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TeTSUO TAKeMOTO: PORTFOLIO 2013


study Walla Walla Symphony Hall & Performing Arts Campus GSD Thesis Project Fall 2006 - Spring 2007 Museum of Mayan Archaeology in Copan GSD 6th Semester Option Studio Spring 2006

Table of Contents

Redevelopment of Shibuya Station in Tokyo GSD 5th Semester Option Studio Fall 2005

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tetsuo takemoto architectural and urban designer

Hybrid-Use Physical & Cultural Performance GSD 3rd Semester Core Studio Fall 2004 Rowhouse U. of Idaho Design Studio Spring 2002


work

play

Southampton Arts Center MSA Project Fall 2012 - Spring 2013

Architecture Studio in Rome University of Idaho Study Abroad Summer 2002

Al Ain Oasis Cultural Quarter MSA Project Fall 2008 - Fall 2010

Archaeology in Greece On-Site Draftsman Summer 2004

Al Ain National Museum MSA Project Spring 2008 - Winter 2008

2ndSkin System NextGen Competition Design Winter 2011

Kuala Lumpur International Financial District MSA Project Fall 2010 - Fall 2012 Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center MSA Project Fall 2007 - Summer 2008

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Project Summary A culmination of work over two semester, this project proposes an architectural thesis, which came out of a semester of site research, precedence studies, and theoretical explorations, followed by a semester in which my architectural design skills were used to prove the efficacy of my thesis. This process of research and self-exploration led to my decision to base my thesis around developing large scale architectural projects in very small, rural cities. For this project, the city is none other than my hometown of Walla Walla, WA. Even with a population of just over 30,000 people, this small city serves as the cultural center piece for the entire SE Washington regions and this became the impetus for developing a project based around a large symphony hall. Currently the Walla Walla Symphony rents rehearsal and performance spaces from Whitman College’s 1300 seat concert hall, the largest venue in the city capable of handling a symphony. A new performance space for the Symphony is the centerpiece of the Performing Arts Campus.

Performing Arts Campus

Walla Walla Symphony Hall & Performing Arts Campus GSD Thesis Project Critic: Jorge Silvetti

View of Floating Concert Hall

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tetsuo takemoto architectural and urban designer


The main conclusion that I reached in this project is that in order to develop a project of this size and magnitude in a very small town, the success of the proposal rests in 1) careful site selection; 2) a means in which to bridge the divergent rural, urban and civic scales; and 3) a composition of a diverse but cohesive set of programmatic elements. Out of nearly 10 sites scattered around the city, I finally chose a site just on the edge of the historic downtown business district. Its potential to spur additional positive development between the site and downtown, but more importantly as a catalyst for future development to the west, set this location apart from the other sites I investigated.

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Walla Walla Symphony Hall & Performing Arts Campus Program Distribution The divergent programmatic elements include office spaces, retail spaces, a music/performing arts education facility, a parking garage and the performance spaces. This includes both the primary 1400 seat concert hall as well as a smaller flexible-use 300 seat recital hall. Fundamental to my design scheme, the distribution of the program elements allows for the blending of the larger components to assimilate with the small residential scale neighborhoods to the north and the medium scale urban scale to the south. At the ground-level, the structures are of a similar scale to the surrounding neighborhoods, allowing for a range of entry points and a more recognizable and comfortable scale to promote pedestrian porosity of the site. The larger scale elements are raised above with the iconic gesture of the concert hall floating above an urban plaza the cornerstone.

Time-Use Diagram

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tetsuo takemoto architectural and urban designer

Program Distribution Diagram


1. Retail Space 2. Restaurant 3. Recital Hall Plaza 4. Recital Hall 5. Cafe 6. Music Education 7. Dance School 8. Box Office/Ticket Booth 9. Office Space 10. Amphitheater 11. Ballroom 12. Support Space 13. Concert Hall Plaza 14. Loading Dock

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Ground Level Plan

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Walla Walla Symphony Hall & Performing Arts Campus

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North-South Section

east-West Section

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Concert Hall Plaza Concert Hall Lobby Concert Hall Stage Fly Space Backstage Support Space Loading Dock Mill Creek

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Revised Mill Creek Ballroom Parking Roof Garden Office Space Recital Hall Recital Hall Plaza

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Walla Walla Symphony Hall & Performing Arts Campus Urban Design Another important aspect of designing a campus of this scale is the surface treatment of the landscape. A catalog of urban landscape materials were created and distributed throughout the site in accordance with various programmatic requirements and circulation routes. Coordinating the public realm will help to unify the various building types and scales. In addition to the surface paving treatment for the site, I felt that another important component of the campus would be the use of a consistent language of urban furniture. Though not as fully developed as the rest of the scheme, I tried to develop a series of furniture elements, such as light poles, benches and paving transitions that would provide a wide range of possibilities within a set framework. They would represent a recognizable feature associated with the Campus.

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architectural and urban designer


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Walla Walla Symphony Hall & Performing Arts Campus

Classroom Level Plan

Lobby Level Plan

View of the Recital Hall Plaza

balcony Level Plan

While I still feel like the actual design of the building remained largely unresolved, I left the project feeling that the idea behind creating a mixture of smaller scale structures at-grade, interspersed with large scale structure above successfully transformed the superblock into an achievable performing arts campus. With enough unique amenities to activate the site at all times of the day, I’m confident that this solution could be implemented in similarly small communities.

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View Looking Back Towards Downtown

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Project Summary For this museum project in Honduras, the emphasis of my design was on the sensitivity to its natural surroundings. Enveloped in lush rainforest and surrounded by beautiful mountains, the small city of Copan still flourishes because of not only these natural riches, but because the amazing Mayan ruins of Copan bring thousands of tourists a year to this isolated complex of pyramids and monuments standing in remarkably good shape. Unfortunately, the museum dedicated to exhibiting the artifacts found at the site is in disastrous shape both in terms of alluring visitors but also in preserving the priceless artifacts on display.

Museum of Mayan Archaeology

Museum of Mayan Archaeology in Copan GSD 6th Semester Option Studio Critic: Jorge Silvetti

View of Facade

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Site Strategy

site strategy

DeSIGN CONCePT The existing museum currently resides in the center of the town of Copan, about a 15 minute walk from the ruins. For this project, we located the museum at the entrance to the excavation site and at the start of the path taking visitors to the ruins. This allows for a more integrated visitor experience between the artifacts found on site and the site itself. From the beginning, the siting of the museum was limited to patches of land previously used by an airfield, so that

undisturbed land that may still contain unfound artifacts remain unharmed. Intrigued by the lushness of the foliage surrounding the airfield site, I chose to site my museum along the leg of airstrip since consumed by the jungle. Using those parameters, my building took on a barshaped building that contained the museum and a bar-shaped building that housed storage for the museum artifacts. I also chose to deliberately conceal an existing

building that houses a remarkably kitchsy reconstruction of one of the ancient temples. The museum bar floats above ground, in alignment with the ancient processional path towards the pyramids while also disguising the existing structure.

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Museum of Mayan Archaeology in Copan Facade Strategy The facade strategy I developed for this project also found its inspiration from the dense rainforest that surrounds the site. The lighting effects created by the leaves and branches of the trees seemed an appropriate shading technique that I wanted to incorporate into the screening of the museum. The following diagrams show how I interpreted the lighting effects and translated them into vertical louvers that, depending upon the lighting needs for that specific space, could be denser (darker) to filter out more light or less dense (lighter) to allow more light to enter. I envisioned that the trees would provide an initial screen and that the architecture provides an additional level of light filtering. Because of the remote location of the museum and the unreliability of electricity, light monitors provide additional daylight, with the hope that very little of the museum would require electrical lighting.

Detailed Model of Facade Section

South Facade

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Detailed Wall Sections

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Museum of Mayan Archaeology in Copan

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Ground Level Plan

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Designing museum spaces along a bar created it own architectural issues, particularly concerning circulation. Primary means of circulation run along the opaque walls while secondary paths flank the screened walls, allowing for passage to the ends of the bars without returning along the same corridor. Private functions such as museum offices, and conservation labs occur along the bar running north-south, but the intersection of bars blur the distinction between public and private spaces.

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Visitors Center/Gift Shop Processional Path Cafe Administrative Offices Archives & Artifact Storage Existing Structure New Musuem Bar Research & Conservation Labs Parking


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PROjeCT SUMMARy In this studio, I had the opportunity to design at the urban scale rather than just at the architectural scale. At the urban design level, the issue at hand was the redevelopment of the public areas around the station and the possibility of introducing more public spaces or green spaces into the concrete and asphalt jungle of Tokyo. Shibuya Station, one of the busiest train stations in the world with its confluence of seven different subway/ metro and commuter train lines, offered an exciting and dynamic setting from which to explore the possibility of challenging the notion of public/private developments. My goal throughout the design process was to find a means in which this transit hub could become more legible and easy to navigate, rather than as simply a series of additions made by different constituents at different times.

