apparent that the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has plans to sell off all but a few neutered display animals of the herd in a misdirected effort to reduce the herd's impact on the 311,000 acre park's ecosystem. Texas House Bill 3037 which would have prohibited Texas Parks and Wildlife from further reducing the size of the Big Bend Ranch continued on p.57

49


Dear TLBT Members,

I hope that everyone has been having fun and being safe. I wanted to thank all of you that showed up to the General Membership Meeting at the State Fair of Texas to offer us your input. And special thanks to our advisors and mentors who guide us. Without y’all, none of this would be possible. Our next meeting will be in January at the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo, and we hope that turnout will be even greater. The Trails is looking for someone to sponsor this page. It would cost $250 per month, and the sponsor would get an ad on the bottom of this page. If you think that you might be able to help, you can get in touch with us through Facebook or contact Laura at the TLBAA office. I also wanted to remind people that our service project is Variety, The Children’s Charity of Texas. Variety offers financial assistance to families of children with special needs, and we are honored to be able to contribute. If you can, please help us at upcoming events by donating, helping, or just supporting this cause. We would be most grateful. Finally, we still have the page on Facebook called the Tlbt Pic Page. There, people can post pictures from longhorn events to be included in the slide show that will be playing during the banquet at the 2014 World Show. I highly encourage y’all to post your pictures there, and help us create this together. I hope you all have a safe and happy Thanksgiving!

Sincerely,

Tarah Moore, TLBT President

TLBT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT

Jonah Faske

TLBT Office: Junior Director Age: 9 years old School: Home Schooled Number of Years in the TLBT: 5 What are the benefits in being a TLBT Officer or Director? I like helping with the planning and hanging out with my Longhorn friends. Why do you enjoy showing Texas Longhorns? I like Texas Longhorn cattle because of their beautiful colors and awesome horns. I like showing them because they are very sweet. Do you see the TLBT helping you with your future career? Being involved in the TLBT and caring for my calves is helping me learn to be responsible.. What have you learned over the past year through the TLBT? I’ve learned how to do better in showmanship and how to give a speech.

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What would be your advice to a newcomer? Listen to the judges and practice, practice, practice!

by searching Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow 50

Texas Longhorn Trails


The Consignment Sale – An Important Marketing Tool An interview with Joyce and Eddie Wood

With the advent of new consignment sales each year, and the influx of potential Longhorn buyers and sellers who have yet to participate in a sale, we chose to reprint the July 1996 interview below with Colonel Eddie Wood and his wife Joyce. Any experienced breeder knows the wealth of wisdom Col. Eddie was and this interview contains invaluable tidbits of making the most of consigment sales for marketing purposes for newcomers and experienced Longhorn owners alike. Reprinted from July 1996 Trails Magazine

Col. Eddie Wood, Texas Longhorn breeder and auctioneer from Wynnewood, Oklahoma, has sold more Texas Longhorn cattle from the auction block than anyone else through the years. He and his wife, Joyce, have participated in numerous consignment sales as auctioneer, sales manager, office manager or consignor. They recently hosted their 14th Annual Spring Cowtown Sale and are planning their 6th Annual Fall Cowtown Sale, both consistently two of the largest consignment sales in the Texas Longhorn industry. TRAILS: What is the difference between a consignment sale and a production sale? EDDIE: Actually, the difference is a great deal. A production sale is normally a one-man sale. It's held by the man who owns the cattle, has raised the cattle, and is selling his product. A consignment sale offers an opportunity for a large number of breeders to market their cattle. Some sales are put on by a limited number of different breeders while one like ours is open to everyone. It's always been our belief that everyone who buys a Longhorn is entitled to a place to sell it. If not, they'll go on to raising something besides Longhorn cattle. JOYCE: A consignment sale is a good opportunity to showcase your herd and your breeding program. Some consignment sales offer the very elite of the Longhorn industry while others give every breeder a chance to market his cattle and perhaps buy something better.

EDDIE: The main obligation of the sale manager is to draw a crowd. He has to promote the sale, and he has to present the cattle to the people in such a way that they will be able to see what you have and understand it. He also furnishes the ring men, the persons who help him locate bids to get the top dollar. Sale management prepares a catalog, sends it to prospective buyers and has it available at the sale. He also advertises the sale. JOYCE: We try to advertise in ways that will bring in new buyers as well as the regular buyers we get from using the Trails. We try to develop new marketing areas such as

the cutting horse industry so we can cultivate some new people as well. TRAILS : What are the consignor's obligations? EDDIE: The obligation of the consignor is to bring the merchandise and have it ready to sell. Pick out an animal that represents your breeding program, one you're not ashamed of. If you sell the tail end of your cows, you're never going to ever sell one for very much money at home. If you bring something that represents your program, then potential buyers can see that you're raising a good cow. Whether they

continued on p. 66

TRAILS : What generally are the sale management's obligations? JOYCE: Basically the sales management's obligation is to provide a convenient place to market your cattle. It is also their obligation to see that your animals are taken care of and handled properly from the time they're unloaded until they leave the sale. We try to handle them the way you like to work your cattle at home. There are no hot shots or sticks used so that cattle will represent themselves in the same manner as they do at your place. After the sale, we try to complete the paperwork properly and see that the seller gets his money as quickly as possible. November 2013

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GHORN N O L S TEXA RS OF NEW E BREED EXICO M Jerry Stevens, President (575) 649-0987

Well, New Mexico finally got rain, at least central New Mexico; and of course it arrived just in time for our New Mexico Texas Longhorn State Fair Show. Parking areas on the grounds looked like you could fish; parking was a bit of a challenge but the barns were high and dry. We arrived on Thursday and our show was on Saturday. With rain every day we were on the Fair Grounds the crowds weren’t as large but the public still loves to see our awesome Longhorns. We want to thank all our exhibitors, friends, volunteers and members that entered longhorns and helped with this fun show. Julie Pack did a great job of judging. Thank you Julie.

The spring of 2013 saw much interest in reviving the Canadian Texas Longhorn Assoc. On June 1 we held an AGM, organizational meeting and Heifer jackpot. Congratulations to the Executive: President: Gordon Musgrove - Patricia, Alberta, Vice President: Deb Lesyk - Outlook, Saskatchewan, Secretary/Treasurer: Mark Stewart - Ponoka, Alberta, Directors: Jeremy Farmer - Lake Country, British Columbia, Jeff Jespersen – Stony Plain, Alberta, Bob Allemand – Shaunavon, Saskatchewan. Heifer Jackpot: There were 19 heifers entered, with top four placings being paid. 1st - SC Topgirl- Owner Sun Creek Ranches, Buck Lake, Alberta. 2nd - Dragon Lady RCR- Owner William Smith, Endiang, Alberta. 3rd - WFR Prime Debut 720- Owner William Smith, Endiang, Alberta. 4th SC Casanova Breeze- Owner Sun Creek Ranches, Buck Lake, Alberta. Thank you to Judges Les Herman from Medicine Hat, Alberta and Jack Johnson from Red Deer, Alberta. A big thank you also to our sponsors: *Double D Arena – Deb Lesyk & Dwight Overlid Outlook, SK* S A X AN TE *Desert Sales Inc. (trailer sales & panels) Bassano, AB* *Panorama Ranch-Dean Marte, Stauffer, AB* CANADI GHORN *One Tree Ranching Co. Patricia, AB* *Hanna Motor Products* *Town of Hanna & Staff* *Alex LON TION Link & Doll Palace & Tea Room – Hanna, AB* A ASSOCI CTLA participated in and was a sponsor at the Canadian National Longhorn Show, Red Deer Westerner Days(Alberta) in July, with great participation from breeders and a good attendance of spectators at the show and in the barn. It was a great opportunity to promote our Gordon Musgrove, President breed and talk to many people. Thank you to our many sponsors for the Canadian National (403) 378-4664 Longhorn Show: * John Bob Farm Equipment-New Holland Ag, Outlook, SK* *CTLA* *Gateway onetreeranch@gmail.com Auction Services, Patricia, AB* *Hanna Motor Products-GM Superstore, Hanna, AB* *Papa Harry Trucking – Harry & MaryAnne Folkerts, Lacombe, AB* *Sun Creek Ranch – Cliff & Melloddee Begg, Buck Lake, AB* * MSW Farms-Mark & Tina Stewart, Ponoka, AB* *Ponoka Dodge, Ponoka, AB* *Double D Arena – Deb Lesyk & Dwight Overlid, Outlook, SK* *Desert Sales – Bassano, AB* *Cliff Radford Ferrier Service, Stony Plain, AB* *Rainy Creek Ranch-Leonard & Doris Boyd* *McFeeds, Ponoka, AB* Presidents Message: Thank you to the executive & membership for your confidence in me as president as we move forward with this association and promote the longhorn breed in Canada. We have a group that is very keen to get things going and create some excitement. We are honored to be an affiliate of TLBAA. A very special thank you to the past CTLA for their support and encouragement in reviving this association.

