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TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS FEBRUARY 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 1


2 | January 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

February 2016 | 49


2 Strong Longhorn Programs Merge for an Even More Successful Future 22 years ago 50 head of Texas Longhorn cattle moved from the arid lands of Arizona to the lush grass of Oklahoma. Their new home was on leased pasture that had been MacGuire land since the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1893. And the rest is history in the making. Charlene Semkin founded Semkin Longhorns 40 years ago this year. It has been a life-long passion that according to Charlene “will not end until I leave this earth”. When her best friend Jo McGuire arrived for a visit to Charlene’s Arizona ranch more than 20 years ago with her 13-year-old son, Matt in tow, none of them could have forseen how that visit would change their lives. Jo and Matt both loved the Longhorns. After wondering what on earth the cattle ate in the Arizona setting, Jo suggested that Charlene lease their land in Oklahoma and put her Longhorns on their green grass. “The thought of moving the cattle to Oklahoma sounded really crazy” Semkin said, “but the more I thought about it, the more it seemed like a good idea.” The arrangement worked well, with the McGuires taking care of Charlene’s herd as well as a herd of their own. Matt actually bought three of his first Longhorns from Charlene’s herd. All of the McGuire children grew up showing Texas Longhorns and were active members of the Oklahoma Texas Longhorn Association. Eventually all the cattle were relocated to Oklahoma. When Charlene’s youngest son, David, got out of the army he helped take care of the herd, now numbering 300 head. Matt and David were like brothers, with Matt learning a lot from his friend who had been around longhorns since the age of two. Through the years, however, all of Charlene’s kids left Oklahoma and didn’t have an interest in the Longhorn business. Matt, however, only got more involved. Thorough the years of working together and with Matt taking over his family’s ranch, McGuire Land & Cattle, it was a natural next step to look ahead to Charlene’s semi-retirement. Matt had made it clear that the ranch life and raising Longhorns was the lifestyle he and his wife, Melanie, wanted for their family. The two separate herds of McGuire Land & Cattle and Semkin Longhorns have now merged into one program under the ownership of Matt McGuire. Charlene is still active with the program, helping with marketing efforts and the website. ghorn cattle moved from the arid lands of Arizona to the lush grass of Oklahoma. Their new home was on leased pasture that had been MacGuire land since the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1893. And the rest is history in the making. Charlene Semkin founded Semkin Longhorns 40 years ago this year. It has been a life-long passion that according to Charlene “will not end until I leave this 2 | January 2016

earth”. When her best friend Jo McGuire arrived for a visit to Charlene’s Arizona ranch more than 20 years ago with her 13-year-old son, Matt in tow, none of them could have forseen how that visit would change their lives. Jo and Matt both loved the Longhorns. After wondering what on earth the cattle ate in the Arizona setting, Jo suggested that Charlene lease their land in Oklahoma and put her Longhorns on their green grass. “The thought of moving the cattle to Oklahoma sounded really crazy” Semkin said, “but the more I thought about it, the more it seemed like a good idea.” The arrangement worked well, with the McGuires taking care of Charlene’s herd as well as a herd of their own. Matt actually bought three of his first Longhorns from Charlene’s herd. All of the McGuire children grew up showing Texas Longhorns and were active members of the Oklahoma Texas Longhorn Association. Eventually all the cattle were relocated to Oklahoma. When Charlene’s youngest son, David, got out of the army he helped take care of the herd, now numbering 300 head. Matt and David were like brothers, with Matt learning a lot from his friend who had been around longhorns since the age of two. Through the years, however, all of Charlene’s kids left Oklahoma and didn’t have an interest in the Longhorn business. Matt, however, only got more involved. Thorough the years of working together and with Matt taking over his family’s ranch, McGuire Land & Cattle, it was a natural next step to look ahead to Charlene’s semi-retirement. Matt had made it clear that the ranch life and raising Longhorns was the lifestyle he and his wife, Melanie, wanted for their family. The two separate herds of McGuire Land & Cattle and Semkin Longhorns have now merged into one program under the ownership of Matt McGuire. Charlene is still active with the program, helping with marketing efforts and the websiteghorn cattle moved from the arid lands of Arizona to the lush grass of Oklahoma. Their new home was on leased pasture that had been MacGuire land since the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1893. And the rest is history in the making. Charlene Semkin founded Semkin Longhorns 40 years ago this year. It has been a life-long passion that according to Charlene “will not end until I leave this earth”. When her best friend Jo McGuire arrived for a visit to Charlene’s Arizona ranch more than 20 years ago with her 13-year-old son, Matt in tow, none of them could have forseen how that visit would change their lives. Jo and Matt both loved the Longhorns. After wondering what on earth the cattle ate in the Arizona setting, Jo suggested that Charlene lease their land in Oklahoma and put her Longhorns on their green grass. “The thought of moving the cattle to Oklahoma sounded really crazy” Semkin said, “but the more I

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 3


COVER STORIES

FEBRUARY 2016

16

Vol. 27 • No. 10

HERD SIRE ISSUE

16

TO BUY OR NOT TO BUY? 3 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Making A Herd Sire Choice by Myra Basham

HERD HEALTH: Health Care and 22 Vaccinations for Bulls Some diseases affect reproduction in bulls as well as cows. Here’s some preventative tips. by Heathe Smith Thomas

FEATURES

20

Departments 6 Editor’s Note

12 Legislative Update

14 TLBAA Announcements

36 TLBT Letter

42 Affiliate News

42

EPDs BENEFIT TERMINAL PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

40

Understanding Expected Progeny Differences by Robert Wells

In the Pen

44 Herd Management

36 Inspecting Brands and Rangering:

An Excerpt From “Longhorn Legacy: Graves Peeler and the Texas Cattle Trade” by Lawrence Clayton

46 Officers & Directors

50 Memoriams

40 TLBAA BRAND REGULATIONS

Requirements for brands and private herd numbers

Index

59

About the Cover: The odds are way more than 50/50! The 85” TTT Fifty-Fifty BCB (Bandera Chex x Ringaling BCB) has risen above the odds. He throws calves that are colorful, correct and have gentle dispositions, not to mention excellent horn growth. Owners include Jimmy Jones, Nancy Dunn, Terry King and Brent & Cindy Bolen. See ad on pg. 45 for more information. 4 | February 2016

59

Texas Longhorn Trails

Just For Grins

60 Calendar


2 Strong Longhorn Programs Merge for an Even More Successful Future 22 years ago 50 head of Texas Longhorn cattle moved from the arid lands of Arizona to the lush grass of Oklahoma. Their new home was on leased pasture that had been MacGuire land since the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1893. And the rest is history in the making. Charlene Semkin founded Semkin Longhorns 40 years ago this year. It has been a life-long passion that according to Charlene “will not end until I leave this earth”. When her best friend Jo McGuire arrived for a visit to Charlene’s Arizona ranch more than 20 years ago with her 13-year-old son, Matt in tow, none of them could have forseen how that visit would change their lives. Jo and Matt both loved the Longhorns. After wondering what on earth the cattle ate in the Arizona setting, Jo suggested that Charlene lease their land in Oklahoma and put her Longhorns on their green grass. “The thought of moving the cattle to Oklahoma sounded really crazy” Semkin said, “but the more I thought about it, the more it seemed like a good idea.” The arrangement worked well, with the McGuires taking care of Charlene’s herd as well as a herd of their own. Matt actually bought three of his first Longhorns from Charlene’s herd. All of the McGuire children grew up showing Texas Longhorns and were active members of the Oklahoma Texas Longhorn Association. Eventually all the cattle were relocated to Oklahoma. When Charlene’s youngest son, David, got out of the army he helped take care of the herd, now numbering 300 head. Matt and David were like brothers, with Matt learning a lot from his friend who had been around longhorns since the age of two. Through the years, however, all of Charlene’s kids left Oklahoma and didn’t have an interest in the Longhorn business. Matt, however, only got more involved. Thorough the years of working together and with Matt taking over his family’s ranch, McGuire Land & Cattle, it was a natural next step to look ahead to Charlene’s semi-retirement. Matt had made it clear that the ranch life and raising Longhorns was the lifestyle he and his wife, Melanie, wanted for their family. The two separate herds of McGuire Land & Cattle and Semkin Longhorns have now merged into one program under the ownership of Matt McGuire. Charlene is still active with the program, helping with marketing efforts and the website. ghorn cattle moved from the arid lands of Arizona to the lush grass of Oklahoma. Their new home was on leased pasture that had been MacGuire land since the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1893. And the rest is history in the making. Charlene Semkin founded Semkin Longhorns 40 years ago this year. It has been a life-long passion that according to Charlene “will not end until I leave this

earth”. When her best friend Jo McGuire arrived for a visit to Charlene’s Arizona ranch more than 20 years ago with her 13-year-old son, Matt in tow, none of them could have forseen how that visit would change their lives. Jo and Matt both loved the Longhorns. After wondering what on earth the cattle ate in the Arizona setting, Jo suggested that Charlene lease their land in Oklahoma and put her Longhorns on their green grass. “The thought of moving the cattle to Oklahoma sounded really crazy” Semkin said, “but the more I thought about it, the more it seemed like a good idea.” The arrangement worked well, with the McGuires taking care of Charlene’s herd as well as a herd of their own. Matt actually bought three of his first Longhorns from Charlene’s herd. All of the McGuire children grew up showing Texas Longhorns and were active members of the Oklahoma Texas Longhorn Association. Eventually all the cattle were relocated to Oklahoma. When Charlene’s youngest son, David, got out of the army he helped take care of the herd, now numbering 300 head. Matt and David were like brothers, with Matt learning a lot from his friend who had been around longhorns since the age of two. Through the years, however, all of Charlene’s kids left Oklahoma and didn’t have an interest in the Longhorn business. Matt, however, only got more involved. Thorough the years of working together and with Matt taking over his family’s ranch, McGuire Land & Cattle, it was a natural next step to look ahead to Charlene’s semi-retirement. Matt had made it clear that the ranch life and raising Longhorns was the lifestyle he and his wife, Melanie, wanted for their family. The two separate herds of McGuire Land & Cattle and Semkin Longhorns have now merged into one program under the ownership of Matt McGuire. Charlene is still active with the program, helping with marketing efforts and the websiteghorn cattle moved from the arid lands of Arizona to the lush grass of Oklahoma. Their new home was on leased pasture that had been MacGuire land since the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1893. And the rest is history in the making. Charlene Semkin founded Semkin Longhorns 40 years ago this year. It has been a life-long passion that according to Charlene “will not end until I leave this earth”. When her best friend Jo McGuire arrived for a visit to Charlene’s Arizona ranch more than 20 years ago with her 13-year-old son, Matt in tow, none of them could have forseen how that visit would change their lives. Jo and Matt both loved the Longhorns. After wondering what on earth the cattle ate in the Arizona setting, Jo suggested that Charlene lease their land in Oklahoma and put her Longhorns on their green grass. “The thought of moving the cattle to Oklahoma sounded really crazy” Semkin said, “but the more I

Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 5


EDITOR’S NOTES

Planning Ahead Planning ahead is key to any successful program, and making a herd sire decision is a task to begin planning long before the actual purchase, especially if you are a new breeder. We take a look at questions you need to ask yourself to decide if purchasing a herd sire is the right choice for you. If these questions are ones you’ve already dealt with yourself, pass your experience on to a new breeder or give them a copy of Trails magazine to get them pointed in the right direction. Be sure to enjoy the book excerpt giving a glimpse into the colorful life of Graves Peeler. Then, in the upcoming March issue, learn more about all of the Hall of Fame Inductees. We’re excited to be showing all the highlights from Longhorn Weekend in the March issue as well. We have already had inquiries wanting to know when the January event coverage would be out, so get your call in to Lindsay and reserve an ad space. It’s always good to advertise your program in a publication you know is in demand. If you know of any story ideas or you would like to submit coverage of an event that we may not be attending, please let me know. Those of you who are out showing, doing ranch visits and going to your affiliate events see and hear lots of interesting things. Share that with us. “News on the Trail” is the spot where we highlight such notable moments as media coverage of your Longhorns or ranch, your kids success with a Longhorn project at school or even a new family member. If you have had a news source talk to you about your Longhorns or know of a member who has been featured on the news or in print, let me know. You will notice that we have started giving you deadlines and editorial calendar items further in advance, This is to better help you plan ahead on your advertising. Just like any other investment, thought and planning helps you develop the most effective marketing plan and Lindsay Maher will be happy to help you with that planning. Pricing has been adjusted to be more attractive and offer more options. Take a look at page 48 to see some of the changes, then gives us a call to plan your future advertising. Blessings!!

Myra Basham DEADLINE:

Myra Basham Editor-in-Chief

April 2016 Issue:

February 22nd

Youth Issue

6 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails

(817) 625-6241 817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 trails@tlbaa.org www.tlbaa.org

Editor in Chief: Myra Basham Ext. 108 • myra@tlbaa.org trailseditor@tlbaa.org Contributing Editor: Henry L. King Advertising Sales Manager: Lindsay Maher • Ext. 109 lindsay@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Joshua Farias • Ext. 117 joshua@tlbaa.org

Registrations Rick Fritsche • Ext. 107 rick@tlbaa.org registrar@tlbaa.org Dana Coomer • Ext. 116 dana@tlbaa.org registrar@tlbaa.org membership@tlbaa.org Accounting Elaine Bauman • Ext. 121 elaine@tlbaa.org Special Events Amy Weatherholtz • Ext. 104 amy@tlbaa.org

Printed in the U.S.A. The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 2315 N. Main, Ste. 402, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $105 per year; foreign per year $180. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 2315 N. Main, Ste. 402, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817)  625-6241. Fax (817)  625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.


Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 5


Westfarms Inc. Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450 • Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 Cell: (985) 515-3172 e-mail: westfarmsinc@gmail.com

Brennan & Michele Potts Rocking P Longhorns P.O. Box 579 • Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com bpotts1@verizon.net

Christa Cattle Co. Jason & Louis Christa 2577 FM 1107 • Stockdale, TX 78160 christacattleco@msn.com www.christacattleco.com Louis (210) 863-7003 Jason (210) 232-1818

Rio Vista Ranch - Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane • Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 Cell: (512) 422-8336 e-mail: elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com

Beadle Land & Cattle Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA 95032 (408) 834-0110 • (408) 656-6266 Ray.Beadle@kapstonepaper.com

McLeod Ranch Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 CR 3031 • Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155

Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety Little Ace Cattle Co. P.O. Box 386 • Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 ketyfolsom@aol.com

Falls Creek Longhorns Stanley & Sandi Tidwell 2330 W. FM 875 • Midlothian, TX 76065 (972) 989-8939 cell Russell Hooks, Herd Manager (409) 381-0616

LL LonghornsNeil & Cynthia Hall 1414 Thorton Rd. • Houston, TX 77018 (206) 574-8950 www.lllonghorns.com cynthia@lllonghorns.com


Jack Mountain Ranch Hal & Betty Meyer 8000 Mount Sharp Rd. • Wimberley, TX 78676 (512) 422-4681 cell (512) 842-1116 halmeyer@hotmail.com

Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 S. Rosemary Dr. • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com

Sidewinder Cattle Co. Ed Shehee, Jr. 1007 Airport Blvd. • Pensacola, FL 32504 (850) 572-6595 www.sidewindercattleco.com

Rockin I Longhorns Nancy Ince & Tony Mangold 30 FM 3351 N • Bergheim, TX 78004 (830) 237-5024 tmangold@sbcglobal.net www.rockinilonghorns.com

Dalgood Longhorns Malcolm & Connie Goodman 6260 Inwood Dr. • Houston, TX 77057 (713) 782-8422 dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com

Triple R Ranch Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Rd. • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467

DuBose Bar D Ranch Keith & Tina DuBose P.O. Box 370 • Ben Wheeler, TX 75754 (979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com www.dubosebard.com

This space is available for your ranch listing! Call Trails magazine: (817) 625-6241


2 | January 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 5


Legislative Update

Key Provisions for Cattle Producers Contained in NewlyPassed Omnibus Appropriations Bill Washington, DC. - The U.S. Congress passed a $1.1 trillion Omnibus Appropriations Bill on December 18, and ultimately signed by President Obama, which funds much of the government through fiscal year 2016. While contentious, the bill does contain a few victories for cattlemen. Most importantly, the bill repeals the mandatory Countyof-Origin Labeling (COOL) for beef. The COOL regulation has plagued the cattle industry for many years, costing us millions and driving us to the brink of retaliation from two of our largest trading partners,” said NCBA President Phillip Ellis. “Cattle producers have had to bear the cost of this failed program for far too long, and we commend the leadership of the Senate Agriculture Chairman Pat Roberts, House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway and Rep. Jim Costa (D-CA) for ensuring the U.S. is brought back into compliance with our trade obligations.”

Also key, the Omnibus Appropriations Bill keeps an over-reaching Environmental Protection Agency in check by continuing to prohibit requiring livestock producers to obtain Clean Air Act permits or report greenhouse gas emissions on livestock operations. Interestingly, the EPA’S “Waters of the United States” rule was not addressed in the omnibus, but the stay remains currently in place. The Omnibus Bill also contains an increase in wildfire management funds, which is critical given the recent drought and lack of federal forest management which has ignited several mass wildfires this year. Finally, the tax extenders legislation also passed both chambers. Section 179 was permanently extended at $500,000 and bonus depreciation is set at 50 percent for property acquired during 2015, 2016, and 2017.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack Announces 2015 Wildfires Burned Record Acres, Urges Congress to Pass Wildfire Funding Fix WASHINGTON, Jan. 6, 2016 - Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that in 2015, wildfires burned a record 10,125,149 acres across the United States, surpassing the previous record set in 2006. The Secretary renewed the call for Congress to pass the bi-partisan Wildfire Disaster Funding Act. In 2015, there were more than 50 fires that exceeded 50,000 acres each; of those, 20 fires exceeded more than 100,000 acres each. In 2015, more than 4,500 homes and other structures were destroyed by wildfires and a total of 13 wildland firefighters, including 7 U.S. Forest Service firefighters, lost their lives in the line of duty. Since 2000, fire seasons have grown longer, and the frequency, size and severity of wildland fires has increased. The 2015 fires stretched across federal, state and private land with Alaska, California, Oregon and Washington being especially hard hit. While the West saw the brunt of the fires, it is agency resources across the country-from New York to Arkansas to Florida-that feel the brunt of a Forest Service budget subsumed by firefighting costs. The cost of the Forest Service’s wildfire suppression reached a record $243 million in a one-week period during the height of suppression activity in August. With a record 52 percent of the Forest Service’s budget dedicated to fire suppression activities, compared to just 16 percent in 1995, the Forest Service’s firefighting budget was exhausted in 2015, forcing USDA to transfer funds away from forest restoration projects that would help reduce the risk of future fires, in order to cover the high cost of battling blazes. “These fires have very real human costs, as we lost seven members of the Forest Service firefighting team in the line of duty, and 4,500 homes were lost. We take our job to protect the public seriously, and recently, the job has become increasingly difficult due to the effects of climate change, chronic droughts, and a constrained budget environment in Washington. Congress must fix the fire budget to stop an ever-increasing amount of the operating budget going to fire suppression. Failing to do so will result in more deadly and devastating fires in the future,” said Secretary Vilsack. “While the news that more than 10 million acres burned is terrible, it’s not shocking and it is probable that records will continue to be broken. By August, the Forest Service had exhausted its firefighting forces and utilized nearly every piece of equipment devoted to saving lives and protecting

12 | February 2016

property, exhausting the Forest Service’s budget for fire suppression and forcing the agency to begin transferring critical resources away from trail restoration, watershed management, hiring, and all other areas of its budget. 2015 would prove to be the most expensive fire season in our Department’s history, costing more than $2.6 billion on fire alone.” “That is why last month I directed our staff to end the practice of fire borrowing and slow the consuming growth of fire as a percentage of the Forest Service budget and, instead, ensure that all resources in the 2016 budget are spent in the manner intended, such as the important forest restoration work that helps to minimize wildfires in the first place. Today’s disquieting report should serve as a powerful call to once and for all fix how the Forest Service pays for firefighting. With a predictably long fire season on the horizon in 2016, lives, property and the future of our forests and grasslands hang in the balance. Congress must fix this issue once and for all.” The Forest Service transferred funds in 7 of the last 14 years, while in 6 of the last 14 years, the Interior Department had to transfer funds. The costs of wildfire preparedness and suppression now account for 76 percent of the Interior wildfire management program budget and, as in the case of the Forest Service, reduce the amounts of funds available for fuels management and restoration efforts. These activities are essential for reducing risks of catastrophic fires, increasing the resiliency of lands to recover from fire, and to protect communities and infrastructure. The Administration proposes that Interior and the Forest Service be able to access a discretionary disaster cap adjustment after the amount spent on fire suppression exceeds 70 percent of the 10-year average. This is mirrored in the proposed bi-partisan Wildfire Disaster Funding Act (WDFA) which is budget neutral and also has broad stakeholder support. This approach allows the agencies to invest additional resources in forest and rangeland restoration and management. In the case of the Forest Service, it would increase acres treated by 1 million acres annually and increase timber outputs by 300 million board feet annually. For Interior, it would increase the number of acres treated annually by 500,000 acres and help protect public lands such as the sage steppe ecosystem.

Texas Longhorn Trails


TLBAA Announcements New Advertising Sales Manager Joins TRAILS Staff Join us in welcoming Lindsay Maher as TLBAA’s new Advertising Sales Manager. Lindsay comes to us with over 10 years of Sales & Marketing experience in construction and industrial equipment. Lindsay studied Communications at Texas Wesleyan University where her love for digital strategy and design was born. When she isn’t chasing her three kiddos around she enjoys trying out new recipes and photography. She looks forward to getting to know our members and all things longhorn. “I had such a great time meeting our members, board members, hall of fame inductees, and TLBT youth during Longhorn weekend. The passion they share for the breed is truly inspiring. Everyone has welcomed me with open arms and I look forward to meeting more of

TLBAF Building Fund Recent Donors Kevin and Tracy Kash

our Longhorn family.” said Lindsay We look forward to working with Lindsay and we’re excited about her eagerness to help breeders benefit from available marking opportunities.

T R A E H T E E SW ECIAL SP

Febr uary Marc 1st h 31s 2016 t

Triple N Ranch Ed & Nan Creel Northwest Longhorn Association Clinard Longhorns Greg & Linda Smith Thank You For Your Help and Generous Support! 14 | February 2016

Use H.O.R.N.S. system to register online and pay only $15 for ANY AGE animal Rick Fritsche 817-625-6241 or rick@tlbaa.org Dana Coomer 817-625-6241 or dana@tlbaa.org

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 5


HERD SIRE FEATURE

To Buy or Not 3 Questions to Ask When Making Herd Sire Choices by Myra Basham

You have just left a Longhorn sale or a breeder’s pasture with your first Longhorn females. As you’re driving your new herd home, the next thought is “now I need a bull”. There are three major questions to ask yourself before you decide whether or not to pursue a natural herd sire or to use A.I. only for your program.

1.

Am I prepared to house and care for a bull on my property?

Longhorns are often noted for their gentleness, but always remember a bull is deserving of your respect at all times, and when he’s got work to do he may not remember his manners. His regard for you in the pasture and for fencing may not always be his highest priority if there are cows in heat nearby. If you have never handled cattle, it would be wise to do a little research reading or talking to other cattle owners on the proper way to handle a bull. And while Longhorns are very aware and usually conscientious with their horns, they do require different handling solutions at times. Adequate fencing is a must. If your budget does not allow for sturdy fencing along with the time and the budget to make immediate repairs of the same quality, then you may not want to keep a bull on your property. Cross-fencing will be necessary if you plan to control what time of year your cows calve or if you want to alternate more than one bull with more than one group of females. It is often recommended to quarantine a bull for 30 days to ensure he brings no diseases in with him and, especially with young bulls, to get acclimated to new surroundings before turning them out with the cows. Windbreaks or shelters are a must in any 16 | February 2016

secondary lots or pastures as well as the main pasture your females will be in. You need to think ahead to what could happen if he gets through a fence and in with someone else’s cattle. Some bulls live their life and never go through a fence, but you must realize that it is always a possibility as long as there are any other cattle in the area. You need to consider potential liability issues for any neighbor’s cows bred or property damage if your bull gets out. If you feel you’re prepared for a bull on premises, then you can decide to own a bull to keep on your herd year round, or to lease or partner on a bull for use for certain times of the year.

2.

What are my options if I decide owning a bull is not for me?

Many people do not want the cost and time investment of using artificial insemination (A.I.) or they just prefer natural breeding methods. While semen cost is reasonable, unless you’re able to handle the A.I. process yourself, there is

Texas Longhorn Trails


To Buy?

Photo courtesy of Dylan Pfizenmaier expense involved in paying someone to perform the procedure, and if you have quite a few cows that can add up quickly. There are options other than buying a bull outright. Forming a partnership with one or more people will allow you to own a higher quality sire, as well as only have a bull on your property part-time or to simply haul your cows to him depending on your agreement with your partner(s). Leasing a bull for a specified time may allow you the same options, depending on the terms of the owner. There are sires available for pasture breeding for a fee and many allow you to bring the cows to them. Keeping your herd health records up-to-date and making sure the bull you’re considering has up-to-date health records is a must when using any form of sharing. Remember, when entering into any agreement, whether it is a partnership, leasing or even someone simply loaning you a bull without exchange of money,

always get the details in writing. This protects not only you, but the other party as well.

3.

How do I choose a herd sire?

While the logistics of keeping a bull, leasing or paying for pasture breeding when needed are important, the harder question for many is how to find the sire that both fits their budget and helps obtain their goals. There are lots of traits in Longhorns that are desirable to all breeders, including good conformation, gentle disposition and reproductive ability. Other traits may vary in importance in each program such as pedigree, color, horn length or type and overall size of the animal. Before looking at any sire, think about your goals. What type of Longhorn do you want in your program?

Texas Longhorn Trails

February 2016 | 17


HERD SIRE FEATURE Once you’ve determined the traits you want to see with a varied group of breeders, allowing you to choose in offspring, go online, look at sale catalogs and magyour direction with more input. If you only make one azine ads and visit some breeders. When you find a ranch visit or attend one type of event, it can limit your herd with females similar to yours and offspring that vision when choosing what type of cattle you want to are what you’d like to see in your herd, look at the herd produce. sire. Look at his overall characteristics and then look Even if you only plan to just turn a bull out on a few into his pedigree. Look at the pedigrees of the offspring cows and sell the offspring or market the beef, don’t as well and pay attention to the dam’s side. Some lines just buy the first cheap sire you come across. You at may cross better than others with a particular sire. This least want the basics of sound conformation and his is the information you want to start your search with. health verified in order for him to do his job successIf you are not familiar with reading pedigrees, find a fully and to avoid exposing your females to disease. more experienced breeder in your area to help you get A breeding soundness exam (BSE) is an examination started. performed by a veterinarian on a bull to verify fertility. Now that you know what type of sire you would It includes checking scrotal circumference, a physical like to find, take a look at the budget. This is when you exam for structural soundness and a semen evaluation. may decide that the partner or lease option is more apIf your bull source cannot produce a BSE performed pealing than an outright purchase, if the type of bull within the past year look elsewhere or insist the bull you would like to have is out of your price range. Anhave one before any deals are struck. Time and money other option is to look for younger herd sire prospects wasted on an infertile bull cannot be regained. Any sire within the same genetic you already own should be pool that have not proven evaluated once a year for themselves yet or they are as long as he is servicing out of a full or half-brother cows. that is not as well known. Resale value is another Planning on what type reason not to rush and of sire to breed to can simply by the cheapest be overwhelming if you bull. If your herd is small are new to the breed. Afand you want new geter you have done a little netics after a generation research into the indusor two or if you change try, find a breeder whose direction with your proprogram appears to share gram, you want to be able your goals and contact recoup some money when them. Most breeders are you sell the bull you’re rehappy to give advice or placing. When you make talk your through the prothe first purchase, buy as cess they used in making much solid quality as your herd sire decisions. Their budget allows and who advice can also cover anyknows, if he proves himthing from proper fencself in your herd you may ing to breeding options come out ahead if you deand how to move forward cide to sell him. while staying within your There are many rebudget. It is always a good sources that delve deeper idea to talk to those who into herd sire selection. have been there, done Your local extension agent that. is a good resource as well Attend different types as free publications put of Longhorn events. Futuout by university agriculrities, affiliate shows, sales ture departments. And, as and field days will expose always, those who already It is always better to take the time to you to all types of Longown Longhorns are an inthink through your options and goals horn breeding programs valuable source of inforand help you cross paths mation. before making a herd sire investment. 18 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


Home of

Trinity R3 Co-owner Little Ace Cattle Co.