Redevelopment of Shibuya Station

Redevelopment of Shibuya Station in Tokyo GSD 5th Semester Option Studio Critic: Peter Rowe

To Ikebukuro/Ueno/Tokyo

Metro Ginza Station JR Shibuya Station

Yamanote Line

Ginza Line

Yamanote Line

To Tokyo/Ueno/Asakusa

To Shinagawa/Tokyo

Bus Terminal Bus Terminal West East

To Medaimae/Kichijoji

Keio Inokashira Line

Pedestrian Pathway

To Kanagawa

Hanzomon Line

To Ikebukuro

#13 Line

(along Tokyu Den-en-toshi Line)

Jingu-dori

Dogen-zaka

Mark City

Keio Shibuya Station Hachiko Plaza

Tokyu Shibuya Station

Tokyu Toyoko Line

Metro Hanzomon Station Metro No. 13 Station Bus Terminal West

Bus Terminal East

Hanzomon Line

#13 Line

NE Entrance

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architectural and urban designer Jingu-dori Exit

To Yokohama

Pedestrian Pathway

Jingu-dori Exit

Tokyo/Oshiage

To Yokohama

(along Tokyu Toyoko Line


Urban Planning Diagrams

The first phase of the design involved untangling the web of various circulation routes and how they aligned with the existing urban fabric. The resulting study model, colored to highlight the different transit lines, made it clear that the only way to really understand how the station works is by making it transparent. It also became apparent that the very nature of the existing station precluded a scheme that patches together the various neighborhoods of Shibuya. One way in which I resolved the division of neighborhoods was by creating large canyons that criss-cross the site and into the city beyond, allowing for a sense of porosity as one meanders through the station.

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Redevelopment of Shibuya Station in Tokyo 7

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The design scheme essentially came out of the desire to create a more transparent and physically porous environment, making for hopefully a more rationally and understandable transit hub. Rather than a series of dark tunnels or passageways that meander through the existing conglomeration of train stations, subways stations, department stores and retail kiosks, I chose to reduce the amount of program at the ground level and allow commuters to actually see their next destination, whether it be a connection to a bus or another train line or simply to one of the surrounding neighborhoods. The other key aspect of my design was to incorporate additional public open spaces both within the complex and on the outside, that would offer places to meet as well as to re-orient oneself after emerging from the subway.

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architectural and urban designer


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Retail Canyon Hachiko Plaza Inter-city Bus Terminal Taxi and Pickup/Drop-Off Open to Metro Station Below Winter Garden Entry Plaza Office Tower Lobbies Ginza Line Station

10. East-West Bridge 11. JR Yamanote Line Station 12. Mark City Connector

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Redevelopment of Shibuya Station in Tokyo

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By pushing the existing department store up, and pushing the various retail kiosks and other miscellaneous amenities below ground, the ground level opened up completely into large open halls with views up towards the Ginza line and Yamanote Line, or down into the depths of the station for the other subway lines. This makes the station more understandable to not only the daily commuter, but more importantly to the occasional visitor who no longer needs to wander aimlessly through the station following arrows and signs to possibly make it to their destination. Instead, the traveller simply looks up or down to find their destination, sees the escalator or elevator that will take them there and goes.

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architectural and urban designer


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Project Summary The program components of this project looked to explore the wide range of performance venues: cultural performance (theater, dance, music), athletic performance (sports) and physical performance (health spa). Exploring these adjacencies through the analogy of music and the visual representation of a sound through harmonic dissonance and consonance became the driving concept behind the project. This project evolved quite a bit over the semester, but it maintained a clarity of an architecture defined by horizontal bands and striations, which could signify any number of components. Initially the project developed out of reference to sheet music and musical notations and how different instruments/sounds could be layered upon one another resulting in harmony. The resulting architectural image based upon musical score uses the bands to signify individual swimming lanes that then partition the different zones of the building while still allowing for visual connectivity between the unprecedented adjacencies of program of swimming pools alongside music practice rooms; a blend of the physical performance and cultural performance.

Performance: Hybrid-Use Project

Performance: Hybrid-Use Project GSD 3rd Semester Core Studio Critic: Joe MacDonald

Final Model at 1/16� = 1’0�

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architectural and urban designer


Circulation Diagram

Initial Study Model

Plexi-glass Massing Model

The use of models, constructed of different materials and built at varied scales proved invaluable in the development of this particular project. By using different colored foam, I could quickly study different massing proportions and programmatic adjacencies. The use of clear plexi-glass further developed a language of transparency, carried throughout the project.

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Performance: Hybrid-Use Project

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In plan, the image of the project appears as disparate programmatic elements juxtaposed to one another with the individual lap lanes as the only physical barrier. The translucency of the water along with the voyeuristic effect of watching swimmers, creates an interesting and exciting backdrop for unexpected adjacencies. The final model, constructed of plexiglass, clear acrylic and grey and white museum board, attempts to highlight the horizontal banding effect created by the individual swimming pool lanes. The rhythmic structure that supports them brings into harmony the structure, program and circulation, to allow for the seemingly dissonant program elements in concert together.

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architectural and urban designer

Street Level Perspective


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1. Outdoor Pool 2. Spa/Black Box Entry 3. Performance Support Space 4. Performance Hall 5. Black Box Theater 6. Health Spa 7. Dance Rooms 8. Ice Hockey Arena 9. Cafe 10. Performance Hall Entry 11. Rehearsal/Practice Space 12. Athletic Center Lobby 13. Aqua Center Lobby 14. Diving Tank 15. Swimming Pool 16. Individual Lap Lane 17. Multi-Use Gymansium 18. Locker Rooms

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Longitudinal Section

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Project Summary This project challenged me to design a row house, crowded on both sides in a dense residential neighborhood. With the two side facades no longer a concern, I chose to consider the roof as a “facade� to help illuminate interior spaces and to help maximize comfort and livability through the design of compact spaces that feel larger and more spacious. The glass front facade faces north, capturing as much ambient light as possible, while the back of the house uses shading devices in order to block the harsh direct sun-light. A large skylight in the center of the roof provides ample day-lighting for the core of the building: the dining room and vertical circulation. The 3-story height volume also allows for the daylighting of the interior spaces from within. STREETSCAPE Though the other row houses designed by other students were not coordinated with one another, this led to an incredibly diverse and eclectic streetscape with a much higher density than the typical suburban sprawl that currently plagues Moscow. In that sense I believe we were all successful. The project showed that the traditional neighborhood design can be done without abandoning contemporary architectural ideas and without sacrificing amenities.

Rowhouse Project

University of Idaho Design Studio Spring 2002

North Elevation in Context

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architectural and urban designer


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Patio Entry Living Room Dining Room Kitchen Sun Room Bedroom Master Bedroom Master Bath

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Southampton Arts Center MSA Design Team: Jorge Silvetti - Design Principle Craig Mutter - Project Architect Evan Brinkman - Project Manager Tetsuo Takemoto - Sr. Designer

Project Summary: When the Parrish Art Museum relocated to their new venue just outside of town, the village of Southampton formed a committee to investigate how the existing building could be rehabilitated. They asked MSA to take the historic Grovesnor Attebury building, and adaptively reuse to create a dynamic center for the arts for residents year-round. Involvement I was a key design member during the conceptual design phase through schematic design phase. My involvement in the design process included plan studies/iterations and the section/elevations. I worked on a majority of the 2D drawings for issue. The most rigorous design task I undertook for this project was the design of the brick facade for the North Pavilion building that houses the ticket booth, radio broadcast booth and back-of-house spaces for the theater functions.

Southampton Arts Center

Location: Southampton, New York Size 30,400 GSF Status Schematic Design

East Elevation of the New Construction

The existing building was built in three different phases, each utilizing a different cladding material and each having slightly different floor levels. As such, over the years, unsightly ramps have been added throughout the building in order to provide universal access. Our first step in the design process was to unify all the floor levels from which all parts of the existing structure and the new construction could be accessed. The next step was to refurbish the interior of the existing theater hall space to accommodate additional seats and to make it more flexible for a wider variety of functions. We gave it a raked seating profile to enhance the sight lines to the stage, which allowed the back stage area to be below grade, thus not obscuring the existing building. Furthermore, the new wings to the side of the theater hall are to be transparent.

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Northwest Corner North Pavilion Design Update

SOUTHAMPTON CENTER Machado and Silvetti Associates, LLC May 2, 2013


Brick Screen Wrapped Around Volumes North Pavilion Design Concept

Volumes Manipulated North Pavilion Design Concept

SOUTHAMPTON CENTER

Machado and Silvetti Associates, LLC May 2, 2013

SOUTHAMPTON CENTER

Machado and Silvetti Associates, LLC May 2, 2013

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NO Brick Screen Peeled to Reveal Inner Volume North Pavilion Design Concept

Potential Building Entry Points Initial Design Strategy

SOUTHAMPTON CENTER

Machado and Silvetti Associates, LLC May 2, 2013

SOUTHAMPTON CENTER

Machado and Silvetti Associates, LLC May 4, 2013

Universal Access Strategy

By creating a new pavilion to the north, the portico created a new small courtyard that embraces the apse of the existing theater hall. The portico also allows for the two sides of the arboretum to maintain their relationship and to allow for a seamless transition between the two sides. The massing for the north pavilion split into two volumes to create an additional entry point to the site, and provide universal access to the building from a multitude of points.

