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Texas Intercollegiate Press Association

Type-Hi 2014

* Sam Houston State University repeats as Director’s Trophy winner * 3 inducted into TIPA Hall of Fame * 47 schools, more than 500 attendees at San Antonio convention * WTAMU adviser named Adviser of the Year * Workshops, on-site contests highlight 2014 convention

WINNING NEWS PHOTO shot by Daniel Carde of San Antonio College. The news event was conducted at the San Antonio Fire Training Academy and included a burning car and a burning structure.


Radio - TV Announcing & TV News Video Radio Announcing (Spanish)

Radio Announcing

(Texas A&M-Kingsville)

(Sam Houston State)

(UT-Pan American)

(Midwestern State)

1. Herminio Rodriguez

1. Alexis Blomer

2. Beatrice Ramirez

2. Jasmine Jones

3. Lucia Espino

3. Amanda Castro-Crist

Television Announcing

Live TV News Video

(Texas A&M-Commerce)

(Sam Houston State)

(Texas A&M-San Antonio)

1. Malcolm Hornsby 2. Elaine Fritz

(Amarillo College)

1. Stephen Snook

2. Baylor Bendele

(Sam Houston State)

(Texas A&M-Commerce)

(Texas State University)

(UT-Tyler)

3. Skye Wallace

3. John Edwards

Television Announcing (Spanish) 1. Lucia Espino

(Texas A&M-San Antonio)

2. Beatrice Ramirez (UT-Pan American)

3. Jaquelin Villafranco (Sam Houston State)

Type-Hi TYPE-HI is the on-line publication presenting 1st, 2nd, 3rd place winners from the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association On-Site Contests conducted at the organization’s annual spring convention. Students representing student media (newspapers, magazine, yearbook, radio, television, on-line) from the state’s two-year and four-year, public and private colleges and universities compete against each other in scenario contests under deadline. Some

Texas Intercollegiate Press Association Spring 2014

actual events or activities, send the students into the field to test their skills. Contests are supervised, monitored and judged by student media faculty advisers. Contest winners are then recognized at the association’s annual Awards Breakfast on the last day of the convention. Material is reprinted as the entries were submitted to judges, there is no editing. Cutlines for photos are as the students submitted them with their photos.

TYPE-HI is produced at the TIPA Central Office, located on the campus of Texas A&M University-Commerce. Contact information: Fred Stewart, executive director, Box 4104, Commerce, TX 75429. Ph: 903-886-5231 Fax: 903-468-3128 Web: www.TexasIPA.org Email: Fred.Stewart@tamuc.edu. Texas Intercollegiate Press Association was established in 1909.


1st Place - Print News Writing (By Taylor Tompkins, Texas State University) San Antonio police and arson units are investigating a “suspicious” pair of simultaneous fires that sent one person to the hospital Thursday afternoon, officials said. San Antonio Fire Department units responded to a car fire call at 123 Acme St. around 2:13 p.m., said Neal Ague, SAFD battalion chief. Upon arrival crews discovered a structure fire in the garage of the home located about 50 feet from where the car was parked. “Crews did a real good job of getting that fire out and stopping it,” said Jesse Olivarri, SAFD engineer. The structure fire was contained to the garage of the home, which sustained $25,000 in damages to the building and its contents, Ague said. The car,

a 2009 Camry, incurred $12,000 worth of damage in the fire, he said. An unidentified 20-yearold woman was found conscious on the scene and transported to University Hospital at around 2:20 p.m. for life-threatening smoke inhalation and minor burns, Ague said. The woman was found in the kitchen of the home connected to the garage and it appeared she had attempted to put out the fire, Olivarri said. It is unknown whether she is the owner of the vehicle or the house where the fires occurred. The fires appeared to have two different points of origin, which could be an indicator of arson, Ague said. A domestic disturbance had been reported at the resi-

dence earlier that morning to the San Antonio Police Department, Olivarri said. No one has been arrested in connection with either the fires or the domestic incident, however arson units and police are continuing to investigate the cause of the fires, Olivarri said “It’s not normal to have a structure fire with a car fire,” Ague said. “Those are incredibly suspicious unless the car is either parked inside the house or adjacent to it and has an exposure. In this situation, the car being so far from the house, it’s definitely not a normal phenomenon that we would see.” The unidentified woman is still being treated and her condition is unknown, Ague said. No other persons incurred injuries in the incident.

There were plenty of activities including music on the Riverwalk during the weekend for the students and faculty advisers attending the 2014 convention in San Antonio.

Photo by Patricia Dillon, Texas A&M University-Commerce


1st Place - Print Advertising (By Melissa Conely, Lamar University

2014-2015 Student Officers President Ernest Macias (Texas State University)

Vice President Dylan Bradley

(Tarrant County College)

Secretary Rihannon Saegert

(Tarrant County College)

Parliamentarian Madeline Orr

(Abilene Christian University)

Charles “Chuck” Choate Memorial Adviser of the Year Butler Cain (West Texas A&M University)

This cool new device is the best way to let your kids be free to explore and discover while you rest at ease knowing they’re safe.       

Tracks child’s location. Allows one touch calling. One way text messaging. Emergency call button. Ability to enable ‘safe zones.’ Affordable at only $199 with $10 plan. Durable for active children.

TIPA Faculty Officers President Jim Sernoe

(Midwestern State University)

Vice President Laura Krantz

(Tyler Junior College)

Secretary Kevin Dilley

(University of Texas at Tyler)

TCCJA Faculty Officers

One touch to call. One touch to locate. It’s that simple.

Executive Director Bob Bajackson

(Texas State University)

President Robert Muilenburg (Del Mar College)

Vice President Rachel Jennische

(Tyler Junior College)

Secretary Lori Dann

(Eastfield College)


1st Place - Editorial Writing (By Rhiannon Saegert, Tarrant County College) Zero tolerance policies in high schools are the direct result of the epidemic number of teenage deaths involving alcohol. However, North Andover High School in Andover, Massachusetts took their zero tolerance policy a step further by suspending and demoting volleyball captain Erin Cox after a house party the police broke up. Except Cox hadn’t had any alcohol. She was only there to pick up a friend who called her when he realized he was too drunk to drive himself home. According to Mothers Against Drunk Driving, one third of car accidents are a result of drunken driving, the exact kind of tragedy Cox was trying to prevent. It’s clear the school is trying to make an example of her in order to scare other students straight, but that’s not the message they’re sending. By suspending her, they’ve effectively told students that preventing trouble and ignoring trouble are the same thing, and they are only safe if they turn a blind eye to a serious problem. Schools use fear to try and prevent students from drinking, and it doesn’t work. Parents use fear to try and prevent their children from experimenting with alcohol, and all it does is ensure that they’re too scared to ask their parents for help when the time comes. Now, the school is using one girl’s responsible

choice as an excuse to scare the student body even more, despite the fact that none of this would have happened if that method actually worked. Cox is being punished for doing the right thing. Her actions protected her friend and prevented him from potentially endangering others’ lives. Her only other option, besides ignoring him, was to contact her drunk friend’s parents, but it’s possible he would have run from the party, or worse, attempted to

drive himself home in an alcoholand-parent induced panic. It’s not trouble that North Andover High School’s administration is scaring students away from with their decision. Instead, they’ve scared their students away from taking responsibility, making decisions for themselves and helping others. When a high school actively pushes teenagers away from the necessary steps toward becoming responsible adults, it ceases to serve its expressed purpose.

Photo by Patricia Dillon, Texas A&M University-Commerce

Activities along the Riverwalk include dining at one of the many restaurants, watching and feeding the fish, ducks and birds.


1st Place - Feature Photo (By Aerielle Karpinsky, Texas A&M-Commerce)


1st Place - Feature Writing (By Lindsey Juarez, UT-Arlington) Vincent Powers parks his cart with a portable trash can and a broom on the sidewalk. He walks to a receptacle in the grass, his wrinkled hands fumbling to open a new trash bag. As he concentrates on the bag, his white-bristled moustache twitches and his hands shake. Powers drops the bag, which almost gets blown away by the breeze. A younger man standing on the sidewalk looks up from his phone and takes a step toward Powers as if to offer assistance. Powers sees him, but he ignores him. He lets out a heavy sigh as he picks up the bag and then continues to finagle it open. Powers has never been one to accept a handout, at least not easily. He said he enjoys his job cleaning up litter along San Antonio’s River Walk and living in a Section 8 Program apartment. For him, this is the life. “If you’re a regular person and you don’t give anybody a hard time, and you’re flexible and you swing with whatever they’re trying to do, you have it made,” he said. In his life, Powers has lost multiple jobs and lived in shelters on more than one occasion. He grew up in New York

City with his Irish, Catholic parents, who lived during the Great Depression. His parents taught him to appreciate what life offers him, no matter how small. Powers lived in the city until he lost his job at a law firm at 50 years old. Rather than find another job in the city, he decided to uproot his life. “New York is for the youth, and I don’t have that anymore,” he said. “Let me go someplace different where nobody knows me and start fresh.” That place was New Orleans. Powers worked several jobs in Louisiana, but could never keep one for long. In 2005, he found himself living at a Salvation Army shelter, homeless and jobless. Still, he felt the environment made him realize he had to take whatever life threw at him. “I think when you stay in any of these shelters, you have to be flexible,” Powers said. When Hurricane Katrina hit the city, Powers and about 300 other residents were trapped in the shelter for more than a week. The women’s side of the shelter was destroyed in the storm, so all the residents had to live on the men’s side.

“There was no electricity, no air conditioning. It was not a pleasant experience to have to go through,” he said. The residents finally left the shelter when the National Guard transported them to an airport and flew them to shelters in Texas. Powers ended up in a Red Cross shelter in San Antonio. “When I came here, I asked the volunteers at the Red Cross, ‘What kind of natural disasters do you have here?’ They said, ‘Just the tornadoes.’ I said, ‘OK, I’m staying,’” Powers said with a raspy chuckle. The shelter was Powers’ home until he got a job with the city picking up trash around the River Walk. He said he felt proud that he put in the application, interviewed and was offered the job rather than asking for assistance. Powers had to give up his Social Security benefits in order to have an income low enough to qualify for the Section 8 Program. Powers said his life hasn’t been glamorous, but he’s learned to appreciate it for what it is. “You’ll find trash wherever you go,” he said. “Life isn’t all roses, but you learn to love it, you deal with it, you endure.”