AFFILIATES… Send Us Your News!

Is your Longhorn Affiliate celebrating a big event, hosting a show, a sale or just having a monthly meeting? If so, spread the news to the entire TLBAA by submitting your information to the Trails each month. Don’t forget to send photos, if you have them. Simply email your information to the Trails, Laura Standley at laura@tlbaa.org or call her at (817) 625-6241. We want to hear from you to help spread the news about your local Texas Longhorn activities.

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Texas Longhorn Trails


I am Mike Coston, most of you know me as the CEO for TLBAA. I have not been in the cattle business before in any way other than my cutting horse experience with those elusive bovine. I am a graduate of North Texas State University where I earned a master’s degree in education administration. I actually taught teachers for a short while. My business experience comes from the Chamber of Commerce world where I was the CEO for the Dallas, Mesquite and Kilgore Chamber of Commerce for nearly 25 years. I have two beautiful daughters, one living in Dallas as an events coordinator for Buckner International and the other daughter is a stage actress and director living in Hawaii. That’s the one we like to visit the most ! My wife of 33 years is an elementary school teacher, who has taught me a lot by the way, and will tell you she is not finished yet ! When I am not tending the business of the TLBAA my wife and I love to trail ride

November 2013

our gaited walking horses. We love riding in the Smoky Mountains, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. One thing I love to do on occasional weekends is work for the Texas State Rail Road. Not as an engineer but as “The Lone Ranger” . I dress the part, walk through the rail cars on the Train and talk to people about the origin and history of the Lone Ranger. I am a Lone Ranger historian. I carry two nickel plated Colt 45’s with ivory handles, holstered in a custom made replica of what Clayton Moore (the original Lone Ranger) wore on the TV series. Trivia question: if you can answer this and be the first one to call in to the office after November 15th you will win a free ¼ page ad in the Trails magazine. Why was the music for the Lone Ranger theme song chosen and who wrote it?

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photos from Annual Membershp Meeting

Fall is definitely here. We have had our first few cool snaps. The cattle are feeling frisky and the County and State Fairs have all started. The smell of Cotton Candy and fried food is carried along -TEX RS with those northern winds. And as an A L K R A E Affiliate, this is our busiest time of the BREED N R O H G N N year. O O I L AT The first thing on our agenda was ASSOCI picking our contestants for the TLBAA Princess/Prince Contest. We would like to thank Chris Parker of Wills Point, Texas, Jessica Tina DuBose, Wade of Decatur, Texas and Keith DuBose of Ben Vice-President Wheeler, Texas for being our Judges. We had several dubosetina@yahoo.com fine entries from our membership. We would also like to thank the ones who traveled to Ben Wheeler, Texas to participate in the judging, lunch and ranch tour. Then on September 21st, we held our Annual Membership Meeting, lunch and ranch tour hosted by Donnie and Marilyn Taylor, 4T Longhorn Ranch in Huntington, Texas. We enjoyed good fellowship, new and old friends, new members, great food and great looking cattle. We also have new officers as follows: Tina DuBose, President; Mary Ellen Holland, Vice President; Billy Cooper, Director; Fred Smith, Director; Aubrey DuBose, Director. We would like to thank Jessica DuBose for serving from 2011 to 2013 as our Affiliate President. She said she learned a lot in those two years. She will continue on our Board for a one-year term as a Director. Jessica was presented with a President’s Buckle at the Membership Meeting. We would also like to thank Bob Mottet for his three years of serving on the Board as a Director. This is all volunteer hours, time and money for travel and phone calls. So thank you for your service to our Affiliate. The Louisiana State Fair World Qualifying Show will be held November 9th & 10th, with check-in the day before. The food and atmosphere is wonderful. Come join us in the Bayou State and get your animals qualified for World! Or you can come and watch. For information about any of our shows and other events go to www.arklatexlonghorns.com or check us out on Facebook.

ETLA is geared up for the East Texas State Fair September 26-28. The amount of entries for this years show has doubled last years entries. Dr. Gene and Lana Hightower have been the show supertindents for the past 16 years and said, “ Longhorns typically exhibit the largest number per breed shown, last year there were some breds that did not have enough numbers and canceled shows.” Judges for the show in S A Haltered & Free is Lizz Huntzberry and Youth Judge Stan Comer. X E EAST T REEDERS The ETLA newsletter went out the second week of September and the next one is tenativiveNB N R O ly scheduled for November 1st. A link may be found on the ETLA Facebook page. We now have H G LON SOCIATIO 61 likes! We also have a new ETLA Youth Facebook page, its link is facebook.com/ETLAYouth. AS During a board meeting September 7, the ETLA board of directors discussed the upcoming shows and elected a new Youth Advisory Committee. The committe members are Jamie Ollive, Amy Weatherholtz and Timothy Roddem. If you have any suggestions for growing a successful youth memConnie Ollive, bership, please e-mail ELTASecretary@gmail.com. President The Kaufman Police Association 3rd Annual Longhorn Show, a world qualify show will be held in Terrell, (903) 780-0665 Tx November 22-24. Deadline is Nov. 9 and packets may be downloaded at www.4NLonghornRanch.com connie_ollive@aol.com under Special Events.

Affiliate & Show Chairman Reminders 1. A completed application form should be sent to the office prior to your show. You can do this by email. All forms are in the Show Procedures Handbook that can be found under the show tab on our website. 2. All show programs/results, must have the animals TLBAA number. Animals sent in with pending will not be entered into the show program. Also, I can help you build a show program through HORNS that will have all of the animal information and you will not have to type it all in. 3. Your show results hardcopy and $5.00 qualifying fee per animal/per division should be in the office within 14 days of your show. We will be unable to accept results that come in extremely late, or without the qualifying fees. You can also scan the official results, with the judge’s signature, and email them to me. All show forms and results should be sent to Scotty O’Bryan at the TLBAA office, or emailed to scotty@tlbaa.org

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Texas Longhorn Trails


May 2013

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This report has been taken for the August 2013 Edition of The Horny Herald, a publication for members of Texas Longhorns Australia Inc. For newsletter information, contact: Geoff “Dallas” Dawson, 74 Kruse Road, Emerald Hill, NSW 2380. Phone: (02) 6743 1603 ah or email: skinnylizard@bigpond.com.

S N TEXA A I L A R AUST NGHORN LO ATION ASSOCI John Bastardi, President (02) 6734 5320

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continued from p.49 herd. The bill would have allowed for the sale of calves and heifers if the number of breeding stock were not reduced. Unfortunately, the legislative session ended without my bill reaching the House floor for debate. Legislators both Republicans and Democrats, concerned about this Texas legacy signed a letter to Governor Perry calling on him to intervene and halt the sale of any more longhorns from the state park. The letter reiterated that the Big Bend region, and this park in particular, is an environment in which these longhorns have existed for multiple generations, and that the effort to remove them appears to lack the logic and longterm view that one should expect from a state agency which is charged with preserving our wildlife resources and the rich history that those resources represent. These animals are free-ranging, require very little husbandry, if any, and are of very little cost to the state. Furthermore, it can only be seen as dismaying that, not only does the Department appear to be arbitrarily vacating its mission of wildlife management without cause, but also that large quantities of this herd have been auctioned off without notice, consultation, or any consideration one might think should be due to parties inside and outside state government who value the rich Western heritage embodied by this herd. Management styles and managers come and go over the years. However, this legacy longhorn herd belongs to the people of the great state of Texas, not to the management of the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife.

