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G

rinstead served Kerrville in many ways, from editing the Kerrville Mountain Sun, to serving as mayor, as president of the school board, and representing this district in the Texas Legislature, where he was elected poet laureate; but mostly, Grinstead was a serial publisher. After selling the Kerrville Mountain Sun and a kerfuffle during his term as president of the Kerrville school board, he settled down to write pulp westerns and periodically published magazines. His Grinstead’s Monthly and Grinstead’s Graphic magazines are quite collectible; over the years, I thought I’d seen every issue. Recently though, while trolling through listings on eBay, I ran across a title I’d never seen before. It has a title on the front that tells it all –– “Golf Number.” Please don’t tell Ms. Carolyn, but I bought the magazine.

“Some of the Graphic’s readers complained last month,” Grinstead writes, “because I used a word several times that the preachers talk about every Sunday. Well, you won’t find it in this number. The worst word I’ll use is Golf.” The little booklet measures about 6 3/4 by 10 inches and, at one time, 32 pages. It was published in October 1924. My copy is missing the middle four pages and is thus, incomplete. It is illustrated with twelve photographs in the story pages, plus five more in the advertisements. (As you know, I’m particularly keen on old Kerrville and Kerr County images.) Like most of Grinstead’s magazines, this one includes some “booster” copy, extolling the unblemished virtues of our neck of the woods, and also a short piece of fiction. “...Golf has come to Kerrville. It seems strange that in this mountain retreat, where so short a time ago smoke was rising from the campfires of the Comanche, such a modern thing as golf links should be at hand. Fifty years ago [from 1921, that

is 1871], a golf course here in these mountains would have been quite a curiosity. Yes, and 50 years ago, a woman with bobbed hair or a man wearing bell-bottomed pants would have been shot for a new kind of varmint. Fifty years ago, if just one automobile had run through Kerr County at night, the population would have been reduced by those who broke their necks trying to get away. “The world has progressed, and Kerrville has progressed with it. As a step in that progress, the Kerrville Chamber of Commerce, the liveliest civic body I know anything about, decided that Kerrville needed a Country Club and a Golf Course. When the Kerrville Chamber of Commerce decides that their town needs a thing, they go get it.” Looking over the photographs, I believe this “country club” and its golf course were spread out over the same acreage as today’s Scott Schreiner Municipal Golf Course. Of the images in the little magazine, I have the negatives to two, which helps me know approximately how old they are.

Some of the Graphic’s readers complained last month,” Grinstead writes, “because I used a word several times that the preachers talk about every Sunday.

Well, you won’t find it in this number. The worst word I’ll use is Golf.

(Continued on page 56)

LIFESTYLE APRIL / MAY 2013 55

Lifestyle April/May 2013  

LIFESTYLE - THE MAGAZINE OF THE TEXAS HILL COUNTRY is the Texas Hill Country’s premier luxury and lifestyle magazine. Residents in the Hill...

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