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Southampton Arts Center LOWER-LEVEL PLAN

GROUND-LEVEL PLAN

LOWER-LEVEL PLAN

UPPER-LEVEL PLAN

GROUND-LEVEL PLAN

UPPER-LEVEL PLAN

Section Perspective Through Cafe Transparent Flexible-Use Spaces Flanking the Theater

heater Program

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Theater Program econic Radio Broadcasting Flexible Spaces

oading/MechanicalPublic Program Bathrooms Office/Admin

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SOUTHAMPTON CENTER

Machado and Silvetti Associates, LLC May 4, 2013

Peconic Radio Broadcasting Loading/Mechanical

Floor Plan Summary Initial Design Strategy

Floor Plans

Placing a majority of the new program spaces below grade allowed us to maintain the integrity of the existing structure, and only allowing a very light and transparent volume to touch the theater walls. It is our hope that the new portico will help the public further appreciate the historic Attebury building, after the removal of the excessive plantings and the mechanical equipment that currently obscure the building.

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Machado and Silvetti Associates, LLC May 4, 2013

ublic Program

Design Strategy

SOUTHAMPTON CENTER

SOUTHAMPTON CENTER

Machado and Silvetti Associates, LLC May 4, 2013

North elevation


Passage Through the North Pavilion

For the North Pavilion, we chose to continue the language of brick but again in a different manner. Atterbury chose to use two different styles of brick, so we chose to use a third. In our case, we wanted to develop a method which provides a means for screening as well as texture. By taking a standard flemish bond pattern and playing with pushing and pulling, we were able to experiment with a range of effects.

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Al Ain Oasis Master Plan MSA Design Team: Jorge Silvetti - Design Principle Michael Yusem - Sr. Associate Paul Schlapobersky - Project Manager Urban Designers: Mete Sonmez, Bao Wei,Jayne Kang, Tetsuo Takemoto

PROjeCT SUMMARy: A master plan for the Abu Dhabi Culture and Heritage (ADACH) to redevelop the Al Ain Oasis and it surrounding urban edge conditions as part of their bid to submit the site as an UNESCO World Heritage Site. In recognition of ADACH’s efforts with this master plan, preliminary nomination has been granted. INVOLVeMeNT I worked with the design team from its original conception in 2008, where many of the fundamental components of the master plan were generated. Work on this project primarily involved working closely with the international consultant team and producing updates and presentation to the client. This involved travelling to the UK and the UAE to get design direction. I developed the book format and structure for all consultants to feed into for both initial planning approval sets as well as the final detailed master plan document set.

Al AIn Oasis Master Plan

LOCATION: Al Ain, UAE SIze 80 Hectare site area; 62,000 sqm building area STATUS Detailed Master Plan

Professional Rendering Overlooking the Cultural Quarter

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Al Ain Oasis Cultural Quarter

Bandar Malaysia Master Plan

Machado and Silvetti Associates, Inc.


A.1.3 Summary of Existing Constraints Discontinuity Between the Cultural Sites In its current condition, the cultural sites of Al Ain are difficult to reach without a vehicle. More than an issue of distance, non-vehicular routes connecting these sites simply do not exist. The Master Plan envisions the Oasis as a primary catilyst for encouraging pedestrian accessibility to these locations. 2009 Site Aerial Photograph

1968 Site Aerial Photograph

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Vacant Lots at Oasis Edges & Concealed Entries Barren expanses of space surrounding the Oasis turns what should be a “front yard” condition into a “back yard” space where haphazard urban elements, best hidden, are exposed. A general lack of structure allows for people to drive and park where convenient, trash receptacles to appear seemingly randomly and for little to no definition at the pedestrian scale. The Master plan proposes the redevelopment of these sites into a series of linked public spaces.

Volume 1: Executive Summar y

Heavy Vehicular Traffic Prohibits Pedestrian Movement Tall curbs, wide lanes of traffic, roundabouts and unimpeded turn lanes all contribute to a less than ideal environment for pedestrians and cyclists. Wide turn lanes allow for vehicles to move at high speeds, but increase the distance a pedestrian must cross and the odds of a potentially lethal outcome. The Master Plan recommends a series of traffic calming measures to make for

Historic Views of the Oasis

Viewing the Traditional Architecture Found Within the Al Ain Oasis (C. 1958)

Obstructed Views of the Oasis Commercial developments have encroached dangerously close to the Oasis seemingly without regards to views from the city towards the Oasis. What views remain are further inhibited by other urban infrastructural elements. A key vision of the Master Plan is to prohibit new construction in key areas where view corridors looking towards the Oasis provide important historical, cultural and aesthetic value.

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Contemporary Views of the Oasis

Desert Landscape Abutting the Oasis Perimeter and the Sultan Fort (C. 1958)

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Heavy Vehicular Traffic Prohibits Heavy Vehicular Pedestrian Traffic Movement Prohibits Pedestrian Movement

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Al Ain Oasis Master Plan PROjeCT SITe OVeRVIeW The aim of the Master Plan is to preserve and improve the Al Ain Oasis as a vehicle for connecting the City to this unique and historic landmark. This is primarily achieved by creating a interconnected network of cultural venues and public spaces within it and at its periphery. The envisioned Cultural Quarter will seek to reestablish a primary visual and physical relationship with the surrounding city, while at the same time acknowledge and enhance planning initiatives within the adjacent Al Ain Central Business District to ensure a cohesive and vibrant urban center. At its core, the Master Plan strives to reassert the Oasis as the conscious center of the city by promoting pedestrian activities at its edges and throughout its interior. This is primarily achieved by: 1. Redesigning underutilized open spaces and passageways within and tangential to the Oasis, such that its essential qualities and size are more apparent and readily accessible to both residents and tourists alike. 2. Reclaiming critical view corridors into the Oasis and between its historic and cultural landmarks to ensure proper visibility and heightened public awareness. 3. Improving and adding to existing cultural institutions and historic monuments in and 12 around the Oasis.

A.1.4 Key Elements of Vision 1) Rehabilitation and Activation of the Oasis and the Oasis Edge 2) Reclaiming Critical View Corridors 3) Preserving/Improving/Adding to Existing Cultural Institutions and Historic Monuments

GREEN NETWORK INTO CENTRAL DISTRICT PRIMARY VIEW SHEDS PATHS THROUGH OASIS CULTURAL BUILDINGS K

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A.1.6 Project Background

Presentation to H.E. Sheikh Sultan (BYDecember OTHERS)5, 2008 the Al Ain Oasis K ICT DEVELOPMENTOn Conceptual Master Plan was presented to L CENTRE FOR MUSIC IN THE WORLD OF ISLAM Sheikh Sultan, H.E. Dr. Zaki Anwar Nusseibeh, and Dr. Sami Al Masri, in the ADACH exhibition space. Jorge Silvetti, of Machado and Silvetti Associates, presented the work that had been done in the eight preceding months since the project’s inception, explaining in depth the concept of creating a “cultural campus” on the eastern side of the Oasis, on the site of what was then the still-functioning Livestock Market and Nursery and Feeds Souk. Professor Silvetti Volume 1: Executive Summar y also explained the concept of intervening in a selective manner within the Oasis, to improve existing pathways and walls, as a means of connecting important new and existing buildings via Oasis paths, thus activating the Oasis as a shaded route from one project to another.

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Key elementsOnof Vision February 22, 2009, subsequent to the

presentation of the Oasis Concept Master Plan, Professor Silvetti presented the concept design of the Al Ain National Museum to Sheikh Sultan and others. The presentation included a model of the AANM design, as it stood at that time.

Discussion of the Master Plan with H.E. Sheikh Sultan bin Tahnoon Al Nahyan, H.E. Dr. Zaki Anwar Nusseibeh, and Dr. Sami Al-Masri

Since the above presentations, the design for both the Oasis and the AANM has progressed considerably, and is showcased in this Master Plan.

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Discussion Discussion of of the the Master Master Plan Plan with with H.E. H.E. Sheikh Sheikh Sultan Sultan bin bin Tahnoon Tahnoon Al Al Nahyan, Nahyan, H.E. H.E. Dr. Dr. Zaki Zaki Anwar Anwar Nusseibeh, Nusseibeh, and and Dr. Dr. Sami Sami Al-Masri Al-Masri

38 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer Master Plan Site Model


C.2.3 Urban Design Framework Plan

Primary Vehicular Access and Routes Visitors arriving by car will have several access options throughout the Oasis. Primary entry to the site is envisioned the Cultural EasternBuildings Cultural New Public Oasis Parksatand Campus, at the to thewill Al be Ain reinvigorated Visitor’s The periphery ofentry the Oasis Centre and the by the linking ofNational a series Museum of public parks, with the goal of activating the Oasis edge and encouraging exploration of the Oasis interior.

Primary Vehicular Access and Routes Visitors arriving by car will have several access options throughout the Oasis. Primary entry to the site is envisioned at the Eastern Cultural Campus, at the entry to the Al Ain Visitor’s Centre and the National Museum

MAJOR VEHICULAR ROUTES Pedestrian Access and Circulation Within the Oasis, visitor’s will encounter a myriad of options for traversing the site. Key Oasis pathways will be refurbished andOasis connections Pedestrian Connections Linking to Al Ain citywide paths will2030 further Atokey visionbike/recreation of the UPC’s Plan Al Ain is the connect of thea Oasis the city of Al Ain. creation green with network of paths extending from the Oasis into the city. The Master Plan finds these connections an important part in reintroducing the Oasis to the public.

