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COVER STORIES HERD SIRE EDITION FEBRUARY 2017 Vol. 28 • No. 10

16 SELECTING A HERD SIRE

The fundamentals to consider when choosing a bull to put with your herd. By Myra Basham

24

WINTER BULL CARE By Heather Smith Thomas

54TLBAA A.I. REQUIREMENTS 10 28

Glossary of Reproductive Terms

36

JP Rio Grande 2003 - 2016

Editor’s Note

8

44

Using the H.O.R.N.S. System

40

6

Officers & Directors

FEATURES

38

DEPARTMENTS

Learn more about this valuable member benefit

Common terms defined.

A look at the life of this prolific herd sire

Promoting Your Herd Sire Let people know about your sire to make offspring more desireable.

Product Spotlight

46

Affiliate News

49 TLBT News

52

Herd Management

63

Show Results

Trichomoniasis in Cattle Learn more about this health danger. By Jeremy Powell & Tom Troxel / University of Arkansas

66

TLBT Points/Hall of Fame

71

56

Safely Castrating Calves

58

Carbon Sequestration a Positive Aspect of Beef Cattle Grazing Grasslands By Donald Stotts

Index

By Heather Smith Thomas

72

Calendar

About the Cover: Pictured on the cover is (top to bottom) Eternal Diamond (owned by JBR Longhorns), DOB: 7/15/08, Wyoming Warpaint x ECR Eternal Tari 206, 94.125” TTT; JBR Eclipse, DOB: Cowboy Tuff Chex x Eternal Diamond, 74.125” TTT, First breeding bull with three 90”+ TTT animals in his pedigree, 2-time Superior Award Winner at TLBAA Horn Showcase ; JBR Net Worth, DOB: 10/13/13, CV Cowboy Casanova x Eternal Diamond, 72.875” TTT. (Both bulls owned by Chisholm Trail Cartel – Bentwood Ranch, Rockin’ I Ranch, Gilliland Ranch, JBR Longhorns) For syndication information call Justin Rombeck (816) 536-1083. Cover art by Gary Davis. 4 | February 2017

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(817) 625-6241 817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 trails@tlbaa.org www.tlbaa.org

EDITOR’S NOTES

IT’S ALL ABOUT THAT BULL Looking at any business, it always pays to step back and look at what impacts the bottom line the most. If your goal is to raise Longhorns and sell them, then you need to take time to consider which bull(s) you will put with your cows. There are so many eye-catching characteristics Longhorns are known for that the fundamental requirements for a bull might be overlooked as one admires flashy color or huge horns. We hope that the information inside this month’s issue will assist those looking for a herd sire to remember (or learn) the requirements for a viable herd sire. Also, we visit with a few breeders about what criteria they use, including their choices once you move beyond the basics. (see pg. 16) Maintaining the health of a bull is important as that of your breeding females. We take a look at winter maintenance for the herd sire as well as a potentially costly disease commonly known as trich. Now that you have selected your herd sire and have established a plan of care, it’s time to let people know about him. Promoting your sire is essential, and paramount to successfully marketing his offspring. See pg. 38 for a variety of ways to get the word out about him. If you ever have questions about additional exposure for your sire in a way that fits your budget, give Lindsay Maher a call at 817-625-6241 and she’ll be glad to let you know what services are available and create a targeted plan to your needs. If you are new to cattle, or recently read or heard a term you are unfamiliar with, take a minute and review the glossary of reproductive terms and the diagram of a Longhorn bull. There are many terms one hears frequently when discussing or reading about breeding Longhorns that may be new or confusing. We included this reference to assist you when you look up something online, read literature or have a conversation that makes you say “I think I know what that is” or “What are they talking about?”. Time is rolling by quickly and while you may still be dealing with winter weather, spring will be here before you know it. And with spring comes the sale season. Give eager spring buyers a detailed look at your consignments and the sires they are bred to. Be sure to watch for the Longhorn Weekend Wrap-Up in the March issue. It sure was great seeing everyone at the TLBF Hall of Fame and YearEnd Awards Banquet. We will give you the highlights of that as well as the shows held at the Fort Worth Stock Show. Don’t miss it! Stay warm,

DEADLINE: April 2017 Issue:

Feb 22nd Youth Issue

6 | February 2017

Myra Basham Myra Basham Editor-in-Chief

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Editor in Chief: Myra Basham Ext. 108 • myra@tlbaa.org trailseditor@tlbaa.org Contributing Editor: Henry L. King Advertising: Lindsay Maher • Ext. 109 lindsay@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Joshua Farias • Ext. 107 joshua@tlbaa.org Administrative Assistant: Raborn Sprabary • Ext. 100 raborn@tlbaa.org

Registrations Rick Fritsche • Ext. 100 rick@tlbaa.org Dana Coomer • Ext. 116 dana@tlbaa.org Special Events Amy Weatherholtz • Ext. 104 amy@tlbaa.org Accounting Theresa Jorgenson • Ext. 119 theresa@tlbaa.org Printed in the U.S.A. Member

The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX and additional post offices. Subscription rates: $105 per year; foreign per year $180. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817)  625-6241. Fax (817)  625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.


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Alaska

17 13 18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

Chairman of the Board: Tom Matott • (303) 500-9465

Secretary/Parliamentarian: Alex Dees • (805) 300-4617

Executive Vice Chairman: Ken Morris • (704) 361-6035

Treasurer: Mark Hubbell • (269) 838-3083

1st Vice Chairman: Jim Rombeck • (785) 562-6665

Director: Todd McKnight • (620) 704-3493

2nd Vice Chairman: David “Nik” Nikodym • (405) 227-7127

Director: Tony Mangold • (830) 237-5024

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

Keith DuBose

Jim Rombeck

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

(979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com

(785) 562-6665 jl.rombeck@outlook.com

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Ken Morris

John Parmley

David “Nik” Nikodym Region 13 - Director

(704) 361-6035 khaoslonghorns@gmail.com

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

(405) 227-7127 bardies@hotmail.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

Jeff Jespersen

Cody Himmelreich

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

Nelson Hearn

Kevin Rooker

Todd McKnight

(780) 966-3320 jeffj91@hotmail.com

(484) 638-0228 nel_tam_hearn@yahoo.com

(303) 775-2034 hi5longhorns@att.net

(817) 692-7843 krooker@centurylink.net

L.D. McIntyre

(308) 750-8384 or (308) 246-5600 tejas@mcintyreranches.com

(620) 704-3493 tmck7@ckt.net

Region 3 - Director

Region9 - Director

Region 15 Director

Tom Smith

Russell Fairchild

David Edwards

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

(254) 485-3434 fairchildranch@yahoo.com

(918) 557-0364 dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

Aaron Adkins

Sandi Nordhausen

Tom Matott

(704) 490-9208 doublealonghorns@gmail.com

(512) 750-1350 sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com

(303) 500-9465 tom@rockymountainlonghorns.com

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Terry King

Stephen Head

Alex Dees

(850) 299-6875 tklonghorns@centurylink.net

(979) 549-5270 headshorns@hotmail.com

(805) 300-4617 atdees@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

Region 18 - Director

Kathy Kittler

Tony Mangold

Chris Herron

(501) 690-0771 k.kittler@hotmail.com Charles Schreiner III* 1964-1967 Walter G. Riedel, Jr.* 1967-1969 J.G. Phillips, Jr.* 1969-1971 Walter B. Scott* 1971-1973 James Warren 1973-1975 J.W. Isaacs* 1975-1977 J.T. “Happy” Shahan* 1977-1978 John R. Ball* 1979-1980

8 | February 2017

Bill Anthony* 1981-1982 Dr. L.V. Baker 1982-1984 Dr. W.D. “Bill” Clark 1984-1986 Richard D. Carlson 1986-1988 John T. Baker 1988-1990 Riemer Calhoun, Jr. 1990-1992

(830) 237-5024 tmangold@sbcglobal.net

Glen W. Lewis 1992-1995 Tim Miller* 1995-1998 Sherman Boyles 1998-2003 Bob Moore* 2003-2005 Joel Lemley 2006-2007 Ben Gravett* 2007

Dr. Fritz Moeller 2007-2009 Maurice Ladnier 2009-2010 Robert Richey 2010 Steven Zunker 2010-2011 Brent Bolen 2011-2012 Bernard Lankford 2012-2013 Todd McKnight 2013-2016

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(909) 721-7577 chris@herronconstructioninc.com

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351 semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659 doublehelix@att.net Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331 fserna@elcoyote.com John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730 jtb2@earthlink.net Russell Hooks – (409) 381-0616 russellh@longhornroundup.com


Frank Anderson Jr. and III

828 S. Rosemary Dr. • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com

Beadle Land & Cattle Ray & Bonnie Beadle

Los Gatos & Hollister, CA 95032 (408) 834-0110 Ray.Beadle@gapac.com

Christa Cattle Co. Jason & Louis Christa

2577 FM 1107 • Stockdale, TX 78160 christacattleco@msn.com www.christacattleco.com Louis (210) 863-7003 Jason (210) 232-1818

Dalgood Longhorns Malcolm & Connie Goodman

6260 Inwood Dr. • Houston, TX 77057 (713) 782-8422 dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com

DuBose Bar D Ranch Keith & Tina DuBose

P.O. Box 370 • Ben Wheeler, TX 75754 (979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com www.dubosebard.com

Jack Mountain Ranch Hal & Betty Meyer

8000 Mount Sharp Rd. • Wimberley, TX 78676 (512) 422-4681 cell (512) 842-1116 halmeyer@hotmail.com

Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. John & Jane Thate

418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467

Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety Little Ace Cattle Co.

P.O. Box 386 • Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 ketyfolsom@aol.com

LL Longhorns Neil & Cynthia Hall

1414 Thorton Rd. • Houston, TX 77018 (206) 574-8950 www.lllonghorns.com cynthia@lllonghorns.com

McLeod Ranch Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod

355 CR 3031 • Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155

Brennan & Michele Potts Rocking P Longhorns

P.O. Box 579 • Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com bpotts1@verizon.net

Rio Vista Ranch Elmer & Susan Rosenberger

4818 Eck Lane • Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 Cell: (512) 422-8336 e-mail: elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com

Triple R Ranch Robert & Kim Richey

21000 Dry Creek Rd. • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

Westfarms Inc. Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland

13529 Hwy 450 • Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 Cell: (985) 515-3172 e-mail: westfarmsinc@gmail.com


Membership Matters

An Introduction to the LongHorn Online Registrations & TraNsfer System (H.O.R.N.S.) Overview

The HORNS system is an internetbased system that can be used by both TLBAA staff and members. For the office staff, the system provides a single integrated solution to functions that had previously been performed by a variety of separate, non-integrated systems, such as: • management of the registry database • management of the membership database • integration with the accounting system • support for shows & sales • miscellaneous administrative functions to support the Trails staff From a member perspective, HORNS provides TLBAA members an unprecedented level of access not only to information on their individual herd but also to the entire registry database itself. Some of the key functions provided to online members include: • view the member’s profile • view & maintain the member’s herd inventory • search the registry • enter registrations & transfers online • view & pay invoices online • generate reports (standard & custom) Numerous other useful functions and capabilities are also provided by the HORNS system. However, the remainder of this article describes each of these key functions in more detail.

Member’s Profile

For every TLBAA member, whether past or present, active or inactive, HORNS maintains a member profile which the member is able to view at any time. The member profile contains the usual contact information one would expect, such as name, address, and phone number(s). The member profile also includes the member’s email address and website address, if any. Access to the HORNS system is controlled by a member login id which consists of a user id and a password. The user id is always the member’s TLBAA membership number. The password is specified by the member during the HORNS setup procedure, which must be done via phone call to the TLBAA office. After initial setup has been completed and the member has successfully logged on to the HORNS system, the member has the ability to modify his password at any time.

HORNS provides the member with the ability to specify multiple addresses, for example home and ranch, as part of the member profile. The member can also individually specify which of the multiple addresses should be used for general, registry and accounting correspondence from the Association. The member can optionally identify the location of the member’s ranch to Google Maps which HORNS uses to display the member’s location as part of an online map of all breeders who have elected to have their ranches identified on the map. Once included in the map, Google Maps allows other members to get directions, contact information and website address for the member. Other information listed in the member profile includes the partnerships that the member participates in, if any, and some historical information such as member’s region, membership expiration date and last registration, transfer and purchase.

Herd Inventory

Within the HORNS system, animals are classified as either ‘active’ or ‘inactive’. Utilizing the HORNS system, the member is able to view and maintain an accurate inventory of the active animals in the member’s herd which can be viewed as a single comprehensive list or separate lists sorted by sex. In addition, the member is able to view a complete list of all inactive animals (legacy animals) which have been removed from the member’s herd for reasons such as sale, slaughter for beef or culling. As animals are removed from the member’s herd, the HORNS system provides a wide range of ‘disposal codes’ that the member can use to record the reason for removal. – Continued on pg 14

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Membership Matters – Continued from pg 10 card (Paypal account is not required to pay with credit card). Once the TLBAA Accounting department is notified that a member payment has been received, the associated transaction (registration/transfer) is committed to Historically, one of the features most often requestthe registry and the registration certificate is mailed out. ed by members was the ability Balances for all member acfor members to access to registry counts are updated daily. Meminformation. The HORNS Search BEYOND REGISTRATIONS bers can view their individual acTool feature makes that request a AND TRANSFERS count balances at any time. reality. Note also that in addition to Record horn measurements Utilizing the Search Tool, memonline payments, the member bers are able to search for, view Record Calving Ease still has the option to pay by eiand print detailed information for ther mailing a check to the TLBAA Record Udder size & description any animal, past or present, in the office or to provide a credit card registry. Detailed information on View customer history thru number on the phone. an animal includes all the inforprocessed transfers mation on the animal’s registraManage member profile such as tion certificate, ownership history The HORNS system provides brand and contact information (for animals currently owned by the following reporting capabilithe member), and progeny. ties: View entire recorded progeny list The registry can be searched by • calving history report View full pedigree animal name, registration num• animal status/disposal ber or private herd number (PHN). worksheet Upload photo(s) The Search Tool supports the use • custom report builder ...AND MUCH MORE... of a ‘wild card’ character (an asterThe calving history report lists isk) which can be used to perform the year-by-year production for partial searches, for example in cases where the exact each cow in the member’s herd. The results can be sortname may not be known. ed by name, registration number or private herd numSimilarly, the Search Tool can be used to perform a ber of the member’s cows. member search based on member name. The result of The animal status/disposal worksheet provides a a member search provides contact information for the herd inventory listing of all active animals in the memmember. ber’s herd with spaces to enter disposal codes and The HORNS Search Tool gives the members a very dates. Status/disposal codes can then be entered from the worksheet into the system to update the member’s powerful capability to assist them in researching pediherd inventory. This report can be generated as an Exgrees prior to sales or making breeding decisions. cel spreadsheet or as an Adobe pdf file. The custom report builder allows the member to With the HORNS system it is now possible for memgenerate a report for all active animals in the member’s bers to enter registrations and transfers online. Extenherd that also includes data selected by the member sive error checking ensures the validity of the data enfrom the list of possible items. Custom reports always tered by the member before staff commits the data to include the name, registration number, private herd the registry. In simple terms, there are three basic steps number and date-of-birth for each animal and the reto complete online registrations and transfers: port can be sorted by any of these items. 1. the member enters the data online 2. the member pays the fees online 3. upon receipt of payment, staff commits the data to If you haven’t signed up for HORNS, it’s simple! Simthe registry & mails certificates ply call your wonderful office staff and request to sign By completing steps 1 and 2 online, registrations up for HORNS. Have a password chosen and staff will and transfers can be completed in a much more timely do two things, 1) verify your current address and confashion. tact information such as phone number(s) and email For online registrations that require additional address (if any) and 2) set your password this first time documentation, such as AI or ET, the registrations are for you (passwords must be at least 4 characters long marked as ‘pending’ until the proper paperwork is reand can be more, you can use letters or numbers or a ceived and validated by the TLBAA staff. combination of both, and if letters are used the system is upper and lower case sensitive). You may change your password yourself should the need arise later. Payment for registrations and transfers entered onDon’t spend your hard earned money for something line with the HORNS system can be made via the Paypal that comes absolutely FREE with your membership payment system. Payments via Paypal can be made in fees. either of two ways: 1) with Paypal account; or 2) credit The potential benefit of members’ use of the HORNS herd inventory feature is an overall increase in the accuracy and efficiency of the registry.