1st Place 2-Person Photo Essay Jennifer Rogers and Jonathen Ruesch (Stephen F. Austin State University)


1st Place - Critical Review (By Miguel Perez, UT-Dallas)

The eerie red glow of an exit sign filters through an otherwise dark room as the silhouette of a man walks through the stage. The lights gradually brighten, and the blue eyes of a desensitized suburbanite command everyone’s attention. There is no doubt that there is a flicker of a pain in his eyes. The first act of “Claybourne Park,” directed by Matthew Byron Cassi and adapted from the 2011 Pulitzer Prizewinning play, focuses mainly on Russ and Bev, an older couple who have lost their veteran son to suicide. In the process of grieving and reconciling their traumatic experience, the couple’s interaction with neighbors and friends aims to shed light on racism and gentrification in America. Taking place in the snug Cellar Theatre inside The Playhouse in San Antonio, “Clybourne Park” desperately wants to tackle the contentious topic of whiteblack race relations in the United States, albeit in a very tame manner. The play is trying to open up a discussion on the “circular conversations about race,” Cassi said, but the effort gets stuck in the same cyclical code it’s trying to take apart. In other words, no kind of reality experienced by black people in the 1950s every fully confronts the audience. Bev (Catherine Babbitt) is the quintessential 50s housewife complete with the blue floral frock and rigid, ginger doll hair. Her mannerisms seem

phony and her interactions with her husband Russ (Gary Hoeffler) seems forced. It’s not made apparent whether these mannerisms are intentional until the latter half of the act. Almost half of the act is dedicated to emphasizing the triviality of suburban everyday life with Bev and Russ’ contrived conversations revolving around the origin of the word Neapolitan. There is nothing organic or authentic about their relationship, and Russ seems a little shut out. Reverend Jim (Ross Avant) makes a seemingly harmless to visit the household, but his intentions are revealed when he brings up the suicide of Russ’ son Kenneth. Intending to help him through the grieving process, Jim only manages to make things worse. What begins as a Seinfeldesque caricature of suburbia intensifies as darker themes start to spill forward. Hoeffler is the production’s silver lining because he truly carries the play on his back. His glazy stare and nonchalance seem out-of-place until his sudden emotional bomb hits the audience full force. It’s in him that we see the only inkling of true pain. It’s in him that we begin to understand what it might be like to lose a son, let alone to suicide. The play falters a bit following Russ’ breaking point with all the actors yelling and many of them crying. It all seems slightly overacted, and the small space of the theatre really stresses

that flaw. Whether that was the director’s intent or not it up for discussion, but a polite blandness blankets the first-half of the act, and the actors have an uncomfortable artificiality to their movement and voices. Megan van Dyke plays Russ and Bev’s black housekeeper, but her small role really undermines the perceived purpose of the play. She’s never fully fleshed out as a character, and in a conversation about race relations, it is one side that is doing all the talking. What begins as a safe production manages to find its footing in a quick emotionallycharged scene only to fizzle out with an artificiality that also exists outside the confines of the play. Ultimately, the production falters, but it is worth seeing if only for Hoeffler’s command of the stage.

TIPA established 1909


1st Place - Editorial Cartoon (By Alex Hernandez, Eastfield College)


1st Place Radio Sports Writing (By Trent Scott, Sam Houston State)

(0:06) TONY RAMIREZ POWERED THE U-T SAN ANTONIO ROADRUNNERS BASEBALL TEAM TO A 6-2 VICTORY OVER THE MARSHALL THUNDERING HERD ON FRIDAY NIGHT.

(0:11) RAMIREZ, WHO HIT HIS THIRD HOMERUN OF THE SEASON, WENT 2-3, WITH 2 RBI FOR THE NIGHT.

(0:18) (sb) “I had 2 homeruns before that but those were early in the year, so just being able to put one out again was a good feeling. I definitely think it was a momentum builder for us too.” (0:23) bROCK HARTSON WAS CREDITED WITH THE WIN FOR U-TS-A, IMPROVING HIS RECORD TO 3-1 ON THE SEASON.

(0:30) mICHAEL TAYLOR, MEANWHILE, TOOK THE LOSS FOR MARSHALL AND FALLS TO 1-6, DESPITE OWNING A 3.40 ERA THIS SEASON. (0:35) WITH THE WIN, THE ROADRUNNERS IMPROVED TO 23-11 ON THE YEAR, WHILE MARSHALL FELL TO 13-19.

(0:41) THE TWO TEAMS WILL MEET AGAIN ON SATURDAY FOR THE SECOND GAME OF A THREE-GAME SERIES THIS WEEKEND. ###

TRT 0:41


1st Place - PR Release Writing (By Morgan Jones, UT-Tyler)

Memorial Hospital San Antonio !

! For immediate release April 10, 2014

Miller Hix Director of Public Relations (888)-555-1212

Memorial Hospital starts new program to help people manage stress

!

!

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS – Memorial Hospital’s new stress management program opens with Stress Relievers and Life Enhancers event from 7- 10 p.m. on April 22. Event attendees will be given helpful advice from some of the top medical professionals in their field, based on their years of experience and areas of study. The three medical professional speakers will be discussing the key components to a healthy stress management life style. Anna George, Memorial Hospital social worker, will discuss how a person can change their personal routine to better manage their time and, in turn, take better care of their body. Memorial Hospital exercise specialist Dean Randall will speak on how a person’s increased level of physical activity can prevent stress. Then to finish the night, Memorial Hospital dietician Jamila Kendal will share nutritional advice to help a person fuel their body for a busy day. To attend the program, the $25 admission fee can be paid at Memorial Hospital’s main desk or online at memorialhospital.com until April 20. If after that date, a $35 admission fee can be paid at the door. Memorial Hospital is dedicating to serving the people of San Antonio with compassionate medical care. Since established in 1946, Memorial Hospital has grown to serve more than 3 million people annually. Memorial Hospital is located at 26773 Purdy St., San Antonio, Texas. For any additional information please call (800)-555-9876.

###


1st Place - Radio Advertising (By Buck Mayden, Amarillo College)

Radio Advertisement 1 Product: Filip Watch Product Talent: MOTHER – specs: 25-30 confident, maternal and reassuring CHILD – specs: 9-year-old girl, excited FRIEND – specs: 25-30 female, curious (SFX: Cell phone ring) MOTHER: HELLO. (SFX: Kids playing at a playground as backtrack) CHILD: HI MOMMY. CAN I GO PLAY AT MEGANS? MOTHER: SURE SWEATHEART. HAVE FUN. I’LL TEXT YOU WHEN IT’S TIME TO COME HOME. SHOULD BE AROUND FIVE. CHILD: OK, LOVE YOU, MOMMY. MOTHER: I LOVE YOU TOO (SFX: end backtrack) FRIEND: YOUR DAUGHTER HAS A CELL PHONE? MOTHER: NOPE IT’S A FILIP WATCH DEVICE. IT’S A WATCH THAT CAN RECEIVE OR SEND CALLS FROM ANY FIVE NUMBERS I CHOOSE. PLUS IT HAS A LOCATOR FUNCTION SO I ALWAYS KNOW WHERE SHE IS. I CAN ALSO SEND HER TEXTS MESSAGES. FRIEND: I NEED TO GET ONE OF THOSE FOR MY SON. (MUSIC: Jingle, upbeat keyboard, three seconds) MOTHER: FILIP, LET ‘EM PLAY. Radio Advertisement 2 Product: Filip Watch Device Talent: MOTHER - specs: 25-30 confident, maternal and reassuring CHILD- specs: 7-9-year-old boy, excited FRIEND- specs: 25-30 female, curious (SFX: Cell phone rings) MOTHER: HELLO (SFX: Laughter followed by light rain. Light rain continues as backtrack)


1st Place - TV News Writing (By Halley Harrell, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor) [AUDIO - ANCHOR LEAD] [anchor: Doug / read rate: 0:13] NEW FOR YOU AT SIX O’ CLOCK, THE SAN ANTONIO FIRE DEPARTMENT IS INVESTIGATING A POSSIBLE ARSON AFTER BATTLING A VEHICLE AND STRUCTURE FIRE THIS AFTERNOON. [TAKE VO :15 Firemen battle car fire // CG: Structure Fire In West San Antonio/Arson Investigation Launched [anchor: Nikki / read rate: 0:10]] IT HAPPENED JUST AFTER 2 THIS AFTERNOON AT 123 ACME STREET. A NEIGHBOR CALLED 9-1-1 AFTER SHE SPOTTED A BURNING VEHICLE ACROSS THE ROAD. THE FIRE DEPARTMENT ARRIVED ON SCENE TO FIND A 2009 CAMRY PARKED ON THE STREET ENGULFED IN FLAMES. [TAKE VO :20 Firemen battle structure fire; possible arson investigated [anchor: Doug / read rate: 0:13]] AND AS FIREFIGHTERS WERE PUTTING OUT THE VEHICLE FIRE, A SECOND FIRE WAS SPOTTED INSIDE THE GARAGE 50 YARDS AWAY. A SECOND UNIT MOVED IN TO CONTAIN THE STRUCTURE FIRE. WHEN RESPONDERS SEARCHED THE HOUSE, THEY FOUND A 20-YEAR-OLD FEMALE INSIDE THE KITCHEN. THE FEMALE WAS CONSCIOUS AND SUFFERED MINOR BURNING AND SEVERE SMOKE INHALATION. SHE WAS TRANSPORTED TO UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL AND IS BEING TREATED FOR HER INJURIES. [TAKE AGUE SOT :18] [SOT: 0:16 [NEAL AGUE/BATTALION CHIEF]] “It’s not normal to have a structure fire with a car fire. Those are incredibly suspicious, unless the car is either parked inside the house or adjacent to it, as an exposure. In this situation, the car being so far from the house, it’s definitely not a normal phenomenon. So we will have arson assist us in this investigation.” [TAG - ON CAMERA [anchor: Nikki / read rate: 0:10]] THE FIRE OCCURRED AFTER SAN ANTONIO POLICE RECEIVED A DOMESTIC DISTURBANCE CALL INVOLVING THE SAME RESIDENCE THAT MORNING. THE POLICE AND FIRE DEPARTMENTS WILL CONDUCT FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS TO DETERMINE IF THE TWO INCIDENTS ARE RELATED. DAMAGES TO THE PROPERTY AND VEHICLE ARE ESTIMATED TO BE $37 THOUSAND.


1st Place - TV Sports Writing (By Cody Lewis, Sam Houston State University) CUT TO FOOTAGE OF CONTESTANT 138 (7 seconds)

SOT-CUT TO FOOTAGE OF TONY RAMIREZ HOME RUN (7 seconds) VO: SOT OF RAMIREZ FOOTAGE (6 seconds) CUT TO FOOTAGE OF GAME (6 seconds)

VO: SOT OF UTSA COACH JASON MARSHALL FOOTAGE (6 seconds)

FOR THE GAME OF THE WEEK, WE HEAD TO ROADRUNNER FIELD ON THE CAMPUS OF UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO WHERE THE UTSA ROAD RUNNERS WON A 6-2 DECISION TO MARSHALL. UTSA LEFT FIELDER TONY RAMIREZ BELTED A HOME RUN IN THE BOTTOM OF THE SECOND INNING TO GIVE THE ROADRUNNERS THE SPARK THEY NEEDED TO DEFEAT CONFERENCE RIVAL MARSHALL 6-2 FRIDAY NIGHT IN SAN ANOTONIO.

“I JUST WANTED TO MAKE SURE I GOT MY PITCH,” RAMIREZ SAID. “I SAW A FAST BALL UP AND PUT A GOOD SWING ON IT AND IT WENT OUT.”

RAMIREZ ALSO ADDED AN RBI DOUBLE IN THE BOTTOM OF THE SEVENTH THAT GAVE THE ROADRUNNERS A 5-2 LEAD OVER THE THUNDERING HERD. UTSA RIGHT FIELDER JOHN WELBORN ALSO HELPED LEAD THE OFFENSE, GOING FOUR FOR FIVE AND SCORING A RUN.

“TONIGHT HE WAS JUST ON FIRE,” UTSA COACH JASON MARSHALL SAID. “HE HAD A GREAT NIGHT THAT I KNOW HE’LL REMEMBER.”

CUT TO FOOTAGE OF UTSA STARTING PITCHER THE THUNDERING HERD HAD 13 HITS DURING BROCK HARTSON THE GAME BUT COULD ONLY DRIVE IN ONE RUN (9 seconds) AGAINST UTSA STARTING PITCHER BROCK HARTSON, WHO WENT SIX AND TWO THIRD INNINGS WITH FOUR STRIKE OUTS. HE IS 3-1 THIS SEASON. CUT TO GAME FOOTAGE (9 seconds)

CUT TO FOOTAGE OF CONTESTANT 138

THE ROADRUNNERS ARE NOW 23-11 ON THE SEASON AND 9-4 IN CONFERENCE USA, WHILE THE THUNDERING HERD MOVE TO 13-19 ON THE SEASON AND 7-8 IN THE CONFERENCE. THE TEAMS WILL CONTINUE THIS SERIES ON SATURDAY AND IT WILL CONCLUDE ON SUNDAY. FOR TIPA, THIS HAS BEEN CONTESTANT 138 AT ROADRUNNER FIELD.