November 2013

That is why our efforts have been supported by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, the Cattlemen's Texas Longhorn Registry & the Cattlemen's Texas Longhorn Conservancy. I hope that you will let the Parks and Wildlife Department know that you too oppose the further degradation of this important herd and call on them to stop this illogical and politically correct attempt to rid an environment of a natural inhabitant. This herd is intended to provide a visual interpretation as descendants of the original cattle that evolved through natural selection in the

Texas brush country. It is imperative that we keep this history and heritage alive to show and teach our children, grandchildren, and future generations of Texans as well as all Americans. The TLBAA supports Representative Anderson in his efforts to preserve the Longhorns. If you feel strongly that the Texas Parks & Wildlife is harming the integrity of the Texas Longhorn please contact them and let them know. They can be reached at: phone (512)-389-4800, fax (512)389-4814 www.tpwd.state.tx.us; address: 4200 Smith School Rd. Austin Texas, 78744.

WORKING CATTLE OR CATTLE THAT WILL WORK! The easy way to work Longhorn cattle! • Can be shipped by common carrier anywhere in the U.S. • Galvanized pipe and steel sheeting • Grease inserts for easy maintenance & operation • Vaccinate or deworm cattle • Palpation gates • Measure horns • A.I. cows

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The Official Chute of the TLBAA Horn Showcase

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END OF TRAIL RANCH Mike or Debbie Bowman • P.O. Box 40 • Benton, KS 67017 • Home (316) 778-1717 • Work (316) 838-6194 Check out our website - www.endoftrailranch.com • mbowman@wildblue.net • wichitafence-dab@sbcglobal.net

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TLBAA Breed Advisory Committee’s

November - Herd Management Guide Spring Calving:

1. As fall approaches and warm season grasses become dormant, realize that the protein and energy values of your pastures will decrease below levels necessary to satisfy nutritional requirements of pregnant females entering the last third of their pregnancy. Feed pregnant mature females to consume adequate energy, protein, minerals and vitamins prior to calving. If pasture grass is limited due to overgrazing or poor rainfall during the summer, then energy is your first concern. Feeding a medium (8-10 percent crude protein) to high quality (15-17 percent crude protein) hay free Photo courtesy of Kurt Twining choice will provide an excellent source of energy for the females. If pasture grass is plentiful, but dormant and poor in quality, then protein is generally your first concern. Assuming that your cows are in good body condition, feeding low levels of a high crude protein supplement (32-40 percent crude protein) is your best alternative. If your cows are thin in body condition, then feeding higher levels of a low crude protein, high energy range cube (20 percent crude protein) will provide increased intake of vital nutrients. If winter pasture or cool season variety grasses are available, then the females should not need additional energy or protein supplementation. A source of salt as well as a good commercial calcium:phosphorus mineral mix with added Vitamin A should be available on a free choice basis. 2. Evaluate the growth of your bred heifers. The goal should be to have your bred heifers weigh 85 percent of their mature weight, including the weight of the fetus, prior to calving at 2325 months of age. Because of this threshold weight, bred heifers should be fed to gain a minimum of one pound per day. 3. Consider controlling internal and external parasites. Treating internal parasites as well as lice infestations are important management decisions.

Feed pregnant mature females to consume adequate energy, protein, minerals and vitamins prior to calving, especially if grazing is limited. Fall Calving:

1. Continue the feeding program begun in October. The nutrient requirements for energy, protein, minerals and vitamins of lactating females increase substantially. During the first 3-4 months of lactation, a 1000 pound cow with average milking ability (producing 10 pounds of milk daily) requires 11.5 pounds of energy, 2 lbs. of protein, 0.06 pounds of calcium, 0.05 pounds of phosphorus and 36,000 international units of

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vitamin A per day. Make sure that your females are receiving adequate nutrition so that they will cycle at the first of the breeding season. Feeding 3-4 pounds of a 40 percent CP supplement, 4-6 pounds of a 30 percent CP supplement or 6-8 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement per head per day should be adequate to meet most protein and energy needs. Choice of appropriate supplement (20 percent CP, 30 percent CP or 40 percent CP) should be based upon cheapest source of protein. Price per pound of protein may be determined by dividing the cost per pound of protein supplement by the percentage of crude protein in the supplement. A source of salt as well as a good commercial calcium:phosphorus mineral mix with added Vitamin A should be available on a free choice basis. If your cows are thin in body condition, then feeding supplemental hay plus higher levels of a low crude protein, high energy range cube (20 percent crude protein) will provide increased intake of vital nutrients. Young, lactating females have 20-25 percent greater supplemental needs than mature cows. 2. Provide supplemental feed for bulls grazing dry, dormant range grass according to age and condition of the bulls: (a) feed mature bulls 3-4 pounds of a 40 percent crude protein range cube daily; (b) feed young bulls 8-10 pounds of a high energy, 20 percent crude protein cattle cube daily, and (c) supplement additional feed as necessary to keep bulls in good body condition as breeding season approaches. 3. If not already completed, conduct breeding soundness exams and fertility checks on all bulls prior to the breeding season. 4. Typically first calving females require 20 to 30 days longer to return to estrus or heat after calving than mature cows. As a result, begin breeding your replacement heifers 20 to 30 days before the rest of the cow herd. This management practice will allow the first-calf heifers additional time to return to estrus so that they can be bred following calving next year with the remainder of the cow herd. 5. Consider controlling internal and external parasites. Treating internal parasites as well as lice infestations are important management decisions.

Texas Longhorn Trails


EAS CAT Y LOC TLE ATO R!

ALABAMA

COLORADO

KANSAS

ARKANSAS

FLORIDA

KENTUCKY

KANSAS CALIFORNIA

LOUISIANA

MICHIGAN

MISSOURI

www.tlbaa.org November 2013

59


MISSOURI

PENNSYLVANIA

NORTHEAST TEXAS

TENNESSEE OKLAHOMA

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

CENTRAL TEXAS

Call in, ask for your H.O.R.N.S. password and take control of your herd inventory and membership information. (817) 625-6241

www.tlbaa.org

SOUTH TEXAS

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Texas Longhorn Trails


SOUTHEAST TEXAS

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

WEST TEXAS

WISCONSIN

UTAH

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

CANADA ALBERTA

www.tlbaa.org

TEXAS LONGHORN T•R•A•I•L•S

November 2013

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Easy Step by Step Instructions for Registering and Transferring Longhorns with the TLBAA REGISTRATIONS

The Only Way to Successfully Register Your Longhorns!

Your new calf crop is on the ground. You’ve spent hours matching your foundation cows with the perfect herd sires. But there is something missing. It simply isn’t a Texas Longhorn until it is registered. Registration is as easy as one, two, three with the TLBAA. Simply grab a registration application and get started.

Is it a cow, bull or steer? What is the 1. 5. Check the appropriate square for the Holding Brand? sex of the Longhorn, whether it is a cow, At the TLBAA, we bull or steer. If this proves difficult to determine, you might have to go out to the pasture and lift some tails. Fill in the calving date information. This is the date when the animal was born. What type of birth was it? Check “Natural” if your herd sire serviced the dam. Check “A.I.” if the dam of the calf was artificially inseminated. Check “Embryo” if an egg from a foundation cow created an embryo using semen and was implanted into a recipient cow. Check “Twin” if this is one of two calves born at the same time to one mother. Check “In-Herd-AI” if this is a cow born from using semen obtained from your own herd sire and used on one of your own females. Check “In-Herd-Embryo” if you transferred an embryo out of one of your cows and into one of your own females. Check “Clone” if the calf being registered is the product of a cloning process.

2. 3.

Name the Longhorn. At times, this can be the most difficult part. What should you name it? Do you have a one-word name for your prized Longhorn? Chances are it might have been used before. If you would like to use a special name, try using your ranch initials in front of the name to make your animal stand out in the catalogs and show programs. This will also insure that your animals will be able to be registered with a unique name. In the event that a previously registered animal already has the proposed registered name, the private herd number will be inserted at the end of the name to ensure a unique registration name. The name of the animal cannot be more than 24 characters, including spaces between words and no symbols may be used.