TRIPLE R RANCH R3Ranch@aol.com

San Angelo, Texas

Robert & Kim Richey 325/942-1198

Jim & Carolyn Van Duzee 817-491-1423 China Spring, Texas

CAPACHE

www.JandCLonghorns.com

Calpat Longhorns

Cal Monger • 512-970-6725 calmonger@yahoo.com

Texas Longhorn Trails

Son of Watson 145 & Calpat’s Breezy Coupland Texas

Laughing Hawk Ranch

Deborah Billings • 512-731-7154 lildebibee@yahoo.com

January 2016 | 45


EPDs Benefit

Terminal Production Systems by

Robert Wells

Surprisingly, I still find that many producers do not use expected progeny differences (EPDs) as a primary selection tool for their bull. Many select their next herd bull based only on physical appearance or a perceived ability to perform, or low birth weight. In other words, does he have a well-balanced body with plenty of muscling, yet look like he will be easy on calving? Several purebred breeders have said that the only question most of their customers have is “Is the bull calving ease?” These buyers typically complain that EPDs are confusing to use or that they don’t work. With some basic knowledge, however, utilizing EPDs can be easy and beneficial to all cattle operations. Typically, when a producer reports that EPDs don’t work, it is usually because they selected a bull with the wrong expectations for a particular EPD. The first thing one must determine is in which direction, higher or lower, a particular trait is desired. The following is a brief list of some EPD traits and the typical target direction for terminal production systems. Each breed association has numerous other EPDs they measure. The inclusion or exclusion of traits does not necessarily imply significance of a particular trait. However, the following list is common among most breeds and is important to consider in a terminal production system. A terminal production system does not retain and develop replacement heifers, and typically sells off the ranch to the next segment of the industry or retains ownership through the feeding phase.

Performance EPD Traits

Calving Ease, Calving Ease Direct (CE, CED): A high CE score will indicate less potential for dystocia or calving problems. This trait takes into account both calf birth weight and calving score data, which ranges from one to four. The higher the value, the better. Use this EPD instead of just the birth weight EPD since it 20 | February 2016

takes into account other factors such as frame size of the calf and relative difficulty of the calving process. Birth Weight (BW): Lower numbers are more desirable. Birth weight EPD is an indicator trait in pounds of calving ease in heifers. The differences between two bull BW EPDs is the average expectation of difference in pounds of calf weight. The genetic relationship between birth weight and calving ease is high (0.76); however, it is not perfect. This is the reason CE is a better indicator for calving ease than birth weight. Weaning Weight (WW): Typically for most terminal production systems, a higher value is more desirable. A production system developing and retaining its own replacements would typically want to moderate this trait. This indicator is measured in pounds and is an indication of the sire’s ability to pass on weaning growth to his offspring. Yearling Weight (YW): Typically for most terminal production systems, a higher value is more desirable. However, a production system developing and retaining its own replacements would typically want to moderate this trait. This indicator is measured in pounds and is an indication of the sire’s ability to pass on growth between weaning and a year of age to his offspring.

Carcass EPD Traits

Marbling (Marb): This is the difference between marbling scores of progeny for one sire compared to another. Typically, a higher Marb EPD value is more desirable in a terminal production system. Fat Thickness (Fat, BF): This is the measure, in inches, of the 12th rib external fat difference from one sire compared to another. Typically, a moderate value is better, depending on the breed of choice. Ribeye Area (RE): This trait is measured in square inches and is the difference in ribeye area of a sire’s offspring relative to another sire of the same breed. Smaller-framed breeds would benefit from larger values, while larger continental breeds will want to moderate this trait but remain above breed average. EPD values are not directly comparable across breeds. However, across-breed EPD adjustments can be made to compare a particular bull in one breed to another bull in a different breed. Remember, single trait selection is dangerous and can have unintended consequences. Furthermore, recognize that selection for extremes in a specific direction for any trait can change mature cow size or production efficiency over time. Select multiple traits that have economic significance for your operation, and develop a plan to use them to meet market goals of the ranch.

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 45


Herd Health

Health Care and Vaccinations for Bulls by

Heather Smith Thomas

Some diseases affect reproduction, in bulls as well as in cows. It’s best to try to prevent these diseases by making sure the cows and bulls have adequate immunity before breeding season. Dr. Tom Hairgrove (Extension Veterinarian, Animal Science, at Texas A&M) says producers need to sit down with their own practitioner and design a vaccination program that fits their own situation. “You may have different risks, and different expectations than some other ranch. The risks for disease may depend on who your neighbor is. If it’s a retired person with a herd of llamas, the risks will be a lot different than if your neighbor is a cattle trader, always bringing new animals into the pastures next to yours.” If there are some unvaccinated animals or cattle with unknown disease history that might get in with your cattle, the risks are higher. “Perhaps your neighbor has a lot of at-risk cattle, or perhaps you purchase at-risk cattle. Where do you get your replacement heifers? When you purchase replacement females do you know anything about their herd of origin? Where do you get your bulls, and do you know anything about their herd of origin? All of these questions are important when you start to put together a program for vaccination,” he says. Every vaccination program starts with calves, to build a foundation for later immunity to disease. This is especially important if you keep heifers or bulls for breeding purposes. “All calves should be vaccinated against blackleg (included in the 7 or 8-way clostridial vaccines), and in the Gulf Coast states I always recommend that people use a clostridial combination that includes C. hemolyticum which causes redwater. Not every region has a problem, but liver flukes are often an issue.” The flukes damage the liver and open the way for infection with this clostridial pathogen. Producers need to assess their risk for liver flukes and use a combination vaccine that covers redwater disease if there is any chance for a problem. All of the clostridial diseases are deadly, and it’s not worth taking a chance, because the vaccine is relatively cheap. “The thing ranchers need to be aware of is what’s actually in those combination vaccines. We talk about a 7-way

and an 8-way, but different products may contain different combinations. To some people, the 8-way vaccine is the one with tetanus in it, whereas an 8-way to someone else might mean the one with hemolyticum (redwater) in it,” he says. “Select the clostridial vaccine that fits your area. Some places there are risks for tetanus, and that should be included. “World War I was the first time there was very much experience with tetanus in humans. When soldiers were fighting in Belgium—in farming areas where there were a lot of horses and horse manure in the fields for hundreds of years—there was lots of exposure to tetanus because that was the first war where soldiers suffered many wounds from shrapnel. This is

when tetanus antitoxin was first employed to protect wounded soldiers, which led to later development of tetanus toxoid vaccine that could be used to prevent the disease.” Humans and horses are very susceptible to tetanus, but cattle can be also, if they are exposed to a high level of infection. “When I was in practice I worked in a couple of areas that were very risky for tetanus. One rancher lost several calves just doing routine knife castration. Not every ranch will have this risk, but this just illustrates the need for developing a vaccination program that fits your ranch and your risks,” says Hairgrove. “In Texas I recommend giving the cow herd a Clostridial booster once a year just to provide protection for the calf via colostrum. Sometimes we also have adult animals die of C. chauvoei (blackleg) and it may be atypical and affect the heart muscle rather than the – Continued on pg 24

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-Continued from pg 22

“When I was in vet school the general wisdom was skeletal muscles. The rancher kicks the carcass and that we didn’t need to vaccinate the bulls—just the doesn’t detect the cardboard crinkle that is typical of cows. “Actually there has been research with the oilblackleg in calves, and doesn’t realize it was an interbased products to show that you can potentially clear nal problem. We documented several of these cases in infection in bulls with that, if you up the dose. You practice, so I think it’s wise to vaccinate cattle annually could talk to your vet about this, for clostridial diseases,” he says. if vibrio might be a risk in your The viral diseases are also an isherd,” he says. If trich might be sue and he recommends giving IBRan issue, bulls can be tested for BVD vaccines. It’s important to have trich ahead of the breeding seagood immunity in the herd prior to son, and infected bulls should be breeding. The big question is when culled. to give these vaccinations. There is also some risk in vacVaccine selection is also imporcinating cows and bulls the day tant. “Some people just go down to No vaccination program is you turn the bulls out. It’s better the feed store and want a vaccine for effective unless the vaccine is to vaccinate at least 2 or 3 weeks everything. This may not be good, viable. Purchase it from a repahead, in case any of those anihowever, because you can get into utable supplier, so you know mals have a reaction (such as a problems if you double up too many it has been properly refrigbit of inflammation, fever, etc.) gram negative vaccines. Too much erated in transit and before especially if you are using a is not always better,” explains Hairyou bought it. Then store it modified live virus (MLV) vacgrove. at your place in a refrigerator cine. This could interfere with Assess your risk and then choose that will keep it in the proper fertility and conception. the appropriate vaccines. “Is BVD temperature range. Maybe “Other vaccines that are coma risk? Yes. Then you need to unyou have an older refrigerator monly employed include pinkderstand a little bit about the disin the barn that used to be at eye. There is nothing wrong ease, because just vaccinating for Grandma’s house, or was one with that product, but make sure it—without understanding the imyour wife didn’t like and you you really need it, because it’s portance of management—may not got a new one. “The temperaanother gram negative. You may be adequate. If a person is buying ture on some of those older not want to give it at the same new heifers all the time and throwrefrigerators may fluctuate time as a lot of other gram negaing them in with the herd with no so much that the vaccine is tive vaccines,” says Hairgrove. knowledge of their background, frozen. If the killed vaccine Ranchers should not neglect this could skew the whole thing. No gets frozen it can cause serito vaccinate their bulls. Even vaccine is 100% protective,” he says. ous problems and make cattle though reproductive losses are Biosecurity can make a big difsick. And if any vaccine gets mainly in females, the bulls need ference. Are you raising your own too warm it may not be any to be on the same vaccination heifers or are you buying them, and good,” says Hairgrove. You program to make sure they are if so, where do they come from? “I might have an excellent vachealthy and won’t spread disease always talk about this with produccination program planned to the cows. It is important to ers but also recommend that they out, but if the vaccine is not start the bull’s vaccination provaccinate for BVD and IBR. If your viable, you may be wasting gram early (just like you would replacement heifers come into your your time and money. for replacement females) if you breeding program with good immuare raising bulls. “You need to nity, this is the foundation for future be careful which vaccines you immunity. “Boosters are necessary put into a young bull before he each year, but it’s all about getting reaches puberty, however. You can use MLV vaccine that initial foundation—just like giving little kids their for IBR/BVD, but do not use a non-cytopathic MLV shots before they go to school,” he says. BVD vaccine in young bulls--because a non-cytopathHe also recommends using vibrio vaccination ic BVD vaccine given to bulls before puberty can cause (campylobacter), especially if you don’t have a closed a chronic testicular infection. I stress the fact that only herd or don’t know the status of your neighbor’s cattle. the non-cytopathic BVD MLV vaccine is associated “The diagnostic tests for vibrio are not very good. Clinwith this problem. There is only one of those products ically, trich and vibrio look alike. The bull shows no still on the market, but this can cause a problem in presigns and the cow usually doesn’t show much (maybe pubertal bulls,” he says. When designing a vaccination a little discharge if you look closely), but you just disprogram for young bulls you need to discuss it with cover you have more open cows or late-calving cows your veterinarian and determine your risks. for next year,” says Hairgrove.

VACCINE CARE AND STORAGE

24 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 5


Inspecting Brands and Rangering Excerpted from Chapter II of Longhorn Legacy: Graves Peeler and the Texas Cattle Trade by Lawrence Clayton Grady Peeler’s return from soldiering in World War I left Graves free to pursue other options, and like his father, he went to work as a brand inspector for the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (T.S.C.R.A.). Graves was ideally suited by personality and background for this work. Leonard Stiles, who served the King Ranch for long years as cattle manager for the Santa Gertrudis Division, said, “Graves was a naturalborn lawman.”- Jack Phillips, a South Texas cowman, stated that Peeler “was one of the finest cattle detectives the T.S.C.R.A. ever had.” Phillips goes on to say that Peeler had “an eagle eye, . . . which made him an excellent tracker and marksman.”; Aggressive and fiercely independent, Peeler had the initiative to work alone and the drive to be successful in his demanding and dangerous job. His “tools” came to include a good pair of binoculars; a pistol; a rifle; a horse, which he later traded for a car; ample patience; and an abundance of courage. His first assignment was at the stockyards in Laredo for just over a year.- Then he was transferred to San Antonio for about a month before he moved to the Fort Worth yards for about three months. Then he began his career as a field inspector. E. B. Spillers, secretary of the Association, sent Peeler on his first field assignment to Barber’s Hill to investigate a case that Peeler found common as a mode of rustling cattle. Because branded cattle would be detected if sold alive on the hoof, the man slaughtered the cattle and sold them as beef and hid the hides. But Peeler quickly discovered the method of operation, caught the man butchering an animal belonging to an Association member, and was able to get a conviction in court that sent the man to the penitentiary. His next case involved a man rustling cattle along the Trinity River. At this time, Graves worked alongside two other inspectors, G. A. Stoner and Jack Eckols. They watched a man from Houston and his hands pen some steers under a large shed. The next morning Peeler observed the men kill one of the steers and begin skinning it. Peeler got the drop on the men with his rifle. The Houston man, realizing that he had been caught in the act, offered the three lawmen $12,000 to let him go. Naturally, the men refused his offer. Peeler is quoted as saying, “He’s our prisoner, and he’s going to have to face the music.” The rustler then made his last effort-he made the sign of a Mason in trouble. The other two men with Peeler were not Masons and did not recog26 | February 2016

nize the sign, but Peeler, who was a member of the group, responded to the man that he should leave the cause of the Masons out of this incident. Several hides belonging to Association members were found in the man’s hide house, so the man was indicted. Although he was tried twice, a jury conviction was never forthcoming. Peeler always felt that the man bought his way out of the incident. Many of Peeler’s arrests were not as calm as these already recounted. In the case of a Cajun named Tibadeaux, the arrest almost brought an end to Peeler’s life. It did end the rustler’s days. The incident took place in Liberty County, where the rustler and his two teenage sons were stealing cattle from at least two members of the Association, F.Y. Dew and Bassett Blakly. The three rustlers owned a few gentle cattle and held them on almost 200 acres of fenced range. To steal the cattle, the men let the fence down, drove their gentle cattle out onto open range, and then added other cattle to the herd. Then the men drove all the animals back onto the fenced range and re-erected their fence. Through his binoculars, Peeler observed this practice and waited for the time to act. One day he saw the two boys drive a cow into a pen. The father shot the cow three or four times and then urged his three dogs to attack her. Once the dogs knocked her down, the men finished her off with an ax. Then the sons began butchering her while the father hid behind a downed pine tree to act as lookout. Peeler moved in to make the arrest. He quietly approached the two skinners from the rear and aimed his rifle at them. Telling them to sit down, he demanded that one of the boys call the father from the hiding place behind the tree. The boy did so, but because of the tall weeds, Peeler could not see for sure what the man was doing. Peeler got the drop on the father and demanded that the man lay down the rifle that he was carrying. The man pretended to be putting his gun down but suddenly turned and fired at Peeler. The shot shattered Peeler’s ear. Peeler returned the fire and hit the man in the abdomen. Because he considered the man dangerous, Peeler put two rounds from his six shooter into the man and killed him. The boys ran to the house for protection. To avoid shooting them in the back, Peeler let them go. From in-