1st Place - Copy Editing

(By Chloe Gonzalez, University of Texas at Arlington)


2nd Place - Copy Editing (By Lesley Warren, Texas State University)


3rd Place - News Photo (By James Allday, Angelina College)


Photo by Patricia Dillon, Texas A&M University-Commerce

Stephen Green (left), 2013-14 TIPA student president, recognizes the 2014-15 student officers including Ernest Macias, Dylan Bradley, Rihannon Saegert and Madeline Orr.


3rd Place - Copy Editing

(By Robbie Key, Stephen F. Austin State University)


2nd Place - News Photo

(By Jennifer Rogers, Stephen F. Austin State University)


1st Place Yearbook Design (By Lina Moon, University of Texas at Dallas)


1st Place - Sports Photo (By Blanca Reyes, Richland College)


2nd Place - Radio Sports Writing (By Brandon Walker, Texas A&M-Commerce)

ANNOUNCER 1:

An impressive night from their leadoff hitter helps the UTSA Roadrunners claim second place in their rookie stint in Conference USA with a 6-2 victory over the Marshall Thundering Herd Friday night at Roadrunner Field.

ANNOUNCER 1:

In the first ever meeting between both Universities the Roadrunners were able to maintain consistent hitting throughout the game never dropping the lead.

ANNOUNCER 2:

Senior leading hitter, John Welborn matched his career high in hits going 4-5 with 4 singles.

SFX

(Crack of the bat with the cheering of the UTSA fans)

ANNOUNCER 2:

Tony Ramirez also had a productive night going 2-3 with a homer in the bottom of the sixth inning.

ANNOUNCER 1:

The Roadrunners now go 9-4 on the season and will look to take game 2 of a 3 game series against Marshall tomorrow with game time starting at 2 p.m. at Roadrunner Field.


1st Place - PR Crisis Management (By Nicole Barrios, Texas State University)

1. To the loyal fans and consumers of Pepsi-Cola and the PepsiCo brand: PepsiCo would like to address the allegations can-tampering recently reported and circulated in the media and news. Stories have been disseminated by the news media in the last two days concerning a report that a syringe was allegedly found in a can of Diet Pesi-Cola. PepsiCo would like to take this time to inform our loyal customers that we believe this allegation to be unfounded in truth. PesiCo and FDA Commissioner David Kessler consider this incident to be a hoax intended to tarnish the PepsiCo brand’s impeccable image. PepsiCo has a long standing reputation of being a respected and ethical company in which safety and leadership is key to its success. Since its inception in 1964 with the merger of Pepsi-Cola and Frito-Lay Today, PesiCo has been a global leader in the food and beverage industry. The company prides itself on being ranked #1 on CoreBrand’s 2013 Most Respected Company, was featured on Ethisphere’s 2013 list of World’s Most Ethical Companies and has been ranked in the top 20 Best Companies for Leadership in 2012 by the Hay Group. Due to PepsiCo’s tradition of excellence and high standards of quality, we would like to assure our customers that there is no need to be alarmed by the recent allegations of can-tampering. Our beverage is safe to consume and we encourage customers to continue to enjoy Pepsi-Cola as they always have. Legal representatives for PepsiCo are currently investigating the allegations and incidents to better inform the public of the cause of what we believe is a case of fraud and malice aimed at tarnishing the company’s impeccable brand. Pepsi-Cola continues to be a safe beverage to consume and enjoy. Sincerely, Craig Weatherup PepsiCo North America CEO 2. PepsiCo must to disseminate this message to the public through a number channels: 1. PepsiCo must begin by briefing all representatives on the language, tone and content of the message they wish to distribute to the public. There must be a unified front with no gap of disparity in information given out by company representatives. All PepsiCo employees must refer questions to the PepsiCo spokesperson or to the company’s Office of Communication so that the asking public may be sent this message. 2. The PepsiCo company must hold a press conference at the PepsiCo headquarters featuring the official PepsiCo spokesperson, North America CEO Craig Weatherup and FDA Commissioner David Kessler. This press conference will aim to reassure the public and loyal customers of PepsiCo’s reputation of excellence, belief that the incident has been falsely created to damage the brand’s image and determination to inform customers of the truth of the alleged can-tampering when more details are known. 3. PepsiCo must my distributing the message to the number of journalists who have, no doubt, been bombarding the PepsiCo spokesperson and public relations representative for a comment on the ongoing news coverage and investigations into the alleged can-tampering. Other inquires made my news media must be directed to the PepsiCo Office of Communication. The company’s spokesperson must strive to


be truthful and transparent with journalists while maintaining the honor and values of the PepsiCo brand. 4. The company must also put the message on the official PepsiCo website and the official Pepsi-Cola website so that it is the first thing readers notice and are directed to when going to the websites to find information on the alleged incidents. 5. PepsiCo’s Office of Communication and Community Relations must publish the approved message through the various social media platforms of the PepsiCo brand and the Pepsi-Cola beverage. A brief summary of the message and a links to the message featured on the PepsiCo website should be published on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr and the other social media channels the brand commands. 6. An informative commercial in which Craig Weatherup, PepsiCo North American CEO, speaks in a brief and concerned manner updating the public by summarizing the content of the written message and again reassuring them that the incident appears to be a hoax. Weatherup must have a tone of sincerity and determination in the fact that the incident should not hinder the public’s image of the brand, that PepsiCo is doing everything they can do find out who is at the core of this alleged and staged tampering and that Pepsi-Cola continues to be a safe beverage for customers consume. 3. Plan: 1. After the allegations of the syringe being found in a can of Diet Pepsi at the grocery store in the state of Washington begins to receive extensive news coverage, the PepsiCo spokesperson and PR/Communication team must begin by comprising a message to present to immediately circulate through their various channels of publication as listed in item two. a. The PR team must focus on first dismissing the allegations that they believe to be untrue and informing the public that the incident appears to be a hoax. i. All PepsiCo employees must be advised to not comment on the ongoing investigation and the tampering incidents. All media inquiries must be directed to the Office of Communication. b. The PepsiCo legal counsel must begin a lengthy investigation of all allegations of can-tampering of Diet Pepsi and investigate the specific syringe incident, which has most likely received the extensive media attention because of the nature of syringes and the unknown use of the syringe prior to its the alleged appearance in the can. The team must investigate all accounts and interview manufactures, workers, truck drivers that load and distribute the Diet Pepsi and workers at the grocery store to insure all facts are known about the origins of the can and how it possible could have come to be tampered with. This will cover the company’s bases when the Office of Communications receives questions into the authenticity of the PepsiCo statement that the tampering was a hoax. i. The PepsiCo legal team must also find the person who bought the can of Diet Pepsi with the alleged syringe in it and ask them to describe how the syringe was found. Legal personnel must try to advise the customer to not speak to news media about the incident as the investigation concerning the tampering is ongoing and any information leaked may lead to negative effects. The legal team must also contact the other people who created the 50 plus reports concerning Diet Pepsi can-tampering and do the same with them. c. They must focus on being timely at this moment and addressing the issue to the immediate news coverage cannot say that the company is not addressing it or aware of it or has not responded to calls. 2. After the two days following the syringe incident in Washington pass and the other 50 plus reports of Diet Pepsi can-tampering, PepsiCo and Weatherup must then disseminate the longer message (in item one from Weatherup) informing the public of the current situation and the. They must also hold the press conference at this time. a. It is here that the legal team at PepsiCo must take their findings from the investigation of the tampering and the found syringe to compile a report file of the investigation and prepare to dis-


tribute it to all employees and later the public. b. PepsiCo’s PR and communication team must create a crisis action plan detailing the remaining steps needed to be done. 3. In 15 days following the publication of the message from Weatherup, the press conference and after immediate news coverage of the tampering reports and alleged syringe incident have occurred, PepsiCo must continue to provide updates via their social media platforms, websites and at this time Weatherup may wish to sit down with television media, such as a nightly news show, to address questions and concerns of the aftermath of the incident. In this TV interview, Weather up will reassure the public that the incidents are being investigated and all production of Diet Pepsi and all other beverages PepsiCo produces have been under tighter regulations so that no other reports such as these could possibly originate in the future. a. At day 25 the thorough investigation into the alleged syringe incident and more than 50 other reports should be completed. At this point, the legal team will have five days to fact check once more and confirm all information in the comprehensive report to prepare it to be distributed to all PepsiCo employees and then to news media around North America. The distribution of the legal investigation into the event will emphasize the PepsiCo company’s dedication to ethical practices and leadership so that it remains a respected company in the eyes of its stakeholders, loyal customers and the public. 4. On day 30 after the reports of tampering, PepsiCo must publish the findings of the investigation into the tampering incidents. If Weatherup and Kessler were correct, the findings should correlate with the previous statement that the syringe incident was falsely created. The public will be encouraged to continue to buy PepsiCo products. a. After the investigation report comes out, the company should create a new marketing campaign and string of commercials emphasizing Pepsi-Cola’s safety standards, quality and great taste to the public.

3rd Place - Feature Photo

(By Christina Ulsh, University of North Texas)


2nd Place - Feature Photo (By Kyra Littlejohn, St. Mary’s University)

TIPA Scholarship Recipients Mike Warms Scholarship for 2-Year Students Raul Alonzo (Del Mar College) Amanda Castro-Crist (Amarillo College) Kenney Kost (Tarrant County College) Frank Buckley Scholarship for 4-Year Students Katelyn Holm (University of Mary Hardin-Baylor) Morgan Jones (University of Texas at Tyler) Stela Khury (St. Mary’s University) Carson Wilson (Texas Tech University) Jeff Henderson Scholarship for Journalistic Excellence Linda Wilkins (Baylor University)


1st Place - News Writing (Spanish) (By Liza Winkler, Texas State University

El cuerpo de bomberos en San Antonio y los oficiales de incendio premedito están investigando un fuego “suspicaz” que herido una mujer de 20 años en el oeste parte de la ciudad en jueves.

Neal Ague, el jefe en el cuerpo de bomberos, dije tres motores de estación 13 fueron respondido sobre son las 2:14 en la tarde al fuego en el coche enfrente la casa de la calle 123 Acme. Una víctima fue transportada por el Hospital de Universidad con quemas menores e inhalación de humo en una condición consciente son las 2:20 en la tarde, Ague dije. Los bomberos encontraron la mujer en su cocina y pensaron que ella fue quitando el fuego, Ague dije. El condición de la mujer no es conocida en este tiempo. Ague dije el fuego en el coche fue muy importante primero, y los bomberos encontraron el otro fuego de la estructura en el garaje sobre 50 pies allí después. Los bomberos apagaron las llamas y quitaron ambos fuegos por 2:25 en la tarde. Los dos fuegos causaron daños de 25 mil en la estructura del garaje y 12 mil del coche, Ague dije. No es normal para tener el fuego de la estructura y el fuego en el coche durante el mismo tiempo, Ague dije. Jesse Olivarri, ingeniero en el cuerpo de bomberos, dije un incidente domestico ocurrieron antes en la mañana, y los oficiales de incendio premedito están investigando los fuegos.

Ague dije el acción de los bomberos durante los dos fuegos fue muy bueno y eficiente. Los bomberos típicamente responden a los fuegos en tres y media minutos. Los bomberos no tienen heridos desde los fuegos, y una mujer es una solo víctima en el incidente.