4.

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have a database that houses the holding brands of our members. Include a large printed copy of the holding brand for the registrations clerk to ensure the correct brand is on file. If you insert your membership number on this line, we will be able to have your holding brand printed on the registration paper of the registered Longhorn. Also include (next to this holding brand number) the location of the brand on the animal. This is usually on the left or the right hip, but brand locations vary from herd to herd. Example: If your holding brand is on the right hip, use the initials RH. According to the TLBAA by-laws (found in the TLBAA Membership Handbook on Pages 31-32) “Animals must be branded by fire, acid or freeze brand and the brand must be visible and readable on the animals. The brand should be registered in accordance with the members local and state law.” Fill in the Private Herd Number. This number varies from breeding program to breeding program and is simply a way for breeders to keep track of their cattle within their own herd. The private herd number is usually composed of two numbers separated by a slash. The top number is the order that the calf was born during the calving season and the bottom number is the last digit of the four-digit year in which the animal was born. Example: if the animal were the first-born calf of your 2004 calf crop, its private herd number would be 1/4. The location of the private herd number on the animal will also need to be included. Usually the holding brand is put on one hip and the private herd number is placed on the opposite hip. Color Description. If you are having difficulty with your description, turn over the registration application. In the middle of the application, you will find a description word list that will help you describe the color of the animal.

6.

7.

A good color description gives a general idea, without too much detail. As an example, “white with red head and shoulders,” will be a sufficient description. The description should use no more than 8-10 words. Name of Sire. Sire information is required in this space. Include the registered name of the sire as well as his private herd number and TLBAA number. If you used your own sire, the ownership information will be your name, address, city and state. If you leased a bull, or used semen from a bull you don’t own, you will have to include the information for the current owner of the bull used. Name of Dam. In this space the dam information is required. Also include her private herd number and TLBAA number as well. The breeder on the certificate is the owner of the dam at the time of service. Owner Membership Number. This will be the membership number of the owner of the animal to be registered. If a non-member purchased this animal at a TLBAA managed sale, a promotional membership number will be generated at no cost to the member. If this animal was sold private treaty to a new breeder, it is common practice for the seller to purchase a promotional membership for the new breeder.

8.

9.

10.

Applicant Registration Number. If you are applying, your information will be put here. Include your TLBAA membership number, sign your name and remember to date the application. It is important that you sign and date this application before sending it to the TLBAA office. Without your signature the registration process will come to a halt. This formality also confirms that you are adhering to the TLBAA By-Laws.

11.

Texas Longhorn Trails


So you have sold one of your Longhorns. You’ve got the check TRANSFERS from the buyer in hand and the animal has been delivered. There is one more step to complete the sale. According to the TLBAA records, you still own that Longhorn, and you need to transfer the ownership of that Longhorn to your customer. To begin, grab a transfer application and get started.

type of Longhorn is it? 1.What Cow, Bull or Steer. What is the Longhorn’s registered 2. name? Make sure you put the correct spelling along with any numbers or spacing of characters here. The correct private herd number is required. The TLBAA registration number is required. The registration number of the animal never changes once registered and so it should be easily found in your records. What was the date of sale? This date can either be the date when the private treaty was agreed upon, when the payment exchanged hands or the date of a consignment sale. This date must be included for the transfer to be processed. New Membership Owner Information This will be the name, address, city and state information of the new owner. If the new owner is not a TLBAA member,

3. 4. 5.

6.

it is common practice for the seller to purchase a gift membership for the new breeder. Seller Membership Information Fill in your TLBAA membership number and sign your name. It is important that you sign because it will certify that you are adhering to the TLBAA By-Laws, while transferring this animal. The registrations department will not transfer an animal unless your signature appears as approving the transfer. Calf at Side information. Did you sell an un-weaned calf along with this Longhorn? If so, fill in the information here. Include as much information as possible. Note: Include the membership number of the breeder of the calf on line “G”. This is usually your number, but if the cow has been exposed to another member’s bull, then it would be that member’s TLBAA number. A and B: Breeding Information If the animal is a female, and has been serviced by either your sires or exposed to other bulls, this information

7.

8.

9.

needs to be filled out to the best of your knowledge. Include the names of the sires and the dates that the animal was exposed to these sires. The TLBAA membership numbers of the owners of these sires need to be included also. The registrations department will try to match up a member’s name with their membership number, to the best of their ability, but you are the best source for information about your cattle. For this process to move along smoothly, give as much correct and current information as possible. Membership Number of the Owner of the Dam Include the TLBAA membership number of the person who owns the dam of the transferred Longhorn.

10.

TLBAA Registration Department Policies: Registrations, for upcoming shows or sales, must be submitted to the TLBAA registration department at least one and a half months in advance to ensure registration before the anticipated show or sale. Registrations are processed in the date order they are received. Rush priority registrations and transfers are available at an extra charge of $10 per head of animal. Rushes are guaranteed a three-day turnaround. All transfer applications must be accompanied by the original registration certificate.

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Save The Date! NOVEMBER 2013 NOV 9-10 • Louisiana State Fair, Shreveport, LA. Tina DuBose (979) 277-2656. www.statefairoflouisiana.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth. NOV 16 • Texas Longhorn Fall Production, Consignment & Ranch Horse Sale, Crossroads Centre, Oyen, Alberta. Contact Ron Walker (403) 548-6684 or walkersu7texaslonghorns@gmail.com. NOV 22-24 • Kaufman Police Association 3rd Annual Longhorn Show, S&S Arena, Terrell, TX. Joel Norris (972) 533-4945 or (972) 932-3094. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth NOV 24 • Tri-State Longhorn Sale, Crawford, NE. Art or Haley Anders (308) 665-2457.

DECEMBER 2013 Dec 6-8 • Holiday Longhorn Extrvaganza, Wise County Sheriff’s Posse Grounds, Decatur, TX. Showchair: Tina Cook (940) 399-7993, trcook65@gmail.com or cbarlonghorns@yahoo.com. World Qualifying Haltered and Youth. Dec 9-12 • 3rd Annual Christmas Celebration Online Sale - El Coyote Ranch. www.cattleinmotion.com. Della Serna (361) 294-5462 or dserna@elcoyote.com.

JANUARY 2014 JAN 17 • TLBAA General Membership Meeting, Fort Worth, TX. Scotty O’Bryan (817) 625-6241 or scotty@tlbaa.org. www.tlbaa.org JAN 17 • Affiliate President Meeting, Fort Worth, TX. Scotty O’Bryan (817) 625-6241 or scotty@tlbaa.org. www.tlbaa.org JAN 18 • Premier Texas Longhorn Sale, Fort Worth, TX. Scotty O’Bryan (817) 625-6241 or scotty@tlbaa.org. www.tlbaa.org

TEXAS LONGHORN Coming Events MAR 22 • First Annual Blue Ridge Ranch Sale, Llano, TX. John Marshall (713) 398-5024 or Bubba Bollier, Ranch Manager (325) 247-6249 www.blueridgelonghorns.com MAR 28 • Rockdale Spring Show, Rockdale, TX. Sandi Nordhausen & Suzanne Torkildsen (956) 793-5484. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth.

APRIL 2014 APR 4-5 • Hudson-Valentine Spring Invitational Texas Longhorn Sale, WKU Ag Expo Center, Bowling Green, KY. Lorinda Valentine (270) 393-2012. APR 11-13 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Washington Co. Fairgrounds, Brenham, TX; Susan Young susanyoung@hotmail.com or (713) 2946334. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth. APR 25-26 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield, KS. Mike Bowman (316) 778-1717 or www.endoftrailranch.com.

MAY 2014 MAY 2-3 • Red McCombs Fiesta Sale and Premier Heifer Sale, Johnson City, TX. www.redmccombslonghorn.com. Alan & Teresa Sparger, alan@redmccombsranches.com, teresa@redmccombsranches.com, (210) 445-8798.