LOCAL VEHICULAR ROUTES PEDESTRIAN ROUTES BICYCLE ROUTES Pedestrian Access and Circulation Within the Oasis, visitor’s will encounter a myriad PUBLIC TRANSIT ROUTES of options for traversing the site. Key Oasis pathways will be refurbished and connections SHUTTLE BUS ROUTES to citywide bike/recreation paths will further connect the Oasis with the city of Al Ain. TRAM ROUTE SERVICE ACCESS ROUTES Composite Diagram of the Al Ain Oasis Cultural Quarter Master Plan

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Al Ain Oasis Cultural Quar ter Master Plan

Primary Vehicular Access and Routes Urban Structure Diagrams Visitors arriving by car will have several access options throughout the Oasis. Primary entry to the site is envisioned at the Eastern Cultural Campus, at the entry to the Al Ain Visitor’s Centre and the National Museum

The Master Plan also calls for the preservation of the Oasis as both a natural and agricultural resource, promoting the sustainable restoration of traditional UAE farming practices such as intercropping. “Living exhibits” and demonstration areas are proposed throughout the Oasis to provide a better understanding of practices and crafts unique to the Al Ain region, including date harvesting, “falaj” irrigation and mud brick fabrication. In addition, commercial programs such as the adjacent souks are reconceived to facilitate an authentic working environment where tourist interest and resident life may coexist with mutual interest. In this regard, the Master Plan shares fundamental objectives with the Al Ain 2030 Structure Framework Plan and calls for the concerted efforts of the Urban Planning Council, the Al Ain Municipality and the Department of Transportation alike to ensure a unified world-class central business and cultural district. Pedestrian Access and Circulation Within the Oasis, visitor’s will encounter a myriad of options for traversing the site. Key Oasis pathways will be refurbished and connections to citywide bike/recreation paths will further connect the Oasis with the city of Al Ain.

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Al Ain Oasis Master Plan

Rendered Site Plan

+0m: City Level Site Plan

Al Ain Oasis Cultural Quarter Master Plan

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architectural and urban designer

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es near o these ernate Select nt urrent routes

Fort. The Eastern Cultural Campus is to be designed so as to return the Sultan Fort back to its historical condition of standing in the desert landscape with the Oasis as the backdrop. New buildings, such as the National Museum and Visitor’s Center that are within the view shed will be primarily below grade in order to preserve this concept. Additionally, views from the new cultural buildings must allow views back to the Sultan Fort, Murabba Fort and the Oasis.

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Volume 1: Executive Summary

Professional Rendering of the Oasis edge

Perspective View Looking Towards Sultan Fort Oasis Path Wall - Existing Condition - Wall Heights Of +/- 1.8M Prevents Views Into Oasis Plots

Oasis Path Wall - Proposed Condition - New Walls (Rammed Earth) - Height Of Walls Allows Views Into Private Plots

Maximum Height Of Oasis Date Palms +/- 13 m

Oasis Path Wall - Proposed Condition - New Walls (Rammed Earth) - Height Of Walls Allows Views Into Private Plots

Urban Grade +/- 0 m

Sightlines at a Distance from Oasis Canopy (not to scale)

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ReVITALIzeD CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS Anchored on the west by the Palace Museum (and to some extent Al Jahili Fort) and on the east by the Sultan Fort and Murabbaa Fort, the Oasis is already the center of Al Ain’s cultural heritage. The Master Plan intends to build upon this strong foundation by revitalizing the National Musuem through extensive renovations and expansions while simultaneously enhancing the visitor experience with the addition of the Centre for Music in the World of Islam and the Al Ain Oasis Visitor Centre. Additionally, a proposed hotel to the south of the Music Centre will provide visitor’s the unique opportunity to stay in Al Ain while in close proximity to the Oasis and its cultural monuments.

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Professional Rendering Overlooking the Visitor’s Center

eASTeRN CULTURAL CAMPUS In addition to putting together the masterplan document for the entire Oasis, I was also a key member of the design team, working on the conceptual design of the Al Ain Oasis Visitors Center, the revitalized National Museum, the Center for Music in the World of Islam and the re-designed Al Ain Souks. Because the designs of these individual projects were occurring simultaneously, it gave us the ability to make refinements to the masterplan in real-time.

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Al Ain National Museum Design Team: Jorge Silvetti - Design Principle Paul Schlapobersky - Sr. Associate Stephanie Randazzo - Project Manager Designers: Bao Wei, Christian Santos, Tetsuo Takemoto

Project Summary: The restoration and addition to the existing National Museum, to bring up the institution to A-grade museum spaces, in order to showcase the history of the city of Al Ain, of Abu Dhabi’s ruling family’s relationship to the city, archaeological and ethnographic documentation from the city and the surrounding Easter Region and the specific history of the Al Ain Oasis itself. Involvement The history behind this project is blurred due to its many iterations and sub-phases. The project came out of an initial master planning phase for the cultural quarter, which led my involvement in the team assigned to produce a Concept Design Pricing Set Narrative Set. During the detailed masterplan phase of the project, we incorporated the design of the museum. Subsequent to the DMP, I returned to the redesign effort of the National Museum based upon client directives to reduce the size and cost of the building.

Al Ain National Museum

Location: Al Ain, UAE Size 204,000 SF Status Completed Schematic Design

Professional Rendering of the National Museum

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V.I.P. Suite

Access from V.I.P. Suite to Museum Courtyard

Public Arrival Hall & Oasis Viewing Lounge

City Level Floor Plan (+1) Upper Level Plan (0.0m) PRIMARY PROGRAM ELEMENTS

Temporary Gallery

AL AIN NATIONAL MUSEUM CONCEPT DESIGN PRICING SET September 15, 2009

7

Visitor Services & Amenities

Main Lobby

Permanent Galleries

Performance & Presentation Spaces

Performance & Presentation Spaces

Community Outreach & Education

Collections Storage & Conservation Research Facilities

Research Facilities Loading Dock & Service Corridors

Lower Level Plan (-2.0/-3.5/-4.0m) Oasis Level Floor Plan (+0)

Below-Grade Level Floor Plan (-1)

Basement Plan (-7.0m)

PRIMARY PROGRAM ELEMENTS

8

ARCHITECTURE : DESIGN MANAGER: STRUCTURAL/CIVIL ENG. : BUILDING SERVICES ENG. : COST MANAGEMENT :

MACHADO AND SILVETTI ASSOCIATES, INC. BURO FOUR PROJECT SERVICES, LTD. ADAMS KARA TAYLOR, LTD. ATELIER TEN, LTD. DAVIS LANGDON, LLP

PRIMARY PROGRAM ELEMENTS

AL AIN NATIONAL MUSEUM CONCEPT DESIGN PRICING SET September 15, 2009

DESIGN STRATEGY In keeping with the masterplan strategy of preserving views of the Sultan Fort with the Oasis as the backdrop, most of the new AANM building is below-grade except for the temporary exhibits gallery, which becomes the new visual focal point. Rammed-earth walls will use locally sourced sands in order to resonate with the existing natural and built environment.

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Tun Razak exchange Design Team: Jorge Silvetti - Design Principle Paul Schlapobersky - Sr. Associate Dan Dwyer - Project Manager Urban Designers: Jeffry Burchard, Bao Wei, Jayne Kang, Dany Guitierrez, Noel Murphy, Jamie Setzler, Tetsuo Takemoto LOCATION: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia SIze 75 Acre site area; 1,946,000 sqm building area;6.8 FAR STATUS Initial Earthworks Underway

INVOLVeMeNT I worked on KLIFD/TRX Detailed Master Plan from the initial competition phase through submission of the final 6 volume document set. Much of my work involved management of the development of the entire document and working closely with the consultant team to ensure consistency and integration. As well as finalizing all images on content into the document set, I also focused on most of the plan diagrams that described the many layers of coordination within the project, including infrastructure, land-use, transport and circulation. With a mixture of UK based and Malaysia based consultants, I travelled frequently to Kuala Lumpur to participate in design workshops with the client, preparing presentations updating them on the design and to get feed back and direction.

Tun Razak exchange

PROjeCT SUMMARy: A detailed Masterplan for 1MDB in Malaysia to develop a new financial center in the heart of Kuala Lumpur.

Professional Rendering The Public Green

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Project Site Overview The approximately 75 acre site of KLIFD has existed as a largely vacant large piece of land at the southeastern edge of Kuala Lumpur’s Bukit Bintang district. Its adjacency to the major arteries of Jalan Tun Razak and Jalan Kampung Pandang, and to the Pandan roundabout/ Maju Expressway junction place it at a visually prominent and strategic nexus of the city. The nature of the site offers tremendous advantages of direct vehicular connection to/from the Maju Expressway, the location of a future MRT station on the northeast corner of the site, and a great amount of visual identity within the city. Challenges for the District created by the site are generated by the difficulty of accessing it from either Jalan Tun Razak or Jalan Kampung Pandang, due to traffic levels on those roads, and by the fact that the adjacent neighborhood is, at the time of this Master Plan, still fairly neglected. The design of the Master Plan for KLIFD has sought to capitalize on all the advantages offered by the site, and to minimize the deficits. The District is capable of simultaneously being both self-contained and highly connected. It is anticipated that KLIFD will have a profound catalytic effect on development of the existing neighborhoods to the north and west of the site, rendering most issues with those neighborhoods moot in the long run.