Search Tool

Reports

Registrations & Transfers

Easy Sign-Up

Online Payments

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Herd Sires

S

ELECTING A

HERD IRE OBJECTIVITY

is not always easy when choosing a Texas Longhorn herd sire. There are so many traits that are wildy diverse, (such as coat pattern and color, horn shape and size) that it is very easy to be distracted from the fundamental requirements when the time comes to purchase, retain or co-invest in a herd sire or prospect.

Talking to Longhorn breeders can sometimes make it even more confusing, as each breeder has certain criteria they may put more emphasis on. Sometimes they are so excited about the special characteristics of the Longhorn breed that they forget to mention the basics when talking to those new to cattle, even though most breeders agree on the basic requirements of a viable herd sire. Here we take a look at the fundamentals as well as the views of a few Longhorn breeders with varied programs.

THE FUNDAMENTALS

For any breed of cattle there are certain things that must be true for a herd sire to be effective. These are the basic qualities that should be considered before putting a bull on your herd. SOUNDNESS/HEALTH Without structural soundess, a bull cannot physically perform his duties. He needs good feet and legs and a strong back and back end to do the job nature intended. Depending on herd and pasture size, a bull may do a lot of traveling every day to check for receptive females. Covering a female requires strength and during the busy parts of breeding season a bull incurs a lot of stress physically. When looking at a prospect start at the feet and go up to see if he is built for the job. Don’t overlook his health. Is he coming from a healthy herd? Is he up to date on vaccinations? If he is 16 | February 2017

not a virgin bull, has he had a trich test? (See pg. 40) Does he have a shiny coat and bright eyes? It is better to walk away if you have doubts on his health information. You do not want to take any health issues home to your cow herd. FERTILITY AND LIBIDO You just purchased a bull and turned him out with your cows, several of which you know are in standing heat and he’s standing off to the side more interested in grazing. It’s a shock to many new to cattle ownership, but some bulls have a low sex drive and show little interest in breeding females. Others are so slow to get the job done they miss breeding cows who are ready and delay those females being bred for another cycle. That sort of inefficiency hurts your bottom line. If purchasing a young prospect, don’t get too attached until you put him on females and see that he is willing to do his job. If you know you’re looking at a bull ready to get to work, another important factor needs to be tested – fertility. A Breeding Soundness Exam (BSE) is often used to determine if a bull is a good prospect. The first part of the exam is structural, checking feet, legs and ability to move and mount a cow. It continues to a structural exam of the reproductive organs as well as measuring scrotal circumference. Finally, sperm is collected and tested. It should be examined for motility (forward moving spermatozoa) and for morphology (evaluating the percentage of normal versus abnormal spermatozoa). Sperm production is ongoing in bulls and testing should continue throughout the life of the bull; as many factors such as injury, health and extreme environmental conditions can affect a bull’s score. Many improve and decline at different times in their life. DAM’S MILK PRODUCTION A bull contributes milk production genetics in future replacement heifers. Milk is essential for raising strong, healthy calves. Look at the maternal line of the bull or his daughters to check for milk production. The bull should

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By Myra Basham pass along the abilities of his dam. Check for good udder structure in his dam and female offspring as well.

times prefer a beefier look as well and put a lot of stress on an animal with correct structure. Others prefer a complete package animal with correct DISPOSITION structure, distinct Longhorn Another trait that a bull can characteristics and able to be pass along is disposition. If a utilized in a wide variety of bull is aggressive and you do markets. not feel comfortable being in While some visual confora pasture with him then you mation faults, such as a swaymight want to avoid using back or a crooked tail may him in your breeding probe the result of injury, a lot gram. That aggressiveness of breeders steer away from has a good chance of being such issues. Others are willing passed along to offspring. to take a chance, saying the “Disposition is very imoffspring they’ve produced portant to me when I look did not carry the negative trait for a herd sire.” explain JP forward. Photo courtesy of Barbara Fanklin Schmidt Wilkins, JP Ranch. “I want to So what is good all-around have cattle that I can halter conformation? There may not break easy, work without them bouncing off the pens be one answer but Wilkins has standards that have his and trailers and hurting themselves. If you breed with bulls winning in the show ring, at futurities and in horn a bull that has a good disposition the majority, not all of measuring competitions. them, but the majority will follow in his footsteps. I want “I want a bull that is structurally correct in every area,” to be able to walk out there and scratch on him and walk Wilkins states, “I want him sound-footed, big boned, around and show people my cattle without him scaring straight legged, flat back, deep in the flank, big stifle you back to the four wheeler. If you raise something like muscles, a thick loin down his back.” that, they will reproduce it.” Along with standard soundness, McGuire likes a “total The gentle nature of Longhorns has been so effec- package” animal that also tends to be weightier. “Realistively conveyed that many new to livestock do not real- tically, only 5-10 percent of my calf crop that are bulls, ize that yes, there are some Longhorns that will chal- have herd sire potential. So if I have 100 bull calves and lenge you in the pasture and when being brought into a only five to ten are potential herd sires, what am I going chute or pen. to do with the other 90?” Weightier animals that yield The majority of breeders agree that good disposition beef well means he always knows what his worst animal is a must, especially those who enjoy pasture visits. is worth, because grinding the whole animal makes for excellent healthy beef and he knows the market value CONFORMATION Beyond simple physical soundness, conformation of that. The bottom line for McGuire is making a living with encompasses the animal’s physical structure. While livestock and that requires animals that sell and bulls that many breeders say they look for good conformation, can produce desireable offspring for a variety of uses. what they look for in the physique of an animal can If looking at a bull calf, McGuire looks at the parents vary significantly. Beef producers may want bulls with first, then the calf. “I look at conformation – his feet, larger frames and heavier weights. Show people some– Continued on pg 20

MEET THE BREEDERS: JAMES WILKINS: James and wife, Paula, won the 2016 Mel Raley Rising Star Award for their heavy involvement with Longhorns in their first five years. James has a background in raising and showing several breeds of cattle and chose Longhorns for their unique characteristics that set them apart from all other breeds. In addition to his Longhorn activities, he works at Champion genetics. They reside in Ben Wheeler, TX.

DORA THOMPSON: Dora is a former TLBAA Board Member and long-time Longhorn breeder in Mansfield, LA. She has built a program that offers quality animals at all price ranges, suitable for many different types of programs, and can compete in all arenas. While she likes a complete animal, she utilizes genetics that will produce larger horn size in her program. (see pg. 7 of this issue)

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MATT MCGUIRE: Matt and his family have owned Longhorns for over 20 years in Perry, OK. Their ranch is a full-time cattle operation that has been in McGuire hands for generations. Matt has worked with Longhorns since he was 12 and strives to produce animals that will work in any program. He recently merged his program with that of long-time breeder and friend Charlene Semkin (see Jan. 2016 Trails Magazine) February 2017 | 17


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Herd Sires

– Continued from pg 17

the way he travels - scrotal correctness. I also look at a good clean, straight backline, lots of color and horn development. I also like to see a bull that looks like a bull. I don’t want to look at them and go ‘now is that a heifer or a bull?’” PREVIOUS OFFSPRING If you’re considering a bull that already has a calf crop on the ground, examine them to see if he is passing along his best traits consistently, especially with females of a type or genetic background similar to those you own. With a young, unproven sire prospect look at the production of his sire and dam.

THE SUBJECTIVE TRAITS

what he’s produced. Then the calf itself.” Wilkins looks at the pedigree specifically for horn potential, and if all other things are equal when choosing between multiple candidates he will look at what families they’re from. “If I am going to raise/purchase a herd sire then I want a bull that’s out of two 80”+ animals. That meets one of my requirements right off the bat which is the horn part of it,” Wilkins explains, “You have to have horn to win at the shows and futurities and of course to bring the big money at the sales.” While consistency is seen more today than in the past Wilkins, who has dealt with many breeds of cattle reminds us that Longhorns are extremely diverse in their genetic makeup. “Sometimes you get progressive results and with some crosses you get regressive results. I’ve seen one cow bred to a bull and have a beautiful 90” daughter. Crossed the same two again and got a 60” short, fat daughter. It can be very unpredictable.”

HORNS Nothing says Texas Longhorn like a set of beautiful, unique horns. And for many, bigger is better. But there are a multitude of horn sizes and shapes and even direction they turn. Some are COLOR twisty, some lateral, and What about A.I.? Coat patern and variety even some shaped like a of colors is a beloved trait horseshoe. It is a matter of Artificial Insemination (A.I.) is a tool that is of Texas Longhorns. It can deciding what you like and often used to improve the quality of your herd. also at times be the hardwhat you want your herd It can become expensive if one relies on a vet est thing to reproduce with to look like. Some bulls for the service on a large number of females, certainty. Color can be imwith lateral horns can actuso many programs use A.I. on selected females portant not only to draw ally cause their offspring to attention in the pasture, have horns sets much flat- and have a herd sire on the rest. but during competitions as ter than their dam’s. There well. are no gaurantees on horn shapes, but if you do your Wilkins explains, “If you can catch a judge’s eye with homework you can find a bull from genetics that tend horn and conformation and keep it with color then to throw the type of horns you want. you’re going to be right at the top of your class every Now that the larger horns sizes are becoming more time you go.” prevalent, most breeders want to make sure their meaMcGuire likes to utilize a black Longhorn bull to bring surements are decent just to have more marketable black and white colors into his herd. It’s a more uncomoffspring, even if they don’t intend to compete in horn mon color and adds even more variety. measuring competitions. Thompson warns not to buy a young sire prospect GENETICS soley on their color as she has watched many Longhorn Longhorn breeders tend to put strong emphasis on coat colors change drastically as they age. Once again pedigree. Genetics certainly play a part in having some she emaphasized that genetics don’t change, even if the idea of what you’ll produce and many of the basic obphysical characterisitics of the animal do with age. jective qualities are fairly consistent within some geThere are breeders through the years who’ve denetic lines, increasing your odds of those traits shining veloped herds that are predominantly black, brindle or through in the bull’s offspring. grulla and produced a sire who is considered consistent Dora Thompson, Sand Hills Ranch, admits “I keep them more for their breeding than anything else. They and throwing certain colors. They are, however, not as may not look like anything when we get ready to wean common. them and I still might keep them as a bull whereas I may have one that looks great, but if I don’t like his breeding I won’t keep him. It always amazed my last helper that was here forever. He could not understand why I would keep a scrawny little calf instead of a big good looking calf, but its strictly for their breeding. Even cows at sales. I’ll buy one that doesn’t look like anything betting she’ll turn into something later.” McGuire, on the other hand, focuses on the sire and dam. “I look a lot at the mother, as far as what her horn is and her milk production. I also look at the dad to see 20 | February 2017

WHAT ARE YOUR BREEDING GOALS? THE END PRODUCT If you are new to the breed, it is wise to talk existing breeders before pursuing a herd sire. Before having that first conversation, envision what you want to accomplish with your breeding program. If you were drawn to the breed because you are fascinated with extreme horn, your criteria beyond the basic reproductive requirements may be different than someone wanting to raise Longhorns strictly for a lean beef program. Many breed-

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Herd Sires – Continued from pg 20 ers today are striving for animals that can compete in all arenas and still maintain original breed characteristics. If you have no idea what you want to do at this point, pick up some back issues of Trails Magazine, look at breeder websites and go to events such as shows and futurities. See what appeals to you. Then see what bulls are in the pedigrees of the type of animal you want to produce. See an outstanding female and wish you could produce one like her? See if she has produced any available bull progeny. That’s what led to one breeder taking a chance on a 10 month old bull calf that turned out to be one of the most prolific sires in the industry. (See pg.36)

cheap cows and a bottom dollar bull without considering what you will do with those offspring. Poor cows and bulls generally produce undesireable offspring that you may wind up selling across the scales for little or no profit.

KEEP SALEABILITY IN MIND If you want that bull to support himself, you have to be able to sell his progeny. If this is a hobby and you just want pasture art, then color may be the key for you. If you want to develop a beef program, size and structure may be more important. You do not want to buy a few

tion? What do his calves look like? If he falls short of your expectations, replace him as soon as you can. Things can change over time, and one should never turn a bull out and forget about him. He is fifty percent of your production and if he falls short your program (and bank account) may suffer greatly.

CHOOSING WITHIN YOUR OWN HERD Once production ramps up and a year or two passes, you will be faced with bull calves of your own that you need to either retain for herd sire prospects or decide how to move them out of your program. First, how do you pick the potential herd sires? Wilkins stresses, “One thing you have to do, especially BUDGET when looking at your animals, you have to be critiHow much one can spend is always a part of the cal of them. And you have to be honest with yourself, equation. No matter the quality of your females, you especially when picking out a bull. If he has flaws, and want to be able to put a bull with them that is able to every animal does, you have to acknowledge the flaws produce offspring that are improved by the mating. If that you see. If you just think he’s so pretty and so nice, going for a small, high quality herd that can compete in you’ll turn a bull out there that has multiple flaws and the horn market you may opt to A.I. to some of the great he’ll wreck your herd. He’s 50 percent of your herd when producers, rather than invest in a high dollar herd sire of you turn him out with your cows.” your own. If the prospect meets the If you want a more difundamental requirements BULL CALVES NOT HERD SIRE verse program, many mentioned earlier, examine MATERIAL? POTENTIAL MARKETS: him closer. Look at conforbreeders have herd sires Many secondary markets are for steers and require your with part of their females mation. Is he structurally bulls to be castrated (see article on pg. 56) and choose to A.I. some of correct? Does he exhibit the ROPERS • TROPHY STEERS • BRUSH CONTROL the most promising ones, best charactersitics of the RIDING STEERS • LEAN BEEF hoping to get a few outsire and dam? Are you hapCROSS-BREEDING • FIRST CALF HEIFERS standing progeny to compy with his horn growth pete at a higher level. and structure? Is his color If budget is tight and the beneficial to your program? females you have purchased are less than ideal, try to If you can answer yes to all of these things, you may get a bull that meets the basics first, then look at your want to give him a chance. If you can only keep one or females and see what department they are weak in and two and have several that have herd sire potential, marchoose his secondary strengths based on what needs ket those to other breeders. Just make sure, if you’re tryimproving. For example, you have good milking, pro- ing to build a breeding program, that you do not sell a ductive cows that have nice structure, but are shorter herd sire prospect that you would not be proud to say than you’d like in the horn department. Until you can you bred in your program. get longre-horned females, you could choose to get the Next look at the remainder of your bull crop. Some best bull you can afford with good horn genetics. may be marketed for use by other breeds for their first It is realistic to expect that you may need to replace calf heifers. If they’re striking in color and already exfemales and eventually the bull as your program grows hibiting good horn growth you can always choose to and you seek greater improvement in production. market them as trophy steers. The remainder can be Wilkins went through that process, saying “When I sold as ropers or butchered and their meat sold. Once first got into it, I went out and bought two trailer loads again these choices need to be made with an unemoof cattle. I thought I had world beaters in every one of tional, critical eye if your goal is to profit from your sire’s them. All but one of those cows is either gone or out production. with a black bull right now. I learned over time what CONTINUED EVALUATION I had bought, and I had bought other people’s culls. It Once you’ve purchased or chosen a replacement took me a long time to learn what it would take to raise herd sire, continue the evaluation. Are the cows getting and win with the animals.” bred each year? Is he still maintaining his calm disposi-

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Herd Health

By Heather Smith Thomas

Winter Care for Bulls – Have a Good Health Program It is important to keep your bulls healthy and in good condition through winter, with adequate exercise rather than being too confined. “Have a good vaccination program, and control internal parasites as well as lice and ticks. Most people have a pretty good program for their cow herd but sometimes the bulls are ignored,” says Dr. Ram Kasimanickam, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University. Don’t wait until the last minute—just before breeding season--for vaccinations and parasite treatments, since the animals need enough time to build immunity against disease, and you also don’t want them carrying heavy parasite loads during winter. Craig Bieber raises cattle near Leola, South Dakota and says his bulls are on the same health program as the cows. “In January or February, we give cows their scour shot (Scour-Bos), and give the bulls their vaccination of BoviShield FP10. It’s important to give it at least 60 to 90 days before breeding season, according to our vet,” says Bieber. If you give these vaccinations too close to breeding, there may be adverse affects on fertility, since there’s a period of fever following vaccination. “We like to give vaccinations 30 to 60 days ahead, for the cows, but our vet thinks it’s essential for the bulls to do it more than 90 days ahead,” he says. The bulls are dewormed when they are brought in after breeding season, with a purge wormer. “We wait to do the lice treatment a little closer to the first of the year and might end up doing it again about the first of March. It seems like we need to do this more often for the bulls than cows. We monitor them to see if they need another treatment before spring,” says Bieber. Ken Dunn, a breeder near Tetonia Idaho, says his bulls are on the same vaccination program as his cows. “Everything gets 8-way twice a year and a modified live 4-way shot before breeding season. We worm everything in the fall. We treat cows for flukes when we give their Scourgard shot, and treat bulls for flukes in early spring when they get their spring shots. We do a pouron in the spring, as well, to help control flies,” he says. “We treat for lice and grubs in the fall, using a pouron, to get internal and external parasites. This usually works for lice through the whole winter, but on occasion we retreat the bulls for lice before spring. We just use the squirt guns and apply a topical product while we’re feeding. After we’ve put the hay out, while the 24 | February 2017

bulls are standing there eating, we walk up behind them and squirt each one of them. That’s an easy method, since our bulls are gentle,” he says.