2nd Place - Editorial Cartoon (By Kenneth Brisendine, Tarleton State University)


2nd Place Print Ad (By Lina Moon, University of Texas-Dallas)


2nd Place - Yearbook Design (By Rachel Grahmann, St. Mary’s University)


3rd Place - Editorial Cartoon

(By Joseph Alderman, Texas A&M-Commerce)


2nd Place - Critical Review (By David Dunn, University of Texas at Arlington) I don’t know what sort of audience would want to watch Clybourne Park. I don’t know what sort of turbulent mind would understand this, let alone pay $15 for it. Clybourne Park is, in a word, a mess, a clunky, misshapen and grossly miscalculated play that is so shoddy and haphazard that Darren Aronofsky’s The Fountain makes more sense than this. Set up as a prequel/ sequel to the highly-revered Lorraine Hansberry play A Raisin In The Sun, Clybourne Park begins in a small house in 1959, where a couple is coping with the suicide of their 19-year old son and with the fact that a black family wants to move into their neighborhood. Fast forward to 2009, where the house is now a crumbling disarray of graffiti and vandalism. The original inhabitants are gone, but the roots are still there, as a white family now wants to move in to the house in a predominantly black neighborhood, discovering the suicide note of the son who killed himself 50 years ago. Sounds like a strong setup for a compelling drama, I know, but it needs to fit in

the context it was originally made for, otherwise it falls into complete shambles. The very first problem with this production is that we are given half of what we were supposed to be given: the performance I went to only showed the first act of the play. That means that we’re given the 1959 portion of the production and expected to read it like its the full thing, revelations and all. Since we’re only given half of a production, all we can give is half of a response. How would you feel if J.R.R. Tolkien went halfway through The Hobbit before deciding to cut it off? How does the first act hold up at least? Terrible. At its best, it is a loud, obnoxious and overly dramatic homily preaching about guilt, segregation and post traumatic stress disorder. At its worst, it’s William Golding’s Lord Of The Flies. If it’s in the middle ground, it’s both. There’s many problems that I find with the first act of Clybourne Park. Perhaps the biggest one is that without the second act to support it, there’s no clear theme or focus that it’s trying to attain. In the first half of the act, Russ (Gary Hoeffler)

and his wife Bev (Catherine Babbit) are packing up to move out of their house, all while struggling to be happy with themselves and get over the suicide of their son Kenneth. If I went into this as a cold viewing, with no background information to support myself with, I would have said this movie was about couples

struggling with the idea of guilt and grief. Only by reading the Playhouse pamphlet was I made aware that Clybourne Park was a commentary on race and society’s perception of such. The play didn’t support this theme until the topic of race was brought up more than halfway through the act. The actors are fine, but not perfect. Characters interjected with bits of dialogue here or there, sometimes messing up their lines due to either late or early line delivery (I could hear Hoeffler slip up a few times with Babbit). Dialogue bits were even more monotonous, with conversations ranging from the origins of neapolitan ice cream to how you pronounce the names of Moscovians. Perhaps the best


performance of the show came from Meredith Alvarez, who played a deaf pregnant wife named Betsy. Alvarez was articulate as Besty, a performance so accurate in its portrayal of the audibly impaired that a few members of my audience questioned whether she was actually deaf or not. The part I find most genuine about her performance was how inoffensive she was about it. Alvarez didn’t seek out to satirize, exaggerate or even parody her performance as the deaf Betsy. There was a certain

sweetness to her, a charming and calming bit of innocence that is trying to understand the world around her, even though she’s always surrounded in a cloud of confusion. Her performance definitely lent a more true perspective into the world of the deaf, and was without a doubt the highlight cast member of the night. There was one other scene that truly struck me, and that was when actor Jacob De Hoyos came out for a flashback sequence of Kenneth, showing us a tragic scene of him writing

2nd Place - Sports Photo

(By Adrian Castillo, University of Texas-Pan American)

his suicide letter only minutes before he killed himself. This was a great scene that peered a little deeper into the mind of a mentally disturbed man that lent a better perspective into him and his situation. Even then though, what does that offer the play as a whole? It lends no conversation on the topic of race, no statement to make about our society and the labels that we place on people. Without the second act, we’re left in a loop, a loop that the first act did a great job getting us into in the first place. To put it in the words


2nd Place - Feature Writing (By May Ortega, University of Texas-Pan American) Homeless, not hopeless Woman’s faith powers through her poverty

In the years prior to her life on the streets, Cecilia Galindo had a house of her own, a husband, four children and three jobs. Now she owns little more than the clothes on her back and the frayed books in her reusable grocery bag.

On any given day, San Antonio’s homeless population consists of about 3,211 individuals, according to homeless prevention service provider SAMMinistries. Sixty-three-year-old Galindo has been living on the streets of San Antonio for three years, so she falls into the category of chronic homelessness. According to CNNMoney, an individual who has been continually homeless for over a year is considered chronically homeless. Taking her morning stroll down St. Mary’s Street with a small Jack in the Box cup filled to the brim with water in one hand and a newspaper in the other, Galindo explained her living situation.

“It’s been three years since I’ve had a house of my own, and lately I sleep wherever I can down this road here,” she said, dressed in a baggy red sweater and loose sweatpants. “It can get pretty cold out here, too, but I get by.”

HER FIRST HOME Before her days were spent on the streets of San Antonio, Galindo was born further west in Del Rio, Texas, about 30 minutes away from the Mexican-American border. She said that she has been a practicing Catholic from a young age and she has kept it that way her entire life.

“I’m a Catholic and I’ve always been a Catholic lady,” she said. “I became Christian at the age of 9. That’s when I started going to church on my own and reading the Bible.” She, along with her only brother and two sisters, grew up with an alcoholic mother while her father worked in the fields. Because her mother’s condition was only getting worse as time went on, the then 14year-old Galindo was driven into the arms of a boy her own age to survive. “He and I were married at 14 because my mother couldn’t raise me. She was an alcoholic and my father told me not to worry about it,” she explained. “He told me to let her go and that he would take care of her issues, so I left with my husband when I was about 15.” At the time, both Galindo and her husband worked in the fields, picking fruits and vegetables every day. Eventually, the young couple gathered enough money to purchase their own home, so they found a $500 house and moved in to start their lives together. With time, they purchased a second house and put their first one to new use.

“We fixed up our first house and turn it into a boarding house for people from across the border, so they could have a place to eat and live,” she said. “They tried to get themselves a job and we helped them have something.” But Galindo said the couple’s plans were cut short when her husband’s friends began to protest against their union.


“His friends didn’t want him to be married to me because of my religion,” she said. “They were very lost, and I invited them to church so they could hear God’s word, but they didn’t want any of it.” As a result, Galindo and her husband went their separate ways before either of them reached the age of 19. But Galindo said she did not let that slow her down.

THE WORKING GIRL With the money she was still earning for herself from her work in the fields, Galindo made a move to Pleasanton, California where she first worked as a grading teacher at the age of 20. After grading papers and tests for a couple of years, she became a teacher and taught non-native students how to speak English; something she said meant a lot to her.

“It made me feel great, sharing my knowledge with others. It is very beautiful, because you help somebody learn how to live,” she said. “Communication is my favorite thing. I love talking to people instead of locking myself up in a little cubbyhole or in my house.” Although she had her teaching job for nearly 15 years, she decided to pursue a new career in nursing, so she enrolled herself in the University of California, Davis. After earning her degree, she became a nurse at Woodland Healthcare in Davis. Throughout her nursing career, Galindo had four children, each of which she tried to raise on her own, but it wasn’t as easy as she had hoped. “I lost all of my kids to either their fathers or the government, because I didn’t have enough resources to provide for them all,” she said, her hazel eyes aimed at the ground. “I couldn’t take care of everybody.” After 10 more years as a nurse, Galindo had her own home in Bakersfield, California, but she also had some uninvited guests. “There was a married couple living in my house, eating my food and using all of my resources without giving me anything. So, I asked them why they were depending on other people for their household, their furniture and their money,” she explained. The pair kept living in her house for four months when Galindo had enough and decided to make a change, brought on by her own faith. “I wasn’t I a violent person, so I didn’t want to get into a fight and hit them, hurt them and throw them out of the house,” she said. “I told them that if they didn’t leave my house, I would uproot myself and leave.” In an act of frustration and pacifism, she left California and returned to her birth state of Texas, where she kept moving in order to find a job. Over time, she kept gaining and losing work, then she decided to drop everything and focus her life on God. FAITH AS WEALTH Galindo took a sip of her free cup of water and smiled as she spoke of what exactly it is that has helped her cope with every obstacle she has faced throughout her life as well as her current situation. “Being homeless doesn’t change my beliefs. Yes, there are a lot of people with bad intentions out there, but that’s not an excuse to stop following God and to stop being a good person,” she said.” As long as she lives, she said she will keep her faith and herself strong because she believes it will pay off in time. “I lost my husband, I lost my children and I’m homeless, but I’m still going on,” she said with a smile. “I don’t see why other people can’t go on too.”


2nd Place - Editorial Writing (By William Darnell, University of North Texas)

When North Andover High School suspended 17-year-old Erin Cox in October, it set a dangerous precedent—for its students, for alcohol related awareness and for common sense. Cox, an honor student, fielded a call from a friend in need. Would she come and drive him home from a party because he had been drinking and wanted to be safe. Cox complied and now suffers the consequence of missing five games for the volleyball team she captained until the incident. She was also arrested, even though police confirmed she wasn’t drinking. Geoffrey Bok, the school’s attorney, wants to make a stand against teen drinking, calling it a “serious problem.” According to him, the school is taking a serious and principled stand regarding alcohol. How that stand results in suspending a student preventing a drunk driver being on the road is anyone’s guess. Following the logic of the school’s website, which states “North Andover students will demonstrate service,” Cox should be lauded for possibly preventing a car accident, a third of which are a result of drunken driving, according to MADD. Of all car accidents, 31 percent had a teen driver behind the wheel. By removing another intoxicated and impaired driver from the equation, Cox more than met her requirement to “contribute support to the greater good.” Instead of celebrating what was a responsible decision by Cox, school officials suspended her, stripped her of her captaincy and declined to comment on the incident. Cox and her family have rightly sought legal counsel over the issue, but they’ve been beaten back by the district court, which hid behind jurisdiction. If the school won’t budge, the courts can’t intervene and the police arrest good Samaritans, maybe Cox’s attorney is right in saying that a dangerous message is being sent out to kids. They should worry more about their disciplinary records than whether or not their friends make it home alive. North Andover must reverse its decision, appropriately praise Erin Cox’s maturity and get really “serious” about drunken driving education, instead of illogically punishing a student whose heart was in the right place.

Photo by Patricia Dillon, Texas A&M University-Commerce

Sports contest coordinator Jay Miller of SMU (in red) goes over contest details before the students board buses to UT-San Antonio for the live sports event.