Texas Longhorn Trails


side the house the family sicced the three large dogs as to investigate theft of cattle from the Elsinore Catthat had downed the cow on Peeler. He shot one in the tle Company. Peeler rode the fence line of this ranch mouth as it tried to bite him and another in the head. and deduced that rustlers had removed staples from a The third one recognized the danger and fled the scene. barbed wire fence, let the wire down, driven the cattle The boys and the mother then ran out the back door of across, and put the staples back into the same holes to the house and made their way to a neighboring ranch. hide the act. They had been careful to protect the staPeeler waited for help to arrive. Dew, one of the ples with a piece of leather when reinserting them so ranchers whose cattle had been stolen, and his fore- that the staples would not be marred by the hammer. man rode in. They feared an ambush and left without Peeler followed the trail to the rustler’s hideout. contacting Peeler. By 11:00 P.M., Peeler saw no point About a quarter of a mile from a house were several in waiting any longer. Blood-stained and assaulted by unbranded calves tied in a heavy screen of mesquite swarms of mosquitos, he mounted his horse and rode brush. The rustlers kept the calves tied up during the to a set of pens some distance away. There a Negro day, but they penned the animals for feed and water at named Roach awaited him. Peeler then went to nearby night. When the herd grew to thirty or more, the men Devers for treatment of his hauled the animals to a ear. buyer. With what he had He had broken the opseen, Peeler had all of the eration by killing the father, evidence he needed. and no charges were filed At daybreak the next against the two boys or their morning, Peeler and mother. Later the two sons several lawmen includtook up their father’s ways, ing Ranger Captain Will got caught, and were sent to Wright moved in to arprison. They loudly voiced rest the culprits. When their threats to kill Peeler for the lawmen approached, killing their father. When two of the men saw them they were released from and bolted to release the prison, Peeler saw them on a calves but were appredowntown street, borrowed hended. The rustler, that a pistol from the local shersame man with whom iff, and went to confront the Peeler had had the conmen. They saw him comfrontation in Post, was aring and abandoned their rested, still in bed. Peeler planned revenge. They had retrieved the man’s pisseen Peeler in action and tol from underneath the wanted no further experiman’s pillow. All three ence with the quick-witted men got a free ride to lawman. Fort Stockton, and the Not all of Peeler’s arrests hungry calves were rehad negative long-term returned to their mothers. sults. Peeler had a run-in The head rustler was later with a troublesome man in sentenced to ten years in Post, Texas, in the first of prison. Graves Peeler & Jack Phillips Peeler’s dealings with several dealings with the man. The man had a reputation for rustling stock and the man, whom he named only as Smith in his interwas known to have killed one man. He was so direct in view with Jane Pattie, continued at the Ramsey Prishis dealings with others that he had run off one brand on Farm, where the man was incarcerated. In time the inspector, and Peeler was called in to replace the man man became a trusty and was put in charge of some of who had left. When Peeler and a Texas Ranger named the livestock on the farm. Some years later when Peeler Light Townsend, along with another inspector named was working for the Nash Ranch located near the farm, Cooksey, were attempting to talk to the owner of the he saw the man again. He gave Peeler some interesting stolen cattle in question, the rustler and some of his information. He confided in Peeler that the manager men confronted Peeler’s group in an automobile repair and another trusty were stealing cattle from the stateowned herd. This case took an interesting twist. shop in Post. Through an informant that had been bootlegging The incident proved a bloodless face-off. Peeler’s lack of fear was likely one of the factors that kept the whiskey to guards at Ramsey before he was doublesituation from erupting into bloodshed. The situation crossed by his partner and sentenced to Ramsey, Peeler was so tense that Cooksey quit his work as a brand in- got inside evidence on the case and moved in to make the arrests. He got a man named Dan Hines, a special spector. Later Peeler went to Fort Stockton in far West Tex- deputy to Sheriff Benford, to go – Continued on pg 30

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2 | January 2016

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-Continued from pg 27

with the bootlegger, who was now released, to pick up some stolen cattle at Ramsey. The thieves did not oppose the loading of the cattle but had a special surprisethey cut a tree that fell across the road and prepared to ambush the truck and kill the occupants. Peeler’s luck held here; he was in the hospital with kidney stones and missed the trip. Because the thieves could not kill all three men, they elected not to kill only two and risk certain punishment for this additional crime. But the affair did not end here. The sheriff in Angleton arrested the two men in the truck Hines and the bootlegger and refused to release them. Peeler went to check the situation and saw the problem. He called Ranger Captain Frank Hamer, with whom he worked on more than one occasion. Hamer intervened, and the men were quickly released. Peeler’s old enemy had proved himself, but he was not through. Not long after this case closed, the man was summoned to testify in a lawsuit between two cattlemen. The attorney, Dayton Moses, secured the man’s release to testify, because the man knew the circumstances of the case. His testimony so inspired the attorney that the lawyer was able to get the man released to the T.S.C.R.A. and himself and made him a brand inspector. Because he was experienced in the activity, the former rustler proved to be one of the most effective inspectors the Association had. His reputation became so widespread that he was able to warn some thieves to leave the lawless side, and they did. This incident with this thief-turned-lawman extended over several years and proved that Peeler was an astute judge of character as well as one willing to forgive and forget, under the right circumstances. He never compromised his principles. In 1928, the Association sent Peeler to Arizona to work for a time. The work he did there had the same adventurous spirit and careful law enforcement drive that characterized his work in Texas. The ranch on which the rustling was a problem was the Double Circle, an outfit owned by a partnership of men, some of whom were members. of the Association. Their range included more than 1000 square miles of rough country in the White Mountains near Clifton, Arizona. The men had purchased 10,000 head of branded cattle already on the range and all of the unbranded cattle running there as well, an estimated 8,000 to 10,000 additional head. These unbranded cattle were a real lure to thieves, especially in the isolated and rough country, which thieves who knew it used to their advantage. Although the range was fenced, there was no cross-fencing. A few line camps, holding traps, and wild cow traps dotted the range. To begin his investigation Peeler accompanied Billy

McGill, a cowboy on the ranch, to camp on Eagle Creek, an area where the rustlers were working. McGill had neglected to pack the grain for the horses, so when he returned to the headquarters for the needed feed, Peeler patrolled along an area where the thieves were known to work. He soon detected their simple method of operation. He saw that two men had roped some yearlings and led them out. Their efforts to camouflage their activity included wrapping burlap around the feet of both horses and yearlings to make their trail in the January snow less apparent. Once safely outside the border fence, the men took the burlap off and rode on to their camp with the stolen cattle led by the horses. Peeler found evidence where the thieves had slaughtered one of the animals, and because he was an experienced tracker, he even recognized the tracks of a mountain lion, which had followed the men. He also found their camp, their supplies, and the other stolen yearlings. Fortunately for them, the men were gone when Peeler found the camp. Peeler hurried back to his camp and laid his plan out to McGill, who had returned to camp by this time. The next morning the two went to the rustlers’ camp and retrieved the stolen cattle. Then they filed charges on the two rustlers, men known to the management. Two ensuing trials with hung juries dismayed Peeler, but the thieves agreed to leave the area, a victory of sorts for the Association. Peeler was then sent to another area of the ranch located on Black River. There he found some wild cow traps set to capture cattle. These traps, featuring a V shaped trap gate, lured cattle in with salt and kept them from escaping. Peeler found one with about forty head trapped inside. The cowboy whose responsibility it was to ride that area had neglected his duties for several days, and the rustlers took advantage of him. Early the next morning Peeler was at the trap with the cowboy when the rustlers rode up. Peeler was as cool as the brisk morning. He confronted the men with the information that these cattle were Double Circle cattle threatened them with legal charges for trapping the cattle, and then convinced two of them to help him brand the mavericks with the Double Circle mark. Peeler became friends with the leader of the rustlers and some weeks later, spent the night in his camp. Peeler remained in Arizona for almost two years and worked with ranchers on problems with rustlers. After he had returned to Texas from Arizona he got a call from E. B. Spiller about a rustling operation in Fort Bend County. Peeler went to the range indicated b Albert George, a director of the Asso– Continued on pg 32

“Peeler was an astute judge of character as well as one willing to forgive and forget”

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-Continued from pg 30

ciation a Richmond. He observed the rustler working in the usual method of driving gentle cows out onto a range and returning with his own cattle and some of the stolen ones. In this case, a fellow inspector named Sid Baird worked with Peeler. The three of them got three cows and marked them with a brand they could positively identify. They then planted these cattle in the pasture where the rustler kept the animals he would later slaughter. One evening Peeler saw the rustler pen some cattle with one of those specially marked ones in the herd. That night a big thunderstorm hit, so Peeler, who was working alone at the time, sought shelter in the hayloft of the barn. Early the next morning, Peeler observed the rustler and two men who helped him come to the pen to slaughter the cow. He watched the activity through a crack in the barn wall, but he also had to keep his eye on the house because the rustler’s wife was there and might pose a threat to him. Peeler crept out of the loft and approached the site of the skinning. The rustler demanded Peeler’s identity, and Peeler responded simply that he was a brand inspector. He instructed the men to continue skinning the cow and indicated that when they had completed the task, he would take them and the evidence to authorities. The leader then challenged Peeler to lay down the pistol he was carrying so that he could “whip hell” out of the inspector. Peeler declined the option and threatened to make the man’s stomach “look like a piece of screen wire” if he gave any more trouble. Once the task of skinning the cow was completed, Peeler had the men load all of the evidence into the rustler’s pickup and took it to a butcher shop in Needville. Peeler instructed the butcher that the animal was stolen and that the butcher was to keep the evidence in the cooler at the butcher shop. When a search warrant was executed on the rustler’s hide house, seventy-eight hides were discovered, all belonging to ranchers other than the rustler. When the case finally came to trial, the rustler had hired a lawyer who was determined to get charges against his client dropped. He failed. After the man was convicted on the first Count and sentenced to four years in prison, the guilty man’s lawyer wanted the Association to drop the other charges. Peeler insisted that the rustler be tried on all ten counts. The attorney kept Peeler on the witness stand for almost three hours and tried every way he could to confuse Peeler’s testimony. When he was unable to rattle Peeler, the lawyer simply charged that the inspectors were “a bigger menace to the public than hijackers” and that they “were always so eager to use their pistols that they were a menace.” Peeler made a mental note of the outrageous charge,

and after the court had recessed for the evening, Peeler went to get something to eat. As he sat in the restaurant, he saw the lawyer and his client walking his way. Handing his six-shooter to the cashier and instructing her to put it under the counter, Peeler walked out and faced the two men. He confronted the lawyer and voiced his resentment for the caustic remark made to the jury. Then Peeler punctuated his feelings with a slap to the side of the man’s head. A crowd, including the sheriff and his deputy, gathered to watch the fight. A large man grabbed Peeler’s arm from behind and at that point the lawyer was able to free his arms and deliver a blow to Peeler’s face. Peeler simply braced himself against the man who was holding him and kicked the lawyer in the stomach and turned him over backwards. Undaunted, the lawyer jumped up and attempted to strike Peeler again but instead hit the man who was holding the inspector. The man then freed Peeler, and the lawyer lost interest in continuing the fight. The court proceedings continued, and on the second count the rustler got another four-year term. On the third count, two more years were added to his sentence. One of the ranchers involved was then approached by other men in the area who asked him not to press the charges further. Because the rustler had a total of ten years prison sentence for his activities and did have a wife and child, the ranchers and Peeler decided to prosecute no further. The rustler, however, refused to give up. He vowed that when he got out of the penitentiary, he would kill Peeler. Years later, the man was out of prison and came face to face with Peeler. Undaunted, Peeler confronted him by repeating the threat the man hado uttered. The man, apparently not recognizing Peeler after all those years had passed, at first claimed not to remember the threat. Peeler identified himself and reminded the man of his threat. He then invited the man to go get a gun and come back and settle the argument. At this point, the man begged Peeler not to kill him. He admitted that Peeler had told nothing but the truth on the witness stand and asked the brand inspector to forget the whole incident. In another case, in Matagorda County, Peeler had an easy time of getting the evidence he needed for a conviction because of kindness to a young Mexican boy to whom Peeler had given some candy. The boy’s father would reveal no information, but when Peeler asked the boy where the hides were, he indicated that they were buried in the hide house. Peeler discovered that the man had rolled each hide into a slender bundle, inserted it in a hole dug with post – Continued on pg 34

“The incident proved a bloodless face-off.”

32 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


2 | January 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


-Continued from pg 32

hole diggers, and covered the hole. Then he wet the soil and brushed over it to conceal the location. Peeler was able to get a conviction in this case as well. During his later years with the T.S.C.R.A. and even after he had left the Association, Peeler held an appointment as a Texas Ranger, the elite force of Texas law enforcement. He first served as a Private after enlisting on May 22, 1926, and re-enlisted on February 19, 1927. Peeler was forty years of age at the time. The enlisting officer named on his record was Gen. Dallas J. Matthews. Peeler gave his occupation at the time as “stockman,” and his duty station is listed as Campbellton. No unit is mentioned, but the document lists the Texas Cattle Raisers Association. Peeler again joined the force for one year on January 27, 1931, after he had left the Association and started his next career. The documents indicate that he was assigned as a Special Member of the Ranger Force, and his occupation is indicated to be “ranchman.” In the remarks section of the document is indication that his term of service was extended to January 20, 1933. Events in which Peeler participated as a Ranger are not so well documented as are his other activities. One source does state that Ranger Frank Hamer asked Peeler to help him track down and capture the notorious Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker. Peeler asked if Hamer intended to offer them the chance to surrender when he caught up with the gun-happy couple, and Hamer responded in the negative. Hamer knew only too well that their pattern was to shoot their way out of any traps into which they might wander. Peeler refused to accompany Hamer because he felt that the sense of fair play required that the subject be offered the chance to surrender, or the lawmen were guilty of murder. Hamer went his own way and led in the ambush that killed the two. But Peeler had his principles. In an interview with W. K. Daetwyler, Peeler recounted another case on which he worked with Hamer.- The Ranger captain was sent to investigate an instance in which two men named Dumas and Wood had lured some men erroneously labeled as bank robbers into a trap in which a sheriff named Reeder and a deputy from Odessa killed them for the $5,000 reward money offered for bank robbers dead or alive. Hamer arrested Dumas and Wood and jailed them in Austin. The two men refused to reveal any information because, Peeler said, Hamer “went at them the wrong way.” Dumas, who had worked as an undercover man for the T.S.C.R.A., asked that Peeler be brought in. Peeler entered the cell holding the two men, but a guard stood