Importance of Exercise and Paying Attention to Social Order in the Group

Bulls need exercise to stay fit. “There are many ways to make sure they get enough exercise. Some producers put the feed and water at different ends of the pen or pasture, so bulls have to walk. They need to be fit before the next breeding season,” says Kasimanickam. You don’t want bulls too fat—with no endurance—after their winter “vacation”. Exercise and travel is the healthiest situation for feet and legs, and for develop-

Photo Courtesy of Misty Tucker

ing athletic fitness. Having plenty of room also helps minimize the risk for injuries if bulls are fighting each other. When bulls are put into their fall/winter pastures, Bieber makes sure they can ease back together and get their differences settled and become comfortable with who is higher in the pecking order. “If they are too confined it’s worse and you have more damage to facilities,” he says. It’s always good for bulls to have lots of space. It’s often best to put yearling bulls in a pasture by themselves after taking them out of their cow groups, with the older herd bulls in a separate pasture. The bulls soon have the pecking order figured out, and there’s not much fighting after that. They establish this within the first day or two. This is easier on them—as they all fight one another--and no one bull gets picked on. If you keep adding bulls to a group, the newcomers are outnumbered and ganged up on by the ones that

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Herd Health – Continued from pg 24 are already there, and some of the new ones may be run to exhaustion. It’s best to not add bulls later, because this upsets the whole social order. Usually the old bulls tend to leave the young ones alone. The young ones are also more timid. They see the size of the older bulls and don’t challenge them as aggressively as they would their peers. The young bulls are agile and athletic and get out of the way of the older bulls, so they don’t get hurt. Even if the older bulls are rivals, in a horned beed usually the boss bull is the boss and no one challenges him very much. He won’t pick on any of the others but he cuts a wide swath wherever he goes, and they stay out of his way. If two of them can’t quite settle it, they eventually get tired of wrestling and tend to go off to their own side of the pasture. This is the advantage of a large pasture. They don’t want to fight every day and can go off by themselves. This usually works until you have to move the bulls, and then it’s best to bring one of those rivals in at a time, never together. It’s always good to have plenty of room for a group of bulls, especially the young ones, so they get adequate exercise. If they are physically fit, they have fewer injuries.

Take Care of Your Investment

It’s good business to take care of bulls. “It’s like having a maintenance program on your vehicles,” according to one breeder. “They last longer. If a person doesn’t take

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care of a young bull, it’s like running a vehicle 100,000 miles without an oil change. On some ranches people assume that the bulls will work under any conditions; people don’t intentionally neglect them, but it happens. It’s natural to try harder to take care of the larger group—the cows—especially when you are really busy and trying to deal with bigger issues. But it pays large dividends to pay attention to bulls and their needs.” Some challenges can arise, due to the constraints of each operation. Not everyone has a good place to put bulls or make pasture divisions so young bulls can be managed separately. The investment in young bulls is usually large, however, so it pays to try to protect that investment with proper off-season care. “Ranchers have become good at making assessments about what they need in a bull, to fit their cow herd and breeding program, etc. They’ve studied bloodlines and know how to feed their cattle, but even after they’ve done the homework and paid a substantial amount for bulls, some stockmen don’t follow through and take good care of that investment,” he says. More emphasis is placed on proper care of the cow herd, since that’s where the bulk of feed resources are going, but the breeding operations that don’t manage their bulls properly are usually the ones with more open cows. It always pays to fine-tune bull management as much as possible, to give them optimum conditions for health and fertility.

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Herd Health

Glossary of Reproductive Terms —A—­ A.I. (Artificial Insemination) – Placing semen in the reproductive tract by means other than natural service. afterbirth – Fetal membranes expelled by the cow following birth of the calf. alleles – Alternative forms of genes. Genes occur in pairs in cells. One gene in the pair may have one effect and the other gene in the pair a different effect on the same trait. anestrous – Period of time when the female cannot become pregnant (usually heifers before reaching puberty and cows following calving) —B— birth weight – A calf’s weight taken within 24 hours of birth.

tion of 0.00 means that as one trait increase or decreases, the other may increase or decrease – no consistent relationship. Correlation coefficients may vary between +1.00 and -1.00. cow – Mature female that has usually produced a calf. crest – Bulging, top part of the neck on a bull. cycling – refers to non-pregnant cows having estrous cycle. —D— dam – female parent dominance – One allele masks the effect of another (recessive) allele. A dominant gene only need be inherited from on parent to achieve expression. —E—

breed – (noun) Cattle with a common origin and shared characteristics which distinguish them from other groups within the same species.

embryo – Fertilized egg in early stages of development, usually prior to development of body parts.

breed – (verb) combining animals in a complimentary way to take advantage of superior traits

embryo transfer (ET) – Transfer of fertilzed eggs from a donor female to one or more recipient females.

breeder – in the TLBAA (and most beef associations), the owner of the dam of a calf at the time she was mated or bred to produce the calf.

estrous – Adjective paired with cycle to represent time from one heat to the next. Can range from 17 to 24 days, averaging 21 days.

breeding soundness examination (BSE) – Physical examination of a bull to determine breeding potential; includes measuring scrotal circumference, evaluating semen for motility and morphology and a physical exam.

estrus – Period of mating activity in heifers or cows. See heat.

bull – an uncastrated male bovine.

fetus – Late stage of development within the uterus – usually first half of pregnancy is considered embryo and second half fetus.

—C— calf – Young male or female bovine under 1 year of age. calf crop – Percentage of calves born in relation to the number of females exposed to breeding. calve – give birth to a calf. calving interval – Time between the birth of a calf and the birth of the next calf from the same cow. Can be days or months. carrier – Heterozygous individual having one recessive gene and one dominant gene for a given pair of genes (alleles) castrate – To remove the testicles chromosome – Long DNA molecules on which genes (basic genetic codes) are located. Cattle have 30 pairs of chromosomes. conception – The fertilization of the ovum (egg). congenital – Acquired during prenatal life. Condition exists at or dates from birth. correlation – Measure of how traits vary together. A correlation of +1.00 means that two traits will move in the same direction (either increase or decrease). A correlation of -1.00 means that as one trait increases the other trait decreases – a perfect inverse relationship. A correla-

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—F—

freemartin – female born twin to a bull calf (approximately 90% of such heifers will never conceive). —G— genes – Basic units of heredity that work in pairs (one from each parent) to determine traits and how a trait develops genotype – Genetic makeup of an individual. gestation – Time from conception to birth, usually 285 days in cattle gonad – Testis of the male, ovary of the female —H— heat – Common term for estrus, the period of time during which a female is receptive to mating. The most receptive period is referred to as standing heat. heat synchronization – Causing a group of females to exhibit heat at the same time by artificial manipulation of the estrous cycle. heifer – Young female bovine prior to the time she has produced her first calf. heredity – The transmission of genetic or physical traits from parents to offspring

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Herd Health— continued from pg. 28 heritability – Proportion of the differences among cattle, measured or observed, that is transmitted to the offspring. Heritability varies from zero to one. heterozygous – Individual possessing unlike genes for a specific trait homozygous – Individual possesses like genes for a specific trait —I— inbreeding – Mating of individuals more closely related than the average of a population. insemination – Depositing semen in the female reproductive tract in vitro – Outside the living body; in a test tube or artificial environment involution – Return of an organ to its normal size or condition after enlargement (e.g. the uterus after birth). A decline in size or activity of other tissues; the mammary gland tissues normally involute with advancing lactation —L—

—P— palpation – Feeling or examining by hand (e.g. the reproductive tract is palpated for soundness exam or pregnancy check) parturition – process of giving birth paternal – refers to the sire or bull pedigree – Records of the ancestry of an animal phenotype – Characteristics of an animal that can be seen and/or measured pheromones – Chemical substances that attract the opposite sex placenta – Membranes that form around the embryo and attach to the uterus postpartum – after birth prenatal – prior to being born prepotency – The ability of a parent to transmit its characteristics to its offspring so they resemble that parent more than usual. progeny – offspring of animals

labor – Parturition; the birth process

prolapse – Abnormal protrusion of part of an organ, such as the uterus or rectum

lactation – Secretion and production of milk lethal gene – A gene that causes death of an individual at some stage of life libido – Sex drive or the male’s desire to mate

prostate – Gland of the male reproductive tract located just behind the bladder that secretes a fluid that becomes a part of semen at ejaculation.

linebreeding - A form of inbreeding in which an attempt is made to concentrate the inheritance of one ancestor, or line of ancestors, in a herd.

puberty – Age at which the reproductive organs become functionally operative and secondary sex characteristics begin to develop.

linecross – Crossing of inbred lines

purebred – An animal of known ancestry within a recognized breed that is eligible for registry in the official herdbook of that breed.

—M— masculinity – Well-developed secondary sex characteristics in the neck, chest and shoulders of a bull maternal – Pertaining to the female maternal traits – all traits expressed by the cow —N—

—Q— qualitative traits – Those traits in which there is a sharp distinction between phenotypes, such as black and white or polled and horned. Usually only one or two gene pairs are involved.

nonadditive gene effects – Favorable effects or actions produced by specific gene pairs or combinations.

quantitative traits - Those in which there is no sharp distinction between phenotypes, with a gradual variation from one phenotype to another (such as weaning weight). Usually, many gene pairs are involved, as well as environmental influences.

—O—

—R—

navel – Area where the umbilical cord was formerly attached to the body of the offspring.

open – non-pregnant females outbreeding/outcrossing – Mating females of a herd to unrelated males of the same breed ova – plural of ovum, meaning eggs ovary – Female reproductive organ in which the eggs are formed and progesterone and estrogenic hormones are produced ovulation – Shedding or release of an egg from the follicle of the ovary ovum – egg produced by the female

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recessive gene - A gene that has its phenotypic expression masked by its dominant allele when the two genes are present together in an individual. reference sire  - Bull designated to be used as a benchmark in progeny testing other bulls (young sires).  Progeny by reference sires in several herds enables comparisons to be made between bulls not producing progeny in the same herd(s). registered - Recorded in the herdbook of a breed. repeatability – A measure of the consistency between records of an individual. The top producers one year will tend to be near the top next year.

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Herd Health— continued from pg. 30 —S— scrotal circumference - Measure of testes size obtained by measuring the distance around the testicles in the scrotum with a circular tape.  Related to the bull’s semenproducing capacity and age at puberty of his daughters. scrotum - Pouch that contains the testicles.  Also a thermoregulatory organ that contracts when cold and relaxes when warm, thus tending to keep the testes at a lower temperature than that of the body. semen  - Fluid containing sperm that is ejaculated by the male.  Secretions from the seminal vesicles, prostate gland, bulbourethral glands, and urethral glands provide most of the fluid. seminal vesicles - Accessory sex glands of the male that provide a portion of the fluid of semen. served - Female is bred but not guaranteed pregnant. service - To breed or mate. settle - To become pregnant.

testosterone - Male sex hormone that stimulates the accessory sex glands, causes the male sex drive, and results in the development of masculine characteristics. trait ratio - Expression of an animal’s performance for a particular trait relative to the herd or contemporary group average.  —U— udder - Encased group of mammary glands of the female. uterus  - That portion of the female reproductive tract where the young develop during pregnancy. —V— vagina - Copulatory portion of the female’s reproductive tract.  The vestibule portion of the vagina also serves for passage of urine during urination.  The vagina also serves as a canal through which young pass when born. variance - Variance is a statistic that describes the variation we see in a trait.

sire - Male parent. soundness - Degree of freedom from injury or defect.  steer - Bovine male castrated prior to puberty.

vas deferens - Ducts that carry sperm from the epididymis to the urethra.

sterility - Inability to produce offspring.

vulva - External genitalia of a female mammal.

—T—

—W—

teat - Proturberance of the udder through which milk flows.

“with calf” - Heifer or cow is pregnant.

testicle - Male sex gland that produces sperm and testosterone. Definitions found at www.beefusa.org as well as a glossary previously published in the 1996 TLBAA Breeders Handbook.

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JP Rio Grande 2003 – 2016 One of the most prolific sires in the Texas Longhorn breed, JP Rio Grande, has passed away. JP Rio Grande was a product of Johnnie and Pat Robinson’s breeding program, sired by the well-known J.R. Grand Slam, who hails back to Gunman. His dam was TX W Lucky Lady, a genetic gold mine in her own right, going back to Lamb’s Power Play and TX W Rose Bud, which brings in Phenomenon, Cowcatcher and Classic genetics. JP Rio Grande’s impact on the industry can be seen in the success of his offspring. was great interest Currently there are shown by others 974 TLBAA registered in the industry and offspring of JP Rio before Mark knew Grande, making him it he had unexpectone of the top three JP Rio Grande at 12 months (above) edly built a name producers of TLBAA and 21 months (right) for JP Rio Grande. Registered offspring At 21 months of since the registry started in 1964. age and 57” TTT, JP Rio Grande finally caught the atThe “2016 Cash Cows” list, which highlights animals tention of Bob Loomis. “I bought part of him as a twosold at public auction for $10,000 or more, featured 53 year-old. At that time, he was showing tremendous females with JP Rio Grande in their pedigree – a little horn growth for his age and he just looked like a very over 30% of the total list! complete bull. In that era and at that time he was one of Among his progeny are many outstanding offthe bigger horned bulls at that age. And, you know, he’s spring, including the current longest horned cow in the on the pedigree of a lot of the bulls that have gone on to history of the breed, BL Rio Catchit. Her son, Cowboy surpass him.” Tuff Chex, holds the Guinness World Record for lon“I have several 80” daughters of his, and one 90” gest horned bull. cow at the time which is the biggest horned cow in the Mark Hubbell was the first to show interest in the breed and she produced the biggest horned bull in the 10-month old bull, simply because he saw the bull’s breed and then we have other daughters that will hit 90” dam in a Trails Magazine ad and wanted a bull out of before long. He’s left a tremendous impact on my herd.” her. “I called Johnnie up and asked if he had any bulls Loomis added that JP Rio Grande was used on a lot out of her (TX W Lucky Lady) and he had this one out of great cows, being partnered on through the years not of Grand Slam. Johnnie promised me that if I didn’t like only with Hovingh and Hubbell, but also Bill Hudson him when I got him that I could send him back.” and Joe Valentine. Toward the end of his career he was Mark called up Dave Hovingh and asked him if he owned by John Harman and Chris Clark, then Clark, wanted to partner on a bull and at that year’s Horn Brett Krauss and John Randolph. Showcase Hubbell and Hovingh took possession of JP Mark explained his enduring use of the bull, “Rio was Rio Grande. Hubbell had ownership in the bull for most real good at taking a high horned cow and flattening of Rio’s life. out that horn which gave you more tip-to-tip. He did When they got Rio home, they measured him at apit on a consistent basis.” Hubbell adds, “I kept him for proximately 12 months old and he was 33.25” TTT which as long as I did because I never found another bull that at the time was remarkable. “I ran an ad announcing could produce the high quality that he did at such a his measurement. I measured him a month later and great percentage of the time.” he had grown over 2” which was unheard of. So I ran Loomis and Hubbell agree that JP Rio Grande’s imanother ad and updated his measurement. He kept pact on the Longhorn breed will continue to be seen for growing about 2-2.5 inches every month so I just kept generations to come. running the ad with an updated measurement.” There 36 | February 2017

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Marketing

Who’s That Bull?