3rd Place - Feature Writing

(By Gabi Powell, Abilene Christian University)

Lulu’s Bakery and Diner is an eatery easily overlooked. The diner is a blur to San Antonio’s downtown traffic whizzing by, with the engines of I-35 drivers still audible to customers dining inside. Luby’s Cafeteria across the street casts a shadow over the humble Lulu’s. Both pitch to the same crowd, hungry patrons looking for a home-cooked meal. But where Luby’s succeeded in restaurant expansion, Lulu’s made up for in pounds, as in its “world-famous,” three-pound cinnamon roll. “Don’t ask me for the recipe. I don’t know. I don’t even want t o know,” said Sylvia, a four-year waitress at Lulu’s. A spool of cream cheese, butter and cinnamon spill over the top. Four-inch walls of yellow cake yield to the poke of a fork. Its renowned rolls are an indulgence doctors will scold, but stomachs dig. And it is only one of Lulu’s many chowing jewels. The 24/7 joint’s menu parades a four-page spread of breakfast, lunch and dinner fare, available at any hour of the day, every day of the week. The “world-famous” cinnamon roll needs little advertising, but an entire page is devoted to its award-winning chicken fried steak. The hole-in-a-wall diner became a massive dining dent after featured on Travel Channel’s “Man vs. Food,” where host Adam Richmond took on the challenge of downing both a cinnamon roll and chicken fried steak in one sitting. Lulu’s busboy Jeremy Martinez testified, the man versus roll battle is one rarely won. “People are pretty confident until about bite number ten,” he said. “That’s when they start asking for the to-go boxes.” Tom Grady sat at the diner counter, savoring scraps of chicken fried steak, vegetables untouched. The waitress brought the check, a reminder his meal was coming to a close. “Three cinnamon rolls to go, please,” he asked. “You mean a three-pound cinnamon roll?” asked the waitress. “No, three, three-pound rolls,” he corrected. “I’m visiting from Dallas,” Grady said to justify his bulk buy. “I have to make these last a month.” Grady hoisted his three Herculean desserts, attempted to move from Lulu’s counter and promised the waitress he’d be back. Jack and Sarah McLittle kept coming back for more than 30 years. The couple had their first dinner date at Lulu’s, back when it was originally named Lulu’s Jailhouse Diner. However, no cinnamon roll was ordered for dessert. “I was afraid to look like a pig on a first date,” Sarah said. The couple made up for declining desert that night by ordering 20 cinnamon rolls for their wedding instead one year later. “People were confused when they saw that would be our wedding cake,” Jack said. “Then they had a bite and understood.” Sightseers come to Lulu’s because it’s a tourist spot, Sylvia said. But Lulu’s is a restaurant built on regulars. Some scrape off icing, others unwind the wheel of sugary bread heaven, but most eaters are three bites in before thinking out a noshing routine. There’s no right way to eat it, however, guidelines are given to those taking their dessert to go. “Four to five minutes in the microwave, do not refrigerate, is good for about a week,” Sylvia rattled off for the tenth time this shift. The “Never trust a skinny chef,” sign hanging above the kitchen warmers reassures customers they are in for a true, home-style, mammoth of a meal. Lulu’s Bakery proves what is wrong, tastes so right, making a case for those believing stomachs are proportionate to the size of their eyes.


1st Place - TV Advertising (By Raul Alonzo, Del Mar College)


2nd Place - Public Relations Release Writing (By Zac Orr, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor)

(Memorial Hospital logo) For Immediate Release Contact: Miller Hix 4/10/14 Director of Public Relations Phone #: 888-555-1212 Memorial Hospital experts offer an evening of solace and support San Antonio – Three experts from Memorial Hospital are joining together April 22 from 7:00-10:00 p.m. to discuss ways to reduce stress and live better by making simple changes in habits and lifestyles. “Stress Relievers and Life Enhancers” will be an opportunity to learn simple changes to escape the “spinning your wheels” feel of daily routines as well as ways to reduce stress and optimize energy and efficiency in a person’s day-to-day life. Memorial social worker Anna George will discuss changes in routine, how an individual can better plan his time and how to take better care of himself. Dean Randall, a specialist from Memorial’s Department of Cardiac Rehabilitation, will speak about how increasing a person’s level of physical activity can help prevent stress. Lastly, Memorial Dietician Jamila Kendall will provide advice concerning nutrition to help people better understand how to “charge up” their bodies for a busy day.

“Stress Relievers and Life Enhancers” is sponsored by Memorial Hospital’s departments of Social Work, Cardiac Rehabilitation and Marketing Services and will take place at the Memorial Hospital Activities Center, Classroom Auditorium 145, located at 26773 Purdy St. in San Antonio. The fee for the program is $25 if paid before April 20 or $35 if paid at the door. The toll-free telephone number to call to register is 1-800-555-9876. Anyone who would like more information should contact the office of Miller Hix at 888555-1212. ###


1st Place - Print Sports Writing (By Nathan Wright, Tyler Junior College)

Brock Hartson scattered nine hits over six and two-thirds innings to lead UTSA to a 6-2 victory against Marshall Friday night at Roadrunner Field. The sophomore right-hander from Pearland allowed just one run and struck out four as the Roadrunners (23-11 overall, 9-4 in Conference USA) won the first-ever meeting between the two schools in UTSA’s first season in the conference. “I felt great,” Hartson said. “I think (tonight) I was able to command all my pitches. My defense played great. Some of the balls they hit weren’t good, but we couldn’t make plays on them.” Hartson, who improved to 3-1 this season, received offensive support from right fielder John Welborn, first baseman Mike Warren and left fielder Tony Ramirez. The trio combined for nine hits, five of the six Roadrunners’ runs and three RBIs. Ramirez hit his third home run of the season in the bottom of the fourth inning to give UTSA a 2-0 lead. He also had an RBI double in the seventh to give the Roadrunners a 6-1 advantage. “In my first AB, I definitely just missed a ball to deep right-center,” Ramirez said. “I just wanted to make sure I got my pitch and he left a fastball up. I got the right pitch, put a good swing on it and it went out.” Welborn continued his current hot streak by going 4-for-5 from the plate while Warren went 3-for-4. Combined, they now own the second-best start in school history with 23 wins in their first 34 games. The Roadrunners have won four of their last five games. “Anytime you can win on Friday night, it’s huge in college baseball,” UTSA Head Coach Jason Marshall said. “As you work through the Conference USA schedule, we call it Friday night at the fights because it is going to be their best arm against our best arm. “Regardless of what the teams look like coming in, it is typically a tough matchup on a Friday night. It was no different tonight. We had to work for everything that we got.” UTSA struck first, scoring a run in the bottom of the first inning. Welborn led off with a double and scored on a groundout by Horacio Correa III after advancing to third on a passed ball. The score remained 1-0 until Ramirez homered in the bottom of the fourth. The Roadrunners doubled their advantage an inning later when John Boormann tripled home Warren and Ramirez to make it 4-0. That two-strike, opposite-field hit turned out to be the game-winner. “That is the approach with two strikes,” Boormann said. “He started me off with two curveballs and then I watched a fastball. I shouldn’t have done that. It was a good pitch to hit. He came back with a splitfinger up and I fouled it off. Then I went back to the approach and I was able to catch up with a fastball.” The Thundering Herd (13-19, 7-8) finally got to Hartson in the top of the sixth. A double by Corey Bird and a single by Sergio Leon resulted in a run for Marshall to cut the UTSA lead to 4-1. The Roadrunners then added two more runs in the bottom of the seventh to put the game out of reach. Warren scored on a double by Ramirez and Jesse Baker crossed home on a sacrifice fly by Boormann to make it 6-1. “Overall I was pleased,” Marshall said. “We had chances to let the dam break with some runners on scoring position and then didn’t get them in. Once we broke through, that kind of eased things a little bit and really gave us a chance to win.” Marshall managed one more run in the top of the ninth to account for the final margin. The two teams will meet again at 2 p.m. Saturday and then conclude their three-game series on Sunday at 10 .m.


3rd Place - Critical Review

(By Ethan Metcalf, Midwestern State University)

Director Matthew Cassi might be on to something, as the “Clybourne Park” director took the broadway play about racial misunderstandings and squeezed it into the intimate Cellar theater of the Playhouse San Antonio, creating a visceral experience unlike any large-sale state could produce. The audience were quite literally in the living room of Russ and Bev as they opened the play attempting to figure out what citizens of Naples are called. Napoleons? No, that’s already been taken, Bev reasons. The older couple are paid visit by Jim, their preacher, but is on becomes clear that Bev has invited him there to play psychiatrist for Russ. Immediately upon realizing this, Russ explodes with his attempt at controlled anger, and so too does the rest of the play. Each character that enters the home adds to Russ’ frustration, but actor Gary Hoeffler did a spectacular job o keeping the audience on his side despite his ark disposition. This serves to further worm the audience to his character after the play’s big reveal, and simultaneously explains Russ’ insistence on moving forward whether it’s moving rapid conversational pleasantries forward into meaningful talk, or moving on from a great tragedy. “Clybourne Park” by Bruce Norris pointedly illustrates society’s seeming inability to move the conversation about race forward, as Russ would surely desire. Cassi described the circular conversation about blacks and whites, or “apples and oranges” as one racist white character put it, as a conversation that moves nowhere, and thus solves nothing. Perhaps like Pulitzer and tony Award winning play, in an atmosphere like the Cellar, can thrust audiences out of circular talk and into a conversation that Russ would appreciate.

2nd Place - News Writing (Spanish) (By Perla Arellano, Amarillo College)

San Antonio, Texas - La Estación de Bomberos de San Antonio respondio a una llamada de un automóvil bajo llamas a las 2:14 de la tarde hoy y terminaron apagando dos incendios, uno cual dejo a una mujer en el hospital. De acuerdo a Neal Ague, jefe de batallón, los bomberos respondieron a la llamada de un vecino por un automóvil, Camry 2009, incendido en la calle 123 Acme. Al llegar, ellos descubrieron otro incendio en la cochera del hogar, Ague dijo. Se despacho reenfuerzos después de descubrir el segundo incendio, dijo Ague. Tres camiónes de bombero y una ambulancia de servicios medicos de emergencia respondieron a la escena. Ague dijo que se encontro a una mujer de 20 años conciente en la cocina. Se supone que ella intentaba apagar el incendio, el dijo. Ella fue transportada en condición critica hacia el Hospital University por lesiones de quemadura menor y por inhalación de humo. Su condición actual no se sabe. No se reportarón más víctimas. De acuerdo a Jesse Olivarri, ingeniero, se reporto una llamada de violencía domestíca en el hogar temprano esta mañana. Se esta investigando la vinculación entre el reporte y los dos incendios. La causa de ambós incendios esta bajo investigación por el departamento especializado en incendios provocados por la distancia del automóvil y la cochera. En esta situación con el auto estando tan lejos de la casa, definitivamente no es un fenómeno normal, dijo Ague. Al intentar apagar el incendio, un camión de bomberos de la plataforma T-38 tuvierón dificultades al sacar la escalera para llegar al techo de la cochera, dijo Ague. Asi que, tuvieron que usar una escalera de suelo para subirse al techo de la cochera. Aunque las llamas se contubieron a la cochera, hubo daños de humo en todo el hogar, de acuerdo a Ague. Los daños de estroctura son de $25,000 dólares más $12,000 por los daños del automóvil.


3rd Place - Public Relations Release Writing (By Jessica Gilligan, Stephen F. Austin State University)

April 10, 2014

Contact: Miller Hix Director of Public Relations Ph: 888-555-1212

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL’S STRESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM TO OFFER A WAY OUT

SAN ANTONIO, APRIL 10, 2014 — Memorial Hospital will host a program designed to enable individuals to better combat and manage stress. The program Stress Relievers and Life Enhancers is 7-10 p.m. April 22. Memorial’s health professionals will speak based on their areas of expertise.

The program is open to the public and designed for people who are stressed and constantly feel like they are under a time crunch. A previously published advertisement read, “Are you ‘stressed out?’ Do you sometimes feel like you are just ‘spinning your wheels?’ in your daily routine? With simple changes in your habits, a person can take positive steps toward preventing or reducing stress in their lives.”

Social worker Anna George, exercise specialist Dean Randall from Memorial’s Department of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Memorial dietician Jamila Kendal will each share their health advice with attendees. George will speak on changes in routine and time management and how to better care for the body. Randall will share the importance of physical activity and how it can aid stress. Kendal will offer nutritional advice and describe why the body needs “fueled” properly for a busy day.