34 | February 2016

a short distance away. After a long conversation, Peeler convinced Dumas that Hamer wanted to punish the guilty sheriff and deputy, not the two men in jail. Under Peeler’s influence, Dumas confessed. Once this information had been gained, Hamer insisted that Peeler accompany him to Odessa to confront the two corrupt lawmen. After questioning the sheriff for about two hours, Hamer asked to see the deputy. He was told that the deputy was at the jail in Rankin. Hamer took Peeler in the Ranger’s car and headed to Rankin. Along the way a car sped past them, and Peeler recognized Reeder. It was clear that the sheriff hoped to get to Rankin ahead of the pair and set a trap for the two investigators. Hamer had a plan to the contrary, however. He and Peeler went to the hotel, not the jail, and called the two men on the telephone. The message was clear the two men should come to the hotel. The confrontation was set. In an Old West style face-off, the two investigators sat in the hotel lobby, one watching one door and the other keeping a steady eye on the other door. Both men sat with their backs to the wall and their hands on their pistols. Suddenly the two men burst in separate doors and confronted their antagonists. The four stood face to face for a time and “bristled” at each other. Hamer invited the sheriff to draw, but the man lost his nerve. Both Reeder and the deputy darted from the hotel, and Hamer and Peeler let them go. The two Rangers had all of the information needed at this point. The two allegedly corrupt lawmen were indicted but never convicted on the charges. Dumas and Wood, however, were convicted and sent to prison, but Hamer secured their release after they had served only two years of prison time. Once again Peeler participated in a dangerous situation requiring skill and nerve and out alive. Cattle rustling and other crimes continued to plague ranchers and law enforcement officers as ‘well. By 1930, however, Peeler had decided to make a change. The contribution that Peeler made certainly belongs to the best efforts of these rugged individuals who risk their lives in stopping thieves whose crimes can run ranchers out of business because the cattle stolen are often the profit margin that allows the rancher to remain in business. For full copy of the book “Longhorn Legacy: Graves Peeler and the Texas Cattle Trade” by Lawrence Clayton and published by Cowboy Press ©1994 Visit www.texaslonghornconservancy.org

Texas Longhorn Trails


TEXAS LONGHORN SHOW SHORT COURSE QUIZ

SHOWMANSHIP

AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS

EXTEMPORANEOUS ESSAY

SPEECH CONTEST

ART CONTEST

LIVESTOCK JUDGING

: www.AutobahnYouthTour.com or phone Larry Barker | 817-988-6110 LEARN HOW TO GET INVOLVED

Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 5


Dear TLBT Members, Last month, I'm sure all of you made New Year’s resolutions to push yourselves to be the best you can be, and that's great! I also hope you're keeping in mind our service project and theme. Open your heart this month to people around you, and you will be rewarded with a great feeling. I know that I'll be bringing a box with me to shows, so that people will have a place to donate clean clothes, socks, or canned goods that we'll give to Beautiful Feet ministries. So bring something to donate and let others know about these opportunities to give. With your help I know we can make a difference. Don't forget to tag us in your pictures from throughout the year, especially you seniors! Spring is always the busiest part of the show year, so I'm sure I'll be seeing you guys soon! Sincerely,

for

8 g. 3 News! p e Se LBT eT mor

Shelby Rooker, TLBT President and study here often, because QUIZ BOWL PREP Read throughout the year questions, answers and information found here could be on the Quiz Bowl at the Longhorn Expo.

TLBT

How many gallons of water will a 100 pound steer drink per day if the outside temperature is 90°F? A. 17-19 gallons

EVENTS From what side do you lead a longhorn calf? Left side to the Herd Sire article what are three EDITORIAL According main questions to ask yourself before making herd sire choices?

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

TLBT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT

Hailey Neal

TLBT Office: Reporter Age: 14 School: Bryson ISD Number of Years in the TLBT: 4

Why did you join the TLBT? Because I love working with animals and heard about the wonderful opportunities this program offers. What are your favorite memories of the TLBT so far? Going to TLBT Officer Camp, winning my first belt buckle, and getting to travel to different places. How is the TLBT going to help your future career? The scholarships I earn will help me go to college. Do you enjoy showing Texas Longhorn cattle, and why? Yes because I love animals and love that I get to be a part of working with them. They have taught me responsibility and leadership skills I will carry with me throughout my life. What advice would you give to a newcomer in the TLBT? Good luck and have fun.

Just For Fun What do you call a sleeping bull?

The answer will be in next month’s TRAILS Magazine!

by searching Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow Texas Longhorn Trails

Last month’s answer: None February 2016 | 36


Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 5


See pg. 38 for more TLBT N ews!

SHOWMAN OF THE MONTH

Happenings

Colby Mead

How old are you/ what grade are you in/what division do you show in? I am 14 years old in 8th grade and show in the Teen division.

How did you get “hooked” on showing Longhorns? Well, my cousin Daniel Mead got me involved. He told me about the responsibilities you have when you show and I thought it sounded like fun. What is your favorite part about having Texas Longhorns? The responsibility of caring for your animals. Any tips for new showman? Pay attention to what others are telling you when they are giving advice, and learn from it. Mostly pay attention. What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever done at a show? I have a horse named Patches.

38 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 45


NEWS

On the Trail...

Longhorn Photo Wins AAA Texas Photo Contest Submitted by Regina Guthrie

A photo taken by Fred Guthrie of Huntsville, TX, won first prize in a photo contest held by AAA Texas Journey Magazine. The photo, titled “Texas Pride”, features a steer named Boogity, owned by Guthrie’s sister-in-law. “He was a special gift from her late husband, a Texas rancher from Bedias. Boogity’s horn length and natural markings that resemble a stick family and hieroglyphics caught my eye when I took this photo in early 2015.”

TLBAA BRAND REGULATIONS The TLBAA requires that each animal registered have a private herd number and a holding brand. Your registration certificate application contains a space for these brands on the animal, i.e. right hip, left hip, left, etc. The TLBAA does not require that your holding brand be registered with your state agency; however, it is recommended. Registering your brand with the TLBAA does not get your brand registered in the state. State registration varies from state to state. In Texas, you must register your brand at your county clerk’s office. In Mississippi, brands should be registered with the Brands Registrar with the Bureau of the Highway Patrol. Check with your local veterinarian, state cattleman’s association or your county extension agent to locate the agency which registers brands. Also ask them how often your brand must be renewed.

The Private Herd number, PH number, as it is more commonly called, is often misunderstood. The TLBAA office does not assign these numbers. The PH number is your own personal identification system to assist you in keeping each individual animal’s records. Any system can be used. A common practice is the three numeral system. The first number is usually the last numeral of the year date (5 for 2015, for example). The next two numbers are usually in sequence of the arrival of the offspring. For instance, the first calf born in the year 2015 could be 40 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails

numbered 501. With a simple odd/even number modification, a breeder can add more information to his PH numbering system. A common method is to assign bull calves odd numbers and heifers even numbers. For instance, a PH number of 203

could tell a breeder that the animal the number is referring to is the third offspring bull calf born in 2015. The third female offspring would be 204. Remember that private herd numbers must numerals only, not Roman numerals or letters. The PH number is the animal’s permanent number and cannot be changed. The number must be branded on the animal, along with the breeder’s holding brand, before application is submitted to the TLBAA office for registration. A breeder is not allowed to duplicate the same number on two different animals within the same herd.

Anyone requiring assistance with a PH numbering system for their herd should contact the TLBAA office for assistance. If anyone has made an error in assigning PH numbers, you can get assistance from the office in correcting the problem.


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January 2016 | 5


Affiliates send us your news! Let people know what’s going on in their area and encourage others to join in the fun.

The Cattle Baron Premier Longhorn Sale and Winchester Futurity are coming up on February 26th & 27th. We will be accepting futurity consignments through early FebruRick Friedrich ary. The sale has become one of the President rick@riverranchlonghorns best Longhorn sales and the futurity is the original Winchester futurity, so named because the top prizes are Winchester-style rifles. The weekend of events include a Friday night social at George & Peggy Wilhite’s ranch home. If you have ever attended, we know you will be back. If you have not attended, please join us for great Longhorn weekend. You will be making it a regular event. Our Spring Show will be May 6, 7 & 8 at Miracle Farms located near Navasota, TX. The facility has an all weather arena. This will again be one of the qualifying shows for the World Show. We are proud to host one of the best Longhorn shows and we will enjoy seeing every one again. One of our goals is to get new folks involved in our breed. One way that we achieve this is by giving away show calves to young participants that make a one year commitment to show them. We will be accepting donation calves to give away via random drawing at this show. If you have a calf to donate, contact Stephen Head (headshorns@hotmail.com) for details The Gulf Coast Chapter (TLBGCA) of the TLBAA has a finalist in the Affiliate Princess competition to represent our chapter. The competition has been cut down to the top three, so our expectations are high. The heifer representing us is Swag Darlin BCB and she is owned by Brent & Cynthia Bolen. The results will be announced on Longhorn Weekend in Fort Worth. The Longhorn Project at the Johnson Space Center is in progress. They have taken Longhorn cattle to the first of eight shows for this season. The Longhorn Project is a partnership with the Johnson Space Center, Houston Livestock Show, Clear Creek ISD and the TLBGCA. It is a great program for the Longhorn breed, because the cattle are viewed by 750,000 NASA tourists and school kids on field trips each year. This program has helped us get new members started with our breed. It is a win-win deal for the Longhorn cattle breed. Hats off to the Houston Livestock Show - We just received word that they are going to build a new barn for the NASA Longhorn Project. The existing barn will be removed and replaced with a new facility. Wow, what a commitment to our breed! The TLBGCA gives out a handful of scholarships each year at school end. If you are or know a Longhorn family with students that are planning to attend college, please have them join us and apply for a scholarship. Last year we gave a $1,500 scholarship to every student that applied. That was the first year that we have accepted everyone that applied. But, you don’t have a chance if you don’t apply. Additional information can be found on our web site at www.tlbgca. com .

Texas longhorn breeder gulf coast ASSOCIATION

IN THE

PEN

We thank these folks for kindly droppin’ in at the TLBAA office.

1. Amy Walker, Aledo, TX with grandchildren Nolen and Kinley Hons

April Youth Issue Do you have great candids of kids and their Longhorns? Share them with us for the Youth Issue of Trails Magazine. We want to show the world how much fun the kids have with their Longhorns at home and on the road. Send submissions to myra@tlbaa.org and please include the youth’s name. 42 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


2016 Millennium Futurity Belton, Texas May 20 - 21, 2016

GUIDELINE FOR ENTRIES: 1. All cattle must be futurity eligible. 2. All cattle must be TLBAA or ITLA registered. 3. All entries must be paid in full by the due date. 4. No change or substitutions of cattle once entered. 5. Cattle blood tested on a random basis. 6. A non-refundable fee of $250.00 must accompany all protests. 7. Decisions of the judges will be final. 8. The Millennium Futurity Partners are not responsible for accidents to any persons or animals while at the event. 9. Anyone who is proven to have cheated on genetics or age will be banned for life from the Millennium Futurity or any of its events. ********************************* The total amount of the entry fee is $300.00. A nomination fee of $150.00 is due on or before February 15, 2016. A final payment of $150.00 is due on or before April 15, 2016. For animals nominated after February 15, 2016, a late fee of $100 will be applied. Absolutely no entries will be accepted after April 15, 2016.  

Millennium Futurity 2016 Classes 14 Divisions

BULLS Class 1............................Oct. 1, 2015 – Dec. 31, 2015 Class 2 ......................... July 1, 2015 – Sept. 30, 2015 Class 3 .........................April 1, 2015 – June 30, 2015 Class 4............................Jan. 1, 2015 – Mar. 31, 2015 Class 5 .........................Sept. 1, 2014 – Dec. 31, 2014 Class 6............................May 1, 2014– Aug. 31, 2014 Class 7 ...........................Jan. 1, 2014– April 30, 2014 HEIFERS Class 8 ..........................Oct. 1, 2015 – Dec. 31, 2015 Class 9 ......................... July 1, 2015 – Sept. 30, 2015 Class 10 ...................... April 1, 2015 – June 30, 2015 Class 11 ........................ Jan. 1, 2015 – Mar. 31, 2015 Class 12 .......................Sept. 1, 2014 – Dec. 31, 2014 Class 13........................ May 1, 2014 – Aug. 31, 2014 Class 14.........................Jan. 1, 2014 – April 30, 2014 

Name ______________________________ D.O.B. ______________ Reg. No. _______ Name of Sire ________________________ Sire Reg. No. ________________________ Name of Dam ________________________ Dam Reg. No. _______________________ Sex of Animal _______________________ Name of Owner______________________ Address ____________________________ ____________________________________ Breeder _____________________________ (Please remit copy of papers)

Contact Information: Telephone # _______________________________________ and/or E-Mail address _____________________________________________________________

The TLMA is proud to be chosen to assist with the management of the Millennium Futurity.   

P.O. Box 1239 - Lampasas, TX 76550 • (512) 556-0300 • www.thelonghornalliance.com Texas Longhorn Trails January 2016 | 5


FEBRUARY

TLBAA Breed Advisory Committee’s

Herd Management Guide

SPRING Calving: 1. As females near parturition and lactation, nutrient requirement for energy, protein, minerals and vitamins increase substantially. Two-thirds of fetal growth occurs during the last three months of gestation. Prepartum nutrition of females has been shown to also influence colostrum (first milk) production, subsequent calf viability and liveability, weaning weights and percent of calves actually weaned. During the last 30-60 days of gestation, it is recommended that females consume 1.8 -2.0 pounds of total protein daily from grass and supplemental feeds to insure adequate fetal development and first milk production. 2. During the first 3-4 months of lactation, a 1000 pound cow with average milking ability (producing 10 pounds of milk daily) requires 11.5 pounds of energy, 2 pounds of protein, 0.06 pounds of calcium, 0.05 pounds of phosphorus and 36,000 international units of vitamin A per day. Warm season pasture grasses are dormant until midApril and provide most of the energy needs, but limited protein, phosphorus and Vitamin A. Sufficient nutrients must be supplied to the lactating females in the form of protein and/or energy supplements, as well as mineral and vitamin mixes to meet their nutrient requirements. If pasture grass is plentiful, but dormant and poor in quality during this time of year, then protein is generally your first concern. A 1000 pound cow in good body condition with average milking ability should generally be fed at least 1.5 pounds of crude protein (CP) from a protein supplement, depending upon the protein value and availability of the dormant pasture grass. Feeding 3-4 pounds of a 40 percent CP supplement, 4-6 pounds of a 30 percent CP supplement or 6-8 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement per head per day should be adequate to meet most protein and energy needs. Choice of appropriate supplement (20 percent CP, 30 percent CP or 40 percent CP) should be based upon the cheapest source of protein. Price per pound of protein may be determined by dividing the cost per pound of protein supplement by the percentage of crude protein in the supplement. A source of salt, as well as a good commercial calcium:phosphorus mineral mix with added Vitamin A should be available on a free choice basis. If your cows are thin in body condition, then feeding supplemental hay plus higher levels of a low crude protein, high energy range cube (20 percent crude protein) will provide increased intake of vital nutrients. If pasture grass is limited due to overgrazing or poor rainfall during summer, then energy is your first concern. Feeding a medium (8-10 percent crude protein) hay free choice plus 2-3 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement daily or approximately 15-20 pounds of a high quality (15-17 percent crude protein) hay per head per day will provide an excellent source of energy and protein for the females. If winter pasture is available, then the females should not need additional energy or protein supplementation. 44 | February 2016

3. Even though Texas Longhorns are known for calving ease, difficult births may arise. Check first calf heifers (due to calve) and pregnant cows daily for possibility of calving difficulties. Once fetal membranes (water sac) have been expelled and ruptured, assistance should be provided if calf delivery has not occurred within 30-60 minutes. 4. Colostrum consumption during the early hours of a calf’s life is essential for passive absorption of important antibodies needed for protection from disease. Absorption of antibodies found in colostrum ceases after 24 hours after birth; therefore, a newborn calf should receive at least 2 quarts (5-6 percent of birth weight) in first milk within the first 6 hours to insure adequate antibody protection. Commercial sources of colostrum may be purchased or the first milk from other cows may be frozen for later use. Many females, especially first calf heifers, do not produce sufficient colostrum and there is no way of knowing how much the calf has nursed. Baby calf scours are typically the result of inadequate consumption of colostrum during the early hours of a calf’s life. Clean calving areas and proper attention to the newborn may reduce exposure to disease organisms and reduce incidence of scouring problems. 5. Dip navels of newborn calves in a 7 percent tincture of iodine solution when you happen to be there shortly after birth as a preventive measure of navel ill problems. 6. At 12-14 months of age, vaccinate replacement heifers with intramuscular IBR/BVD (modified live virus), a 7way Clostridial booster, 5-way Leptospirosis, and vibrosis at least 60 days before breeding. Consult a local veterinarian on vaccine types and other vaccinations recommended in your area. Deworming is recommended prior to spring grass. 7. Evaluate the growth of your yearling heifers as well as first calf females. The goal should be to have your yearling heifers weigh 65 percent of their mature weight by first breeding (14-15 months of age) and have a weight of 85 percent of their mature weight, including the weight of the fetus, prior to calving at 23-25 months of age.

