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mart mouth

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Texas Dental Association Publication

Educate while you wait.

FALL 2014

IN THIS ISSUE Keep Calm and Quit It’s a Mouthful And more!

What it is Why it happens How to avoid it

Periodicals supplement to the Texas Dental Journal, September 2014


W hat’s Smart Mouth™, a bi-annual publication of the Texas Dental Association (TDA), is produced for the purpose of providing oral health information to the public. Member dentists can access electronic versions of Smart Mouth™ on tda.org. The information included in each edition of Smart Mouth™ is provided by the TDA Council on Dental Economics, the Council on Membership, and the Council on Dental Education, Trade & Ancillaries. The material contained herein is for educational purposes and is not intended for diagnostic or treatment decisions. Please contact your dentist for oral health concerns and questions. Visit tda.org for more oral health information and resources. For comments and suggestions about Smart Mouth™, please contact the Texas Dental Association, attn Managing Editor Nicole Scott, 1946 S IH 35 Ste 400, Austin, TX 78704; Phone 512-443-3675; Email nicole@tda.org.

inside

contents meet the dental team.............................................

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fluoride facts.......................................................

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dumpster breath.............................................

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©2014 Texas Dental Association Daniel L. Jones, DDS Editor

keep calm and quit..........................................

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Lee Ann Johnson Director of Member Services & Administration Staff Liaison to Council on Membership

it’s a mouthful: tooth sayings...............

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Nicole Scott Managing Editor Staff Liaison to Communications Committee Billy Callis Publications Coordinator The persons shown in photographs in this publication are stock photography models (Models) and are not actual patients of, nor are they affiliated with, the Texas Dental Association and indirect parent companies, subsidiaries, or subsidiaries of its parent companies ("Affiliates"). Texas Dental Association has obtained the rights to use the photographs via license agreements with certain third party stock photography companies, and Texas Dental Association's use of the photographs is in compliance with the terms of those license agreements. The photographs showing the Models are used in this publication for illustrative purposes only. The Models do not personally endorse Texas Dental Association, or any products, services, causes, or endeavors associated with, or provided by, Texas Dental Association or any of Texas Dental Association's Affiliates. The context in which the photographs are used in this publication is not intended to reflect personally on any of the Models shown in the photographs. Texas Dental Association, its respective officers, directors, employees, agents, and/or independent contractors assume no liability for any consequence relating directly or indirectly to the use of the photographs showing the Models in this publication.

Look for the next issue of Smart Mouth, available only in your dentist’s office!


Who are these people, and what are they

doing in my dentist’s office?

Meet

DENTAL TEAM

A healthy mouth is a smart mouth, and it takes a team of health care professionals to care for your teeth – all 20

FRONT OFFICE TEAM I am the RECEPTIONIST and likely

appointments, I coordinate comfortable from the beginning.

As the OFFICE MANAGER, I oversee When you check out, I make sure your easy, and I am involved in the day-to-

PATIENT CARE TEAM I am the head of the dental team. I am the DENTIST

training. I’m the DENTAL HYGIENIST. As a dental hygienist I can take x-rays and do any of the work of a dental assistant. My primary duty is to perform dental prophylaxis, cleaning and polishing of teeth during recall visits. I may also talk to you about how to care for your teeth properly. I’m a dental hygienist in Texas, I have completed at least 2 years of dental hygiene training and passed several training requirements. I am a great so please feel free to ask how you can improve your oral health!

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I am the DENTAL ASSISTANT! Dental assistants have many important jobs in a dental the front desk, maintain In fact, the work of an assistant varies greatly. In will teach the assistant how to complete his or her tasks, and assistants in Texas do not need to although some may.


10 REASONS to 1

Texas: Home of the Free and Fluoridated By Delton Yarbrough, DDS Here in Texas, we are lucky for many reasons. Great weather. Great economy. Great food! And, great water fluoridation! Water fluoridation benefits everyone. Fluoride is a naturallyoccurring mineral found in water, food, rocks, and soil. It helps to prevent tooth decay, and luckily for us, Texas cities include fluoride in community drinking water. Almost 80% of the state’s population is served by public water systems that receive fluoridated water, and Texas is ranked as 21 in the states’ water fluoridation percentage, according to the Centers for Disease Control (1). Water fluoridation is a good thing. Next time you’re enjoying your favorite Texas farm-raised beef steak or Tex-Mex burrito, wash it down with a cold glass of fluoridated water. Your teeth will thank you.

3 To learn more, visit ADA.org/ fluoride

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Dr Yarbrough is a general dentist in Fort Stockton. He is a consultant to the TDA Council on Dental Economics. References 1. http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/statistics/2012stats.html

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1. http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/ Member%20Center/FIles/article_10reasons.ashx


FLUORIDATE PUBLIC WATER SINGLE

MOST EFFECTIVE PUBLIC HEALTH MEASURE TO PREVENT TOOTH DECAY.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has proclaimed community water fluoridation one of 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century.

SIMILAR TO FORTIFYING FOODS AND BEVERAGES.

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Water that has been fluoridated is similar to fortifying salt with iodine, milk with vitamin D, orange juice with calcium and bread with folic acid.

PROTECTS ALL AGES AGAINST CAVITIES. Studies show that community water fluoridation prevents at least 25% of tooth decay in children and adults, even in an era with widespread availability of fluoride from other sources, such as fluoride toothpaste.

SAVES MONEY.

The average lifetime cost per person to fluoridate a water supply is less than the cost of one dental filling. For most cities, every $1 invested in water fluoridation saves $38 in dental treatment costs.