MAY 9-11 • TLBAA 50th Aniversary Celebration Weekend, Fort Worth, Texas MAY 16-17 • Millennium Futurity, Glen Rose, TX; Bill Davidson (405) 258-7117 or milflonghorns@sbcglobal.net. www.mlfuturity.com.

JUNE 2014

JAN 20-21 • Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo, Fort Worth, TX. Trigg & Traci Moore (254) 396-5592. Qualifying Haltered & Youth

JUNE 7 • The Breeder Sale, Stockyards, Durant, OK. Ron Marquess (903) 570-5199. Wesley Watson (580) 286-1240.

JAN 24-25 • National Western Stock Show, Denver, CO. Lana Pierson (719) 740-0741. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth

JUNE 11-15 • 2014 Autobahnanza, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Larry Barker (817) 988-6110 or lbarker@abahn.com. www.autobahnyouthtour.com

FEBRUARY 2014 FEB 15 • The Breeder Sale, Stockyards, Durant, OK. Ron Marquess (903) 570-5199. Wesley Watson (580) 286-1240.

MARCH 2014 MAR 1 • Cattle Baron’s Premier Sale, Mid-Tex Auction Barn, Navasota, TX. TLBGCA. Steve Azinger (713) 823-5371, s_azinger@lazyaranch.org. Rick Friedrich (713) 305-0259, rick@riverranchlonghorns.com.. MAR 1-2 • San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo, San Angelo, TX; Dennis Urbantke (325) 656-9321 or dennisurbantke@zipnet.us. For entries: www.sanangelorodeo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth. MARCH 7-9 • Austin Star of Texas Show, Travis County Expo Center, Austin, TX. Louis Christa, Chair (210) 863-7003 or LChri58@msn.com. Non-haltered trophy steer show. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth. MAR 8-9 • Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, Houston, TX. Scotty O’Bryan (817) 625-6241 or scotty@tlbaa.org. www.tlbaa.org. Qualifying Haltered & Youth. MAR 21-23 • Stillwater Shootout, Stillwater, OK. Steve & Bodie Quary (405) 567-3093 or dqlonghorns@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth.

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AUGUST 2014 AUG 6-9 • TLBAA World Show, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Scotty O’Bryan (817) 625-6241 or scotty@tlbaa.org. www.tlbaa.org. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth.

SEPTEMBER 2014 JUNE 7 • SEPT 14 • Hill Country Heritage Sale, River Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. (325) 668-3552 or (713) 305-0259.

OCTOBER 2014 OCT 4 • 6th Annual Appalachian Trail Registered Texas Longhorn Sale & TLBAA Horn Showcase Satellite Measuring, Turnersburg Livestock Market, Turnersburg, NC. Carl Brantley, Wilkesboro, NC pyledriver1964@yahoo.com or (336) 667-5452.

Let us know about your upcoming events!

(817) 625-6241or email us at laura@tlbaa.org. Texas Longhorn Trails


California State Fair World Qualifying Show

July 25 – July 27, 2013 Saturday night (our third night at the California State Fair) at 7:00pm I started counting the number of pictures that people were taking of senior steer C Cross John Wesley, exhibited by Randy Copus at the California State Fair. He was in my row of Longhorns that I was keeping an eye on until the barn closed. At 72 pictures I lost count… it was only 8:30pm. We were there until 10:20pm when, literally, Christina DeMaria (Cross Canyon Ranch) and I shut the lights off in the barn. This was my second year showing at the California State Fair. With a lot of good advice from Leo Omlin of Rolling-O Longhorns, I was a bit better prepared this time with a case of water and a better looking wheelbarrow. We had a coloring center for kids, where they could color pictures of Crown Max, our longhorn bull. It was a big hit, and many left their picture to be hung up. Christina set up a stall as a cooling center with chairs, fans and water squirt bottles for people to take a break and read about Longhorns. Danielle William’s steer, Rusty, was a big hit. It turns out Rusty is a big ham and loved the attention he was getting from passersbys. We (Locatelli Longhorns) won first place in the Herdsman contest, for keeping our area clean. I think I cheated as I brought my 80+-year-old mother and had her sweeping the aisles. How could they not vote for her? Coming from the dog show world, I November 2013

was surprised how all the Longhorn exhibitors help each other out. I had a bit of trouble getting a number on a cow and Leo Omlin and Randy Copus were right there to help me. During the show, everyone pitched in to get the cows moved to the arena and back to the proper pens. By Sunday night, humans and cattle were exhausted and ready to go home. It’s a scramble to get your trailer in the barn to load up cows amongst all the sheep and llama exhibitors. I had to go to work Monday although I didn’t get home until after midnight Sunday night. When I came home from work Monday evening, the cows were all still sleeping, exactly where I left them! CHAMPION FEMALERolling-O-Molly Bred and exhibited by Leo Omlin RES. CHAMPION FEMALE XC Selena Gomez, Bred and exhibited by Christine DeMaria CHAMPION BULL – The Companionator, Bred and exhibited by Teresa Locatelli CHAMPION STEER Rolling-O-Andy Bred by Double K Corral. Exhibited by Leo Omlin RES. CHAMPION STEER – C Cross John Wesley, Bred by Mack Teutsch Exhibited by Randy Copus PREMIER EXHIBITOR AND BREEDER Christina DeMaria

Respectfully submitted, Teresa Locatelli, Locatelli Longhorns Director–California Association of Texas Longhorn Breeders

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continued from p. 51 buy her or not, they'll remember her as a good cow and where she came from, which can lead to future sales. Once you have committed to bringing your animal to the sale, take it off the market immediately. A buyer may have seen your animal in the catalog and flown down from New York to buy that specific lot. If it's not in the sale, he's upset with the consignor for not bringing the animal and also with management for advertising an animal that's not there. Have your animal in good condition. We would like to think that consignors would take their cattle out of the pasture and put them on feed for 30 days or more prior to the sale. You can look at the market any day and see that fat cows bring more money than thin ones. I know we don't all have grass, but we need to do the best we can. Also take into account that a lot of cattle won't drink when you get them away from home for the first time. Work with them on drinking strange water from other places. Put some Coca Cola in it if that helps. Also, a lot of cattle have never been to town and penned up. They may be a little upset, but if you put them in a pen for a while with a little feed, they'll relax. JOYCE: First of all, when you consign cattle, give us the proper information as soon as possible so we can promote them. Perhaps if you have a good photograph, you could get to the sales manager early enough to be used in advance advertising. Often, when I select photos for the advertisements, it's actually whose photos I have at the time. Also, remember that a bad photo is worse than no photo at all, so try to have a good one. After a good photograph, comes a good footnote. Here the opposite is true. No footnote is worse than a poor footnote because people will skip right over your lot if there's no information. Put some thought into the footnote. It is very important that we have accurate information about your animal--something that will help the auctioneer sell your animal. Don't just say, ‘she's a pretty cow’. Everyone will see that when she comes into the ring. If she has an impressive horn measurement, tell what it is. If she has a calf at side, list the calf's date of birth, the sire, and the sex. If she's bred, give the breeding information--the name of the sire and the date of service. The reason I'm so strict on beginning and ending breeding dates is that we have buyers from places that have bad winters who won't buy a cow if she's going to calve in the wintertime. Put all this information up front in your footnote so Eddie can quickly glance at it without hunting for the information

66

in a long footnote. EDDIE: The footnote is also a good place to list any faults. If a cow only has three good quarters in her udder, say so. Then come back with the fact that she's raised a good calf for the last so many years. My theory's always been that if you tell people the truth, they'll still buy it and give you just as much if they’re aware of all the facts. Part of my success in the auction business is that I tell the truth about an animal if there's any way possible, but I'm not in the position to call it if I'm not told about it. JOYCE: Health papers are a real sore spot with me. We have to be very strict because we always have a large number of out-of-state buyers and sellers. A man who