FALL Calving: 1. Continue supplemental feeding program until good spring grass is available and calves are weaned. Lactating cows grazing dormant range grass require approximately 34 pounds of a 40 percent range cube or 6-8 pounds of a 20 percent range cube daily to meet their protein requirement. If winter pasture is available, forage intake should be sufficient to meet nutrient requirements of lactating females. 2. Remove bulls after a 90 day breeding season. A February 20 breeding date will result in December 1 calves. For a fall calving program, September, October and November calves are most desirable. 3. Consider limited creep feeding (16 percent crude protein) for calves nursing older cows, first calf heifers or any calves needing additional nutrition.

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February 2016 | 45


Alaska

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

17 13

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

Chairman of the Board: Todd McKnight • (620) 704-3493

Secretary/Parliamentarian: Gary Bowdoin • (254) 640-0844

Executive Vice Chairman: Ken Morris • (704) 361-6035

Treasurer: Mark Hubbell • (269) 838-3083

1st Vice Chairman: Alex Dees • (805) 300-4617

Director: Tom Matott • (303) 500-9465

2nd Vice Chairman: Kathy Kittler • (501) 690-0771

Director: Jeff Jespersen • (780) 966-3320

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

(979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18 At-Large Director

Keith DuBose

(573) 406-9868 robertslonghorns@live.com

David Roberts At-Large Director

(405) 227-7127 bardies@hotmail.com

John Parmley

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

David “Nik” Nikodym

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

Region 13 - Director

Jeff Jespersen

(780) 966-3320 jeffj91@hotmail.com

Lana Hightower

(903) 681-1093 glcattleco@aol.com

(308) 750-8384 or (308) 246-5600 tejas@mcintyreranches.com

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

(704) 361-6035 khaoslonghorns@gmail.com

Ken Morris

(484) 638-0228 nel_tam_hearn@yahoo.com

Nelson Hearn

L.D. McIntyre

(817) 304-1665 diamondglonghorns@yahoo.com

Gwen Damato

Region 3 - Director

(620) 704-3493 chairman@tlbaa.org Region 15 Director

Todd McKnight

Region 9 - Director

Tom Smith

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

(254) 485-3434 fairchildranch@yahoo.com

(918) 557-0364 dledwards.texaslonghorncattle @gmail.com

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

David Edwards

Russell E. Fairchild

Scott Hughes

(828) 287-4257 shughes@partonlumber.com

Gary Bowdoin

(254) 640-0844 run4funbow@aol.com

(303) 500-9465 tom@rockymountainlonghorns.com

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Tom Matott

Nancy Dunn

(334) 318-0887 nancydunn2010@windstream.net

Larry Smith

(281) 935-2811 texasslonghorns@aol.com

(805) 300-4617 atdees@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

(501) 690-0771 k.kittler@hotmail.com

(979) 249-4255 sktorkildsen@gmail.com

Region 18 - Director

Kathy Kittler

CHARLES SCHREINER III* 1964-1967 WALTER G. RIEDEL, JR.* 1967-1969 J.G. PHILLIPS, JR.* 1969-1971 WALTER B. SCOTT* 1971-1973 JAMES WARREN 1973-1975 J.W. ISAACS* 1975-1977 J.T. “HAPPY” SHAHAN* 1977-1978

Alex Dees

Bill Torkildsen

JOHN R. BALL* 1979-1980

RIEMER CALHOUN, JR. 1990-1992

BILL ANTHONY* 1981-1982

GLEN W. LEWIS 1992-1995

DR. L.V. BAKER 1982-1984

TIM MILLER* 1995-1998

DR. W.D. “BILL” CLARK 1984-1986

SHERMAN BOYLES 1998-2003

RICHARD D. CARLSON 1986-1988

BOB MOORE* 2003-2005

JOHN T. BAKER 1988-1990

JOEL LEMLEY 2006-2007

(909) 721-7577 chris@herronconstructioninc.com

Chris Herron

— MEMBER —

BEN GRAVETT* 2007 DR. FRITZ MOELLER 2007-2009 MAURICE LADNIER 2009-2010 ROBERT RICHEY 2010 STEVEN ZUNKER 2010-2011 BRENT BOLEN 2011-2012 BERNARD LANKFORD 2012-2013

* DECEASED

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE

46 | February 2016

Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351

Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083

Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659

Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331

John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730

Russell Hooks – (409) 381-0616

semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com

hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

doublehelix@att.net

fserna@elcoyote.com

jtb2@earthlink.net

russellh@longhornroundup.com

Texas Longhorn Trails


2015 Fey Longhorns Ranch Sale Report submitted by

The 5th Ranch Sale was held on June 6, 2015 in Yamhill, OR. The party was kicked off with a casual dinner on Friday night at the Fey Ranch. Longhorn burgers were served for lunch on Saturday before the auction. Molly Clubb and Jaymie Feldmann from Hired Hand were present to make on-line bidding available and their service made a significant impact on the bidding and the sale prices. 7 lots ended up to be sold over the Internet, several others were sold through phone bidding. Sale Hosts: Daniel & Angelina Fey, Yamhill OR Auctioneer: John Walton, Dallas OR Pedigree Reader: Bob Larson, Tillamook OR Top 10 average: $4,475 Sale average (27 lots sold, 2 lots scratched, 3 POs): $3,002

Daniel Fey

High selling cows:

1A. ST Rio Royal – consigned by St. Hilaire Longhorns, Yamhill OR and purchased by Bill & Elizabeth Hudson, Floyds Knobs, IN for $7,000. 1B. Smoking Brown Cow – consigned by RC Larson Longhorns and purchased by Mike & Cattrina Lucas, Bakersfield CA for $7,000. 3. KCCI Black Lace, consigned by Caballo Bravo Longhorns, Sanger CA and purchased by Scott & Amelia Picker, Dundee OR for $5,000. 4. Gorgeous Award RCR, consigned by Rock Creek Ranch, Gearhart OR and purchased by Mike Lutt, Wayne NE for $4,600. 5. Carmen 123 CB, consigned by Caballo Bravo Longhorns, Sanger CA and purchased by Mike Lutt, Wayne NE for $3,800. 6. Shamrock Dominos Best, consigned by CR Ranches, Harper OR, and purchased by Doug Woodard, Vacaville CA for $3,700. 7. JH Jet’s Sharman, consigned by Diamondback Ranch, Paskenta CA and purchased by CR Ranches, Harper OR for $3,650.

Texas Longhorn Trails

February 2016 | 47


Trails Announces NEW Pricing for 2016 Trails Magazine is always looking for new ways to improve and increase opportunities for our breeders to highlight their programs and for corporate advertisers to promote their products and services. We are happy to announce LOWER advertising prices for 2016, starting with our March issue. In addition to our 1x, 6x, and 12x rates we have added 3x and 9x as well as new pack-

2016 PRICING

ages incorporating both print and web advertising. Our new options and lower prices will give advertisers more flexibility with their marketing plans and help extend their reach. Please contact Lindsay Maher for more information and how to make the most of your marketing budget, custom advertising plans are available.

TRAILS SIZE- ALL COLOR

1X

3X

6X

9X

12X

FULL PAGE

$800

$775

$750

$725

$700

1/2 PAGE

$550

$525

$500

$475

$450

1/3 PAGE

$450

$425

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$375

$350

1/4 PAGE

$350

$325

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$275

$250

1/5 PAGE

$215

$205

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$195

$190

1/6 PAGE

$165

$150

$130

$110

$105

1/8 PAGE

$100

$95

$90

$85

$75

BREEDERS GUIDE- 1YR

$365

COVERS

BACK $1,000

INSIDE FRONT INSIDE BACK $950 $900

MEDIA E-BLASTS E-TRAILS CLASSIFIED

ONE $70 $15

ONLINE DIRECTORY

$240

48 | February 2016

2-5 $65 $10

6 or more $60 $5

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

February 2016 | 49


IN MEMORIAM

JL Collier

September 8, 1939 - January 3, 2016 J L Collier of Gustine, Texas passed away on January 3, 2016. He was 76, having been born on September 8, 1939, in Clovis, New Mexico. He is preceded in death by his parents John L. Collier and Arlesa Collier and his daughter Katty Marie and he is survived by his brother Bob Collier and granddaughter Shannah Marie.  J L graduated from Odessa High in 1957.   He then found

a career he loved - working on oil rigs. J L worked on off shore rigs for over 20 years, where he traveled the world to over 25 countries and retired at the top of his field.   J L then found his true passion in life - breeding and raising Longhorns.  He became one of the top breeders in the industry, with many breeders in the association wanting a JMC and JC branded animal.  J L bred and raised some of the first 80 inch horn animals in the breed.  His hard work through life and dedication to Longhorns will forever be remembered. He was a dearly loved friend and will be greatly missed, but never forgotten.

Billie Sue DuBose

December 30, 1934 - December 30, 2015 Services for Billie Sue DuBose were held Friday, January 1, 2016 at Hilliard Funeral Home with Rev. Kenneth Meadows officiating and Rev. Mike Calhoun & Dr. Tom Campbell assisting. A graveside service was held on Saturday, January 2, 2016 at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Beaumont, with family serving as pallbearers. Billie Sue Marshall DuBose was born December 30, 1934 in San Augustine, Texas to the late Glen M. Marshall and Minnie Marie Yancey Marshall. She passed away at the age of 81 on her birthday, December 30, 2015 in Tyler. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Jasper, and attended First Baptist Church of Van. She and her husband, Wayne were the first “Grandparents of the Year” for the TLBAA’s TLBT, where she also served as secretary and treasurer of several affiliates in past years. She was also an active member and past president of the Civic Club in Jasper, and member of the Ladies

Auxiliary in Jasper, known as the “Pink Ladies”. She was preceded in death by her husband, Wayne DuBose, who passed away in 2001; her parents, Glen & Marie Marshall; and her sister, Betty M. Jones. Survivors inlcude her three children and their spouses, Keith & Tina DuBose of Ben Wheeler, Sandy & Norman Hoff of Van, and Betty & Joe Matthews of Jasper; sisters and brothers-in-law, Kathryn & Tom Decker of Huntsville and Jane & Butch Miller of Plano; grandchildren, Rebekah & Markus Diffee of Austin, Jessica & Derek Wade of Shreveport, Sydney & Blake Sugg of Ben Wheeler, Cody & Kristen Hoff of Aledo, Sarah & Casey Russell of Tyler, Katelyn & Marcus Evan of Lindale, Josh Matthews of Newton, Ellen & Bo Lewis of Jasper, and Justin & Laurel Matthews of Hudson; twelve greatgrandchildren with one on the way; caregiver, Carla Hardaway of Tyler; and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, relatives and friends. If desired, memorials may be made to Jasper Public Library, 175 E Water St, Jasper, TX 75951; Hospice of East Texas, 4111 University Blvd, Tyler, TX 75701; or TLBAA Building Fund, P.O. Box 4430, Fort Worth, TX 76164 (Attn: Elaine).

Franklin “Frank” Pate

February 04, 1946 - December 28, 2015 Franklin “Frank” Pate 69, rancher, car enthusiast, loving husband, father and grandfather, died Monday, Dec. 28, 2015. The family greeted friends to share memories on Tuesday, Jan. 5, at Smith Mortuary. Survivors: wife, Linda; son, Scott Pate of Austin, TX; daughter, Amy White (Dan50 | February 2016

ny); son, Aaron Jackson (Jennifer) all of Douglass; sister, Peggy Base of Enid, OK; grandchildren, Ryan, Lee, Brian, Abby, Kyler, Lauren and Brett; great-grandson, Holden; many nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by his parents, Lois Franklin and Evelyn Pate; sister, Joan Johnson; grandson, Franklin Austin Pate. Memorials to Rivercross Hospice. Condolences to smithfamilymortuaries.com

Texas Longhorn Trails


Advice From An Old Farmer Your fences need to be horse-high, pig tight and bull strong. Keep skunks and bankers at a distance. Life is simpler when you plow around the stump. A bumble bee is considerably faster than a John Deere tractor. Do not corner something that you know is meaner than you. When you wallow with pigs, expect to get dirty. The best sermons are lived, not preached. Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer. If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is to stop diggin’. Always drink upstream from the herd. Good judgement comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgement.

Texas Longhorn Trails

January 2016 | 51


10 Winter-Feeding Tips By Clint Peck Contributing Editor BEEF Magazine Used by permission from BEEF Magazine Want some “hot” advice on ways to cheapen cowherd rations as fall and winter approach? After visiting with John Paterson, Montana State University Extension beef specialist, and ranchers from diverse locations, here’s a top-10 list of cost-saving tips adaptable to about any winter grazing situation and geographic location.