AVAILABILITY OF FLUORIDE CONTINUES TO GROW. In the United States, 73.9 percent of the population on public water systems receive fluoridated public water, or a total of 204 million people.* This is an increase of almost nine percent from 2000.

NATURAL.

Fluoride is already present in all water sources, even the oceans. Water fluoridation is simply the adjustment of fluoride that occurs naturally in water to a recommended level for preventing tooth decay.

PREVENTS DENTAL DISEASE.

It is the most efficient way to prevent one of the most common childhood diseases–dental decay. An estimated 51 million school hours are lost each year due to dental-related illness.

SAFE AND EFFECTIVE.

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For more than 65 years, the best available scientific evidence consistently indicates that community water fluoridation is safe and effective.

RECOGNIZED BY MORE THAN 100 ORGANIZATIONS.

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The American Dental Association (ADA) as well as the U.S. Public Health Service, the American Medical Association, the World Health Organization and more than 125 national and international organizations recognize the public health benefits of water fluoridation.

ENDORSED BY THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION.

One of the most widely respected sources for information regarding fluoridation and fluoride is the American Dental Association.

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By David L. Doerre, DDS

“ hot

how

does it get in north

Texas in the

summer?

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“How is your flossing going?” My patients have come to expect me to ask this question at each appointment. Those who have hesitation in their answer have their reasons — or excuses — for not adhering to the daily recommendations. As dentists, hygienists, and assistants, we have all asked, stressed, educated, encouraged, and, with those patients with a sense of humor, even nagged them to keep up with their flossing routine. After years of prodding I finally came up with an illustration that seems to work with any age. I give them a visual example they are not bound to forget. I sit down face to face and ask, “How hot does it get in north Texas in the summer?” I have lived in this area since the 1960s and can attest to the fact that it easily gets to 100 degrees throughout the summer months. Have you ever left a local restaurant in the middle of the summer and accidentally ended up next to their dumpsters? Is it a pleasant place to hang around? You can easily guess their responses, along with their scrunched up noses.


“ the acids

eat right through

the dumpster”

dumpster. All of this food, the bacteria, and the 100-degree heat results in the ster, even requiring a new container on occasion. The gases just roll out of the top of the dumpster, producing the terrific odors. Now I sit back and tell them to think about this scenario: You leave last night’s supper or yesterday’s lunch stuck between your teeth, and we all naturally have bacteria in our mouths, and we are all 98.6 degrees. What do you think is tooth structure, and the gases are rolling out when you speak!

that always results in open eyes. “Do you know anybody — please, no names — who, when they step up to you to say, ‘Hi,’ you have to back up about 6 inches to get away from their breath?” Agreement to change their habits comes with about and then wonder if they have ever been on the other side of that same to-face today? Have I flossed?”

they know their daily flossing will help them keep their teeth… and their

on Membership.

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KEEP CALM AND

QUIT What happens when you

2-3 WEEKS

20 MINUTES

after quitting, your heart rate drops.

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12 HOURS

after quitting, carbon monoxide levels in your blood drop.

after quitting, your heart attack risk drops, and your lung capacity improves.


DANGERS Taking drags off a cigarette literally takes years off your life. Smoking is bad for you, no question. But, do you know the extent of the damage that smoking can cause to your body? According to the American Dental Association, smoking and tobacco products cause bad breath, plus these other possible oral health impacts:

stained teeth and tongue

slow healing after dental procedures

gum disease

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dulled sense of taste and smell

difficulties in correcting dental problems

oral cancer

Do you know the only way to decrease your risk of these and other tobacco-related health problems? Quit. Instead of burning it down, put it down. Determine a quitting plan that works best for you. Visit cdc.gov/tobacco/campaign/tips/ to read tips from other smokers and find the support you need to put that cigarette down for good.

quit?

1-9 MONTHS

Smoking’s effects linger long after you’ve quit. But, the good news is that your body can start repairing itself immediately (1).

after quitting, your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.

1 YEAR

Your added risk of coronary heart disease is 1/2 of that of a nonsmoker.

1. Centers for Disease Control: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/2004/posters/20mins/index.htm

15 YEARS

Your risk of coronary heart disease is back to that of a non-smoker. Smart Mouth Smart Mouth

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Whence do these hitherto-hornswoggling sayings originate?

Meaning: Fight fiercely Origin: the expression literally means “with the use of one’s teeth and nails as weapons; by one’s might.” (1) He fought tooth and nail to buy the dental floss he wanted!

Meaning: Each of the 4 hindmost molars in humans, which usually appear at about the age of 20 Origin: wisdom teeth, or third molars, are the last teeth to develop and appear in your , which means third molar (3). She knew her wisdom teeth would take her out, if she didn’t get them taken out first.

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Meaning: Origin: The expression dates from the late 14th century when it referred to sweets

ancestors survive. As he explains it, they got “more bang for their buck” when foraging strategy to avoid harmful toxins in plants (5). My sweet tooth got the best of me! I ate 3 pounds of icing before dinner.

Meaning: To be very old Origin: The expression was first found in England in the 19th century, and it derives from horses, surprisingly. To determine a horse’s age, one examines its teeth. An old horse's gums will recede, and the roots of the teeth will be visible, thus making the teeth appear longer, hence long in the tooth (6). I may be long in the tooth, but I feel like I’m only 50!

References:

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Texas. With more than 8,800 members, the TDA understands

health care for you and your family. 1 9 4 6 S I H 3 5 S t e 4 0 0 A u s t i n , T X 7 8 7 0 4 P : 5 1 2 - 4 4 3 - 3 6 7 5 t d a . o r g

Smart Mouth™ Fall 2014  

Educate while you wait! Smart Mouth™ is a publication for dental patients, brought to you by the Texas Dental Association.