Aerial View Looking South East Over the KLIFD Site PROjeCT SITe OVeRVIeW 29 The approximately 70 acre site of TRX has existed as a largely vacant large piece of land at the southeastern edge of Kuala Lumpur’s Bukit Bintang district. Its adjacency to the major arteries of Jalan Tun Razak and Jalan Kampung Pandang, and to the Pandan roundabout/Maju Expressway junction place it at a visually prominent and strategic nexus of the city. The nature of the site offers tremendous advantages of direct vehicular connection to/from the Maju Expressway, the location of a future MRT station on the northeast corner of the site, and a great amount of visual identity within the city.

The design of the Master Plan for TRX has sought to capitalize on all the advantages offered by the site, and to minimize the deficits. The District is capable of simultaneously being both self-contained and highly connected. It is anticipated that TRX will have a profound catalytic and regenerative effect on development of the existing neighborhoods to the north and west of the site.

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A HIGHLy VISIbLe SIGNATURe TOWeR The Signature Tower will be the main anchor for the TRX site. It is highly visible from not only within the site, but from the approach to the site. As the site is located one of the key access points to the centre of the city, the Signature Tower is sited so as to provide maximum visibility from these highway approaches. On-site, the Signature Tower also acts as an easily identifiable way-finding device.

A

SUSTAINAbLe INFRASTRUCTURe In addition to promoting high performance buildings, TRX aims to achieve a GBI Silver/ LEED Gold certification at the district level through a sustainable and unified approach to TRX’s infrastructure. This includes central plants for power management, cooling, wastewater treatment, and data that all feed into a combined utility tunnel. The CUT delivers these district utilities to the cores of the towers. Primary service areas that serve multiple buildings create an efficient waste and servicing strategy. The Master Developer will continue to explore alternate solutions to optimize the sustainable design of TRX’s infrastructure.

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Signature Tower Potential Stock exchange The Park The Financial Quarter Neighborhood The Lifestyle Quarter Neighborhood The Park Quarter Neighborhood The Urban Quarter Neighborhood

Key elements

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Power Management Unit (PMU) District Cooling Plant (DCP) Co-generation Plant Wastewater Treatment Combined Utility Tunnel, North Site

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Utility Connection to South Site Primary Service Areas LeeD Platinum Target buildings LeeD Gold Target buildings Filter beds

Infrastructure Coordination Baseline Water Demand - Pot vs. Non-Pot

DEMAND (MLD)

Prooposed Water Cycle

KLIFD

KLIFD BUILDINGS

BUILDINGS

9.1

SYABAS

SITE

BUILDING POTABLE DEMAND

(SINKS, SHOWERS, BATHS, KITCHEN ETC)

EFFICIENT BUILDINGS POTABLE

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NON-POTABLE

12.2 MLD

10.3

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DEMAND (MLD)

KLIFD SITE

COOLING

LANDSCAPE

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BUILDING NON-POTABLE DEMAND (TOILETS, URINALS ETC.)

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1.4 MLD

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COOLING TOWER MAKE-UP (ASSUMING GAS FIRED ABSORPTION)

6.4 MLD FROM CITY

LANDSCAPE

(INCLUDES IRRIGATION AND

0.45

WATER FEATURES)

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architectural and urban designer 2% CT Make-Up Water (3.1 MLD)

Irrigation and Water Features (0.45 MLD)

25

Baseline Water Demand - By Program

2% CT Make-Up Water (3.1 MLD)

Irrigation and Water Features (0.45 MLD)

tions

Baseline Water Demand - Pot vs. Non-Pot

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23.0 MLD

23.0 MLD

17.2 MLD

6.4 MLD

~25% red.

~70% red.


OVeRVIeW OF THe MASTeR PLAN As with many global cities, Kuala Lumpur is growing at a rapid rate, in keeping with national economic development and the continuing urbanization of the populace. Population growth and increased foreign investments into the city contributes to its continual enlargement and creates a demand for buildings that respond to the variety of needs generated by growth on a large scale. The maturation and physical expansion of the city and its existing infrastructure (particularly road networks) renders portions of the existing central district harder to access. Simultaneously, existing building stock ages, and fails to keep pace with current trends in floorplate sizing, architectural styles, and sustainability benchmarks, causing Class A tenants to seek other options. Amidst these realities, Kuala Lumpur continues to emerge as a regional center of commerce, industry and major government initiatives such as the Economic Transformation Program.

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It is these accumulated needs, coupled with a move to reposition and reinvigorate Kuala Lumpur that led to the conceptualization of TRX. The broad goal of the District is to create an international-quality environment for financial industry owners and tenants, as well as top class accommodations and leisure associated with those primary functions. Nested within this overall goal is a desire to connect this district physically and psychologically, encouraging a robust interaction with the city.

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Rendered Site Plan

A B C D E

The Public Green Signature Tower The Ravine NW Gateway Plaza MRT Station

F G H I J

Retail Mall Hotel Office Tower Residential Cultural/Institutional

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LEGEND Office Towers Hotels Serviced Apartments Retail Public Amenities Conference Centre MRT Station Public Realm Parking Services Infrastructure

Podium Level Plan


A DIVeRSe MIXTURe OF USeS The intent of the master plan is to provide for a wide variety of uses to be interspersed throughout the site to encourage a lively and active development. It is proposed that 50% of the site be used for office space. 31% of the site should be serviced apartments/condominiums. About 10% should be allocated for hospitality and another 9% should be utilized by retail and F&B elements, a majority of which is in the retail shopping mall. Other on-site uses will include public and cultural amenities.

A3.1-HT

A4.3-RT

A4.4-RT

A4.5-RT

zone A: Lifestyle Quarter E14.19-CC

A5.6-HT

A4.2-RM

B11.17-CT C7.8-CT

zone e: The Park B11.16-CT E15.22-RM

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zone b: Park Quarter B13-CC

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B12.18-CT

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zone C: Financial Quarter

B10.15-RT

B10.14-RT

C7.13-RT

C7.12-CT

C7.10-CT

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LAND USe Office Retail Hospitality Serviced Apartment Institutional Total

GFA m² 977,967 180,000 182,500 600,000 6,010 1,946,477

% of Total 50.2% 9.2% 9.4% 30.8% 0.4% 100%

zone D: Urban Quarter

D17.29-HT

D17.28-RT

D17.27-RT

D16.26-CT

Land-Use Plan

Site Area Total GFA Site FAR Number of Buildings Signature Tower Height Retail GFA Office GFA Residential GFA Hospitality GFA Cultural/Community GFA Parking Bays Public Park

285,776m² [70.6 acre] 1,946,477m² 6.8 29 380m Tall 180,000m² 977,967m² 600,000m² 182,500m² 6,010m² 28,842 30% of TRX

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A Urban Integration The area surrounding the KLIFD site is, at present, predominantly low-rise and consists of single storey or two story masonry buildings from the mid-Twentieth Century. The surrounding neighbourhoods are already beginning to transform, given their proximity to the central district of Kuala Lumpur, and the resultant land values. KLIFD will act as a major accelerator of this transformation.

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A major ambition of the KLIFD Master Plan is to acknowledge the changes that are already taking place in the surrounding neighbourhoods, as well as the catalytic effect that KLIFD will have on the area, and to propose improvements to urban streets in the area around KLIFD so as to speed up the transformation and allow connection in the short term to existing urban nodes and transportation infrastructure. It is hoped that the improvement of these road corridors, including a substantial uplifting of sidewalks for pedestrians, will be accomplished in partnership with the Kuala Lumpur Municipality.

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There are some existing important urban nodes near KLIFD, such as the Pavilion and Berjaya Times Square, in addition to existing transit stops to the west of the KLIFD site.

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Site Access Strategy

IMPROVeD PeDeSTRIAN CONNeCTIONS One of the key principles of the TRX Master Plan is to create clear connections to the city and the local context and providing a pedestrian friendly environment, not only within the master plan site, but beyond the site extents into the adjacent neighbourhoods. TRX needs to embed itself into the existing urban fabric and attract pedestrians from the abundance of vibrant neighbourhoods within walking distance. Neighbourhoods such as Bukit Bintang and Pudu, as well as the shopping complexes such as The Pavilion, provide an existing customer base near TRX, so improving the connections to this and proposed future developments will be instrumental in the growth of Kuala Lumpur’s city centre.

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C.23 Vehicular Access Summary Efficient and Convenient Access A key barometer of the success of the project will be the ease in which vehicles will be able to enter and exit the site. With this in mind, KLIFD will provide direct vehicular access points from Jalan Tun Razak into the Below-Grade Parking Garage, the connector to the MRR2, SMART Tunnel, and most importantly, direct ingress and egress to the Maju Expressway (MEX Highway). By linking directly to the MEX, without having to circumnavigate the at grade roundabouts and intersections, visitors to KLIFD arriving from the airport will have uninhibited access to the site, drastically reducing their travel times and headaches. Because the roadway must be elevated in order to cross over Jalan Tun Razak, having the podium in these locations allows the vehicles to seamlessly enter at what is seemingly grade-level. The Financial District Loop above the podium will also see significantly reduced vehicular traffic speeds and loads as a majority of the vehicular traffic will divert to other destinations before engaging with the loop, creating a highly urban and pedestrian friendly environment at the podium level.