Balance rations Balance rations to be “best-cost” rations, realizing that they may not be least-cost rations, Paterson says. “Understand the nutrient requirements for a weight or age class, or stage of production, of the cow, calf or bull,” Paterson says. “Cow nutrient requirements – dry matter intake, energy intake, etc. – are different for replacement heifers.” Paterson likes ranchers to know the differences in the nutrient requirements for a cow in the middle trimester of gestation vs. the final trimester.

Flexibility Johnny Weese’s key to keeping cow wintering costs down is flexibility. The Fisher, WV, rancher rents dormant fescue pasture when he needs some low-cost winter grazing. “I don’t normally like fescue,” he says. “But we can go in behind yearlings after the first good frost and get 60 days of good pasture on dormant fescue.” This year, Weese is gearing up to feed corn silage, which he says will be available due to drought stress. “The corn around here just isn’t going to ear-up, but it will make good forage.”

Standing forage Of course, one of the best ways to cheapen a winter ration is to have enough standing forage to keep the cows out grazing as long as possible, aided by a small amount of high-protein supplement, says Gene Vieh, Kaycee, WY. But when Vieh feeds a supplement, he likes to be strategic about what he feeds. “The higher the protein amount in the supplement, the fewer trips you’ll have to make to the pasture,” he says. “Those extra trips with the feed truck cost money.”

Health and nutrition Nutrition and health programs depend on each other. When developing a year-round nutrition program, Paterson wants the local veterinarian to be a part of the management team to cover all the bases. This includes vaccinations, parasite control, biosecurity measures and recordkeeping. Cattle performance will suffer if either nutrition or the health programs is deficient. Not providing an adequate amount of any nutrient – water, energy, protein, vitamins and minerals – may result in compromised immune function, reduced conception rates and lighter calves.

Forage analysis Paterson always recommends obtaining a forage 52 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


analysis of hay supplies well in advance of winter feeding. “Then, a rancher knows how much energy and protein is available,” Paterson says. “A water analysis should also be done to check for detrimental antagonists like nitrates or sulfates.” Vieh likes to include an analysis of fecal samples as a nutrient balance gauge.

Body condition score Split the cowherd into groups based on body condition score (BCS). Paterson likes to see the herd split into groups of animals with good BCS (greater than 5) and those with poorer BCS (less than 5). “Why feed the entire herd an expensive ration when only the thin cows need it?” he asks. “Depending on the winter, we might or might not sort and feed the cows according to age and body condition,” Vieh says. “Sorting is a pain in the neck, but we’ll do it if we’re facing a bad winter.” Wheat or barley straw Paterson likes to use wheat or barley straw in the rations he formulates. He does this to cheapen the ration, prevent over-feeding of nutrients, and control rates of gain for cows and even heifers. Recently, because of drought conditions, Paterson’s balanced many rations based on barley-grain hays, alfalfa and wheat straw. These rations often do not require additional supplementation other than a mineral supplement. Weese says rolled-up corn stalks serve the same purpose in his region. “Corn stalks make great filler and there’s not a lot of waste.”

Alternative feeds Determine if feed or food-industry byproducts can be used as supplements: wheat midds, distiller’s grains, peas, carrots, corn gluten feed and even whole potatoes. One of Paterson’s favorite rations had used rejected caramel candy in cardboard boxes. The cows ate the candy and the boxes. He’s seen rations that used rejected hard Christmas candy, corn chips and even chocolate. Weese plans to use brewer’s grain this year on cows that need a little extra boost before calving – mixing the wet grain with corn silage and hay. “We’ve got a Coors brewery over in the Shenandoah Valley that is close enough to make it worthwhile.” For more detail on the typical composition of more than 300 feeds commonly fed to cattle and sheep in the U.S., view BEEF magazine’s “2007 Feed Composition Tables” published in the March issue of BEEF and avail-

able at www.beefmagazine.com. It’s in the “resources” section of the opening page.

Weight Know the weight of your cows using a scale. Paterson says a rancher who underestimates average cow weight by up to 200 pounds could see a 4- to 5-pound difference in dry matter consumption each day. Vieh knows his mature cows average 1,080 pounds “We can’t let cow weight get out of hand,” he says.

Feed waste Minimize feed waste. Research shows that the method of feeding hay can have a dramatic influence on hay waste. Marc King, Sweetgrass County, MT Extension educator, says he’s worked with a Big Timber, MT, rancher who’s saved $9,000 in hay cost purchasing a bale processor. The rancher partitions the hay out in smaller packages on a daily or alternate-day basis. This practice has been shown to produce less waste than providing free-choice consumption by feeding once weekly.

Texas Longhorn Trails

February 2016 | 53


USDA Expands Microloans to Help Farmers Purchase Farmland and Improve Property Producers, Including Beginning and Underserved Farmers, Have a New Option to Gain Access to Land

WASHINGTON, Jan. 19, 2016 — Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will begin offering farm ownership microloans, creating a new financing avenue for farmers

HUSKY BRANDING IRONS

Gold N Rule Sittin Bull

Max Caliber Coach

If your electric brand will not stay hot in cold or windy weather, get a Husky.

We Guarantee Ours Will Stay Hot

1 Letter/Figure_____120.00 2 Letter/Figure_____130.00 3 Letter/Figure_____140.00 Mountain Home, Texas

1-800-YO RANCH

charlie4@yoranch.com Proud member of the TLBAA and TLMA

54 | February 2016

Plus shipping * All Electric Brands Shipped in 24 Hours.

P.O. Box 460 • Knoxville, AR 72845 800/222-9628 • FAX: 800/267-4055 www.huskybrandingirons.com huskybrandingirons@yahoo.com

Texas Longhorn Trails

to buy and improve property. These microloans will be especially helpful to beginning or underserved farmers, U.S. veterans looking for a career in farming, and those who have small and mid-sized farming operations. “Many producers, especially new and underserved farmers, tell us that access to land is one of the biggest challenges they face in establishing and growing their own farming operation,” said Harden. “USDA is making it easier for new farmers to hit the ground running and get access to the land that they need to establish their farms or improve their property.” The microloan program, which celebrates its third anniversary this week, has been hugely successful, providing more than 16,800 lowinterest loans, totaling over $373 million to producers across the country. Microloans have helped farmers and ranchers with operating costs, such as feed, fertilizer, tools, fencing, equipment, and living expenses since 2013. Seventy percent of loans have gone to new farmers. Now, microloans will be available to also help with farm land and building purchases, and soil and water conservation improvements. FSA designed the expanded program to simplify the application process, expand eligibility requirements and expedite smaller real estate loans to help farmers strengthen their operations. Microloans provide up to $50,000 to qualified producers, and can be issued to the applicant directly from the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA). This microloan announcement is another USDA resource for America’s farmers and ranchers to utilize, especially as new and beginning farmers and ranchers look for the assistance they need to get started. To learn more about the FSA microloan program visit www.fsa. usda.gov/microloans, or contact your local FSA office. To find your nearest office location, please visit http://offices.usda.gov.


analysis of hay supplies well in advance of winter feeding. “Then, a rancher knows how much energy and protein is available,” Paterson says. “A water analysis should also be done to check for detrimental antagonists like nitrates or sulfates.” Vieh likes to include an analysis of fecal samples as a nutrient balance gauge.

Body condition score Split the cowherd into groups based on body condition score (BCS). Paterson likes to see the herd split into groups of animals with good BCS (greater than 5) and those with poorer BCS (less than 5). “Why feed the entire herd an expensive ration when only the thin cows need it?” he asks. “Depending on the winter, we might or might not sort and feed the cows according to age and body condition,” Vieh says. “Sorting is a pain in the neck, but we’ll do it if we’re facing a bad winter.”

Wheat or barley straw Paterson likes to use wheat or barley straw in the rations he formulates. He does this to cheapen the ration, prevent over-feeding of nutrients, and control rates of gain for cows and even heifers. Recently, because of drought conditions, Paterson’s balanced many rations based on barley-grain hays, alfalfa and wheat straw. These rations often do not require additional supplementation other than a mineral supplement. Weese says rolled-up corn stalks serve the same purpose in his region. “Corn stalks make great filler and there’s not a lot of waste.”

Alternative feeds Determine if feed or food-industry byproducts can be used as supplements: wheat midds, distiller’s grains, peas, carrots, corn gluten feed and even whole potatoes. One of Paterson’s favorite rations had used rejected caramel candy in cardboard boxes. The cows ate the candy and the boxes. He’s seen rations that used rejected hard Christmas candy, corn chips and even chocolate. Weese plans to use brewer’s grain this year on cows that need a little extra boost before calving – mixing the wet grain with corn silage and hay. “We’ve got a Coors brewery over in the Shenandoah Valley that is close enough to make it worthwhile.” For more detail on the typical composition of more than 300 feeds commonly fed to cattle and sheep in the U.S., view BEEF magazine’s “2007 Feed Composition

Tables” published in the March issue of BEEF and available at www.beefmagazine.com. It’s in the “resources” section of the opening page.

Weight Know the weight of your cows using a scale. Paterson says a rancher who underestimates average cow weight by up to 200 pounds could see a 4- to 5-pound difference in dry matter consumption each day. Vieh knows his mature cows average 1,080 pounds “We can’t let cow weight get out of hand,” he says.

Feed waste Minimize feed waste. Research shows that the method of feeding hay can have a dramatic influence on hay waste. Marc King, Sweetgrass County, MT Extension educator, says he’s worked with a Big Timber, MT, rancher who’s saved $9,000 in hay cost purchasing a bale processor. The rancher partitions the hay out in smaller packages on a daily or alternate-day basis. This practice has been shown to produce less waste than providing free-choice consumption by feeding once weekly.

Texas Longhorn Trails

February 2016 | 53


USDA Expands Microloans to Help Farmers Purchase Farmland and Improve Property Producers, Including Beginning and Underserved Farmers, Have a New Option to Gain Access to Land

WASHINGTON, Jan. 19, 2016 — Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will begin offering farm ownership microloans, creating a new financing avenue for farmers

HUSKY BRANDING IRONS

Gold N Rule Sittin Bull

Max Caliber Coach

If your electric brand will not stay hot in cold or windy weather, get a Husky.

We Guarantee Ours Will Stay Hot

1 Letter/Figure_____120.00 2 Letter/Figure_____130.00 3 Letter/Figure_____140.00 Mountain Home, Texas

1-800-YO RANCH

charlie4@yoranch.com Proud member of the TLBAA and TLMA

54 | February 2016

Plus shipping * All Electric Brands Shipped in 24 Hours.

P.O. Box 460 • Knoxville, AR 72845 800/222-9628 • FAX: 800/267-4055 www.huskybrandingirons.com huskybrandingirons@yahoo.com

Texas Longhorn Trails

to buy and improve property. These microloans will be especially helpful to beginning or underserved farmers, U.S. veterans looking for a career in farming, and those who have small and mid-sized farming operations. “Many producers, especially new and underserved farmers, tell us that access to land is one of the biggest challenges they face in establishing and growing their own farming operation,” said Harden. “USDA is making it easier for new farmers to hit the ground running and get access to the land that they need to establish their farms or improve their property.” The microloan program, which celebrates its third anniversary this week, has been hugely successful, providing more than 16,800 lowinterest loans, totaling over $373 million to producers across the country. Microloans have helped farmers and ranchers with operating costs, such as feed, fertilizer, tools, fencing, equipment, and living expenses since 2013. Seventy percent of loans have gone to new farmers. Now, microloans will be available to also help with farm land and building purchases, and soil and water conservation improvements. FSA designed the expanded program to simplify the application process, expand eligibility requirements and expedite smaller real estate loans to help farmers strengthen their operations. Microloans provide up to $50,000 to qualified producers, and can be issued to the applicant directly from the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA). This microloan announcement is another USDA resource for America’s farmers and ranchers to utilize, especially as new and beginning farmers and ranchers look for the assistance they need to get started. To learn more about the FSA microloan program visit www.fsa. usda.gov/microloans, or contact your local FSA office. To find your nearest office location, please visit http://offices.usda.gov.


EAS CAT Y LOC TLE ATO R!

ALABAMA

COLORADO

KANSAS

ARKANSAS

FLORIDA

KENTUCKY

INDIANA

LOUISIANA

IOWA

MISSOURI

CALIFORNIA

KANSAS MONTANA

Call in, ask for your H.O.R.N.S. password and take control of your herd inventory and membership information.(817) 625-6241 Texas Longhorn Trails

www.tlbaa.org Februrary 2016 | 55


NORTH CAROLINA

PENNSYLVANIA

OKLAHOMA

TENNESSEE

SOUTH TEXAS

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

Call in, ask for your H.O.R.N.S. password and take control of your herd inventory and membership information. (817) 625-6241

www.tlbaa.org

SOUTHEAST TEXAS

CENTRAL TEXAS

R&R RANCH – REAGAN, TEXAS RON AND REBECCA SKINNER

(336) 302-0966

WWW.RRLONGHORNS.COM 11/16

56 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

WEST TEXAS

www.tlbaa.org CANADA ALBERTA

Find all the information and forms you need at

WWW.TLBAA.ORG

Texas Longhorn Trails

FFbruary 2016

| 57


CLASSIFIEDS

AUCTIONEERS

Bruce E. McCarty Auctioneer Weatherford, TX

(817) 991-9979 CATTLE FOR SALE

OLIVER LONGHORNS

www.oliverlonghorns.com

Cattle for sale “To God Be The Glory”

joliver@mytocn.com (972) 268-0083

BEAVER CREEK LONGHORNS- Check our new website with "Super Sales" and herdreduction prices. Tazman (Gunman) genetics. Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK (580) 7659961, www.beavercreeklonghorns.com

THATE Cattle Company Your source for big-horned cattle in the North—utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

(507) 235-3467

LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains (918) 855-0704 • Sallisaw, OK

www.lonewolfranch.net Quality HEIFERS & HERD SIRE PROSPECTS FOR SALE- I have a LARGE herd, so you have lots of variety to pick from! Located approx. 20 mi. off the EAST TEXAS line in Louisiana just below Shreveport. Lots of Hunts Command Respect, McGill Breeding, some ZD Kelly and Grand Slam, etc. Good cows, good babies. I specialize in bulls and am a partner in RIP SAW who now measures 83 1/2” TTT and is a gorgeous color. Several of his heifers and sons for sale. DORA THOMPSON Tel (318) 872-6329 echoofambush@aol.com•www.sandhillsranch.com

Great genetics. I enjoy meeting and working with new breeders. Also have a large STRAIGHT BUTLER herd.