Memorial’s departments of Social Work, Cardiac Rehabilitation and Marketing Services are sponsoring the program scheduled for 7-10 p.m. April 22. Stress Relievers and Life Enhancers is set to take place in the Memorial Hospital Activities Center, Classroom Auditorium 145. Admission is $25 before April 20, or $35 at the door. Call 1-800-555-9876 to register. For more information visit our website at www.memorialhospital.com/programs.


2nd Place - PR Crisis Management (By Amber Quaid, Del Mar College) 1. Announcement: PepsiCo, ranked #1 on Corebrand’s Most Ethical Companies, have allegations of can-tampering. A grocery store in Washington State allegedly found a syringe in a can of Diet Pepsi two days ago. Other reports have sprung up as well. PepsiCo North America CEO Craig Weatherup and FDA Commissioner David Kessler believe this incident is a hoax and will have the allegations looked into. PepsiCo was started in the late 1890’s by a North Carolina pharmacist Caleb Bradham. Pepsi-Cola merged with Frito-Lay Today in 1965 making PepsiCo a global food and beverage leader of today. PepsiCo was included in Ethisphere’s 2013 World’s Most Ethical Companies, its 7th year on this list. PepsiCo currently has 19,000 employees and is ranked number 16 among the Hay Group’s Top 20 Best Companies for Leadership. PepsiCo is a company that has proudly made its name and product a household item. The allegations that wish to take this away will be looked into as the integrity of PepsiCo’s products will not be so easily tarnished.

(This announcement needs to have a photo of CEO Craig Weatherup, preferably in a PepsiCo shirt, in a PepsiCo factory with the workers, a close-up. The machinery, the floor and anything photographed for this usage needs to be clean and presentable to the public.) 2. Message Delivery: The message would be delivered via traditional news media first as this was how the allegation was first delivered. If the media delivery is not available in a timely matter then we would post on the company’s main page, Twitter, Facebook and any blog or media style alternative PepsiCo is attached to, this includes but is not limited to Frito-Lay and any other affiliates(Gatorade, etc.). Radio is a must. If the media delivery is in a timely manner then we would post directly after to the company’s other media alternatives. All deliveries need to have a human touch and not just logos, change any logo picture to that of CEO Craig Weatherup or friendly face of the company backing us. 3. 4-step plan: 1- CEO Craig Weatherup needs to make a public statement immediately after this release and after any negative publicity directly from the original source with the tampered syringed can.

2- Keep CEO Craig Weatherup in the news. Show him in his factories, in his community helping out, and talking to FDA Commissioner David Kessler. He needs to be seen 2 out of the 7 days of each week for a minimum of 4 weeks. CEO Craig Weatherup needs to be shown investigating the allegations. He needs to be seen talking to investigators both in and outside of his production facilities. 3- PepsiCo needs to have an open forum to the media discussing what is going on with the situation, how they plan to handle situation and what PepsiCo is doing to make sure this never happens to any of their products. This should happen every 3 days the first two weeks (or when significant news surfaces), then only twice a week in the third week, and finally once a week until issue is resolved but not longer than 8 weeks. 4- All affiliates need to be pictured backing up PepsiCo. This can happen in the community, at charity events or anywhere that is in a positive, respectful position. This should happen as a large group immediately and then throughout the next four weeks at least once a week with one of the affiliates. (If these four steps are followed, whether this is truth or just allegation, there should be enough positive reinforcement by the end of the month. This reinforcement should allow us to further the positive image created or if the allegations were true then we can focus on fixing the situation and finding out why this happened and how can it not happen again.)


3rd Place - PR Crisis Management (By Leah Bunkers, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor)

1. PepsiCo would like to address the syringe that was allegedly found in a can of Diet Pepsi at a grocery store in Washington state. More than 50 reports of Diet Pepsi can-tampering have been reported since the first allegation. CEO of PepsiCo North America Craig Weatherup believes this incident to be a hoax. David Kessler, an FDA Commissioner, also considers the allegations to be fraudulent. The company intends to investigate this issue further in the coming days. PepsiCo strives to provide customers with top-tier beverage and food products. It is committed to community, ethics, character and integrity. PepsiCo is determined to confront the circulating allegations and keep the public informed throughout the process. The company thanks its dedicated customers for their continued patronage. In 1965, Pepsi-Cola, a company created in the late 1890s by Caleb Bradham of New Bern, N.C., and Frito-Lay merged to become PepsiCo. It reports sales of $510 million. In 2013, PepsiCo was ranked #1 on CoreBrand’s list of the Most Respected Companies. The company was recognized by Ethisphere’s World’s Most Ethical Companies in the same year. PepsiCo employs 19,000 people. It ranked #16 globally in Hay Group’s Top 20 Best Companies for Leadership in 2012. 2. I would send this announcement to the news media. It is important for them to have a statement as soon as possible before they become biased with customer allegations. Additionally, I would hold a brief press conference to confront the issue, especially since the CEO claims this to be a hoax. An honest message to the public is necessary to maintain trust. I don’t think anyone needs to apologize that this press conference, however. It just needs to be apparent that PepsiCo is committed to quality and ethics.

Photo by Patricia Dillon, Texas A&M University-Commerce

Barry Bedlan, assistant chief of bureau, South-Central United States, of The Associated Press, was among more than 30 media professionals and faculty advisers presenting workshops during the convention in San Antonio.


3rd Place - Print Advertising (By Matt Sloan, Abilene Christian University)

More than 500 students and faculty advisers, representing 47 colleges and universities, attended the 2014 TIPA spring convention in San Antonio. Students participated in on-site contests including traveling to the San Antonio Fire Training Academy for a mock news event, the University of Texas-San Antonio for a collegiate baseball game and The Playhouse for a theatrical production. Students also received valuable information from media professionals during two days of workshops and seminars.


2nd Place - Print News Writing (By William Darnell, University of North Texas)

A 20-year-old woman was transported to University Hospital after suffering life-threatening injuries in a suspicious fire Thursday afternoon in Far West San Antonio, according to officials. Neighbors alerted the San Antonio Fire Department at about 2:12 p.m. after seeing a car on fire across the street at 123 Acme St. When three crews of firefighters arrived and began extinguishing the blaze, they noticed the garage of the house was also on fire. One of the crews on scene then began their primary search of the home, which is when they discovered the victim, who had inhaled a high amount of smoke and suffered minor burns. The victim was transported to University Hospital under a code 3, rapid EMT transport. It took about seven minutes for the fire crews to put out the 1-alarm blaze, which had two different points of origin. Suspicions arose after San Antonio Police notified fire officials of a domestic complaint at the address earlier in the day. That coupled with the two different point of origin has led to an arson investigation being opened. “It shouldn’t,” said Neal Ague, Battalion Chief in regards to two separate fires starting more than 50 feet apart. “That’s why we have the arson investigators working with us. It’s not a normal progression. A lot of times on scenes there are some tell tale indicators of arson.” Engineer Jesse Olivarri said that while wind conditions and humidity levels were apt for further damage, they did not contribute to the spread of the blaze. Ague said the investigation could take as little as a few hours or as much as several weeks. Damages are estimated at more than $35,000--$25,000 for the garage and smoke damage throughout the house and $12,000 for the total loss of the 2009 Toyota Camry. The start of the fire is unknown, but crews did find a lawnmower gas can in the garage. Whether or not the victim owned the house or the car is also unknown at this time, pending a further investigation, according to fire officials.


3rd Place - Print News Writing (By Jay Jordan, Sam Houston State University)

Arson could be to blame for the hospitalization of a woman after a fire in San Antonio’s west side Thursday. A 20 year-old unidentified female was given CPR and transported to University Hospital for smoke inhalation and minor burns after San Antonio Fire Department responded to a 911 call saying that a car was on fire at 123 Acme St. When firefighters arrived, they found that both the car and the two-story house where the car was parked were on fire. Battalion Chief Neal Ague said the proximity and origins of the two fires sparked an arson investigation of the incident. “In this situation, the car being so far from the house, it’s definitely not a normal phenomenon that we would see,” Ague said. “A lot of times on scenes… there are indicators of arson. There’s some clues that arson’s involved if you have multiple starts. When you have two points of origin, that’s not normal.” According to San Antonio EMS engineer Jesse Olivarri, even though winds were high, they weren’t high enough to spread the fire from the house to the car or vice versa. Only after firefighters distinguished the car blaze did they notice the house fire. Olivarri said a neighbor reported the car fire at 2:12 p.m. Both fires were put out 13 minutes after the call. According to Ague, since they were only initially responding to the car fire, they didn’t expect to find the victim inside the house. Usually, Ague said, they would rather prioritize entering a house and saving lives higher than distinguishing a vehicle. “Our number one issue to deal with is life safety,” Ague said. “This time, they actually happened to find something [in the house].” According to Olivarri, an earlier domestic dispute at the residence that day reported to San Antonio Police Department could play a part in the investigation.

San Antonio’s Riverwalk and river cruises attracted students during the weekend.

Photo by Patricial Dillon, Texas A&M University-Commerce


3rd Place - Print Sports Writing

(By Grant McKinley, University of Texas at Arlington)

Sophomore starting pitcher Brock Harston went 6.2 innings giving up nine hits and zero earned runs to lead the University of Texas at San Antonio to a 6-2 win against Marshall University Friday night at Roadrunner Field. The Roadrunners picked up their third consecutive win and 23rd of the season, marking the second best start to a year in program history. “I’m extremely proud and I’m very humbled,” UTSA head coach Jason Marshall said about leading the team to a 23-11 record. “Been here 14 years and haven’t seen a start like this in my time so I’m excited. I thought we had it in us to start the year.” UTSA improved to 9-4 in Conference USA and is tied for first in the league standings with the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Marshall dropped to 13-19 overall and 7-8 in Conference USA. The Roadrunners jumped ahead to an early lead in the bottom of the first inning when senior short stop Horacio Correa III grounded out to first base and scored senior right fielder John Welborn from third. Welborn, who was previously batting ninth in the lineup, had a career night for the Roadrunners as he went 4-5 with one run while batting in the leadoff spot. Marshall said Welborn “earned” the spot at the top of the lineup and had a night to remember after recording a hit in every at-bat until the eighth inning. “Honestly, at the beginning of the game, I felt more nervous than any other game for some reason,” Welborn said. “I prayed on deck and then just told myself to swing, get feeling right. I told my eyes to lock in and it just worked for me.” Welborn was one of six players to finish with a hit for the Roadrunners. UTSA held a one-run lead until the bottom of the fourth where senior left fielder Tony Ramirez sent a high fastball on a 1-1 count sailing over the right field wall to give UTSA a 2-0 lead. “I knew he was going to attack with fastballs again so I just wanted to make sure I got my pitch and saw a fastball up and I got the right pitch, put a good swing on it and it went out,” Ramirez said. The Roadrunners tacked on two more runs in the bottom of the fifth inning when Ramirez drew the second walk of the inning and junior catcher John Bormann belted a triple to right field to give the team a 4-0 lead. Ramirez finished 2-3 with two RBIs and two runs. Marshall looked to spark its offense in the top of the sixth when the team put its leadoff hitters on base with a pair of singles but its rally was cut short after scoring one run. After a lineout to short stop and recording one of his four strikeouts on the day, Harston ended the threat by forcing a fly ball to right field. Marshall didn’t score again until the top of the ninth inning. UTSA tacked on two more runs in the bottom of the seventh to lead 6-1 and junior pitcher Logan Onda earned his fifth save of the season for the Roadrunners after giving up four hits and striking out three through 2.1 innings of relief. Sophomore pitcher Taylor Michael picked up the loss and fell to 1-6 after giving up four earned runs and nine hits through 5.2 innings. “We had to work for everything that we got,” Marshall said. “We had to play the game fairly efficient which I think we did.” UTSA and Marshall will resume its three-game series at 2 p.m. Saturday at Roadrunner Field.