Photo by Jim Curry

buys your cattle wants to make sure he can get them home. First of all, I like consignors to read the information I've sent them. Health regulations are constantly changing, and I always call the Animal Health Commission in Austin to get the latest rules before a sale. The next thing is to have something on the health papers to help us identify your cow such as the private herd number, her name, or her lot number, not a number from her private ear tag (which you should take out before the sale), or a metal ear clip. We can't run every cow through the chute and check her ear. Also have your vet be specific about age, not just "A" for aged. If you list a year, it makes it easier for us to identify your animal. Thirdly, remember that the only reason you have an animal brucellosis or TB tested is to get results. It won't do you one bit of good if you have your cattle tested and don't have the results listed on the health papers. If results are not listed as negative, we must assume they are positive. EDDIE: Perhaps most important is OCV status. That stands for Official Calfhood Vaccinate and means a heifer calf has been vaccinated against brucellosis at the proper age; it's not a brucellosis test. You cannot call an animal calfhood vaccinated

unless your vet can see a sign of the purple indelible ink in their ear or some sign of the tattoo which would be (1) the first letter is the quarter, (2) the second would be a V (3) and the third would be the year they were vaccinated. You never know who is going to buy your cow, and you limit the number of buyers you can sell to if your cattle are not OCVd or the vet has not marked it on the health papers. OCV means that cattle can be shipped throughout the US. Before you ever leave the vet's, check that all the necessary information is on the health papers. Joyce sends out an example that you can double check against. You hurt the value of your cow if the health papers aren't complete. And last, don't go to all the trouble to have the health forms properly filled out and go off and leave them at home! TRAILS : How can the consignor help get top dollar for his cattle? EDDIE: The man who really gets something for his cattle is the man who stays around and promotes his cattle. Truly, the mistake a lot of people make is just bringing their cattle to the sale and kicking them out, saying "well, it’s up to the sale manager now." Normally, that sale manager has looked at that cow for the first time that day. He doesn't know the cow, but the man who owns her knows everything there is to know. He knows about the bull she's bred to, something about her background and pedigree. Everything about her that it takes to sell that customer has to come from the man who owns it. All we know is what's in the footnotes or on the health papers. JOYCE: Stay around the pens the evening before the sale and the morning of the sale to answer buyers' questions. I send out buyer's numbers to consignors before the sale so they don't have to stand in line getting a number when they could be out in the pens, marketing their animals. I remember one year we had some cattle in someone else's consignment sale, and our cattle topped the sale. Everyone wanted to know how we did that. I guarantee it was because when anyone walked through the door, I asked them "Have you seen our cattle?", and I took them right over to look at them. I also think that consignors need to do some advertising on their own. We can't do it all. Several people in the industry send out flyers to their buyer, inquiry, and prospective customer lists, advising them of the cattle they have in the sale. Some send

continued on p. 69 Texas Longhorn Trails


November 2013

67


MONTHLY MOVERS & SHAKERS

Registrations and Transfers from August 1, 2013 to August 31, 2013

Division A

Division B (cont.)

Division B (cont.)

Division B (cont.)

Rio Rojo Longhorns LLC Hudson Longhorns Dora Thompson Anna & Alexander Leichtenstern Ron A. Walker Panther Creek Ranch F. Clay Tillman III Matthew J. Durkin H'N'B Longhorns Kathy Kittler Ken & Charlotte Beler Oldenburg Farm, LLC Allemand Ranches Terry R. Moore B T Farms Dorothy Ammerman Sidewinder Cattle Co. LLC Dickinson Cattle Co., Inc. Janet E. Fowler Meridian Longhorns Harry & Maryanne Folkerts David L. or Robert W. Harcrow B. Eugene Berry, M.D. Brian and Mary Stahl Calvin Deemer Henry Detweiler Kasar & Lisa Kety Reginald Pederson Westfarms, Inc. Wilburn & Kathleen Sisco Curtis Elburn Nancy Mindlin Tom A. Smith Triple R Ranch Danny D Guffey Hoenstine's Diamond H Farm Hoosier Longhorns James or Janiece Pardue Larry and Charlotte Gribbins Mark, Darryl, Keith Christenson Mitchell Longhorns One Tree Ranching Co. LTD Ray & Donnah Stavig Ronald Arnsberger Royal Heritage Farm T and C Longhorns Terry King James Fansler

Rick & Tracey Friedrich Frank & Jane Applewhite Lee & Gay Gaddis Doug and Sandy Stotts Star Creek Ranch Good Life Ranch, LLC Rio Vista Ranch Circle Double C Ranch Barrett & Melanie Evans Gwen Damato La Pistola Cattle Co Austin and Susan Young Bill Hardin Davis Green Elias F. Hal Meyer, Jr. Hal and Carole Griffin John Oliver Liz and Franklin Myers Richard & Sharon Parr Stephen P Head Eddie W Braidfoot Robert R. King Allen & Suzanne Perry Annie Morgan & Steve Bell Cactus Rose Longhorns Danny and Sharon Burnette Dave & Althea Sullivan Frank J. Elliott John & Ursula Allen Pat & Stan Ivicic Steve and Rene' Azinger Triple R Ranch Bow Carpenter David Stanley Jaye Wells Joe Tillman J.T. Wehring Hollis & Carla Jefferies Breck & Alaina Hudson Deer Creek Longhorns Erin A. Winkel Joel Norris Larry and Paula Reck Malcolm & Constance Goodman Dr. Thomas E. Duncan Billy and Kim Cooper Brennan L. Potts Charles Schreiner IV Clinard Longhorns Cloud 9 Longhorns IM Rockin I, LLC Jason Carter Jim and Jean Murray Johnna Williams Ken and Beth Smith

Kip & Kelly Stansell Lloyd (Speedy) La Fond Matt Hill Michael McLeod Mr. and Mrs. John Davenport Red McCombs Ranches of Texas Richard James Filip Sandra K. Nordhausen Shannon Larson Sheila Fries Swing'n Star Ranch Timothy Phillips Tommy Mulhollan Top Shelf Longhorns Vida Nueva Ranch 4W Ranch Brian Wallis Fort Griffin State Historic Site Henry and Lori Salas John Marshall Johnny and Barbara Coleman Ron & or Laurie J. Lucas Bo & Jo Ann Winkel Bruce and Connie Ollive Bruce & Karen Fisher Carona Ranches, LLC. Chase Vasut D D Stiles Diamond D Ranch Donnie Taylor Dr. Zech Dameron III Edward Payne El Coyote Ranch George and Cindy Dennis Greg And Sandy Jameson Helm Cattle Company Jason Christa Jim and Luann Blay Jim Taylor John T. & Betty Baker Jordan Mosser Kelly or Chrisann Merriman Kevin and Laureen Rooker Kyle & Whitney Mayden Lonny and Nella Montgomery Mark Oliver Mike and Kim MacLeod Ohlendorf Land and Cattle Company, LLC" Ron & Kevin Asbill Schumacher Cattle Company Steven L. Havens Tilman R. Thomas III Tom and Cay Billingsley Wilton and Carolyn Wilton

B. M. & Wanda Buchanan

Division B

Rex & Nora Mosser Rhonda Harris Vincent T. Girolamo Gary & Teresa Bowdoin

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Division C

Wilson Longhorns Bob & Pam Loomis Todd and Kelli McKnight Semkin Longhorns Tom and Molly St. Hilaire Dusty Leonard Clyde Peek Billy & Audrey Doolittle Kenneth J. & Valerie J. Webb Kent & Sandy Harrell Ray, Kale & Julie Williams Scot & Jodie O'Bryan Audrey L. Walleser Dr. G.T. Bohmfalk Alexandra Dees Daniel & Angelina Fey Buckhorn Cattle Company Darlene Parsons Don Anderson Oren & Dianna O'Dell Sunset Ridge Ranch Art Anders Robert Wichers Del Vic Farms Gene and Delma Murphy Joseph M. Graham McGill Ranch Robert and Jenny Smoot Shamrock Land & Cattle, LLC Dylan Pfizenmaier Fairlea Longhorn Ranch, LLC Lawrence Morgan Longhorns L.D. and Debbie McIntyre Warren and Cathy Dorathy Wesley Earl Watson Woodson School Ranch Bill and Jo Le'AN Charley E. and Doris Snyder Dale Hunt David and Christine Ryland Dean L. Or Mary P. Horkey James and Mary Clark Joseph Sedlacek Kristin Horkey Rockin' J Longhorns Scott & Tammy Shaw Vel and Warren Miller Westhaven Longhorn Ranch