Have a Happy, Happy, Happy Valentine Celebration …and remember our great choices of Longhorns to supplement an existing herd, begin a new one or just surprise that special person on your gift list! ★ Top notch, gentle bulls, bred and open heifers, plus beautiful young cows…many with calves at side. ★ Awesome, big horned trophy steers, 3 yrs and up. They are destined to become traffic stopping pasture art. Very gentle and colorful! For information or to schedule a tour at either of our ranch locations, please call:

Dorie Damuth - Flying D Longhorn Ranch 40206 Community Rd. • Magnolia, TX 77354 281-356-8167 • fax: 281-356-2751 dorie27@sbcglobal.net • www.damuthflyingdranch.com Scott Damuth, Legal Counsel • Shery Damuth, Vineyard Consultant sdamuth@damuthlaw.com • Gun Barrel City, TX Law office: 903-887-0088 • Fax: 903-887-2925 Scott Cell: 214-546-3681 • Shery Cell: 940-393-0991

TRADE & BARTER TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breeds’ top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days (512) 454-0476 / Weekends (830) 644-2380.

TRANSPORTATION

HAULING - Anywhere-Anytime We specialize in Longhorns. Dan Tisdale (940) 872-1811 Mobile: 940/841-2619 Randy Mack (940) 366-6215

Need help finding a home for that special Longhorn? Give the classifieds a try. It’s a very economical way to reach fellow Longhorn lovers.

Have you seen the new, improved website? www.tlbaa.org

58 | February 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails

TEXAS LONGHORN T•R•A•I•L•S (817) 625-6241 • Fax (817) 625-1388 trails@tlbaa.org

Classified ads are $15.00 for 25 words. Box ads are $25.00 per inch. Deadline is the 25th of the second month preceding publication.

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ADVERTISING INDEX —A— Adkins, Aaron & Clay..................................39 Allen Ranch...................................................41 Almendra Longhorns..................................55 Anderson, Frank Jr. and III...........................9 Arch Acres.....................................................55 Astera Meadows..........................................57 —B— Bar H Ranch..................................................55 Beadle Land & Cattle..................................55 Bentwood Ranch.......................................IBC Big Valley Longhorns..................................55 Billingsley Longhorns.................................56 Blue Ridge Ranch....................................... 49 Bolen Longhorns................................. FC, 45 Breeders Guide .................................... 55-57 Brett Ranch...................................................56 Bright Futures Scholarships..................... 38 Bry Longhorn Chute...................................54 BT Farms.......................................................56 Buckhorn Cattle Co....................................56 Bull Creek Longhorns.......................... 10, 57 Butler Breeders..............................................9 Butler Spread............................................. 8, 9 —C— Caballo Bravo Longhorns..........................55 Callicrate Banders.......................................53 Calpat Longhorns........................................52 Cattle Baron’s Sale & Futurity................. IFC CedarView Ranch......................................IBC Champion Genetics.................................... 51 Christa Cattle Co...........................................8 Circle Double C Ranch..............................56 Cowboy Catchit Chex................................39 CV Cowboy Casanova.............................IBC —D— Dalgood Longhorns......................................9 Diamond Q Longhorns..............................56 Diann Chase LH Scholarship Expo..........35 DK Longhorn Ranch...................................55 Double A Longhorns..................................56 Dubose Bar D Ranch....................................9 —E— El Coyote Ranch...................................... 1, 15 Elah Valley Longhorns................................55 End of Trail Ranch.......................... 37, 53, 55 —F— Falls Creek Longhorns..................................8 Fey Ranch.....................................................47 Fifty-Fifty BCB...................................... FC, 45 Flying Diamond Ranch...............................55 —H— Haltom Hollar Ranch..................................55 Harrell Ranch...............................................39 Helm Cattle Co..................................... 31, 56 Hickman Longhorns...................................56 Horseshoe J Longhorns..............FC, 39, 45 Hubbell Longhorns.....................................39 Hudson Longhorns.......................................5 Hudson-Valentine Sale............................2, 3 Husky Branding Irons.................................54 —I— ITTLA.............................................................. 21 —J— J & C Longhorns..........................................19 J.T. Wehring Family Ranch........................56 Jack Mountain Ranch.............................9, 57 Jane’s Land & Cattle Co..............................9 Johnston Longhorns..................................56 Jordan Insurance Group............................54

—K— Khaos Cattle Co...........................................39 King, Terry & Tammy.............. FC, 39, 45, 55 Kittler Land & Cattle............................. 52, 55 —L— Laughing Hawk Ranch...............................19 Lazy A Ranch................................................56 Lightning Longhorns..................................56 Little Ace Cattle Co.......................................8 LL Longhorns.................................................8 Lodge Creek Longhorns............................55 Lone Wolf Ranch.........................................56 Lonesome Pines Ranch.............................19 Longhorn Sale Pen......................................53 Loomis Longhorns......................................39 — M— McLeod Ranch...............................................8 Midwest Sale................................................37 Millenium Futurity.......................................43 Moriah Farms...............................................56 —N — Northbrook Cattle Company....................56 —P — P&C Cattle Pens.......................................... 51 Pearl Longhorn Ranch...............................19 —R— R&R Ranch....................................................56 Rancho Dos Ninos......................................57 Red McCombs Ranches...........................BC Red River Livestock Auction..................... 21 Rio Vista Ranch..............................................8 Rockin I Longhorns.............................. 33, 57 Rockin Hil Ranch.........................................25 Rocking P Longhorns...................................8 Rocky Mountain Longhorns.....................55 Rolling B Ranch.......................................... 49 Rolling D Ranch.............................FC, 45, 55 Running Arrow Longhorns........................ 51 —S— Safari B Ranch..............................................56 Sand Hills Ranch......................................7, 55 Schumacher Cattle.....................................56 Semkin Longhorns......................................56 Sidewinder Cattle Co...................................9 Singing Coyote Ranch...............................57 SS Longhorns...............................................56 STLA...............................................................19 Star Creek Ranch......................................... 11 Stotts Hideaway Ranch..............................56 Struthoff Ranches of Texas.......................57 —T— 2 Bar 2 Ranch...............................................19 T Bar W Ranch.............................................23 Terry King’s Longhorn Cattle........ FC,39,45 Texas Longhorn Heritage Found............ 38 TLBAA World Show..............................28-29 Triple R Ranch (TX)..................................9, 19 TS Adcock Longhorns......................... 48, 57 —W — Walker, Ron...................................................57 Westfarms Inc................................................8 White Pines Ranch......................................39 Wichita Fence Company...........................53 —X— XCalibur Star.................................................45 —Y— YO Ranch......................................................54

Texas Longhorn Trails

JUST FOR GRINS Create an original caption for this photograph and win TLBAA merchandise! (Only first-place winners receive prizes.) Photos for “Just for Grins” are welcome, but they cannot be returned. Send your caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails, Attn. Myra, • P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, Texas 76164 or myra@tlbaa.org (Email entries should include address.) Please specify which month your caption is for.

Photo courtesy of John Renfro, Haltom City, TX

December Winners

First Place: “Who are you???” Kay Snow Angleton, TX

Honorable Mention: “It wasn’t Me”” Ron Simpson Midland, TX

UPCOMING ISSUES: March: Texas Longhorn Weekend Wrap-Up

April: Youth Issue May/June: Spring Sales/Brood Cow Februrary 2016 | 59


Save The Date!

TEXAS LONGHORN Coming Events

FEBRUARY 2016

JUNE 2016

FEB 11-13 • San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo, AT&T Center, 3201 East Houston St., San Antonio, TX. Bubba Bollier (325) 247-6249 or bollier7572@yahoo.com. Qualifying Free & Youth. FEB 20-21 • San Angelo Stock Show, San Angelo Fairgrounds, San Angelo, TX; Dennis Urbantke (325) 656-9321 or dennis@thlonghorns.com Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth. FEB 26-27 • Cattle Baron’s Sale & Winchester Futurity, Mid-Tex Sale Barn, Navasota, TX. Rick Friedrich (713) 305-0259 or Steve Azinger (713) 823-5371

JUNE 8-11 • TLBAA World Show & National TLBT Youth Show, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Amy Weatherholtz (817) 625-6241 or amy@tlbaa.org. Haltered, Free, Youth, Miniatures & Trophy Steers. JUNE 15-19 • Autobahn Youth Tour presents the Diann Chase Longhorn Scholarship Expo, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Larry Barker (817) 988-6110, lbarker@abahn.com or Laura Standley (817) 390-3132, lstandley@abahn.com www.autobahnyouthtour.com

JULY 2016

MARCH 2016 MAR 7-8 • Houston Livestock Show, Houston, TX. Amy Weatherholtz, TLBAA (817) 625-6241 or amy@tlbaa.org. Qualifying Haltered & Youth. Non-qualifying free steers. MAR 11-13 • NTLBA Spring Show, Somervell County Expo Center, Glen Rose, TX. John & Brenda Oliver 972-268-0083 or joliver210@yahoo.com. Qualifying Free, Halter & Youth MAR 12 • Rodeo Austin-Star of Texas, Austin, TX. Bubba Bollier (325) 247-6249 or bollier7572@yahoo.com. Qualifying Free & Youth MAR 25 • South Texas State Fair, YMBL, Beaumont, TX. Tina DuBose (979) 277-2656 or tinadubose10@gmail.com Qualifying Haltered & Youth MAR 25-26 • B&C Show-Me Fall Longhorn Sale, Grand River Livestock, Tina, MO. Bill Sayre (660) 734-0827 or Shawn Sayre (660) 734-8782 MAR 25-27 • Oklahoma Spring Shoot-Out, Payne Co. Expo Center, Stillwater, OK. Steve Quary (405) 567-3093 or (405) 932-5531 Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth MAR 30-APRIL 1 • Southeastern Winchester Futurity, WKU Ag Expo Center, Bowling Green, KY. Terry King (850) 956-4154 tklonghorns@centurylink.net

APRIL 2016 APRIL 1-2 • Hudson-Valentine Sale, WKU Ag Expo Center, Bowling Green, KY. Lorinda Valentine (270) 996-7046 or h-vlonghornauction@gmail.com APRIL 8-9 • Blue Ridge Ranch Sale, Llano, TX. Bubba Bollier (325) 2476249 or bollier7572@yahoo.com APRIL 15-16 • Rockdale Spring Show, Rockdale Fairgrounds, Rockdale, TX. Sandi Nordhausen-sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com or (512) 898-2401; Merrilou Russell-crose@cactusroselonghorns.com or (361) 781-4221; Christy Randolph-lpinesranch@aol.com or (713) 703-8458 APRIL 16 • NTLA Annual Sale, Broken Bow Livestock, Broken Bow, NE. Consignment Deadline: Feb. 26th. (402) 423-5441 or (402) 5682353 APRIL 22-23 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield Livestock Auction, Winfield, KS. Mike Bowman - mbowman@wildblue.net or (316) 778-1717. www.endoftrailranch.com APRIL 29-30 • Red McCombs Fiesta Sale, Johnson City, TX. www.redmccombslonghorns.com. Alan & Teresa Sparger, alan@redmccombslonghorns.com, (210) 445-8798

MAY 2016 MAY 7-8 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Miracle Farm, Brenham, TX. Stephen Head (979) 549-5270 or headshorns@hotmail.com. Qualifying, Haltered & Youth. MAY 14 • Elite Bulls Tour, Astera Meadows Ranches, Caldwell, TX; Joe Dowling (979) 271-0277 or dowlingjoe@yahoo.com. MAY 20-21 • Millennium Futurity, Bell County Expo Center, Belton, TX. Christy Randolph (512) 360-4299, (713) 703-8458 or lpinesranch@aol.com. Bill Davidson (405) 258-7117 or milflonghorns@sbcglobal.net. www.mlfuturity.com. MAY 27 • ITTLA Trail of Tears Winchester Futurity, Red River Sale Barn, Ardmore, OK. Kerry Mounce - kerry@los-inc.com or (214) 675-9317. MAY 28 • Red River Longhorn Sale, Red River Sale Barn, Ardmore, OK. Rick Friedrich (713) 305-0259 or rick@riverranchlonghorns.com.

60 | February 2016

JULY 23 • Montana State Fair Longhorn Show, Montana State Fair, Great Falls, MT. Shannon Kearney (509) 684-2963 or (509) 680-0019 or giddyup73@hughes.net. Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth

AUGUST 2016 AUG 6 • Deschutes County Fair, Deschutes County Expo Center, Redmond, OR. Tamara Kuntz (541) 280-1645 or tamaroo300@gmail.com.Qualifying, Free & Youth. AUG 6 • Rocky Mountain Select TL Sale, Consignments due May 16, Charlie Searle (719) 649-0058 or charliesearle02@gmail.com AUG 13 • Western Montana Fair Longhorn Show, Western Montana State Fair, Missoula, MT. Shannon Kearney (509) 684-2963 or (509) 680-0019 or giddyup73@hughes.net. Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth.

SEPTEMBER 2016 SEPT 3 • NRLA Sanders Co. Longhorn Show, Sanders Co. Fairgrounds, Plains, MT. Shannon Kearney (509) 684-2963 or (509) 680-0019 or giddyup73@hughes.net Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth. SEPT 3 • Butler Breeder’s Invitational Sale, Lockhart, TX. Kaso Kety (985) 674-6492 or Michael McLeod (361) 771-5355. SEPT 4-5 • Moutains and Plains, Colorado State Fair, State Fair Grounds, Pueblo, CO. Kenny Richardson (970) 352-3054, krichardson21@aol.com or Lana Pearson (719) 740-0741, lana14338@gmail.com. Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth. SEPT 9-10 • Hill Country Heritage Longhorn Sale, River Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Rick Friedrich - rick@riverranchlonghorns.com or (713) 305-0259. SEPT 10 • NRLA Spokane Fair Longhorn Show, Spokane Fairgrounds & Expo Center, Spokane, WA. Shannon Kearney (509) 684-2963 or (509) 680-0019 or giddyup73@hughes.net. Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth. SEPT 11 • Spokane NWLA Show, Spokane, WA. Sheryl Johnson (503) 349-4985 or j5longhorns@yahoo.com. Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth. SEPT 24 • NRLA Central Washington Longhorn Show, Central Washington State Fair Park, Yakima, WA. Shannon Kearney (509) 684-2963 or (509) 680-0019 or giddyup73@hughes.net. Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth. SEPT 30-OCT 2 • ETLA World Qualifying Show, East Texas State Fairgrounds, Tyler, TX. Lana Hightower - glcattleco@aol.com or (903) 681-1093. www.etstatefair.com. Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth.

OCTOBER 2016 OCT 10-15 • TLBAA Horn Showcase, Lawton, OK. Amy Weatherholtz (817) 625-6241 or amy@tlbaa.org. OCT 14 • NRLA NILE Longhorn Show, Metra Park Fairgrounds, Billings, MT. Shannon Kearney-giddyup73@hughes.net or (509) 684-2963 or (509) 680-0019. Qualifying, Haltered, Free & Youth. Would you like to get your event listed? Contact Myra Basham 817-625-6241 or myra@tlbaa.org

Texas Longhorn Trails


2 | January 2016

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Trails

February 2016 | 49

Profile for Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine

February 2016 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

February 2016 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America