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Podium Level Drop-offs At-Grade Lay-byes and Drop-offs North/South Tunnel Link SMART Tunnel Ingress/Egress Bus and Taxi Locations

Pedestrian Access Routes

Vehicular Access Routes

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Tun Razak Exchange

East-West Site Section

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Site Section Through Public Green

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Tun Razak exchange

A.3.3 Jalan Utara Mall Facade Retail Frontage Along Jalan Utara A key architectural element and “signature” for TRX, the Jalan Utara Mall Facade must be a unique and powerful design that provides access from the urban edge along Jalan Utara. Entrances along Jalan Utara must be closely coordinated with designated drop-off/valet parking areas as well as with the Residential Tower Lobbies at grade level. To avoid creating a blank facade facing the urban environment, the facade must provide a high degree of transparency at the ground level.

DeSIGN GUIDeLINeS While the original DMP document provided the client with generic plot controls for each parcel within TRX, we were also asked to produce more detailed design guidelines for specific project sites with particularly complex coordination issues and marque locations. These project sites needed additional guidelines to re-assure the master developer that when handed over to a future developer, the buildings would be implemented to the highest quality.

Distinct Residential Tower Entrances Integrated Retail Mall Entrances

Design of the public realm (paving, softscape, urban furniture etc.) must conform to the TRX Urban Design Guidelines, as well as coordinated with the design and layout of the Retail Mall to ensure a seamless indoor/outdoor experience for visitors to TRX and the mall. The design of the Residential Tower Entrances must be clearly marked. While an integrated part of the overall facade design, it must provide a unique architectural moment, such as a canopy or porte cochere to mark the entrance. Along the length of the Jalan Utara Mall Facade, a series of retail mall entrances designed in coordination with the layout of the Retail Mall, must be integrated into the overall design of this elevation.

Design Category

Preferred Item & Description Minimum Requirements1

Solid Panel Cladding

Stone

Basis of Design2

• 20mm Thickness Natural Stone

Prohibited3

NOTES

• Thinset tile, EIFS, stucco,

The following materials are prohibited:

• Any Type of Masonry Units in above grade or

Panels

• High quality proprietary facade

exposed conditions

• Terra-cotta • Pre-Cast Concrete Panels • Wood • Plastic composite materials • Reconstituted stone

hanging system

• Stainless Steel, Bronze, or

Metal Panel

Lighting - Concealed luminaires

Solid Panel Cladding - Stone Panels

Aluminum panels With minimum 5mm thickness, concealed fasteners Spider Cleat or Structural Glass Fin Structural Silicone Glazing, Aluminum, no cap Low-iron glass Minimum 40% light transmission Color to closely match vision glass

Frameless Glass System

Curtain Wall

Clear Glass Translucent Glass Spandrel Glass

• • •

Signage

Commercial Treated Glass Mall Signage

• Silkscreened or etched glass • Mall signage to be an integral

Mechanical Systems

Air Intake/Exhaust

• If required, grilles/louvers are to

Lighting

Facade Lighting

• Contemporary/Modern Luminaires

Curtain Wall & Glazing

Centria, Morin

• Corten steel or copper panels • Corrugated metal panels

• Glass that is in the color spectrum of yellow, bronze,

Pilkington Planar

orange or black is prohibited.

• Heavily tinted or mirrored glass • Spandrel panels should match the color of the vision

Schuco, Kawneer,

• Aluminum storefront systems

Pilkington energiKare Pilkington Optifloat Pilkington Spandrel

• Heavily tinted or mirrored glass

Viracon Bespoke

• Glued on decals • Decal/vinyl adhesive signage

contrast with surrounding facade treatments

Translucent Glass - Etched Glass and integrated mall signage

glass and be back-painted

• Glued on decals on the glazed surfaces are prohibited

• Color or materiality may not

• Because silkscreen treatments are permanent, a sample of the pattern/design of silkscreen/etching must be approved by DRB

• Signage design must be approved by DRB

component of the facade design

• Air Intake/Exhaust may not be

be integrated architecturally that are Concealed/Integrated

located on facade

• Visual impact of grilles/louvers must be minimized • Airflow may not interfere with pedestrian comfort • Lighting should reinforce view to The Park. • Luminaires to utilize LED, fluorescent or ceramic

Bega, Erco, iGuzzini, Lumenpulse, or similar

• Luminaires with Exposed Lamps • Neon • Dynamic Lighting • Decorative Luminaires

Vitro, Dorma

• Metal or Wood panel doors • Translucent or opaque doors

• Glass to match curtainwall • Glass must be either laminated or safety glass

Bespoke Design

• One Zone of Limited Architectural Lighting

• Illuminated Signage within a

metal halide lamps.

• White Light, Color Temperature 4000K +/-100K • Beyond white light, one additional color of light also

Prescribed Zone Translucent Glass - Silkscreened Frit Patterns

Residential Tower - Covered entry and signage

Entrances

High quality all-glass doors

Facade - Structural glass wall detail

Facade - Well-lit steel and glass retail frontage

Retail Mall - Covered entry canopy

14

DRAFT August 22, 2012

allowed.

• Glass doors with recessed, concealed operators • Doors must be part of the integrated glass facade system

High quality architectural glass/steel canopies of contemporary design, providing weather covering for retail mall and residential tower pickup/ dropoff area

• • • •

Full integration of all design elements into a cohesive ensemble Minimum Canopy clear height of 4.5m Clear sitelines to maintain safety and security of residents visible from interior Concierge/Security Station The three Residential Entries should be treated in the same style character and must be clearly differentiated from the Retail Mall Entrances

Materials Inconsistent with Class A Developments Antique flourishes/adornment representative of a “retro” or ornate style

• • •

Vehicle waiting/loading provisions to be sufficient for all front-of-house building operations Vehicle short term parking provisions at Residential dropoff should be limited to a very small number of vehicles (maximum 3), if any Vehicle movement areas and canopy heights to be consistent with Code requirements for operation of emergency vehicles Curbs to be reinforced to allow for mounting by light and medium-duty vehicles without deflection, settlement or other damage

1. When specifying a Preferred Item, the Minimum Requirements for that material/design must be met and approved by the Design Review Board. 2. Basis of Design indicates suggested manufacturers which provide products of the required level of quality for TRX. Other manufacturer/systems of equal or greater quality may be substituted. 3. Prohibited items may not be used without expressly written permission granted through the Design Review Board. Materials must be pre-approved before incorporation into the design.

TRX Lifestyle Quarter

DRAFT August 22, 2012

Plot-1 Design Code

B.2 Master Height Controls

A4.4

Massing envelope diagrams were very specific, particularly for the lower levels because of the complicated interactions between the various project plots and primary infrastructural elements. We established key height datums to help the sectional guidelines ensure that floor levels are properly coordinated between project sites.

A4.5

A5.6

Plots A4.3-4.5, A5.6 Towers

A4.3

Residential & Hotel Towers

RETAIL MALL & PARKING - 3 SCENARIOS Due to the complex nature of the Retail Mall and Parking design, three permissible scenarios are provided. Only one scenario may be selected for development and the number of levels and allowable building height shall not exceed the requirements set forth for the selected scenario.

RESIDENTIAL & HOTEL TOWER The residential and hotel towers have varying heights. The stepped configuration of the residential towers contributes to the overall site massing, with buildings growing taller as they gain proximity to the Signature Tower. Conversely, the hotel tower is lower in height to further accentuate the dramatic presence of the Signature Tower.

Base Scenario

Levels

Building Height

Residential Towers

Plot A4.2

6 above ground

35.6m max

Planting Zone

n/a

Rooftop Parking*

3

Retail Mall, Upper Level*

1

Retail Mall, Levels 0-1

2

8.0m floor-to-floor

Basement Retail Mall

1

8.0m floor-to-floor

Basement Parking*

4

3.2m floor-to-floor

Alternate 1 Residential Terrace/ Planting Zone

Rooftop Parking*

Plot A4.2

A4.2

A4.2

Retail Mall Levels 0-1

A4.2

-

Entry Lobby

-

8.0m floor-to-floor

Roof Terrace

-

Building Height

40.4m max 2.0m depth 3.2m floor-to-floor 8.0m floor-to-floor

Plot A4.2

1

8.0m floor-to-floor 8.0m floor-to-floor

4

3.2m floor-to-floor

Levels

Building Height

7 above ground

43.6m max

Planting Zone

n/a

2.0m depth

Rooftop Parking*

3

3.2m floor-to-floor

Retail Mall, Upper Levels*

2

8.0m floor-to-floor

Retail Mall, Levels 0-1

2

8.0m floor-to-floor

Basement Retail Mall

1

8.0m floor-to-floor

Basement Parking*

3

3.2m floor-to-floor

Notes / Definitions * Components for which Number of Floors and Allowable Building Height vary by scenario. Building Height: Measured vertically from the average finished ground level elevation to the highest point of the roof, except for skylights, vents, or wireless masts. A4.2 Basement Retail Mall & Parking*

Retail Mall & Parking

Typical Floor

3.2m floor-to-floor

2 2

See Section --

Basement

10.0m floor-to-floor

2.0m depth

2

Basement Parking*

Tower Roof Terrace

6.0m floor-to-floor

140m max

6 above ground

Retail Mall, Levels 0-1

8m minimum from edge of top parking level

3.6m floor-to-floor

35 total

n/a

Alternate 2

A4.2

Levels

Zero Setback First parking level to be setback 2m from face of Retail Mall. Subsequent parking levels to be setback additional 2m from face of preceding parking level.