2nd Place - Print Sports Writing (By Grant McGalliard, TCU)

(SAN ANTONIO) — The UTSA Roadrunners opened their series with the Marshall Thundering Herd with a 6-2 victory at Roadrunner Stadium that marked the first ever meeting between the two Conference USA schools. The win also boosted the Roadrunners to their second best start in school history, placing them at 23-11 (9-4 in conference) and pleasing head coach Jason Marshall. “Anytime you can win on Friday night, it’s huge in college baseball,” Marshall said. “We call it ‘Friday Night at the Fights,’ because it’s going to be their best arm against your best arm.” UTSA benefited from a strong pitching performance by starter Brock Hartson, who threw 6 2/3 innings while only allowing one run, as well as a solid game from their infielders on the defensive side. “I just tried to bear down,” Hartson said. “When you have good defense behind you, there’s no need to get nervous, just keep attacking.” Coach Marshall said that he was proud of his team for refusing to panic when their opponents had men on the bases. “We’re going to give up some hits,” Marshall said. “The key to the game is don’t panic. Let’s find a way to minimize damage, and if we give up a run, we have a good enough offense to compound that.” Neither of the runs given up by UTSA’s pitchers were earned. Marshall left ten men stranded on the basepaths, scoring only on the two errors committed by the Roadrunners’ defense. UTSA opened the game by doubling up the Herd in the top of the first inning before scoring a run of their own on a sacrifice groundout by shortstop Horacio Correa III. No scoring occurred for either side in the second and third innings, although the Roadrunners did leave two men on base. Marshall looked to be making a run in the top of the fourth when shortstop Sergio Leon and second baseman Andrew Dundon each reached on singles, but designated hitter Chase Vogelbach grounded into a double play and first basemen TJ Diffenderfer couldn’t bring Leon home. Left fielder Tony Ramirez launched a solo home run to right field for the Roadrunners in the bottom of the fourth after narrowly missing another homer in his first at-bat. “In my first AB, I just missed a ball deep,” Ramirez said. “I got the right pitch, put a good swing on it, and it went out.” Designated hitter Andre Vieyra and right fielder John Welborn reached base afterwards, although both were stranded. Welborn had a career night, going 4-5 with a double, three singles, and a run. “All the hard work in the offseason has paid off, and I’m just having a good time out there,” Welborn said. “I’m just trying to have fun.” The Thundering Herd stranded a runner in the top of the fifth, but UTSA wasn’t done adding to their total. Third basemen RJ Perucki had a leadoff single and moved to second on a fielder’s choice, while Ramirez reached first on a walk. Both touched home when catcher John Bormann lined a triple to the opposite field to increase the Roadrunners’ lead to 4-0. “I looked at a fastball that was a really good pitch, and I shouldn’t have done that, but I was guessing,” Bormann said. “I was able to catch up to the fastball, and it stayed fair for me, which was pretty cool.” Marshall finally added a run in the top of the sixth when center fielder Cory Bird hit a single and moved to second on an error by Ramirez. Bird moved to third on a single by Leon before Dundon had an RBI single of his own. The Roadrunners couldn’t score in the bottom of the sixth, and the Herd were also shutout in


the top of the seventh when relief pitcher Logan Onda got UTSA out of a jam and killed the rally. A misplaced infield fly in the bottom of the seventh allowed first baseman Mike Warren to reach first, and after a single by center fielder Jesse Baker, Ramirez doubled to score Warren. Baker would then score on a sacrifice fly by Bormann, leaving the Roadrunners with a 6-1 lead. Neither team could get anything going in the eighth, but Marshall made it closer than UTSA would have liked in the ninth. A single by catcher Matt Reed was compounded by a throwing error on a steal attempt that allowed him to move to third base, and Bird ran out an infield single to score Reed. The Herd would add another infield single before Dundon grounded out to Onda to end the seal the win for UTSA. The Roadrunners and the Thundering Herd will finish out the three-game series with games at 2 p.m. Saturday and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Roadrunner Field.

3rd Place - News Writing (Spanish) (By Brittany Jackson, Abilene Christian University)

El departamento de formación incendios a San Antonio respondió a fuego y busció una mujer en la situación. Un coche y el garaje de la casa de 123 en la calle Acme eran en llamas.

La mujer tiene veinte años. Ella estaba consciete cuando ella buscaron, y transporté rápido a Hospital de Universidad.

Neal Ague, jefe de batallón, dijo que el incidente de fuego se convirtió en un caso de doble cuando bomberos buscaron un fuego en un coche y el garaje.

“Este no es un normal progression,” dijo. “Es raro tener un fuego de coche y garaje, pero la primera prioridad es entrar en la casa y ayudar.” El dijo que antes del incendio, en la mañana, era un reporte de violencia doméstico en la casa. Pero un vecino llamaró sobre del incendio y alerta el departamento.

Bomberos primero respondaron para un fuego regular cuando un bombero busció huma en el garaje, ellos rápidamente respondieron del situación. Bomberos trabajaron a extinguir las llamas y era fuera en ocho minutos.

Jesse Olivarri, ingeniero de bomberos, dijo que el equipo encontró la mujer un la cocina. “Ella podría haber intentado apagar el fuego,” dijo el. No es determinado a condición de ella ahora.

Está daños de huma de $25,000 a la casa y $12,000 del automóvil. El equipo de incendio premediato se está investigado el caso.


3rd Place - Sports Photo (By William Jones, Lamar University)


2nd Place - Radio Advertising (By Daniel Morales, University of Texas-Pan American) Daniel Morales-367 University of Texas Pan American

Radio Script 1 (Soft music playing) (Easygoing female voice narrates) What is peace of mind? It is knowing your family is safe and sound, and with the Filip Watch you can do just that. Introducing the all-new Filip Phone by The Filip Phone has the amazing ability for your child to be within your reach. The geofencing capability enables you to set a boundary for your child That can make your life a whole lot easier and fill his childhood with more adventure. Filip

Radio Script 2 (Two different female voices) (Children in the background are heard laughing and playing. Slowly noise from children starts to fade down.) Friend 1-

They grow up so quickly don’t they?

Friend 2-

Tell me about it. Josh can ride his bike all day and if I don’t keep my eyes on him he will pedal his way to the end of the block. He’s so fast it almost gets me worried.

Friend 1-

That’s why I wanted to get you something for his birthday. It’s the brand new Filip Watch.

Friend 2-

What does the Filip Watch do?

Friend 1-

With the capabilities to provide you with a way to call Josh at any time if he rides his bike outside the designated area. All you have to do is purchase the watch and download the app and from your Iphone or android device, letting Josh ride his bike can become worry-free.


3rd Place - Radio Advertising

(By Brittany Weatherspoon, Tyler Junior College)


3rd Place Yearbook Design (By Karen Villarreal University of Texas Pan American)


2nd Place - Radio News Writing (By Raylyn Bowers, Amarillo College) Slug: Fire at 123 Acme St. Cume: 50 seconds

Radio News Writing - Reporter #095

THE SAN ANTONIO ARSON TEAM IS LOOKING INTO A FIRE THAT OCCURRED TODAY AT 123 ACME STREET.

A 20-YEAR-OLD FEMALE WAS TAKEN BY EMS TO UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL WITH SMOKE INHALATION AND MILD BURNS. HER CONDITION IS UNKNOWN. A CAR FIRE WAS CALLED INTO DISPATCH AT 2:12 THIS AFTERNOON. WHEN FIREFIGHTERS ARRIVED, THEY DISCOVERED A GARAGE FIRE APPROXIMATELY 50 FEET FROM THE CAR. BATTALION CHIEF NEAL AGUE SAYS THIS IS NOT A NORMAL PHENOMENON. SOT: 8 sec. Outcue: “…far from the house.”

“We are having the Arson investigators respond. It’s not normal to have a car and structure fire at the same time since the car was so far from the house.” FIREFIGHTERS HAD THE FIRE UNDER CONTROL BY 2:19 AND THE FIRE WAS COMPLETELY OUT BY 2:25.

SAN ANTONIO POLICE DEPARTMENT INFORMED FIREFIGHTERS THAT THERE WAS A DOMESTIC DISPUTE AT THE RESIDENCE EARLIER THAT DAY.

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT ESTIMATES THE TOTAL DAMAGES OF THE CAR AND STRUCTURE TO BE APPROXIMATELY 37 THOUSAND DOLLARS. #


3rd Place - Radio News Writing (By David Dunn, University of Texas at Arlington)

RADIO NEWS WRITING 395 04/10/14 [RUNS :45] NAT SND: FADE IN SIRENS, HORNS HONKING [:01] 395: Sirens squealed as fire and smoke bellowed into the air. At 2:14 p.m. Thursday, the San Antonio Fire Department responded to a car and garage fire at 123 Acme [ACK-ME] Street. [:10] AGUE: We did find one victim. 20 year old female, conscious, but needed treatment. [:04] 395: Battalion chief Neal Ague [AGG-OU] says that its unusual to have a car and garage fire at the same time, unless the two were near each other at the time of the incident. They were not. [:12] AGUE: In this situation, with the car being so far from the house, its definitely not a normal phenomenon. [:06] 395: Ague says that Arson will hold an investigation for possible causes of the fire. The victim was moved to University Hospital for treatment, her status unknown at this time. In San Antonio, I’m 395, Texas Intercollegiate Press Association. [:12]

Best of Show Division 1 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place

The Shorthorn The University Star Baylor Lariat

University of Texas at Arlington Texas State University Baylor University


2nd Place - TV Advertising (By Cody Lewis, Sam Houston State University)

Best of Show Division 2 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place HM HM

Patriot Talon Pine Log Collegian The Flare University Press

University of Texas at Tyler Stephen F. Austin State University Tarrant County College Kilgore College Lamar University


Best of Show Division 3 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place HM

The Mercury Et Cetera The Foghorn The Bells

University of Texas at Dallas Eastfield College Del Mar College University of Mary Hardin-Baylor


2nd Place - TV Sports Writing (By Cassie Logan, University of Texas at Arlington)

Cue Sports Stinger

Cue studio (9 seconds): The University of Texas-San Antonio baseball team squared off against Marshall University Friday night, signaling the start of a three-game Conference USA series this weekend. The Roadrunners hustled to score six runs off of 12 hits to silence the Thundering Herd, 6-2.