The Importance of Promotion

D

o you have a bull in your pasture right now that is throwing outstanding progeny? Does anyone else know about it? Failing to promote your herd sire is a little like “hiding your candle under a bushel basket.” The effects may especially be felt when it comes time to sell the sire’s calves and you might experience a lack of interest because no one has ever heard of your valued bull. If you want buyers looking at your calves, they need to know about your outstanding mystery sire. Consider promoting your sire with pasture tours. Invite prospective buyers to your ranch or consider hosting a field day with your Texas Longhorn affiliate. Additionally, local livestock associations, 4-H groups or FHA groups could be invited as well, which serves as a way of spreading “Eyewitness” accounts of that magnificent bull and his outstanding progeny. Participating in industry events like shows, futuri-

even though you have followers or “likes”, that does not guarantee they see every post you make. The newsfeed wall settings are customizable and updates are often made requiring users to revise their settings. Ideally your Facebook page and posts directs users to your website. As we discussed in the Trails September 2016 issue, building a website can be as simple as using a free web page builder and selecting a domain or contacting a design professional to create one for you. Once your website is live, how do you let everyone know? Yes, you can announce it on Facebook and hope folks searching for Longhorns come across it. If you utilize a professional to create your website, they can assist you not only with content but with SEO. Search engine optimization affects the visibility of your website in search engine’s unpaid results, referred to as “organic” results. In general, the higher ranked your site is on the search results page or if your site appears f you want those calves to sell people more frequently, the more visitors your site need to know more about your herd sire will receive. Here is where print advertising comes in. It ties, field days, and the TLBAA Horn Showcase provide may seem hard to imagine, yet there is still a part of the excellent opportunities to show off and promote your ag industry that has not yet ventured into the world of bull. It also allows you and others to see how he is persocial media or their internet access is limited. In some ceived. The Horn Showcase has the added benefit of rural areas cell phone coverage is nonexistent or folks providing you with an official measurement to use in choose to not use smartphones or computers. Even if your promotions. Even if not participating, attend the you’re on the web and active on social media, people festivities to take advantage of the occasion, learn more need to know how to find you and your special bull about the breed, and network with other breeders. Netthrowing outstanding calves. working is one of the best ways to find out who is lookThe most targeted and immediate audience is found ing for animals to add to their program; and by being in your hands right now, the Trails Magazine. Our readpresent you have the chance to let them know you have ers are genuinely interested in what you have to offer. just what they’re looking for and to promote your herd A common mistake new advertisers make is to run a sire and his progeny. single full page ad, get discouraged by the lack of feedIf your program has grown to the point where your back and suspend advertising. If you want to introduce calf crop is larger than the number of buyers you’re a herd sire and increase the desirability of his offspring, bringing in through face-to-face contact, you might consider buying a smaller ad and run it frequently. consider marketing your sire through the web, social Show photos of sire and dam if he is young. As progeny media, email marketing and print advertising. With adhit the ground add their photos to the ad. Take fresh vancements in technology, these methods enable you photos every month or two to show how he is proto reach a wide audience in an economical way. gressing, including horn measurements. You may even Facebook has become a popular avenue to promote want to show updated pictures of his offspring as well. your herd, generate interest, and draw in buyers. But Over time his name will become known and he will be for most, seeing a photo is not enough. The bull’s pedirecognized as a producer. Interest in him will increase. gree should be clearly visible along with any other wellBut keep in mind, unless you ask prospective buyers known genetic lines. Discuss his gentle nature, correct how they heard about you, they rarely will volunteer confirmation, and his sire and dam if you are familiar that they saw your ad. with them. Don’t miss the opportunity to show progeIs your bull the “next big thing” or are you trying to ny, buyers want to see the potential of those youngsters find buyers for your sire’s offspring? If so, promotion is you have for sale. a must. The best approach is a well-designed combinaAn important point to consider with Facebook is that tion of all the methods discussed.

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Herd Health

By Jeremy Powell & Tom Troxel / University of Arkansas

Trichomoniasis in Cattle Introduction Trichomoniasis, commonly referred to as “trich,” is a venereal disease of cattle caused by a protozoa organism, Tritrichomonas foetus. This small, motile organism is found only in the reproductive tract of infected bulls and cows. Infected cattle can lead to major economic losses due to infertility, low pregnancy rates, an extended calving season, diminished calf crops and occasional abortions in pregnant cows and heifers. It can also be very costly to eradicate from a herd. Trich is not a human health issue, but it is currently a reportable disease in Arkansas.

Transmission and Clinical Signs Trich is transmitted from an infected bull to the cow’s reproductive tract during breeding and then migrates to the uterus. Infected cows will experience infertility and early embryonic death, causing the cow to return to estrus (heat) and subse- quently leading to poor pregnancy rates and an extended breeding season. This disease causes very few outward signs in infected cows or bulls. An infected cow may show a very subtle, mild vaginal discharge 1 to 3 weeks after becoming infected, but in many cases no outward signs are apparent. Obviously, these signs can easily go unnoticed; therefore, trich

can be present in a herd for a considerable time before it is suspected and diagnosed. Repeat breeding or infertility of individual cows can last up to 5 months. The reason for the open or late cows is that the organism causes the loss of the calf a few weeks into the pregnancy. The majority of infected cows will clear the infection if given 120 to 150 days of sexual rest. Most cows will eventually settle, if given enough time, but their immunity to the disease is weak; therefore, they can be reinfected the next season. An infected bull has virtually no outward signs of infection, but the bull is the main source of transmission for the herd. In bulls, the organism lives on the tissue lining of the penis and preputial sheath. Once infected, bulls (especially bulls over 4 years of age) often stay infected for life. Trich typi- cally gets introduced into a herd by the introduction of one infected animal, an infected bull.

Diagnosis In spite of the fact that bulls do not show clinical signs of infection, the organism is easier to find in bulls than in cows. This is because bulls become long-term “carriers” of the disease while cows eventually shed the infection. Two weeks of sexual rest is recom- mended before a bull is tested. This allows the organisms time to -- continued on pg. 42

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Trichomoniasis -- continued from pg. 40 build up to a detectable level. A wash and scrapings from inside the preputial sheath are collected and placed into special growth media. This sample can be used for two types of test: a culture test or a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Confirmation of infection can be identified by three separate culture tests (weekly intervals) or one PCR test. For more information about testing, contact your local veterinarian.

Treatment and Prevention Currently, there is no approved treatment for cattle infected with trichomoniasis. However, cattle producers can do a lot to protect their herds from a trichomoniasis outbreak. • When purchasing bulls, purchase virgin bulls if possible. • If purchasing a bull that has prior breeding experience, or if you are renting or borrowing a bull for breeding, then isolate the bull and have it tested for trich before turning the bull out with the cows. • If you suspect a problem in your herd, test your current bull battery. Any positive bulls should be culled and sold for slaughter only. • Keep the neighbor’s bull out of your cow pasture. You don’t know if he may be a carrier of the disease.

• Pregnancy check cows in a timely manner after the breeding season to identify a potential problem early. • When purchasing females, purchase virgin heifers and/or cows from a reputable source. • Keep fences in good repair to prevent accidental contact with potentially infected cattle. Monitor traffic in and out of the herd. • Keep good records of a herd’s reproductive efficiency. The records can help identify a possible problem. • Maintain a defined breeding season, perform pregnancy exams and cull open cows. A vaccine is available to aid the control and prevention of this disease. The vaccine can be useful in cows but does not protect bulls from becoming infected. Vaccination requires two injections, typically administered 2 to 4 weeks apart. Consult with your veterinarian when starting a trichomoniasis vaccination program for your herd. Cattle producers should be aware of trichomoniasis testing requirements prior to mov ing cattle. For the current trichomoniasis testing movement requirements, contact your state livestock comission or your local veterinarian.

JEREMY POWELL, DVM, Ph.D., is associate professor and veterinarian with the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Department of Animal Science, Fayetteville. TOM TROXEL, Ph.D., is professor and associate department head - animal science with the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Department of Animal Science, Little Rock.

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Product Spotlight

MULTIMIN® 90- Supplementation For Your Bull Bulls may lose from 100- 400 lbs of bodyweight during the breeding season which equates to a loss of 1 to 4 units of body condition score. For this reason, high quality mineral/supplement products should be provided prior to breeding cows and through the season. Providing supplements should not be confused with overfeeding. As overweight bulls have lowered sperm production, which could be due to the layer of fat that lines the scrotum and insulate the testes. Thereby raising the temperature and retarding sperm development. It is essential to know the limitations of available forage, regarding mineral levels which can be determined from blood samples and plant tissue analysis (with input from the vet and nutritionist) or more simply from local knowledge. The best approach to supplementation is to include a balance of all minerals that impact production and especially reproduction. MULTIMIN®90 is an injectable supplemental source of zinc, manganese, selenium and copper for cattle. For bulls it is recommended to administer 3 times per year or 90 days prior to breeding/semen collection. University studies and trial data show that adequate levels of

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these essential trace minerals demonstrate increased reproduction efficiency and improved immune response.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

With Multimin® 90 metalloenzymes levels, which usually peak between 25-30 days, are enhanced resulting in increased immunocompetence and reproduction efficiency. It is also commonly used in heifers prior to breeding and calves at birth/weaning. From the Manufacturer: Each ml of Multimin® 90 is a chelated source of 60 mg zinc, 10 mg manganese, 5 mg selenium and 15 mg copper. Multimin® 90 should be administered to cattle by SQ or IM injection. The recommended dosage is 1 ml per 100 lbs body weight for calves up to 1 year of age; 1 ml per 150 lbs for cattle 1-2 years of age; and 1 ml per 200 lbs for cattle over 2 years of age. Frequency of administration may vary to suit management program. Zinc, manganese, selenium and copper. The average price for Multimin® 90 100ml is $55 and $205 for 200ml. A prescription is required. Visit multiminusa.com for detailed information including a Trace Mineral Map by state, supplementation health articles and university product studies.

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Affiliates send us your news! Let people know what’s going on in your area and encourage others to join in the fun.

“The South Texas Longhorn Association held the annual Edna Winterfest Show at the Brackenridge Main Event Center in Edna, on December 9 and 10, 2016. Also added to this very successful event, was the first Edna Winterfest Futurity held on December 11, 2016.   The show chairs and futurity chairs, CHRISTY RANDOLPH Merrilou and Danny Russell, Bubba Bollier, Troy Unger, Derek and Hope PRESIDENT Thurmond, Troy Unger, Louis Christa and Sandi Nordhausen did a terrific LPINESRANCH@AOL.COM job and kept the show and futurity running smoothly.  So many volunteers, Annie Morgan, Phil and Brenda Tudyk, John Randolph, Nick Kaatz, Danny Russell along with Bubba Bollier, Troy Unger, Derek Thurmond, Sara Jennings and others helped moving cattle and kept everything calm.  We thank them for jumping in to make this a great success!  So thankful for all our judges.......show judges were Keith DuBose, Russell Hooks and Justin Hansard.  Futurity judges were Steve Azinger, Julie Pack, Josie Becker, Stephen Head and Don Bordelon;  all did a terrific job!! We have San Antonio Rodeo coming up and have been excited to see the entries increase over the last several years.  We will follow San Antonio with Rodeo Austin in March and then finally the always fun Rockdale show.  Watch for information coming up on those events. South Texas Longhorn Association has seen an uptick in our membership and look forward to a wonderful 2017 for all.”

SOUTH TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

Cattle Baron Premier Longhorn Sale is closing in on us. The sale date is February 25th. We are working on the catalog and we are still taking Futurity entries for our February 24th Winchester Futurity. The Futurity deadline is February 10th. Please put those dates on your calendar and plan to join us for a good time. The Winchester Futurity entry forms can be downloaded and RICK FRIEDRICH printed at www.TLBGCA.com . PRESIDENT RICK@RIVERRANCHLONGHORNS The sale and futurity location will be again be at the Mid-Tex Livestock Facility located just east of Navasota, Texas on Hwy 90. The sale barn, restaurant and pens are spacious and a very comfortable setting for our event. They give us plenty of room for sale, futurity and transit animals. The Friday night social will also be at George & Peggy Wilhite’s ranch home again. This event is always a good time. Please add it to your calender of events not to be missed. The next big thing - The Spring Show will again be held at Miracle Farm, located near Brenham, Texas. The show dates are May 5-7, 2017. It gets a little bit bigger and better every year. With entries and attendance rivaling the World Show, we hope to make it even a little bit better this year. Please join us.

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It’s about time for our TLBT (Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow) Seniors to apply for scholarships and applications to schools and PRESIDENT programs in preparation KEITH DUBOSE for post-graduation! Many DUBOSETINA@YAHOO.COM have already accomplished these important decisions for the future, which schools or jobs to apply for. Wrapping up a successful 2016 show season for ETLA, under the supervision and direction of our Youth Advisors Jacob Weatherholtz and Haley Calhoun, we had a great year and great participation in our 2016 Youth shows! ETLA Youth had an overall total of 226 entries by the end of show season out of 402 entries!! TLBT Officers ETLA Many thanks go out to our ETLA Youth Advisors and the TLBT officers. The ETLA Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow president for the past year has been Carter Smith, of Aledo, Texas. Carter and his parents Eric and Chrissy Smith of Aledo, have been raising and showing longhorns for five years. Besides TLBT, he has participated in the Aledo FFA Chapter and completed his high school senior 2016 Carter Smith, TLBT year early in the fall President ETLA semester of 2016. 2016 Carter and Junior Champion 2014 Carter and Eric Smith w Lana Hightower East Texas State Fair Carter and ten other classmates will have Haltered Bull Edna Festival their commencement ceremony to complete their high school graduation in January 2017! He’ll be busy showing through-out this spring! Carter aspires to pursue a military career and go into the U.S. Navy! We look forward to high-lighting our ETLA graduating seniors in the next couple of months in TRAILS!

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President’s Message Dear TLBT Members, Last month, I’m sure all of you made New Year’s Resolutions to push yourselves to be the best you can be, and that’s great! I also hope you’re keeping in mind our service project. Open your heart this month to people around you, and you will be rewarded with a great feeling. I know that we have much planned for Glen Rose this year, so we can bring in some donation money for Shriner’s Hospital, and add to our World Show Fund. With your help, I know we can make a real difference. It was great to see all of you at the Fort Worth Stock Show general membership meeting, and we had a great show! On that note I’ll remind you of a few things: Seniors, don’t forget about all the scholarship opportunities around you. There are several scholarships within your local affiliates, as well as ones from the TLBAA. It is 100% worth a look on the TLBAA website. Also, please remember there is a special slideshow for seniors at our World Show Banquet, so send your pictures to any of our contacts. Don’t forget to tag us in your pictures from throughout the year, especially you seniors! Spring is always the busiest part of the show year, so I’m sure I’ll be seeing you guys soon! I’ll add that throughout this spring season, you may all be thinking about ways to involve yourself more with the TLBT. Becoming an officer or director is a great way to involve yourself, and I hope you’ll all consider joining us here on the board!