Residential Tower

Plot A4.3

Retail Mall, Upper Levels*

Floor-to-Floor Heights: Intended as a guide and are not absolute requirements. Actual dimensions may vary but must conform with clearance requirements set forth in Development Code. Basement Depth: Subject to detailed design of mall and parking and integration with sitewide infrastructure, including but not limited to Roadway Tunnels, Combined Utilities Tunnel, and MRT access. See Section 4.0 Guide Sections for further information.

Plot A4.4

40 total

160m max

Typical Floor

-

3.6m floor-to-floor

Entry Lobby

-

6.0m floor-to-floor

Roof Terrace

-

10.0m floor-to-floor

Plot A4.5

45 total

180m max

Typical Floor

-

3.6m floor-to-floor

Entry Lobby

-

6.0m floor-to-floor

Roof Terrace

-

10.0m floor-to-floor

Storeys

Building Height

Hotel Tower

Above Ground

Rooftop Parking

Building Height

Rooftop Parking*

BUILDING SETBACKS BY COMPONENT

Retail Mall

Storeys

Planting Zone

Basement Retail Mall

Retail Mall Upper Level(s)*

15

Aug. 31, 2012

B.5.2 Guide Section: Frontage B1

INTENT OF HEIGHT CONTROLS Height controls establish maximum allowable building heights for all development within Plot 1. The controls ensure that each plot is developed in accordance with the overall vision for the district. In this interest, the maximum heights provided herein shall not be exceeded without consent from the Design Review Panel.

Plot A4.2 Retail Mall & Parking

In this case, we developed detailed guidelines for the retail mall component. Because of its key location on a primary frontage, it required us to provide descriptive parameters to control its massing, setbacks and material conditions. We wanted to control the quality of materials, to ensure a consistency with the master developer’s intent on creating a world-class live work environment, so we provided specific material recommendations and prohibited materials, along with precedent imagery to reinforce the expected look and feel.

Public Realm Interaction

Key Considerations

Plot A5.6

30 total

120m max

Typical Floor

-

3.6m floor-to-floor

Entry Lobby

-

6.0m floor-to-floor

Roof Terrace

-

10.0m floor-to-floor

Minimum setback determined by required right-of-way allowance for B2/B3 Tunnel and CUT. Final Right-of-Way dimension may vary; subject to detailed design.

KEY CONSIDERATIONS B2/B3 Tunnel & Combined Utilities Tunnel The B2/B3 Roadway Tunnel and CUT serve the overall TRX site and are to be provided by the Master Developer. Plot 1 basement setbacks and levels must be coordinated with the roadway tunnel design to ensure proper connectivity with basement parking areas. Additionally, CUT service access and utilities distribution must be integrated at basement level. Plot 2 Five-Star Hotel Interface Plot 1 shares a zero lot line interface with the Plot 2 5-Star Hotel. Although the two plots are independent, the mall and hotel may benefit from a high level of connectivity. Floor levels must align to enable direct access between the hotel and mall concourses.

Notes / Definitions Building Height, Residential Towers: Measured vertically from the finished level of the Plot A4.2 roofscape to the highest point of the tower roof, except for skylights, vents, or wireless masts. Building Height, Hotel Tower: Measured vertically from the finished level of The Park (±13m) to the highest point of the tower roof, except for skylights, vents, or wireless masts. Entry Lobby: Tower entry lobbies shall be provided at ground levels and integrated within the retail mall footprint. Roof Terrace: Tower roof terraces shall be provided at the top level(s) of each tower. A portion of the terrace floor area (40%) shall be established as open space (unenclosed, but shading is allowed and recommended). Concurrently, enclosed area shall not exceed 60% of the overall floor area. All terrace level building enclosures require a 5m minimum setback from edge of proposed building footprint (as determined by preceding floor level). No setback is required for roof/shading structures. Floor-to-Floor Heights: Intended as a guide and are not absolute requirements. Actual dimensions may vary but must conform with clearance requirements set forth in Development Code.

A D1

B1 B2

D2 C1 C2

E

Planting Zone: Required 2m soil zone above rooftop parking. Soil zone serves the residential terrace and is not required to be continuous across the entire roof area.

Frontage Key Plan

Plot 1 Components (Indicates Base Scenario)

46

DRAFT August 22, 2012

DRAFT August 22, 2012

Guide Section (Indicates Base Scenario)

Setback Controls

Height Controls

TRX Lifestyle Quarter Plot-1 Design Code

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PUbLIC ReALM In addition to building guidelines, in coordination with our landscape consultants, we produced public realm guidelines for each building site. While we provided public realm guidelines for site wide conditions, such as sidewalks and roadways that are common to throughout the project, we created special guidelines for sites where we anticipated a higher level of quality. Because of the variation in aesthetics when it comes to urban furniture and landscaping, the guidelines were developed to ensure that the appropriate language of materials, which are consistent with the rest of TRX are utilized.

C.1 Landscape Guidelines

C.1.1 Strategic Tree Typologies - Park Tree A Tree Character and Physiology • 18-25m mature height • Tall slender tree form with clear stem. • Non-buttressing • High level canopy with 10m minimum clear stem to retain open views across park • Single stem • Tall and narrow growth form • Compact canopy to control views from buildings • Non sap producing • Limited leaf fall • Non fruit bearing Planting Requirements • 2m depth soil zone over podium deck • Root barriers to control surface disturbance • Rootball anchored to structure slab • The growing conditions for urban street trees will restrict the growth and mature height of the trees, but the tree appearance and character will remain healthy and clean Procurement • Container grown specimen tree • Size at planting : 9m tall with 4m clear stem

Example Malaysian Species : Hopea odorata - Merawan Fragrae fragrans - Tembusu Swietenia macrophylla- Big Leaf Mahogany

Hopea odorata

Fragrae fragrans

Swietenia macrophylla

Sterculia foetida

Chorisia sp.

Couroupita guianensis

Millettia atropurpurea

Azadirachta excelsa

Pithecolobium saman

Peltopherum pterocarpum

Example Global Tropical Species : Sterculia foetida - Kelumpang jari Chorisia sp. Couroupita guianensis - Ayahuma, Cannonball Tree

C.1.2 Strategic Tree Typologies - Park Tree B

0

25

50

Tree Character and Physiology • 8-12m mature height • Low tree form with canopy relatively wider than height • Single stem • Non-buttressing • 4m minimum clear stem to retain open views across park and along promenade • Open canopy form with interesting branch structure • Non sap producing • Limited leaf fall • Non fruit bearing Planting Requirements • 2m depth soil zone over podium deck • Root barriers to control surface disturbance • Rootball anchored to structure slab • The growing conditions for urban street trees will restrict the growth and mature height of the trees, but the tree appearance and character will remain healthy and clean Procurement • Container grown specimen tree • Size at planting : 9m tall with 4m clear stem

100

Strategic Tree Typologies The Detail Master Plan provides a pallet of 12 tree typologies to set the character and function of tree planting for TRX. Each typology includes a selection of example species, including both Malaysia native species along side tropical trees widely used within South East Asia, which suit the criteria set out within each typology. This selection of native and non-native species will provide the client and various developers with a range of species that meet the masterplan aspirations.

Within Plot A4 the tree typologies include: • Park Tree A • Park Tree B • Scented Tree • Fruiting Tree • Plaza Tree • Plaza Palms • Plumeria Walk • Trees within Ravine • Street Tree Type 2

66

LEGEND Park Trees A

Plumeria Walk

Park Trees B

Trees within Ravine

Scented Tree

Street Tree Type 2

Fruiting Tree

Example Malaysian Species : Millettia atropurpurea - Tulang Daing, Purple milletia Azadirachta excelsa - Sentang

Example Global Tropical Species : Pithecolobium saman - Golden Shower Raintree Peltopherum pterocarpum - Yellow Flame Tabebuia sp.