Texas Longhorn Trails


Gold N Rule Sittin Bull

Max Caliber Coach

Mountain Home, Texas

1-800-YO RANCH charlie4@yoranch.com Proud member of the TLBAA and TLMA

continued from p. 66 post cards; others make phone calls. Any way to tell people, "here's an opportunity to buy some of my cattle at this sale”. Many people who are interested in your breeding program will come to the sale to support that program or bloodline whether they get your cattle or not. Others supplement the management's advertising with their own. One man recently ran a 1/2 page ad in the Trails listing his consignments to our spring sale. That ad probably cost him about $5 per head, but it resulted in an additional $100 per head for him. If you are there to promote your sale cattle, you are also promoting your cattle at home. A man may not get your sale lots, but he'll remember the kind of cattle you have, and look you up later. TRAILS : What should the consignor do after the sale? EDDIE: After the sale, it doesn't hurt for that consignor to stand around and talk to the man who bought his cattle because that man has a lot of questions in mind. He may be a first time buyer and not know anything about Longhorns. But if he buys your cow for $1500, and you're not there to answer any questions, he may think all you wanted was his money. You need to be there, shake his hand, and say "I'm proud you bought my cattle". We have lots of consignors who come in the office to see who bought their cows so they can look them up and thank them, and Joyce always includes the names of the buyers in with the consignor's check. JOYCE: Follow up with a thank you note or a phone call in a week or two. Find November 2013

• Semen Collection & Processing • CSS Available Facility • Storage • Shipping • Supplies • AI • Embryo Collections • AI Training Schools

At our facilities or on-farm collecting Bob Woodard

903.521.7904

Brenda Barton

903.567.4044 (Office)

Craig Barton

903.920.3223

out how the cattle are getting along. I know many buyers who've gone back and bought more cattle from a consignor because they liked the way they were treated, and they liked his cattle when they got them home. All these little details are important because you establish a rapport with your customers, and repeat customers are what you've got to have to stay in the cattle business. TRAILS : What is the value of consigning to a sale? JOYCE: Exposure! Exposure to a new set of customers from new areas. Even if you have enough cattle for your own pro-

18035 FM 17 • Canton, TX 75103 Toll Free 1.866.604.4044 Fax 903.567.6587 www.championgenetics.com duction sale, these new customers will remember your cattle from the consignment sale and attend your own sale. I think pioneer breeder Dave Evans summed it up best. One time he took one of his really top cows to a consignment sale and ended up taking her home. I said, "Dave, you spent a lot of money trying to sell that cow, with the consignment fee, the hauling, etc. Aren't you upset?" His reply was, "Joyce, that was the cheapest form of advertising I could ever have. I brought my best cow to that sale, all those people saw her, they learned what kind of cattle I've got at home, and they know where to come!"

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CLASSIFIEDS

AUCTIONEERS

JoelAuctioneer Lemley P.O. Box 471 Blackwell, TX 79506

325-668-3552

www.lemleyauctionservices.com TX. License 15204

Bruce E. McCarty Auctioneer Weatherford, TX

(817) 991-9979

DORA THOMPSON just registered 38 QUALITY HEIFERS and 17 HERD SIRE prospects BRED FOR HORN. We specialize in Hunts Command Respect and McGill Ranch genetics and offer young stock at reasonable prices. We have a Farlap Chex son on a herd of straight Butlers. Sand Hills Ranch is 20 mi. off the TX line in Northwest Louisiana below Shreveport. A large herd (approx. 175 mama cows) promises you plenty of variety. echoofambush@aol.com www.sandhillsranch.com • Tel (318) 872-6329

OLIVER LONGHORNS

www.oliverlonghorns.com

Cattle for sale “To God Be The Glory”

joliver@mytocn.com (972) 268-0083

REAL ESTATE

HOME & RANCH REALITY TRIGG MOORE

CATTLE FOR SALE ELITE TEXAS LONGHORNS FOR SALEDale Hunt - www.rockinhlonghorns.com (402) 214-4851. JBR LONGHORNS- frozen embryos, AI & ET, semen, elite females, miniatures, lean beef, free advice, call before you buy. Jim Rombeck (785) 562-6665, Justin Rombeck (816) 536-1083. BEAVER CREEK LONGHORNS- Check our new Web site with "Super Sales" and herdreduction prices. Tazman (Gunman) genetics. Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK (580) 7659961, www.beavercreeklonghorns.com

Cell: (254) 396-5592 Ofc: (254) 965-5500 Fax: (254) 965-5532

Owner/Broker 936 S. Hwy 281 Stephenville, TX 76401 Email: trigg@c21homeandranch.com

www.c21homeandranch.com

SEMEN FOR SALE LONGHORN SEMEN – Boomerang C P, Bold Ruler, Emperor, VJ Tommie, GF Gman, Tabasco, Watson 167, Diamond W Paycash, JM Sue & more. John Oliver (972) 268-0083 or www.oliverlonghorns.com

SERVICES

THATE Cattle Company Your source for big-horned cattle in the North—utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

(507) 235-3467 It’s Thanksgiving Time at the Flying D Ranch! ❖ Thanks to the good Lord for providing pastures and an outstanding calf crop. ❖ Thanks to our Longhorn friends who helped us in so many ways this year. ❖ Thanks to new and old breeders who chose our cattle for their herds. ❖ Thanks most of all for letting us live in America where we are all free to love God and have the right to be the best we can be. The Longhorn life just gets better!! Call or visit. We have outstanding bulls, cows, heifers and steers at reasonable prices.

Dorie Damuth • Flying D Longhorn Ranch Magnolia, Texas • 281-356-8167 281-356-2751 Fax www.damuthflyingdranch.com • dorie27@sbcglobal.net

LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

New Location: Sallisaw, OK (918) 774-9107 • (918) 855-4907 new web site:

www.lonewolfranch.net

For information, visit

www.tlbaa.org or read the Trails Magazine!

70

TRADE & BARTER TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breeds’ top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days (512) 454-0476 / Weekends (830) 644-2380. WOULD YOU LIKE SOME VANIZM OR JUBAL JANGLER HEIFERS? – Save your cash for hay. How about trading bulls or steers for them instead of cash? Call (785) 447-9132 McIntyre Ranches - www.mcintyreranches.com.

TRANSPORTATION

LIVESTOCK TRANSPORTATION Ted Roush (713) 299-7990 Cell www.asocl.com or troush57@yahoo.com YOU CALL - I HAUL!

WESTERN DECOR

Specializing in mounted steer horns, cow skulls, horn furniture, hides

M.P. & K.D. HORN and LEATHER SHOP 408 E. Drew • Ft. Worth, TX 76110 817-927-8061 • Fax: 817-927-7970 E-mail: MPKDhornshop8061@msn.com Web site: www.hornandleather.com

TEXAS LONGHORN T•R•A•I•L•S (817) 625-6241 • Fax (817) 625-1388 trails@tlbaa.org

Classified ads are $15.00 for 25 words. Box ads are $25.00 per inch. Deadline is the 25th of the second month preceding publication.

____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ Texas Longhorn Trails


ADVERTISERS’ INDEX

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L

Lazy J Longhorns............................................59 Lemley Longhorns ........................................61 Lightning Longhorns ....................................60 Little Ace Cattle Co.........................................10 Lone Wolf Ranch............................................60 Longhorn Designs..........................................49 B Longhorn Sale Pen ........................................49 Bar H Ranch....................................................59 Loomis, Bob & Pam................................19, 21 Beadle Land & Cattle..............................10, 59 Bear Boot Ranch ............................................61 M Bentwood Ranch ............................................21 Billingsley Longhorns....................................61 Mangold, Tony................................................13 Blue Mountain Longhorns ..........................51 Marquess Arrow Ranch........................60, IBC Blue Ride Longhorns....................................BC McLeod Ranch ................................................10 Box Z Ranch..............................................10, 61 Miller, Tim ......................................................59 Brett Ranch ......................................................60 Moore, Trigg ....................................................43 Broken W Ranch ............................................60 Moriah Farms ..........................................11, 60 BT Farms ..........................................................60 Mosser Longhorn Sale ....................................9 Buckhorn Cattle Co. ..............................10, 60 Mounce, Paul..................................................13 Bull Creek Longhorns ..................................60 Butler Breeders ..........................................10-11 N Adcock, Terry & Sherri ..................................61 Adkins, Aron & Clay ......................................21 Almendra Longhorns....................................59 Anderson, Frank Jr. & III................................10

C

Just For Grins Create an original caption for this photograph and win a TLBAA cap! (Only first-place winners receive prizes.)