Until next time,

Shelby Rooker, TLBT President

TLBT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT

Jacob Lowrie

TLBT Office: Intermediate Director Age: 12 School: McCarroll Middle School Birthday: March 24th Number of Years in the TLBT: 2 years Why did you join TLBT? I wanted to show Longhorns! What is your favorite Longhorn show, and why? Autobahn Scholarship Show. I appreciate the generosity of the Chase family and also love the variety of activities! What is your favorite Longhorn color and/or pattern? White with light tan spots and traditional twisted horns Where did you earn your first award? What type of award? Holiday Extravaganza 2014 .2nd place Showmanship – I won a calf halter. What is your funniest TLBT moment? When I was on “clean up duty” in the arena at the Glen Rose Show. The announcer kinda made fun of me…. We all laughed. What has been your biggest challenge showing Longhorns? Dealing with my emotional cow. What is your favorite movie? Star Wars Do you enjoy showing Longhorns and why? Yes! They’re amazing animals and a Texas icon! What person has influenced you the most? Robert Baden Powell, the founder of Boy Scouts of America If you were going to be turned into a mythical creature, what would you want to be? Leprechaun – I like to make everyone laugh! What is your favorite quote?Why? DO YOUR BEST. It is the boy scout motto and it applies to all areas of life. What is your favorite season?Why? Spring because of the nice weather. What do you want to be when you grow up? Historic Preservation Architect What is the best part about being a TLBT member? Missing lots of Fridays of school for cow shows. What advice would you give a newcomer to TLBT? Jump in with both horns and get involved!

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2016 Horn Showcase Winner’s Gallery

BULLS CLASS 38 M.C. MR. BIG STUFF Tip-to-Tip, Total Horn, Composite This photo was not included in December 2016 Trails Horn Showcase Winner’s gallery. We apologize for the omission.

IN THE PEN We thank these folks for kindly droppin’ in at the TLBAA office. 1. Amanda & Stoney Rogers, Paradise, TX 2. Lori McCarty, McCarty Productions; Lorinda Valentine, Panther Creek Ranch

1

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FEBRUARY SPRING Calving

TLBAA Breed Advisory Committee’s

Herd Management Guide

1. As females near parturition and lactation, nutrient requirement for energy, protein, minerals and vitamins increase substantially. Two-thirds of fetal growth occurs during the last three months of gestation. Prepartum nutrition of females has been shown to also influence colostrum (first milk) production, subsequent calf viability and liveability, weaning weights and percent of calves actually weaned. During the last 3060 days of gestation, it is recommended that females consume 1.8 -2.0 pounds of total protein daily from grass and supplemental feeds to insure adequate fetal development and first milk production. 2. During the first 3-4 months of lactation, a 1000 pound cow with average milking ability (producing 10 pounds of milk daily) requires 11.5 pounds of energy, 2 pounds of protein, 0.06 pounds of calcium, 0.05 pounds of phosphorus and 36,000 international units of vitamin A per day. Warm season pasture grasses are dormant until mid-April and provide most of the energy needs, but limited protein, phosphorus and Vitamin A. Sufficient nutrients must be supplied to the lactating females in the form of protein and/or energy supplements, as well as mineral and vitamin mixes to meet their nutrient requirements. If pasture grass is plentiful, but dormant and poor in quality during this time of year, then protein is generally your first concern. A 1000 pound cow in good body condition with average milking ability should generally be fed at least 1.5 pounds of crude protein (CP) from a protein supplement, depending upon the protein value and availability of the dormant pasture grass. Feeding

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3-4 pounds of a 40 percent CP supplement, 4-6 pounds of a 30 percent CP supplement or 6-8 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement per head per day should be adequate to meet most protein and energy needs. Choice of appropriate supplement (20 percent CP, 30 percent CP or 40 percent CP) should be based upon the cheapest source of protein. Price per pound of protein may be determined by dividing the cost per pound of protein supplement by the percentage of crude protein in the supplement. A source of salt, as well as a good commercial calcium:phosphorus mineral mix with added Vitamin A should be available on a free choice basis. If your cows are thin in body condition, then feeding supplemental hay plus higher levels of a low crude protein, high energy range cube (20 percent crude protein) will provide increased intake of vital nutrients. If pasture grass is limited due to overgrazing or poor rainfall during summer, then energy is your first concern. Feeding a medium (8-10 percent crude protein) hay free choice plus 2-3 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement daily or approximately 15-20 pounds of a high quality (15-17 percent crude protein) hay per head per day will provide an excellent source of energy and protein for the females. If winter pasture is available, then the females should not need additional energy or protein supplementation. 3. Even though Texas Longhorns are known for calving ease, difficult births may arise. Check first calf heifers (due to calve) and pregnant cows daily for possibility of calving difficulties. Once fetal membranes (water sac) have been expelled and ruptured, assistance should be provided if calf delivery has not occurred within 30-60

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August 11-12, 2017 Latigo Trails Equestrian Center Colorado Springs, Colo.

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minutes. 4. Colostrum consumption during the early hours of a calf’s life is essential for passive absorption of important antibodies needed for protection from disease. Absorption of antibodies found in colostrum ceases after 24 hours after birth; therefore, a newborn calf should receive at least 2 quarts (5-6 percent of birth weight) in first milk within the first 6 hours to insure adequate antibody protection. Commercial sources of colostrum may be purchased or the first milk from other cows may be frozen for later use. Many females, especially first calf heifers, do not produce sufficient colostrum and there is no way of knowing how much the calf has nursed. Baby calf scours are typically the result of inadequate consumption of colostrum during the early hours of a calf’s life. Clean calving areas and proper attention to the newborn may reduce exposure to disease organisms and reduce incidence of scouring problems. 5. Dip navels of newborn calves in a 7 percent tincture of iodine solution when you happen to be there shortly after birth as a preventive measure of navel ill problems. 6. At 12-14 months of age, vaccinate replacement heifers with intramuscular IBR/BVD (modified live virus), a 7-way Clostridial booster, 5-way Leptospirosis, and vibrosis at least 60 days before breeding. Consult a local veterinarian on vaccine types and other

vaccinations recommended in your area. Deworming is recommended prior to spring grass. 7. Evaluate the growth of your yearling heifers as well as first calf females. The goal should be to have your earling heifers weigh 65 percent of their mature weight by first breeding (14-15 months of age) and have a weight of 85 percent of their mature weight, including the weight of the fetus, prior to calving at 23-25 months of age.

FALL Calving:

1. Continue supplemental feeding program until good spring grass is available and calves are weaned. Lactating cows grazing dormant range grass require approximately 3-4 pounds of a 40 percent range cube or 6-8 pounds of a 20 percent range cube daily to meet their protein requirement. If winter pasture is available, forage intake should be sufficient to meet nutrient requirements of lactating females. 2. Remove bulls after a 90 day breeding season. A February 20 breeding date will result in December 1 calves. For a fall calving program, September, October and November calves are most desirable. 3. Consider limited creep feeding (16 percent crude protein) for calves nursing older cows, first calf heifers or any calves needing additional nutrition.

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Registrations

TLBAA A.I. Certification Regulations The TLBAA requires that each animal registered have a private herd number and a holding brand. Your registration certificate application contains a space for these brands on the animal, i.e. right hip, left hip, left, etc. The TLBAA does not require that your holding brand be registered with your state agency; however, it is recommended. Registering your brand with the TLBAA does not get your brand registered in the state. State registration varies from state to state. In Texas, you must register your brand at your county clerk’s office. In Mississippi, brands should be registered with the Brands Registrar with the Bureau of the Highway Patrol. Check with your local veterinarian, state cattleman’s association or your county extension agent to locate the agency which registers brands. Also ask them how often your brand must be renewed. The Private Herd number, PH number, as it is more commonly called, is often misunderstood. The TLBAA office does not assign these numbers. The PH number is your own personal identification system to assist

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you in keeping each individual animal’s records. Any system can be used. A common practice is the three numeral system. The first number is usually the last numeral of the year date (5 for 2015, for example).

The next two numbers are usually in sequence of the arrival of the offspring. For instance, the first calf born in the year 2015 could be numbered 501. With a simple odd/even number modification, a breeder can add more information to his PH numbering system. A common method is to assign bull calves odd numbers and heifers even numbers. For instance, a PH number of 203 could tell a breeder that the animal the number is referring to is the third offspring bull calf born in 2015. The third female offspring would be 204. Remember that private herd numbers must numerals only, not Roman numerals or letters. The PH number is the animal’s permanent number and cannot be changed. The number must be branded on the animal, along with the breeder’s holding brand, before application is submitted to the TLBAA office for registration. A breeder is not allowed to duplicate the same number on two different animals within the same herd. Anyone requiring assistance with a PH numbering system for their herd should contact the TL-

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BAA office for assistance. If anyone has made an error in assigning PH numbers, you can get assistance from the office in correcting the problem. An A.I. Breeding Certificate/Embryo Transfer Certificate form is available from the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America. When registering offspring of an A.I. Sire, this form should be sent to the TLBAA office along with the Registration Application. Spaces are provided for the name and information of the cow and on the A.I. Certified Sire. Also required is the date of insemination and the name, address and signature of the inseminator. If embryo transfer is used, the name, address and signature of the transfer technician is required. If you are the one who inseminated the cow, we must have your signature. If you have any questions, please contact the TLBAA office.

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Herd Health

Safely Castrating Calves The best age and method for castrating a bull calf the han- dles, so it can be placed over the testicles and may vary, depending on your situation. Some stocksitu- ated above them. men feel that a calf should be allowed to grow all sumThis can be readily accomplished with a small calf mer before being castrated, since calves grow faster as simply by placing him on the ground on his side, havbulls. The hormones of the young bull enable him to ing someone hold his head and front legs so he can’t gain weight more quickly than a steer of the same age. get up. Kneel- ing behind him so he can’t kick you with But on the other hand, steers may produce better qualhis hind legs, hold the scro- tum with one hand and ity beef, if you in- tend to sell or butcher the animal for place the ring over them, using the stretching tool. beef. Always make sure both testicles are in the scro- tum Some people also have a preference regarding before situating the ring. Pull them down as far as poswhether a knife or a “rubber band” is the best way to sible so they are completely below the ring when it is castrate. Whichever method is used, the animal must be adequately restrained for castration. It is true that young bulls grow a little faster than steers, due to hormonal influences on growth. It is also true that the meat from steers is sometimes better quality. Steer meat is also less apt to be dark colored and tough due to stress and excitement at the time of butchering— since steers tend to be more docile and calm than bulls. Any bull calf that is not destined to become a herd sire should be castrated. Longhorn breeders who are trying to produce ani- mals with spectacular horns prefer to castrate any bull calf they don’t intend to keep for breeding, since the steers The simplest and most humane way to castrate grow the longest horns. with less risk of infection or extensive blood loss is Most stockmen castrate with a bander. bull calves early in life. The Photo of Callicrate Bander courtesy of No Bull Enterprises. procedure is not only much easier on calves when they re leased. If the calf is tense, or trying to kick, he may are small, but steers are easier to handle and work pull one or both testicles back up out of your grasp. He with than young bulls as they grow up. Steers are less must be relaxed. aggressive, and much safer to be around. As the calf The tight ring cuts off circulation to the scrotum. grows up, he’ll be less apt to try to get through fences The calf feels some numbing discomfort for a short and go find other cattle, if he is a steer. while, and then no pain at all. Tissue below the conThe simplest and most humane way to castrate, and stricting ring dies from lack of blood, the scrotal sac with less risk of infection or extensive bleed- ing, is to and its contents wither and dry up, falling off after a put a “rubber band” (elastrator ring) on the calf when few weeks—leaving a small raw spot that soon heals. he is a day or so old. This can be done any time durSurgical castration with a knife can be done at any ing the first weeks of life. These strong rubber rings age, but this, too, is much easier on a calf when done can be purchased cheaply at a farm supply store or vetyoung, while testicles are small. Removing the small erinary clinic. The ring is about the size and shape of testicles of a baby calf is not nearly as risky for blood Cheerios cereal. The tool to apply the rubber ring has loss or infection as it would be after he is older, with four small prongs upon which you place the ring. The larger testicles and more blood supply. tool spreads and stretches the ring when you squeeze 56 | February 2017

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By Heather Smith Thomas A slit is made in the scrotum with a clean, sharp knife. Each testicle is worked out through the slit and removed with the knife. There is less bleeding if you scrape the knife back and forth on the cord attachment to sever it, rather than making a straight cut. A scraped and torn blood vessel tends to shrink up and close off more readily than a vessel cut straight across.

No matter which method is used, the animal must be adequately restrained for castration.

Surgical castration is easiest when a calf is lying on its side. Begin with a clean sharp knife and and make a slit in the scrotum.

The procedure is easiest when the calf is lying on his side. A small calf can be held by two people; one person holds the head and front legs and the other holds the hind legs so the calf cannot kick the person doing the castrating. A large calf is more safely held with ropes, or restrained on a calf table (a small tilt- ing chute). If restraining him with ropes, you need a rope around his head and one front leg so the calf will not choke and also so he cannot get up, or a halter on the head, and both front feet secured with another rope, and a rope around both hind legs with a half hitch so he can’t kick out of it. The ropes should be securely tied or dallied around a fence post or some other sturdy object so the large calf will be com- pletely restrained— stretched out on the ground on his side. While the calf is thus restrained, this is also a good time to give him any needed vaccinations, or put in an ear tag or brand him.

Work each testicle out through the slit for removal with the knife..

Scrape the knife back and forth on the cord attachment to sever it, rather than making a straight cut, for less bleeding.

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Environment

Carbon Sequestration a Positive Aspect of Beef Cattle Grazing Grasslands STILLWATER, Okla. – Beef cattle grazing on grass pastures might not be the first thing people think of when discussing the subject of combatting greenhouse gas emissions, but it is an agricultural practice providing significant dividends to the effort. “Environmental as well as economic sustainability are key elements of best management practices for agriculture, as most people involved in agriculture are well aware they are stewards of the land,” said Keith Owens, Oklahoma State University associate vice president for the university’s statewide Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station system. “Air, water, soil; we pay attention to all of them.”   In terms of greenhouse gas emissions, scientific

studies have long indicated the burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes such as deforestation have led to an increase in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide since the beginning of the industrial revolution. “Carbon dioxide atmospheric concentrations have risen from 280 parts per million prior to the industrial revolution to more than 400 parts per million today,” Owens said.  Carbon sequestration – the long-term capture and storage of carbon from the atmosphere, typically as carbon dioxide – is a method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.   “Many different agricultural production practices can capitalize on carbon sequestration in both soil and biomass to reduce negative environmental effects,” Owens said. “These practices enable use of the natural carbon cycle to replenish carbon stores while reducing the amount of carbon in the atmosphere.”   That is where beef producers who employ grasslands as a pasture resource come in. Research by R.F. Follett and D.A. Reed published in 2010 examined the effects of grazing on soil organic carbon storage in North American rangelands. Follett and Reed found impacts ranging from no change to up to 268 pounds of carbon stored per acre per year.