SOT UTSA head coach Jason Marshall (10 seconds): “We had to work for everything we got. We had to play the game fairly efficient which I thought we did. Hartson, who was our pitcher tonight, threw lots of strikes and anytime you can do that in a baseball game regardless of the level, you got a chance to win.” VO shots of Welborn’s double and crossing the plate (7 seconds):

Senior right fielder John Welborn acted as a catalyst for the UTSA line-up, leading off the first inning with a double and scoring on a groundout. Welborn finished the game 4-for-5 with a pair of runs and RBI’s. SOT UTSA RF John Welborn (8 seconds):

“Honestly at the beginning of the game, I felt more nervous than any other game for some reason. I prayed on-deck and told myself to swing and get to feeling right. I told my eyes to lock in and it just worked for me.” VO shots of Ramirez’ homer and runners coming home (8 seconds):

The Roadrunners stayed hot, adding three more runs to their lead in the fourth and fifth innings including a lead-off rocket by senior left fielder Tony Ramirez. Ramirez finished the game 2-for-3 with a pair of runs and RBI’s. VO shots of Andrew Dundon’s hit and Bird coming in to score (8 seconds:

Marshall’s unenergetic offense finally found a way on the board in the top of the sixth as junior second baseman Andrew Dundon lined to right to score in freshman center fielder Corey Bird. Cue studio (8 seconds):

UTSA advanced their overall record to 23-11, the team’s best start in school history. Now 9-4 in conference, the Roadrunners broke away from a four-way tie for second place. The Series will continue at 2 p.m. tomorrow at Roadrunner Field. ##### END TRT: 58 seconds


3rd Place - Editorial Writing (By Cody Reeves, Amarillo College)

Editorial Writing 104

Erin Cox is an honor student at North Andover High School and until recently, was the captain of her school’s volleyball team. She is a leader among her peers, makes good grades, and feels the pressure to always do the right thing. So she never expected to be punished for her decision to keep a drunk driver off of our roads. The night she received a call for help from a friend who had too much to drink, she thought the right thing to do would be to ensure the safety of him and anyone else who may have been on the road that night. So she went to pick him up. Now because of her decision, North Andover High School has decided to suspend her for five games and remove her from the position of team captain. Even though officers at the scene verified that Cox was not intoxicated, school officials are hiding behind their zero tolerance policy and refusing to reconsider her fate. Zero tolerance, that wonderful invention that removes the need for any attempt at human thought and common sense. Why think, when they have a policy that requires them not to? Only someone who has turned off their brain could look at this and see Cox as a villain. If anything, a zero tolerance policy regarding alcohol should be considered right in line with Cox’s values. After all, she had zero alcohol. Maybe North Andover High’s policy is more like zero tolerance for designated drivers. Most of us try to do the right thing, even though we all make mistakes. It must be very confusing for young people when our schools are telling them that doing the right thing is a mistake. It must be confusing to live under a policy of scrict zero tolerance, while knowing that the real world isn’t so cut and dry. It must be frustrating for students who know that their school is not preparing them for life in the real, messy world. We support Erin Cox, and we would like to thank her for doing the right thing by keeping us and our loved ones safe from a potentially deadly accident. We hope that the people in charge of her education can come around to the side of reasoned, critical thinking; that skill that our schools are supposed to be teaching.


3rd Place - TV Advertising

(By Eddie Miller, Midwestern State University)

30 sec.


1st Place - Radio News Writing (By Melissa Wylie, University of North Texas) 0:00 VO

Arson investigators are looking into a suspicious house and car fire in far west San Antonio Thursday afternoon. Firefighters reseuec a 20-year-old woman from a smoke-filled home after responding to a report of aburning car at 123 Acme St. aropund 2:15 p.m. Fire officials say the woman suffered from smoke inhalation and minor burns. She was taken to University Hospital. Officials are unsure of her connection to both the car and the house. Neal Ague, San Antonio Fire Department battalion chief, says the firs started in the car then jumped to the garage, which was 50 feet away.

0:22 AUDIO - AGUE

“It’s not normal to have a structure fire along with a car fire.”

0:25 VO

Fire engineer Jesse Olivarri says San Antonion police received a report of a domestic dispute at the home on Thursday morning. Though arson is suspected, Olivarri says the windy and dry weather conditions could have caused the fire’s movement.

0:43

TIPA 2015 Convention San Antonio, Texas El Tropicano Riverwalk Hotel April 8 - 11


2nd Place - TV News Writing (By Bryan Savens, University of Texas at Tyler)

AUDIO

VIDEO Anchor on screen

B-roll of the structure

Suspicious structural and auto mobile fires broke out at 123 Acme St. around 2:12 p.m. Thursday afternoon, according to Battalion Chief Neil Ague. --- NAT SOUND-Ague reported that there was not clear evidence of how the firee was started, buyt becauyse of the suyspicious llcation of the vehicle in relation to the garage of the structure, station thirteen of the San Antonio Fire Department will bring in the arson responders to further investigate the cause of the fire. --SOT ---

Anchor on screen

B-roll of damaged car in relation to structure

Engine 13 was first to respond to the scene, arriving at 2:14 p.m. Firefighters recovered a twenty-year-old female from the structure who was in the kitchen, reportedly trying to stop the fire. The victim, who’s identify is unknown at this time was rushed to University Hospital after reports of smoke inhalation and minor burns. -- NAT SOUND-A total of 18 firefighters responded to the scene, after second responder Engine 37 arrives moments later. --SOT --

Anchor on screen

The vehicle that was extinguished was a 2009 Camry that is said to belong to the female.

Anchor on screen

According to Ague and engineer Jessie Olivarri, the vehicle and the structural fire was extinguished at 2:25 p.m.

B-roll of police station

--NAT SOUND-San Antonio Police Department reported a domestic violence issue earlier in the day and infored the fire department of the issue after the fire was resolved. No news as of now as to whether this issue was connected to the fire in any way.

Anchor on screen

--SOT -After the arson investigators observe the structure and come to a conclusion, we will update you on their findings. For more information, visit our wevsite and stay up to date on the latest news with our Facebook and Twitter feeds.


3rd Place - TV News Writing

(By Colin Harris, Sam Houston State University) WS: Fire scene (00:00-00:20)

A CAR AND HOUSE FIRE ERUPTED THIS AFTERNOON IN A WEST SAN ANTONIO NEIGHBORHOOD. RESPONDERS DISCOVERED ONE VICTIM SUFFERING FROM SMOKE INHALATION AND MINOR BURNS WHO WAS TAKEN TO UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL BY PARAMEDICS. INVESTIGA- TORS BELIEVE ARSON MAY HAVE PLAYED A ROLE IN THE BLAZE. A NEIGHBOR REPORTED THE FIRE AT ONE-TWO-THREE ACME STREET WHEN HE SPOTTED A TWO-THOUSAND- NINE CAMRY ENGULFED IN FLAMES AT THE FRONT OF THE HOUSE. EIGHTEEN FIREFIGHTERS IN FOUR VEHI- CLES RESPONDED TO THE SCENE AND DISCOVERED A SECOND BLAZE IN THE GARAGE. BATTALION CHIEF NEAL AY-HEW NOTED THE UNUSUAL CIRCUMSTANCES WITH TWO SEPARATE FIRES AT ONE RESIDENCE.

CU: Neal Ague (00:21-00:29)

Ague: (It’s not normal to have a structure fire with a car fire. In this situation with the car being so far from the house, it’s defi- nitely not a normal phenomenon we would see, so we will have arson assist us with the investigation.)

WS: Fire Scene (00:30-00:40) CU: Neal Ague (00:41-00:45)

ACCORDING TO AY-HEW, S-A-P-D RESPONDED TO A DOMESTIC INCIDENT AT THE RESIDENCE EARLIER THIS MORNING THOUGH INVESTIGATORS HAVEN’T YET TIED THIS EVENT TO THIS AFTERNOON’S FIRES. THE CAR WAS PARKED APPROXIMATELY FIFTY FEET FROM THE GARAGE, SO OFFICIALS BELIEVE IT’S HIGHLY UNLIKELY ONE FIRE CAUSED THE OTHER.

WS: Fire Scene (00:46-00:58)

THOUGH FIRFIGHTERS CONTAINED THE GARAGE IN- FERNO, THE REST OF THE STRUCTURE SUFFERED SMOKE DAMAGE. AN ESTIMATED COST OF THE TOTAL DAMAGE TO THE HOUSE IS TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND S-A-P-D IS CONDUCTING AN ARSON INVESTIGATION AT THIS TIME.

###

Ague: (A lot of times on scenes, there are clues there’s arson in volved, such as multiple points of origin.)


3rd Place - TV Sports Writing (By Geoffrey Navert, South Plains College) ANC

(ANC) IN COLLEGE BASEBALL, THE U-T-S-A ROADRUNNERS TOOK ON THE MARSHALL THUNDERING HERD IN THE FIRST OF THREE GAME SERIES FRIDAY NIGHT.

TAKE VO

(VO)

CG: FRIDAY

IN THE FIRST INNING, JOHN WELBORN GETTING THE OFFENSE STARTED EARLY FOR THE ROADRUNNERS WHITH A LEADOFF DOUBLE

SAN ANTONIO, TX EDITORIS NOTE: GAME FOOTAGE: 42

HE WOULD MOVE TO THIRD ON A WILD PITCH AND SCORE ON AN RBI GROUNDOUT BY SHORTSTOP HORACIO CORREA (core-A-uh) to put the ROADRUNNERS UP ONE TO ZERO. IN TH FIFTH, THE ROADRUNNERS AHEAD TWO TO ZERO WITH TWO ON AND TWO OUT, JOHNNY BENCH AWARD CANDIDATE JOHN BORMANN PUTS THE BALL DEEP INTHE CORNER TO RIGHTFIELD TO SCORE TWO RUNS AND MAKE THE SCORE FOUR TO ZERO. IN THE TOP OF THE SIXTH, MARSHALL TRYING TO MAKE A COMEBACK. THEY GET THREE CONSECUTIVE SINGLES TO START THE INNING TO BRING THE SCORE TO FOUR TO ONE, BUT HARTSON DIGS IN AN RETIRES THE NEXT THREE BATTERS TO LIMIT THE DAMAGE.

EDITORS NOTE: POST GAME FOOTAGE: 12

HARTSON WOULD FINISH THE NIGHT WITH SIX AND TWO THIRDS INNINGS, GIVING UP NINE HITS, BUT ONLY THE ONE RUN WHILE STRINING OUT 4. THE ROADRUNNERS WOULD GET TWO MORE RUNS IN THE SEVENTH AND WOULD WIN BY A SCORE OF SIX TO TWO. THEY LOOK TO TAKE SERIES IN GAME TWO TOMORROW AT 2 P-M.


2nd Place 2-Person Photo Essay (By Austin Humphreys & Madelynne Scales, Texas State University)

La Pera Vaca plays the Violin to restaurant attendees April 10 on the Riverwalk. Vaca performs with a mariachi band to make extra

Cuco Macias plays the trumpet to passing river barges on the San Antonio River.

C Los Rosas performs for patrons sitting at a bar on the Riverwalk.

A woman sings along with the mariachi band April 10 at a riverside bar. C los Rosas performs for patrons on the Riverwalk.


1st Place Newspaper Design (By Kasi Dickerson, Stephen F. Austin State University)


2nd Place Newspaper Design (By Lina Moon, University of Texas at Dallas)


3rd Place Newspaper Design (By Stephen Green, Sam Houston State University)


3rd Place - 2-Person Photo Essay

(By Connie Cheng & Pablo Arauz, University of Texas at Dallas)


1st Place Headline Writing (By Cory McCoy, Tyler Junior College)

2nd Place Headline Writing (By Bodey Cooper, Trinity Valley Community College)


Butler Cain (right), faculty adviser at West Texas A&M University received the Charles “Chuck” Choate Memorial Adviser of the Year Award at the San Antonio convention from last year’s Adviser of the Year, Don Fisher of Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

Photo by Patricia Dillon, Texas A&M University-Commerce

Photo by Patricia Dillon, Texas A&M University-Commerce

Steve Blow, a columnist for the Dallas Morning News, was inducted into the TIPA Hall of Fame. Blow started his journalism career at Tyler Junior College. In addition to addressing the luncheon crowd, Blow conducted a workshop for the convention attendees.


1st Place - Magazine Design (By Taylor Griffin, Baylor University)


2nd Place - Magazine Design (By Austin Countryman, University of Texas - Tyler)


3rd Place - MagazineDesign

(By Rachel Grahmann, St. Mary’s University)


Profile for Texas Intercollegiate Press Association

Type-Hi 2014  

1st, 2nd, 3rd place on-site contest winners from 2014 TIPA convention.

Type-Hi 2014  

1st, 2nd, 3rd place on-site contest winners from 2014 TIPA convention.

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