Photos for “Just for Grins” are welcome, but they cannot be returned. Send your caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, Texas 76164 or laura@tlbaa.org (Email entries should include address.) Please specify which month your caption is for.

National Western ..........................................67 Northbrook Cattle Co...................................60

Caballo Bravo Longhorns ............................59 Cattle Baron’s Premier Longhorn Sale ......31 P CedarView Ranch ....................................21, 59 Champion Genetics ......................................69 P&C Cattle Pens ............................................23 Colley, Dean....................................................13 Panther Creek Longhorns........................2, 59 Clark, Douglas................................................39 Parmley, John....................................................5 Pearl Longhorn Ranch ..................................61 D PJ’s Cattle Company ......................................10 Dalgood Longhorns ......................................11 Damato, Gwen ..............................................13 DCCI Equipment ..........................................69 Deer Creek Longhorns..................................61 Detweiler, Henry ............................................49 Diamond Q Longhorns ..............................60 Double LB Longhorns ..................................61 Doug Hunt Longhorns ................................61 DuBose, Keith ................................................39

E

R Registered Texas Longhorn Beef..................57 Rio Vista Ranch ..............................................10 Rocking G Ranch ............................................11 Rockin I Longhorns ................................11, 61 Rocking P Longhorns ....................................10 Rocky Mountain Longhorns ......................59 Rolling D Ranch ............................................59 Running Arrow Farm ....................................69

Photo courtesy of Dora Thompson, Sand Hills Ranch

S Eagles Ridge Longhorns ................................11 Eddie Wood 2014 Cowtown Classic ..35, 37 7D Longhorns ................................................59 El Coyote Ranch................................................1 Safari B Ranch ................................................60 End of Trail Ranch ..................................17, 59 Sand Hills Ranch ......................................7, 59 Schumacher Cattle ........................................36 F Semkin Longhorns ........................................60 Sidewinder Cattle Co.....................................11 Flying Diamond Ranch ................................59 Singing Coyote Ranch ..................................61 First Financial..................................................67 Smith, Larry......................................................51 5D Ranch..........................................................61 Smith, T.M. & Jean ........................................60 SS Longhorns..................................................60 Star Creek Ranch ..............................................5 G Stotts Hideaway Ranch..................................61 G6 Longhorns ................................................60 Girolamo, Vincent ........................................13 T Green, Davis....................................................60 Taylor, Donnie ................................................13 Texas S Longhorns..........................................61 H TLBA Foundation ..........................................38 Haltom Hollar Ranch ..................................59 TLBAA 50th Anniversary......................IFC, 27 Harrell Ranch ..................................................11 TLBAA Membership......................................72 Helm Cattle Co. ............................................60 TLBAA Special Events....................................47 Helm, Nathan ................................................13 Torkildsen, Bill................................................43 Hickman Longhorns ....................................61 Triple R Ranch (MI) ......................................59 Hill Country Heritage Sale ..........................29 Triple R Ranch (TX)........................................11 Horseshoe J Longhorns ................................21 Triple T Longhorns ........................................60 Hubell Longhorns..........................................21 Hudson Longhorns..........................................3 U Hudson-Valentine Spring Inv. Sale ............15 Underwood Longhorns................................59

J

W JBR Longhorns................................................59 J.T. Wehring Family Ranch ..........................60 Jack Mountain Ranch....................................61 Jane’s Land & Cattle Co.................................11 Johnston Longhorns ....................................60

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Walker, Ron......................................................61 Westfarms, Inc.................................................10 White Pine Ranch ..........................................21 Wichita Fence..................................................57 Woodson School Ranch ..............................60

Y

Khaos Cattle Company....................................21 King, Terry & Tammy ................................21, 59 YO Ranch ........................................................69 Kittler Land & Cattle Co. ................................59 November 2013

OCTOBER PHOTO FIRST-PLACE WINNER: “OK, all together now,” the cowboy yelled.

Wendy Hastings, Art, TX ◆ HONORABLE MENTION:

“Would you mind telling me what we are looking for because I don’t see anything out of order back there.” Keith Alft, Jr., Tigerton, WI

HONORABLE MENTION: “Because we can.” Stan Ivicic, Austin, TX

Coming Next Month:

Horn Showcase Results

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Join Us! We’re Growing Fast!

a small group of concerned cattlemen banded together to preserve the unique heritage of Texas Longhorn cattle. With this goal, they established the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America (TLBAA) to maintain the breed registry and to promote the magnificent breed to as many persons as possible.

In 1964,

the purposes of the TLBAA remain the same. In addition, the Association has expanded its membership services as the number of Texas Longhorn enthusiasts has increased to an all-time high.

Today,

The Advantages of Membership Include:

★ State of the art Registration Department to maintain four ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

decades of herd registry. Active, dedicated officers and directors. Dedicated and knowledgeable staff. Network of national and international affiliates. Active youth organization – the Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow (TLBT). Youth Show Circuit and Youth Hall of Fame. Strong World Qualifying Show Circuit and a World Exposition. Hall of Fame. Canadian show circuit for breeders in the North. Weekly Internet newsletter, E-Trails. Breed Advisory Committee of dedicated animal scientists. Horn Showcase for official horn measurements. Active Foundation Board to preserve the history of our association and the Longhorn breed. Yearly subscription to Texas Longhorn Trails monthy magazine.

★ Educational Web site. ★ Sales Management Division with cattle sales available to the membership.

★ Riding steer group – another unique use for the Texas

Longhorn. Educational breed seminars. Group field days. Futurities. Commercial breeding programs. A.I. Certified Sires. Dam of Merit program. Member of state and national cattle organizations. Exclusive computer software program to keep your herd updated. ★ Advertising campaigns in world circulated publications. ★ Mail-in voting for regional directors.

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

THE GREATEST BREED OF CATTLE IN THE WORLD AND THE BEST GROUP OF PEOPLE ANYWHERE! Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America P.O. Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 817/625-6241 • Fax 817/625-1388 www.tlbaa.org

TLBAA Membership Application

MEMBERSHIP NUMBER _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Name:______________________________________________________

Other Name: ________________________________________________

Address: ___________________________________________________

City, State, Zip: ______________________________________________

Home Phone: (

Ranch Phone: (

)______________Office Phone: ( )______________Fax Number: (

)______________

)______________

Website Address: ____________________________________________

Email Address: ______________________________________________

PAYMENT OPTIONS:

VISA

DISCOVER

MC

Check or Money Ord.

Card No.:___________________________________________________

Expiration: ________________ CID# ( 3-digit code on back) ____________

Referred by:_________________________________________________

Please draw your brand inside the box exactly as you wish to be recorded.

Reading of Brand _______________________

100.00/yr

New Active Member*

100.00/yr

Renewal Active Member

125.00

LATE ACTIVE MEMBER RENEWAL (After Aug. 31)

1000.00

Lifetime Member

25.00

New/Renewal Junior Member (18yr. & Under) ** New/Renewal Outrider (Associate Member) (pays Non-Member rates for animal work)

Monthly Breed Publication (Texas Longhorn Trails)

**Junior Member Birthday ___/___/___

75.00 60.00

All dues must be paid by U.S. Funds.

* New Active Membership includes New Member Welcome Package and subscription to the Texas Longhorn Trails monthly publication. Texas Longhorn Trails subscription ONLY rate is $60 US address or $75 (US) foreign address. TLBAA Membership dues may be deducted as an ordinary and necessary business expense; however they are not deductible as a charitable contribution.

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Texas Longhorn Trails


Profile for Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine

Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine November 2013  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine November 2013  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America