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By Donald Stotts “The variability in the imtion system, enhancing carbon CARBON SEQUESTRATION: pact grazing can have on carsequestration through well-manbon sequestration on rangeaged cattle grazing practices and he long term capture lands, pastures and grasslands improved feed production can reand storage of carbon is due to differences in specific duce the carbon footprint of beef,” grazing management practices said Clint Rusk, head of the OSU from the atmosphere from operation to operation,” Department of Animal Science. said Sara Place, assistant proMost beef cattle in the United typically as carbon fessor of sustainable beef cattle States spend the majority of their dioxide t is a method systems with OSU’s Division of lives on pastures and grasslands. Agricultural Sciences and NatFor those finished in a feedlot, apof reducing greenhouse ural Resources. proximately 65 percent to 85 per The number of cattle grazed cent of their lives will be spent gas emissions per acre, fertilization and prior grazing. For grass-finished beef land use can all affect how much carbon is stored. cattle, up to 100 percent of their lives may be spent graz “While changes in carbon sequestration due to graz- ing. ing or other management decisions may be relatively   The main difference in carbon footprints between minor on a per acre basis, they can translate into signifi- grass- and grain-finished beef occurs as a result of the cant impacts if implemented on a large scale given the time spent in the finishing phase, the type of feed connumber of acres of grasslands in the world,” Place said. sumed and the body weight of the animal at the end of  Research by R. Lal published in 2011 indicated if soil the finishing phase. organic carbon in agricultural ecosystems and grass “Cattle entering the final ‘finishing’ stage are typicallands could be increased 10 percent globally during the ly 12 to 16 months of age, and remain in this phase until 21st century, the atmospheric concentration of carbon they achieve a level of body condition that will provide dioxide could be reduced by 100 parts per million.   “In addition to the potential for grazing to increase the capacity of soil carbon sequestration in certain cases, grazing beef cattle and other ruminants such as sheep and goats provide economic, societal and environmental value from available pasture and grassland resources,” Place said.  Pasture and grasslands account for approximately 27 percent of the land area in the United States. Avoiding the conversion of this land to tilled cropland and residential uses could help prevent further increases in greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, establishing permanent pastures for grazing beef cattle on degraded croplands that are currently tilled or of poor quality can sequester carbon at rates comparable to forests, according to a study released by the Council for Agricultural Sciences and Technology in 2011. When it comes to beef production, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates direct emissions from the U.S. beef industry are only 1.9 percent of the total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. “Regardless of the beef produc-

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February 2017 | 59


Environment carbon dioxide through the proa positive eating experience for establishing permanent cess of aerobic respiration. consumers,” Rusk said. “As humans, our collective Average grass-finished cattle pastures for grazing impact goes far beyond that,” provide a live animal weight at Owens said. “Transportation and harvest of 1,100 pounds, a dressbeef cattle on degraded electricity production account ing percentage of 58 percent and for more than 56 percent of total a carcass weight of 638 pounds croplands that are greenhouse gas emissions in the per animal resulting in eight U.S. currently tilled or United States. We should strive to citizens being fed per animal, acdo what we can to reduce emiscording to USDA per capita beef of poor quality sions, and in agriculture most do, consumption data. mainly because, as a whole, the  For grain-finished cattle with can sequester carbon responsibility of being stewards a live animal weight at harvest of the land is not lost on us.” of 1,300 pounds, a dressing perat rates comparable Environmentally sound, ecocentage of 64 percent and a carnomically viable “best managecass weight of 832 pounds per to forests ment practices” for beef producanimal would result in 10.4 U.S. tion, crop production and other citizens being fed per animal, acagricultural practices are available online at http://osucording to USDA per capita beef consumption data. Rusk, Place and Owens stress it is important to re- facts/okstate.edu via the OSU Extension fact sheet sysmember that the Earth’s carbon cycle is a naturally oc- tem.   “Developing and disseminating research-based incurring process and involves cyclical recycling, storage formation to help people solve concerns and issues of and use of a resource in different physical states.  Plants, animals including humans and soil microbes importance to them, their families and their communiconsume molecules containing carbon for energy and ties is a fundamental aspect of our responsibilities as a release some of the carbon back into the atmosphere as land-grant university,” Owens said.

.

60 | February 2017

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SHOW RESULTS STLA WINTERFEST DEC 09, 2016 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 2: 1. ANCHOR T BLACK BEAUTY, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX CLASS 3: 1. CR JAWGIE GIRL, Jeff and Kristi Ging, PALACIOS, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR AMBROSIA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX CLASS 4: 1. HD SAMSONITE’S PENNY, Kris Michalke Peterek, WEIMAR, TX 2. SKH CORDELIA, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 5: 1. CF CRYSTAL FIND, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX 2. JKG LEAP YEAR LADY, Jeff and Kristi Ging, PALACIOS, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: CF CRYSTAL FIND, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: CR JAWGIE GIRL, Jeff and Kristi Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 8: 1. JP PAINTED JEWEL, JP Ranch, BEN WHEELER, TX 2. JKG REGINA JAWGE, Jeff and Kristi Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 9: 1. KETTLE’S GARNET, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX 2. RHL NANCY JANE, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX CLASS 10: 1. SANDDOLLAR HONEY BUTTER, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. SVR HERSHEY, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 11: 1. BZB STOMPIN’ HONEY, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. SKH REINA, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: BZB STOMPIN’ HONEY, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: KETTLE’S GARNET, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: CF CRYSTAL FIND, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: BZB STOMPIN’ HONEY, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 17: 1. SANDDOLLAR CARMEN, Phillips Longhorns, ANGLETON, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: SANDDOLLAR CARMEN, Phillips Longhorns, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 22: 1. JR HAWKEYE BRANDON, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. ANCHOR T CRUISER, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX CLASS 23: 1. SJ OCEAN’S WHITE CAP, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. JKG MARCH MADNESS, Jeff and Kristi Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 24: 1. SW DIRTY DEEDS, JP Ranch, BEN WHEELER, TX 2. BRAZOS REBEL 636, Ronnie & Jackie Mullinax, CYPRESS, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: SW DIRTY DEEDS, JP Ranch, BEN WHEELER, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: BRAZOS REBEL 636, Ronnie & Jackie Mullinax, CYPRESS, TX CLASS 27: 1. ANCHOR T SKIPPER, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. AWESOME CADDY, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX CLASS 28: 1. MC HANK WILLIAMS, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. SARCEE RHINESTONE COWBOY, Bruce and Connie Ollive, BIG SANDY, TX CLASS 29: 1. CR JAWGE’S LIL BRO, Cactus Rose Longhorns, EDNA, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion: ANCHOR T SKIPPER, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: AWESOME CADDY, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: ANCHOR T SKIPPER, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: AWESOME CADDY, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. CHERRY MARY KETTLE, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX 2. J R CHARLENES RED LADY, Jonell Westerberg & Norman (Roger) Ridgway, ROCKSPRINGS, TX CLASS 4: 1. CR SIMPLY GORGEOUS, Cactus Rose Longhorns, EDNA, TX 2. BLACK ANGEL, Thurmond Longhorns, ADKINS, TX CLASS 5: 1. CASANOVAS CANDY, MB Longhorns, DENTON, TX 2. BRR BECCA’S VALENTINE, John Marshall, LLANO, TX Free Female Junior Champion: CASANOVAS CANDY, MB Longhorns, DENTON, TX Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: CHERRY MARY KETTLE, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX CLASS 8: 1. SANGRIA 4, Jorge Avalos, FERRIS, TX 2. KETTLE’S SMOKIN’ ROSE, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX CLASS 9: 1. LL SOPHIE’S SUNNY, Kris Michalke Peterek, WEIMAR, TX 2. SR 007’S PEARLS 544, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX CLASS 10: 1. BRR STARRY NIGHT, John Marshall, LLANO, TX 2. MIDNIGHT BLUEGRASS, John Marshall, LLANO, TX CLASS 11: 1. KETTLE BELLE, Troy Unger, CEDAR PARK, TX 2. OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Free Female Senior Champion: KETTLE BELLE, Troy Unger, CEDAR PARK, TX Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Free Female Grand Champion: KETTLE BELLE, Troy Unger, CEDAR PARK, TX Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: CASANOVAS CANDY, MB Longhorns, DENTON, TX CLASS 16: 1. CR JUST FROSTED CHEX, Cactus Rose Longhorns, EDNA, TX 2. J R BLUEBONNET BRAYLINN, Jonell Westerberg & Norman (Roger) Ridgway, ROCKSPRINGS, TX CLASS 17:

1. CR TOTEM’S PLUM GORGEOUS, Cactus Rose Longhorns, EDNA, TX 2. CWR FRENCHIE, Jonell Westerberg & Norman (Roger) Ridgway, ROCKSPRINGS, TX CLASS 19: 1. JTW HANNAH’S SLICK, Cactus Rose Longhorns, EDNA, TX 2. HC MISS DAKOTA, Jonell Westerberg & Norman (Roger) Ridgway, ROCKSPRINGS, TX Free Mature Female Champion: JTW HANNAH’S SLICK, Cactus Rose Longhorns, EDNA, TX Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: CR TOTEM’S PLUM GORGEOUS, Cactus Rose Longhorns, EDNA, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 2: 1. ANCHOR T BLACK BEAUTY, Marisa Garcia, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 3: 1. ANCHOR T QUEEN VICTORIA, Marisa Garcia, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. JP WIND IN THE WILLOWS, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX CLASS 4: 1. SKH CORDELIA, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. RAFTER M MEMPHIS ROSE, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 5: 1. JKG LEAP YEAR LADY, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX 2. CF CRYSTAL FIND, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: JKG LEAP YEAR LADY, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: SKH CORDELIA, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 8: 1. SPECKLED LADY 15/15, Peyton Anderson, KEMAH, TX 2. JKG REGINA JAWGE, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 9: 1. GD HENRIETTA, Ryan Henderson, HOUSTON, TX 2. RHL NANCY JANE, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX CLASS 10: 1. SVR HERSHEY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. SKH HOOK’EM LOLA, Koby Maclain Green, WEST COLUMBIA, TX CLASS 11: 1. OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. BZB STOMPIN’ HONEY, Marisa Garcia, SAN ANTONIO, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SPECKLED LADY 15/15, Peyton Anderson, KEMAH, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: SPECKLED LADY 15/15, Peyton Anderson, KEMAH, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 18: 1. JR HAWKEYE BRANDON, Taylor Marie Hoyle, MANSFIELD, TX 2. ANCHOR T CRUISER, Marisa Garcia, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 19: 1. HPBT JAMIN BRISKET, Ryan Henderson, HOUSTON, TX 2. SJ OCEAN’S WHITE CAP, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 20: 1. CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Blake Merriman, HOUSTON, TX 2. CARSON’S NEED FOR SPEED, Alexandria Rodriquez, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 21: 1. AWESOME CADDY, Zaida Espinosa, HOUSTON, TX 2. ANCHOR T SKIPPER, Marisa Garcia, SAN ANTONIO, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: JR HAWKEYE BRANDON, Taylor Marie Hoyle, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Blake Merriman, HOUSTON, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. JKG MR. AMERICA, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 26: 1. BZB BRUISER, Madison Guerrero, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. MAY SKIES, Merideth Harvey, ALVARADO, TX CLASS 27: 1. SKH CALL ME PRINCE, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX 2. JP FULL METAL JACKET, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: SKH CALL ME PRINCE, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: BZB BRUISER, Madison Guerrero, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 30: 1. TACO BUENO, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX 2. JTW HILLBILLY BUDDY 4/5, Savana R. Taylor, THORNDALE, TX CLASS 31: 1. T C STRATFORD, Cooper D. Taylor, THORNDALE, TX 2. C2R SALT LICK, Jacob Sylvie, Austin, TX CLASS 32: 1. RHL LONE STAR, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX 2. SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 33: 1. TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX 2. T C RESPECTED DEFEGO, Savana R. Taylor, THORNDALE, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: RHL LONE STAR, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: RHL LONE STAR, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. KETTLE ONE, Thurmond Longhorns, ADKINS, TX CLASS 2: 1. 2LB ELI, Bronson Baker, BRENHAM, TX 2. FRED 3, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX

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February 2017 | 63


SHOW RESULTS Steer Junior Champion: 2LB ELI, Bronson Baker, BRENHAM, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: FRED 3, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Steer Grand Champion: 2LB ELI, Bronson Baker, BRENHAM, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: FRED 3, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX

STLA WINTERFEST - POINTS ONLY Dec 10, 2016 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. SANDDOLLAR AMBROSIA, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX 2. CR JAWGIE GIRL, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 4: 1. SKH CORDELIA, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. T C GOLLY GOSH GIRL, Cooper D. Taylor, THORNDALE, TX CLASS 5: 1. JKG LEAP YEAR LADY, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX 2. BLUEBELLE 1/16-1, Logan Daniels, SEGUIN, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: JKG LEAP YEAR LADY, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: BLUEBELLE 1/16-1, Logan Daniels, SEGUIN, TX CLASS 8: 1. SPECKLED LADY 15/15, Peyton Anderson, KEMAH, TX 2. JKG REGINA JAWGE, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 9: 1. SITTIN’ ON A STAR, Kelli Jones, HOUSTON, TX 2. RHL NANCY JANE, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX CLASS 10: 1. CVL VICTORY IS SWEET, Ryan Henderson, HOUSTON, TX 2. SKH HOOK’EM LOLA, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 11: 1. OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. SKH REINA, Kelli Jones, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: CVL VICTORY IS SWEET, Ryan Henderson, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: CVL VICTORY IS SWEET, Ryan Henderson, HOUSTON, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 19: 1. SJ OCEAN’S WHITE CAP, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. TL BRUTUS, Logan Daniels, SEGUIN, TX CLASS 20: 1. CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Blake Merriman, HOUSTON, TX 2. BRAZOS REBEL 636, Peyton Anderson, KEMAH, TX CLASS 21: 1. AWESOME CADDY, Zaida Espinosa, HOUSTON, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: AWESOME CADDY, Zaida Espinosa, HOUSTON, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Blake Merriman, HOUSTON, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. JKG MR. AMERICA, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 26: 1. DOUBLE LB HIJO, Bronson Baker, BRENHAM, TX 2. HI 5’S HANGTIME, Zaida Espinosa, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 27: 1. JP FULL METAL JACKET, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX 2. CR STRIKING GOOD LOOKS, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: JP FULL METAL JACKET, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: JKG MR. AMERICA, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 30: 1. QUICK DRAW MCGRAW, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX 2. WHISKEY RIVER 12/15, Hannah Daniels, SEGUIN, TX CLASS 31: 1. PK’S ROUGH RYDER, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX 2. TC VANDERBILTS CAMO STAR, Savana R. Taylor, THORNDALE, TX CLASS 32: 1. RHL LONE STAR, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX CLASS 33: 1. TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX 2. T C RESPECTED DEFEGO, Savana R. Taylor, THORNDALE, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: RHL LONE STAR, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: RHL LONE STAR, Joseph Faske, BURTON, TX

NTLBA HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA Dec 09, 2016 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. JCG CHARLIE 1042, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX 2. MS DUTCHESS SH, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 4: 1. IVANKA 4/12, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX 2. SUNRISE SPARKLE 26, Infinity Ranch Land and Cattle, BURLESON, TX CLASS 5: 1. SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Greg & Kathy Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX 2. MS SAUCY LADY SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Female Junior Champion: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Greg & Kathy Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: IVANKA 4/12, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 8: 1. CS EDGE’S SWEET GEORGIE, George and Cindy Dennis, COUPLAND, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR ANGELINA, Greg & Kathy Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX CLASS 9: 1. CHAPARRAL MASQUERADE, Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX 2. TC3 DISCO DISCOVERY CP, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX CLASS 10: 1. STEEL LACE SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. CT SYDNEY, Joe Tucker, PARADISE, TX CLASS 11: 1. TESSA BELLA, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR ESCALLADA, Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: CHAPARRAL MASQUERADE, Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: STEEL LACE SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS

64 | February 2017

Haltered Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL MASQUERADE, Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Greg & Kathy Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX CLASS 16: 1. BLACK CADILLAC, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. BAR G REBA, Bar G Ranch, MONTAGUE, TX CLASS 17: 1. MK CATALINA, Ryan M.& Devin D. Culpepper, FORT WORTH, TX 2. TL COUNTRY RAZZLE DAZZLE, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: BLACK CADILLAC, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: MK CATALINA, Ryan M.& Devin D. Culpepper, FORT WORTH, TX

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 21: 1. CHAPARRAL J.R., Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX 2. MC MERLE HAGGARD, Madison Connell, FERRIS, TX CLASS 22: 1. SANTA ANA, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX 2. CHARIS MEMPHIS REIGN, Charis Horse & Cattle, Ennis, TX CLASS 23: 1. HD SENTINEL, George and Cindy Dennis, COUPLAND, TX 2. REDSTAR THAT’S RIGHT, Doug and Deborah Burkham, Red Oak, TX CLASS 24: 1. CL VELOCITY, Chris Schaper, BRENHAM, TX 2. HI 5’S THUNDERSTRUCK, Infinity Ranch Land and Cattle, BURLESON, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: CL VELOCITY, Chris Schaper, BRENHAM, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: SANTA ANA, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 28: 1. AJ NIGHTSTORM, Addison Crumpton, MIDLOTHIAN, TX 2. OLD NO.7, Savannah Anderson, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 29: 1. HI 5’S MOONSHINE, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Senior Champion: HI 5’S MOONSHINE, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: AJ NIGHTSTORM, Addison Crumpton, MIDLOTHIAN, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: CL VELOCITY, Chris Schaper, BRENHAM, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: SANTA ANA, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX

PRODUCE OF DAM

CLASS 34: 1. CL ATHENA, Ryan M.& Devin D. Culpepper, FORT WORTH, TX 2. MK CATALINA, Ryan M.& Devin D. Culpepper, FORT WORTH, TX Produce of Dam: MK CATALINA, Ryan M.& Devin D. Culpepper, FORT WORTH, TX

GET OF SIRE

CLASS 35: 1. SANDDOLLAR ESCALADE, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. TL BULLETPROOF, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX Get of Sire:

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. MS DUTCHESS SH, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. JP AMIDSUMMERNIGHTSDREAM, Matthew Wallace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 4: 1. HD SAMSONITE’S SOPHI, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX 2. IVANKA 4/12, Hadley Morgan, BOWIE, TX CLASS 5: 1. SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX 2. MS SAUCY LADY SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Junior Champion: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: MS DUTCHESS SH, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX CLASS 8: 1. SANDDOLLAR ANGELINA, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX 2. CS EDGE’S SWEET GEORGIE, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX CLASS 9: 1. CL GEORGIA RAIN, Caitlyn Holson, ALBANY, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR HARPER, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 10: 1. DIAMOND Q CINNIA, Shelby A. Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX 2. TTT DIZZY DIVA, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 11: 1. CHAPARRAL SPRINKLES, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX 2. CL BELLAMY, Caitlyn Holson, ALBANY, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: DIAMOND Q CINNIA, Shelby A. Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SANDDOLLAR ANGELINA, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q CINNIA, Shelby A. Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 17: 1. CHAPARRAL J.R., Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX 2. MC MERLE HAGGARD, Christian Connell, FERRIS, TX CLASS 18: 1. SANTA ANA, Hadley Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. DEJA VU SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 19: 1. R4 BEACH BOY, Avery Roesler, KRUM, TX 2. HD SENTINEL, Madilyn B. Schaper, BRENHAM, TX CLASS 20: 1. CL VELOCITY, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX 2. FULL THROTTLE SH, Avery Roesler, KRUM, TX CLASS 21: 1. HD NIGHTFIRE, Shelby A. Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: CL VELOCITY, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: HD NIGHTFIRE, Shelby A. Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. JCG AVENTADOR, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 26: 1. REMINGTON RED 6, Megan Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. HI5 GR8 NO BALLS OF FIRE, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 27: 1. ECC GUNNY, Weston Riley Parks, HICO, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR LEGENDARY ACES, Lance Shipman, GUSTINE, TX Youth Bull Junior Champion: CL VELOCITY, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX Youth Bull Junior Champion Reserve: REMINGTON RED 6, Megan Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 30: 1. BRR DOC HOLIDAY, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. JCG G’DAY MATE, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 31: 1. HI 5’S FIREBALL, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. ROCKY ROAD RZL, Lucas Zarsky, MARQUEZ, TX CLASS 32: 1. HEARTBRAKE KID, Emma Stapp, ALVARADO, TX

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


2. HI 5’S DIPSTICK, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 33: 1. HHR GUNNER, Heather McDuff, PARADISE, TX 2. HI 5’S HANGOVER, Avery Roesler, KRUM, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: HEARTBRAKE KID, Emma Stapp, ALVARADO, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: HHR GUNNER, Heather McDuff, PARADISE, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: HEARTBRAKE KID, Emma Stapp, ALVARADO, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: ECC GUNNY, Weston Riley Parks, HICO, TX

NTLBA HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA - POINTS ONLY Dec 09, 2016 YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. MS DUTCHESS SH, Hadley Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. R4 KRUM CAKE, Avery Roesler, KRUM, TX CLASS 4: 1. IVANKA 4/12, Hadley Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. SUNRISE SPARKLE 26, Savannah Anderson, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 5: 1. SUNRISE SPECIAL 16, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX 2. MS SAUCY LADY SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Youth Female Junior Champion: IVANKA 4/12, Hadley Morgan, BOWIE, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: SUNRISE SPARKLE 26, Savannah Anderson, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 8: 1. SANDDOLLAR ANGELINA, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX 2. CS EDGE’S SWEET GEORGIE, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX CLASS 9: 1. CHAPARRAL MASQUERADE, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR STONEHONEY, Andrew Hartsell, FERRIS, TX CLASS 10: 1. STEEL LACE SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. C BAR SASSY PANTS, Audrey McDuff, PARADISE, TX CLASS 11: 1. CHAPARRAL SPRINKLES, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX 2. TESSA BELLA, Hadley Morgan, BOWIE, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: SANDDOLLAR ANGELINA, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: CHAPARRAL MASQUERADE, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: SANDDOLLAR ANGELINA, Cade Radenbaugh, MCKINNEY, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: IVANKA 4/12, Hadley Morgan, BOWIE, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 17: 1. CHAPARRAL J.R., Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX 2. MC MERLE HAGGARD, Christian Connell, FERRIS, TX CLASS 18: 1. CHARIS MEMPHIS REIGN, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. SANTA ANA, Hadley Morgan, BOWIE, TX CLASS 19: 1. REDSTAR THAT’S RIGHT, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. HD SENTINEL, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX CLASS 20: 1. CL VELOCITY, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX 2. HI 5’S THUNDERSTRUCK, Savannah Anderson, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 21: 1. HD NIGHTFIRE, Shelby A. Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX 2. W5 ROCK ISLAND, Rafael Pereyra, FERRIS, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: HD NIGHTFIRE, Shelby A. Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: CL VELOCITY, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. JCG AVENTADOR, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 26: 1. REMINGTON RED 6, Megan Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. TOMMIE TUCKER PLR, Sierra Skidmore, BURLESON, TX CLASS 27: 1. TTT SRS COPENHAGEN, Sierra Skidmore, BURLESON, TX 2. JCG PRISIONER OF WAR, Matthew Wallace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: TTT SRS COPENHAGEN, Sierra Skidmore, BURLESON, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: REMINGTON RED 6, Megan Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 30: 1. JCG G’DAY MATE, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. ALPHA 115, Katlynn Michelle Putnam, ALVORD, TX CLASS 31: 1. REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. HI 5’S FIREBALL, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 32: 1. CAMP BOSS, Savannah Anderson, MANSFIELD, TX 2. REDSTAR MOST IMPRESSIVE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 33: 1. D/O TROUBADOUR, Madison Looney, ALVARADO, TX 2. BOWIE GL, Jason Harwell, BRYSON, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: CAMP BOSS, Savannah Anderson, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: D/O TROUBADOUR, Madison Looney, ALVARADO, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: CAMP BOSS, Savannah Anderson, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: D/O TROUBADOUR, Madison Looney, ALVARADO, TX

MINIATURE SHOW RESULTS ARK-LA-TEX FALL SHOW Oct 22, 2016 NON-HALTERED MINIATURE FEMALES

CLASS 1: 1. SS MINI L’IL ABAGAIL, Dave & Althea Sullivan, 2. SS MINI RUMMY, Dave & Althea Sullivan, CLASS 2: 1. TONKAWA LEGACY EFFIECENA, Dave & Althea Sullivan, 2. SH DUTCH DAZZLER 77/3, Mary Mann, Non-Haltered Miniature Female Grand Champion: TONKAWA LEGACY EFFIECENA, Dave & Althea Sullivan, Non-Haltered Miniature Female Grand Champion Reserve: SH DUTCH DAZZLER 77/3, Mary Mann,

KAUFMAN POLICE ASSOCIATION LONGHORN SHOW Nov 18, 2016 NON-HALTERED MINIATURE FEMALES

CLASS 1: 1. SS MIN L’IL HALEY, Jersey Girl Plantation, 2. SS MINI TRIPS, Dave & Althea Sullivan, CLASS 2: 1. SS MINI PRINCESS PATTI, Dave & Althea Sullivan, 2. COWBOY DAINTLY LADY CHECK, Mary Mann, Non-Haltered Miniature Female Grand Champion: SS MIN L’IL HALEY, Jersey Girl Plantation, Non-Haltered Miniature Female Grand Champion Reserve: SSS MINI PRINCESS PATTI, Dave & Althea Sullivan,

HALTERED MINIATURE FEMALES

CLASS 1: 1. SS MINI TRIPS, Jersey Girl Plantation, 2. SS MINI 6 OF SPADES, Dave & Althea Sullivan, CLASS 2: 1. SS MINI PRINCESS PATTI, Dave & Althea Sullivan, Haltered Miniature Female Grand Champion: SS MINI TRIPS, Jersey Girl Plantation, Haltered Miniature Female Grand Champion Reserve: SS MINI PRINCESS PATTI, Dave & Althea Sullivan,

HALTERED MINIATURE STEERS

CLASS 1: 1. IM LITTLE VALENTINO, L48 Ranch, Haltered Miniature Steer Grand Champion: IM LITTLE VALENTINO, L48 Ranch,

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February 2017 | 65

«

«

«


SHOW RESULTS ANIMAL POINT STANDINGS

TLBT POINT STANDINGS

At Time of Publication

At Time of Publication

Junior 2030 1880 1480 1050 785 675 520 395 355 325

Madilyn Moreland • DECATUR, TX Ty Anders • CRAWFORD, NE Dylaney Rose Georges • ROCA, NE Justin Sabio, Jr. • BOYD, TX Caroline Holson • GRANBURY, TX Weston Riley Parks • HICO, TX Oran Chambliss • MANSFIELD, TX Annalisa Romero • HOUSTON, TX Finch Griffin • ORANGE, TX Hannah Hays • DALLAS, TX

Intermediate 2440 2275 2255 1795 1650 1465 1460 1385 1255

Chance Kearney • EVANS, WA Jacob Daniel Lowrie • RHOME, TX Dalli Anders • CRAWFORD, NE Tyler Lindsey • LAUREL, MS Allison D. Lowrie • RHOME, TX Jackson Grace • SUNSET, TX Ashlyn Holson • ALBANY, TX Evelyn Sabio • BOYD, TX Ella Wieczorek • HICKMAN, NE

Teen 2620 1685 1655 1530 1490 1365 1325 1190 1175 1120

Jodie Ging • PALACIOS, TX Caitlyn Holson • ALBANY, TX Ryan Johnson • BIG HORN, WY Caden Wieczorek • HICKMAN, NE Sara Jennings • ANGLETON, TX Gabby Curtis • LANCASTER, TX Clara Holson • GRANBURY, TX Clarice Francis • ANGLETON, TX Rope Anders • CRAWFORD, NE Joseph Gerlach • RHOME, TX

Senior 4065 2380 1815 1530 1215 1125 1095 1020 1000 910

Cody Garcia • HICO, TX Cody Mc Donald • OAKHURST, TX Shelby A. Rooker • POOLVILLE, TX Carter T. Smith • WILLOW PARK, TX J.F. (Josh) Vinson • HICO, TX Joseph Faske • BURTON, TX Matthew Wallace • SUNSET, TX Madison Looney • ALVARADO, TX Zaida Espinosa • HOUSTON, TX Garrett Ybarra • LEAGUE CITY, TX

66 | February 2017

Haltered Females 234 SALTILLO CG 305 Damrow Longhorns • ROCA, NE 149 TH MISS CHA-VERRO Dennis & Judy Urbantke • SAN ANGELO, TX 141 COWGIRL WALK IN THE FIELD Two Heart Bar Ranch • PLAINS, MT 114 K - T RACHEL Rocking K Bar T Ranch • EVANS, WA 106 DV RAZ BY TAZ Del Vic Farms • SCRIBNER, NE 102 CK RUBIES AND PEARLS John Oliver • MALAKOFF, TX 102 ENR KASHMIR Ben and Ilse Myren • COLVILLE, WA 90 SOUTHERN CHABLIS Two Heart Bar Ranch • PLAINS, MT 89 HO HAY YOU REINDEER Dennis & Judy Urbantke • SAN ANGELO, TX 68 DECKERIFIC Toby Johnson • BIG HORN, WY

Haltered Mature Females 212 BLACK CADILLAC Jackson Grace • SUNSET, TX 211 K-T AUTUMN Rocking K Bar T Ranch • EVANS, WA 189 BLACK PEARL 82 Rocking K Bar T Ranch • EVANS, WA 142 FCL KEROSENE Fossil Creek Longhorns • GREELEY, CO 138 SALTILLO COWGAL IV 031 Damrow Longhorns • ROCA, NE 118 AUNT JEMIMA 012 Ryan Johnson • BIG HORN, WY 107 ANDERS MW MAPLE WISH Art Anders • CRAWFORD, NE 98 JAMMIN DANCER Fossil Creek Longhorns • GREELEY, CO 88 ALAMO’S MEMORY Infinity Ranch Land and Cattle • BURLESON, TX

58 CT SISTER JUDYE Joe Tucker • PARADISE, TX

Haltered Bulls 321 ANDERS RODEO TITAN Art Anders • CRAWFORD, NE 239 G&L JOHNNY RINGO Kent & Sandy Harrell • TULSA, OK 232 WYOMING STRONG Toby Johnson • BIG HORN, WY 206 K-T TRAIL DUST Rocking K Bar T Ranch • EVANS, WA 195 ANDERS LORD PETE

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

Art Anders • CRAWFORD, NE 188 SARCEE RHINESTONE COWBOY Bruce & Connie Ollive • BIG SANDY, TX 174 CL VELOCITY Chris Schaper • BRENHAM, TX 155 SALTILLO SUPER SMOOTH 62 Damrow Longhorns • ROCA, NE 139 ENR PATRON Ben and Ilse Myren • COLVILLE, WA 137 ENR MR OMBRE’ Ben and Ilse Myren • COLVILLE, WA

Free Females 394 DIAMOND DOLLAR Toby Johnson • BIG HORN, WY 160 IRON HOT FIREBALL Saddle Thorn Enterprises, LLC • DECATUR, TX 160 KETTLE BELLE Troy Unger • CEDAR PARK, TX 154 CHOCOLATE RAIN Ryan Johnson • BIG HORN, WY 152 THB TEXA’S MERLOT Two Heart Bar Ranch • PLAINS, MT 136 TTT SOUTHERN DRAWL Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey • LAUREL, MS 110 CR CUPID’S CANDY HEART Bronson Baker • BRENHAM, TX 106 DV AWESOME Del Vic Farms • SCRIBNER, NE 103 5SL LUCY 5 Star Livestock • DAYTON, TX 94 ENR MS OO LA LA Ben and Ilse Myren • COLVILLE, WA

Free Mature Females 234 SALTILLO CG 305 Damrow Longhorns • ROCA, NE 149 TH MISS CHA-VERRO Dennis & Judy Urbantke • SAN ANGELO, TX 141 COWGIRL WALK IN THE FIELD Two Heart Bar Ranch • PLAINS, MT 114 K - T RACHEL Rocking K Bar T Ranch • EVANS, WA 106 DV RAZ BY TAZ Del Vic Farms • SCRIBNER, NE 102 CK RUBIES AND PEARLS John Oliver • MALAKOFF, TX 102 ENR KASHMIR Ben and Ilse Myren • COLVILLE, WA 90 SOUTHERN CHABLIS Two Heart Bar Ranch • PLAINS, MT 89 HO HAY YOU REINDEER Dennis & Judy Urbantke • SAN ANGELO, TX 68 DECKERIFIC Toby Johnson • BIG HORN, WY


ALABAMA

COLORADO

ARKANSAS

FLORIDA

CALIFORNIA

INDIANA

KANSAS

LOUISIANA IOWA MISSOURI KANSAS

MONTANA Call in, ask for your H.O.R.N.S. password and take control of your herd inventory and membership information. 817-625-6241

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

February 2017 | 67


NORTH CAROLINA

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTHEAST TEXAS

OKLAHOMA

CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTH TEXAS

PENNSYLVANIA

68 | February 2017

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


WEST TEXAS

UTAH

CANADA ALBERTA

Call in, ask for your H.O.R.N.S. password and take control of your herd inventory and membership information. 817-625-6241

Find all the information and forms you need at

www.tlbaa.org

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

February 2017 | 69


Classifieds Auctioneers

Bruce E. McCarty Auctioneer Weatherford, TX 817-991-9979

Cattle For Sale

OLIVER LONGHORNS www.oliverlonghorns.com

Cattle for Sale “To God Be The Glory”

joliver@mytocn.com

972-268-0083

Beaver creek longhorns - Check our new website with “Super Sales” and herd-reduction prices. Tazman (Gunman) genetics. Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK 580-765-9961, www.beavercreeklonghorns.com

BUTLER HEIFERS A select few yearlings and bred two year olds FOR SALE NOW! Our herd has been closed to outside genetics for over a decade. The very best Butler quality available in the breed.

Robert King at 210-827-6700 or rking6700@gmail.com

Bob King Ranches LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

918-855-0704 • Sallisaw, OK

www.lonewolfranch.net Have a Happy, Happy, Happy Valentine Celebration

…and remember our great choices of Longhorns to supplement an existing herd, begin a new one or just surprise that special person on your gift list! • Top notch, gentle bulls, bred and open heifers, plus beautiful young cows…many with calves at side. • Awesome, big horned trophy steers, 3 yrs and up. They are destined to become traffic stopping pasture art. Very gentle and colorful! The Longhorn life just gets better!! Call or visit…we have outstanding bulls, cows, heifers and steers for sale at reasonable prices. Please call any of us to schedule a visit to each ranch. We love to talk Longhorns! Cattle always available at all times. Reasonable prices. For information or to schedule a tour at either of our ranch locations, please call: Dorie Damuth - Flying D Longhorn Ranch 40206 Community Rd. • Magnolia, TX 77354 281-356-8167 • fax: 281-356-2751 dorie27@sbcglobal.net • www.damuthflyingdranch.com

THATE Cattle Company

Your source for big-horned cattle in the North— utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

507-235-3467

Small Registered Longhorn Herd For Sale 1 Bull, 6 Cows, 1 Bull Calf, 1 Heifer Calf Call 409-382-3096 for more information.

Quality HEIFERS & HERD SIRE PROSPECTS FOR SALE- I have a LARGE herd, so you have lots of variety to pick from! Located approx. 20 mi. off the EAST TEXAS line in Louisiana just below Shreveport. Lots of Hunts Command Respect, McGill Breeding, some ZD Kelly and Grand Slam, etc. Good cows, good babies. I specialize in bulls and am a partner in RIP SAW who now measures 83 1/2” TTT and is a gorgeous color. Several of his heifers and sons for sale.

Dora Thompson Tel 318-872-6329

echoofambush@aol.com•www.sandhillsranch.com Great genetics. I enjoy meeting and working with new breeders. Also have a large STRAIGHT BUTLER herd.

Realestate 778 Acres – Great for cattle or hunting. Native grasses. 5 ponds (one spring fed) two good water wells. Great fencing. Two small corrals. Metal shop (50x60, 2 silos, storm cellar. 3 br. home w/1920’ sf built in 1983. Central Heat and Air (2) Fireplaces in den. Built in appl’s. lots of cabinets. Lg. master br. w/lg. master ba. w/jet tub. Wrap around porch. Park like setting w/lots of beautiful oak trees & flower beds. Home is very secluded Grady, Ok. (S. of Ringling) $1,522,500. Linda Weber Realty, Inc: 580-226-8777 www.lwrealtyinc.com

Trade & Barter TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breed’s top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days 512-454-0476 / Weekends 830-644-2380.

Scott Damuth, Legal Counsel • Shery Damuth, Vineyard Consultant sdamuth@damuthlaw.com • Gun Barrel City, TX Law office: 903-887-0088 • Fax: 903-887-2925 Scott Cell: 214-546-3681 • Shery Cell: 940-393-0991

70 | February 2017

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

Transportation

FMB Land & Cattle LLC Custom Hauling...Shows....Sales 8ft wide Trailer for Longhorn Care Ron Bailey 254.534.1886 Rodney Brown 682.220.8501


ADVERTISING INDEX —A— AA Longhorns.............................................68 Almendra Longhorns................................. 67 Anderson, Frank Jr. and III.......................... 9 Arch Acres.................................................... 67 Astera Meadows.................................. 26, 68 Autobahn..................................................... 47 —B— Bar H Ranch..................................................67 Beadle Land & Cattle..................................67 Bentwood Ranch........................................ FC Big Valley Longhorns..................................67 Billingsley Longhorns................................ 68 Blue Ridge Sale........................................... 50 Bolen Longhorns....................... 5, 15, 39, 40 Brazos Rose Ranch....................................... 5 Bright Futures Scholarship................. 55, 65 Buckhorn Cattle Co................................... 68 Bull Creek Longhorns.................................39 Butler Listings.................................................9 —C— Caballo Bravo Longhorns..........................67 Cactus Rose Longhorns............................25 Callicrate.......................................................61 Cattle Baron’s Sale...................................... 11 Cedarview Ranch........................................67 Champion Genetics....................................61 Chisolm Trail Cartel...................................FC Christa Cattle Co........................................ 25 CR Ranches........................................... 12-13 —D— Dalgood Longhorns..................................... 9 Dauntless Longhorns...............................IFC DCCI Equipment........................................ 61 Diamond Q Longhorns.............................68 Dickinson Cattle Co.................................. BC DK Longhorn Ranch.................................. 67 Double A Longhorns.................................68 DuBose Bar D Ranch................................... 9 —E— El Coyote Ranch......................................1, 23 Elah Valley Longhorns................................67 End of Trail Ranch................................ 31, 67 —F— Flying Diamond Ranch.............................. 67 FMB Land & Cattle, LLC............................ 59

Harrell Ranch.............................................. 27 Helm Cattle Co.....................................37, 68 Hickman Longhorns..................................68 Hope Creek Cattle..................................... 56 Horseshoe J Longhorns............................15 Hubbell Longhorns.................................... 37 Hudson Longhorns..................... 2, 3, 18, 19 Hudson/Valentine Bowling Green.......... 18 Husky Branding Irons................................ 58 —I — ITTLA Trail of Tears Futurity.......................41 —J— J.T. Wehring Family Ranch.......................68 J & C Longhorns......................................... 25 Jack Mountain Ranch............................9, 68 Jane’s Land & Cattle Co............................. 9 JBR Longhorns...........................................FC Jones Ranch.................................................51 —K— KDK Longhorns........................................... 25 King, Terry & Tammy............................ 15, 67 Kittler Land & Cattle................................... 67 —L— Lazy A Ranch...............................................68 Leonard Farms........................................... 2,3 Lightning Longhorns.................................68 Little Ace Cattle Co...................................... 9 LL Longhorns................................................ 9 Lodge Creek Longhorns.................... 42, 67 Lone Wolf Ranch........................................68 Lonesome Pines Ranch............................ 25 Longhorn Sale Pen..................................... 58 Lucas Ranch................................................ 67 Lucky Mountain Ranch........................... IBC Lutt Longhorns...........................................40 — M— Mast, Andy................................................... 37 McGuire Land & Cattle..............................68 Midwest Sale................................................31 Millennium Futurity..............................34-35 McLeod Ranch.............................................. 9 Moriah Farms..............................................68 —N — Northbrook Cattle Company...................68

—G— Gilliland Ranch............................................FC

—P — P & C Cattle Pens....................................... 57 Panther Creek Ranch................................ 18

—H— Haltom Hollar.............................................. 59

—R— Red River Longhorn Sale.......................... 41

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

Rio Vista Ranch............................................. 9 Rockin’ Hil Longhorns............................... 67 Rockin I Longhorns.............................FC, 68 Rocking P Longhorns.................................. 9 Rocky Mountain Longhorns.................... 67 Rocky Mountain Select Sale..................... 53 Rolling D Ranch.......................................... 67 Rolling Horns Ranch.................................. 29 Running Arrow Longhorns........................51 Running N Longhorns................................21 —S— Safari B Ranch.............................................68 Sand Hills Ranch..................................... 7, 67 Singing Coyote Ranch..............................68 South Texas Longhorn Association........ 25 SS Longhorns..............................................68 Stotts Hideaway Ranch.............................68 Struthoff Ranches of Texas......................68 Sugar Hill Ranch......................................... 63 —T— 2Bar2 Ranch..........................................25, 52 Tallgrass Cattle Company......................... 33 Tanner Longhorns...................................... 54 Thate Cattle Co............................................ 9 TLBAA Longhorn Expo.............................. 44 TLBAA TX Gold Futurity..............................45 Triple R Ranch (MI)......................................43 Triple R Ranch (TX)........................................9 TS Adcock Longhorns.........................48, 69 —W — Walker, Ron..................................................69 Wannaba Ranch......................................... 69 Westfarms Inc............................................... 9 Wichita Fence Company.......................... 58 Winding Prairie Ranch............................... 55

UPCOMING ISSUES: March: Longhorn Weekend Wrap-Up April: Youth Issue May: Brood Cow Edition

February 2017 | 71


TEXAS LONGHORN

SAVE THE DATE FEBRUARY 2017

Coming Events

APRIL 21-23 • Rockdale Spring Show, Rockdale Fairgrounds, Rockdale, TX. Entry

FEB 9-11 • San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo, AT&T Center, 3201 East Houston St., San Antonio, TX. Derek Thurmond 210-860-8202 Bubba Bollier 325-247-6249 or

Deadline is April 11, 2017, Sandi Nordhausen-sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com or 512-898-2401. Qualifying Haltered, Youth & Youth Points Only (x2)

bollier7572@yahoo.com. Qualifying Free & Youth.

APRIL 22 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield Livestock Auction, Winfield, KS.

FEB 18-19 • San Angelo Stock Show, Fairgrounds, San Angelo, TX. Entry Deadline

Joel Lemley 325-668-3552.

Feb. 1st, Dennis Urbantke 325-656-9321 or dennis@thlonghorns.com. Qualifying Halter, Youth and Youth Points Only. FEB 24-25 • Cattle Baron Premier Longhorn Sale & Winchester Futurity, Mid-Tex Sale Barn, Navasota, TX. Rick Friedrich 713-305-0259 or Steve Azinger 713-823-5371.

MAY 2017 MAY 5-6 • Red McCombs Fiesta Sale, Johnson City, TX. Alan & Teresa Sparger, 210-445-8798 or dodgeram52@yahoo.com. www.redmccombslonghorns.com. MAY 5-7 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Miracle Farm, Brenham, TX, Stephen Head

MARCH 2017

979-549-5270, headshorns@hotmail.com. Qualifying Haltered & Youth.

MARCH 10-12 • NTLBA Spring Show, Hopkins County Civic Center, Sulphur

MAY 11-14 • Millennium Futurity, Red River Livestock Auction, Overbrook, OK.

Springs, TX. Contact John & Brenda Oliver 972-268-0031 or

Christy Randolph 713-703-8458 or lpinesranch@aol.com.

brenda@olivermfg.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, & Friday and Sunday Youth.

MAY 26-27 • Red River Longhorn Sale & ITTLA Futurity, Marietta, OK. Rick

MARCH 11 • Butler Breeder’s Meeting and Ranch Tour, Sand Hills Ranch, 3502

Friedrich 713-305-0259 or rick@riverranchlonghorns.com. Kerry Mounce 214-

Hwy 513, Mansfield, LA. 10 a.m. Please RSVP to Dora Thompson 318-872-6329.

675-9317 or kerry@los-inc.com.

MARCH 12-14 • Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, NRG Stadium, Houston, TX. Amy Weahterholtz 817-625-6241 or amy@tlbaa.org. Qualifying Haltered and

JUNE 2017

Youth. NQ Trophy Steers

Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth & Friday Points Youth Only.

JUNE 8-11 • 30th Longhorn Expo TLBAA World Show & National TLBT Show, Will Rogers Coliseum, Fort Worth, TX. Entry Deadline is May 5, 2017. Qualifying Free, Haltered, Youth. NQ Trophy Steers & Miniatures. Texas Gold Futurity. Banquet

MARCH 25 • 39th B & C Show Me Spring Longhorn Sale, Tina, MO, Grand River

JUNE 14-18 • Autobahn Youth Tour presents the Diann Chase Longhorn

MARCH 24-26 • Oklahoma Spring Shoot Out, Payne County Expo Center, Stillwater, OK. Contact Rob Van Liew 405-420-1728 or vanliewranch@gmail.com David Edwards, 918-557-0364 or dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com.

Livestock Market. Contact Shawn Sayre 660-734-8782, Bill Sayre 660-734-0827

Scholarship Expo, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Larry Barker

or visit sayreauction.com

817-988-6110, lbarker@abahn.com or www.autobahnyouthtour.com.

MARCH 25 • Rodeo Austin-Star of Texas, Austin, TX. Entry Deadline is February

JUNE 23-24 • Winchester Futurity of the North, JaeBird Performance Ranch,

1, 2017, Christy Randolph 713-703-8458, Bubba Bollier 325-247-6249 or

Bellevue, MI. Mark Hubbell 269-838-3083, hubbelllonghorns@aol.com. www.

bollier7572@yahoo.com. Qualifying Free, Halter & Youth

winchesterfuturitynorth.com

MARCH 31 • YMBL South Texas State Fair, Ford Park Fairgrounds, Beaumont, TX.

AUGUST 2017

Entry Deadline March 15, 2017. Tina Dubose 979-277-2656 or tinaduboseloe@ gmail.com Qualifying Haltered, Youth & Youth Points Only. NQ Trophy Steer Free. MARCH 31 • Southeastern Winchester Futurity, WKU Ag Expo Center, Bowling Green, KY. Terry King 850-956-4154 tklonghorns@centurylink.net or Nancy Dunn 334-318-0887, nancydunn2010@windstream.net MARCH 31 - APRIL 1 • Hudson-Valentine Sale, Bowling Green, KY. Contact Lorinda Valentine, panthercreekranch@att.net or 270-996-7046.

AUGUST 5 • Deschutes County Fair, Deschutes County Expo Center, Redmond, OR. Entry Deadline 7/14/17. Tamara Kuntz 541-280-1645 or tamaroo300@gmail. com

SEPTEMBER 2017 SEPTEMBER 2 • Butler Breeder’s Invitational Sale, Lockhart, TX. Kaso Kety 985-674-6492 or Michael McLeod 361-771-5355. SEPTEMBER 8-9 • Hill Country Heritage Longhorn Sale, River Ranch,

APRIL 2017

Fredericksburg, TX. Rick Friedrich 713-305-0259 or rick@riverranchlonghorns.

APRIL 7 • Bayou Classic - Dixie TX Longhorn Assoc. & Ark-La-Tex. West-Cal

com. Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or jlem@camalott.com

Arena, Sulphur, LA. Chris Lindsey 601-319-8296 or clindsey04@yahoo.com.

SEPTEMBER 15-16 • Elite Futurity, Enid, OK. L.D. McIntyre 308-750-8384, tejas@

Qualifying Free, Haltered and Youth and Points Only.

mcintyreranches.com. Kevin Bryant (580) 254-1864, cactus254@gmail.com. Joe

APRIL 8 • Nebraska TLA Spring Sale, Broken Bow, NE. Consignment deadline

Dowling 979-271-0277, dowlingjoe@yahoo.com

Feb. 25th. Contacts: President Rodger Damrow (402) 423-5441, Vice President

SEPTEMBER 22-23 • Fort Worth Stockyards Sale, Fort Worth, TX. Contact Lorinda

Delwin Smeal 402-568-2353.

Valentine, panthercreekranch@att.net or 270-996-7046.

APRIL 8-9 • Blue Ridge Ranch Sale, Llano, TX. Bubba Bollier 325-247-6249 or bollier7572@yahoo.com

72 | February 2017

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2017 | 35


22 | December 2016

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

Profile for Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine

February 2017 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

February 2017 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America