Plaza Palm

Tabebuia heptaphylla

Plaza Tree DRAFT August 22, 2012

TRX Lifestyle Quarter

DRAFT August 22, 2012

Plot-1 Design Code

67

Aug. 31, 2012

C.4 Urban Landscape Elements Design Item

Preferred Item & Description

Raised Tree/ Landscape Planters

• Pre-constructed (bespoke):

Minimum Requirements1

• Incorporation of wide top edge Reinforced concrete core, clad with (min. 250mm) to double as seat min. 40mm stone, with matching edge, or design of integral or stone coping adjacent seating surface • Site-constructed: Solid granite • Maximum height to be 600mm blocks (note: depth to be approved by • Site-constructed: Architectural Landscape Architect to insure finish concrete sufficient planting depth for proposed tree species) • Integral drainage provision • Integral tree root watering and

Raised Tree Planters - High quality landscape planters, made of architectural grade concrete, or stone

• •

In-Ground Tree Planters (Tree Grates) In-Ground Tree Planters - High quality cast-iron, cast stone tree grates or defined planted areas

• Integrated into overall paving • •

Paving areas other than sidewalk (small plazas and parks

• •

strategy with neat and efficient details Flush with sidewalk surface, with in-ground edging and concrete subsurface High quality standard cast iron gratings flush with sidewalk surface, with in-ground edging and concrete subsurface High quality stone paving Concrete aggregates

• • •

Basis of Design2

aeration provision (drip irrigation required) Integral electrical outlets for tree lighting (outlets may not be surface mounted on the exterior) 450mm seat high. Location of raised planters to be carefully considered to remove risk of clutter and potential obstructions within the streetscape Voss, DAE or Integral drainage provision Integral tree root watering and aeration provision (drip irrigation required) Integral electrical outlets for tree lighting (outlets may not be surface mounted on the exterior)

• High specification, durable materials

Prohibited3

None. Bespoke required. • Standard pre-manufactured precast planter boxes • Washed aggregate “pebble” precast finish • Exposed concrete finish (other than custom architectural finish to design by an Architect or Landscape Architect, subject to Review Panel approval) • Chamfering of corners beyond 10mm chamfer or “easing”

Miller Druck, or equivalent

• All details should be clean and flush with surrounding surface materials leaving no obstructions

• Concrete tree grates • Stainless steel tree grates • Corten materials • All other items or products not listed herein

• Concrete, unless carefully designed. All proposed concrete will be subject to review by the Review Panel

• Macadam surfacing • Any kind of thin tile applied to concrete sub-base

Plaza and Feature Space Paving - High quality paved surfaces of stone

NOTES

• Any planter boxes to be pre-constructed off-site are to be designed by an Architect or Landscape Architect, and are subject to Review Panel approval

• Integral foot-lighting is desirable • Innovation is encouraged. Bespoke designs involving the use of materials not listed here (including weathering steel plate, cast iron, bronze, wood, etc.) will be reviewed by the Review Panel

• Internal waterproof liner required

• Gratings to allow for growth of tree trunk • Coordination with local utilities will be required; in-ground planting may not be an option in many locations, in which case above-ground tree planting will be required.

• Any paving patterns will be reviewed by the Design Review Board

• Natural Stone Tactile paving to match overall paving strategy material and color

• Curb conditions to be of consistent dimensions, material and color to match that of general footpath paving strategy

• Joints between flags and pavers should not be less than 2mm and not more than 5mm wide Drains

Manhole Covers & Utility Covers

Drainage grates are to be stainless steel and integrated flush with the surrounding paving Cast iron or steel

• All details should be clean and flush with

Greenleaf (UK)

the surrounding surface materials, leaving no obstructions Flush in-ground with inset pavers

Steel Line Limited, or equivalent

• Precast • Fiberglass or other composite

• Service covers are to be stainless steel and recessed into paving

• Covers to be aligned with dominant pathway edge and/or paving configuration 1. When specifying a Preferred Item, the Minimum Requirements for that material/design must be met and approved by the Design Review Board. 2. Basis of Design indicates suggested manufacturers which provide products of the required level of quality for TRX. Other manufacturer/systems of equal or greater quality may be substituted. 3. Prohibited items may not be used without expressly written permission granted through the Design Review Board. Materials must be pre-approved before incorporation into the design.

Integrated Details for Drains and Servicing - Recessed and well detailed drainage and utility covers

76

DRAFT August 22, 2012

DRAFT August 22, 2012

TRX Lifestyle Quarter Plot-1 Design Code

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Tun Razak Exchange TRX Lighting Masterplan Lighting is a critical component to the night experience at TRX and for its branding and positioning. Creating visual interest, excitement and a sense of place shall be the primary focus, while always maintaining a sense of safety and comfort. The aspiration for the lighting is to create an iconic, innovative and inviting nighttime environment. A series of focal points and rhythms are proposed as key visual themes. Rhythmic elements capture the eye and are critical to the sense of wayfinding (i.e. the ravine, land bridge, pedestrian routes and highways) and lead one to focal points in the landscape (i.e. the Signature Tower, MRT station, Retail Mall Entrances, information kiosks).

58 tetsuo takemoto

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Ongoing Process The TRX/KLIFD Masterplan is an on-going 25 year development process. Ground breaking to begin the initial early works packages and earthworks started in early 2013. The first phase of the development, which includes the retail mall and public realm is scheduled to wrap up in 2016, with the Signature Tower a few years later. Over the course of this time, I anticipate the design of KLIFD/TRX to evolve several times, and while it saddens me to think that what we originally designed will ultimately look very different, I anticipate that because of the strength of our key fundamental principles, the vision for the project will remain intact. I look forward to revisiting the project in the years to come and to see my influence.

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Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center Jorge Silvetti - Design Principle Edwin Goodel - Project Architect Derek Johnson - Project Manager Christian Santos, Steve Poon, Oscar Kang, Tetsuo Takemoto and Samina Saude Location: Hanover, New Hampshire Size 105,000 SF Status Completed in 2012 Project Summary: The Visual Arts Center will consolidate the College’s Studio Art and Film and Media departments into a single facility as well as house the newly created Digital Humanities program. The facility will house sculpture, printmaking, photography, architecture, painting & drawing studios as well as the art film production, animation and editing spaces. At the building’s heart is the Arts Forum, a central atrium bringing natural light to its social center. Involvement 2007-2009 Key design member during Conceptual Design Phase through Construction Drawing phase. Design involvement include early conceptual renderings, design of fritted glass screen pattern, interior steel window details, exterior slate cladding details, interior casework details and wall sections and details.

Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center

MSA Design Team:

Perspective Rendering of West Entrance

Evolution of Concept Massing (2006-2009)

60 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer


8

7

4

4 5

5

3

6

2 7

6 1

2 1

1

Site Plan - Prior to Construction

Site Plan - After Construction

Pre-existing Conditions

Post-Construction Conditions

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Parking Brewster Hall Clement Hall Hood Museum Loading Dock Spaulding Auditorium Dartmouth Green

3

Spaulding Loading Dock Arts Plaza VAC Loading Dock Hood Museum Hood Loading Anex Visual Arts Center [Campus Entry] Spaulding Auditorium Dartmouth Green

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Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center

5

22

44

3 3

1 9 9

8

77 33 66

Ground Level Floor Plan

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 62 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer

Digital Lab Film and Media Studios Sculpture Outdoor Sculpture Loading dock Lebanon Street Entry Shared Exhibition Gallery Auditorium West Campus Entry


14.Faculty Lounge 15.Film and Media Offices 16.Film and Media Editing and Animation

22.All Campus Conference 23.Studio Art Department Offices 24.Intern Studios 25.Arts in Residence

Scale 3/32”=1’-0”

10 11

9 10

17 18

12 11

20 21

18 19

25 26

20 21

19 20

21 20

12 13

17 16

16 15

23 24 14 15

Second Level Plan

Third Level Plan

9. Photography 10.Printmaking 11.Film and Media Studies Seminar 12.Architecture 13.Digital Humanities 14.Faculty Lounge 15.Film and Media Offices 16.Film and Media Editing and Animation

17.Senior Studio 18.Senior Seminar 19.Painting Crit 20.Drawing Studios 21.Painting Studios 22.All Campus Conference 23.Studio Art Department Offices 24.Intern Studios 25.Arts in Residence

Third Level Floor Plan

Scale 3/32”=1’-0”

Photography Printmaking 17 Film and Media Studies Seminar Architecture Digital Humanities Faculty Lounge Film & Media Offices Film & Media Editing & Animation 25

18

22 21 22 23

13 14

Second Level Floor Plan

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

21 22

24 25

19

20

20

20

18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

Senior Studio Senior Seminar Painting Crit Drawing Studios Painting Studios All Campus Conference Studio Art Department Offices Intern Studios Arts in Residence

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Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center

EAST/WEST

12 12

55

44

11

1. West Camp 2. Exhibit Gal 3. Animation 4. Shared Pin 5. Artist in Ris 6. Lower Leve 7. Screening 8. Machine R 9. Outdoor Sc 10. Architectu 11. Architectu 12. Drawing S

33

11 11

10 10

88

22

99 99

66

77

East-West Building Section

1. West Campus Entry 2. Exhibit Gallery 3. Animation Studios 4. Shared Pin Up Space 5. Artist in Residence Studio Beyond 6. Lower Level Elevator Vestibule 7. Screening Vestibule 8. Machine Room 9. Outdoor Sculpture Terrace 10. Architecture Studio 11. Architecture Fabrication Lab 12. Drawing Studio View of Art Forum

West Campus Entry and Exhibit Gallery 1

The Visual Arts Center is comprised of three levels with a small screening 3 4 room in the basement. The larger sculptural studios, welding/fabrication studios and the TV/Film studios which require the greater ceiling-height were located on the ground level and acoustically separated from the rest of the building. Print making, photography, media-editing and architecture studios were located on the 2nd Level because they didn’t require as 5 6 much natural daylight the drawing and painting studios on the 3rd level require.

9

architectural and urban designer

10

16

17

7 11

12

64 tetsuo takemoto

15

8

2

13

18

14

NORTH/SOU

1. Campus Co 2. South Lant 3. Faculty Lou 4. South Lant 5. Entry Vesti 6. Lebanon S 7. Art Forum 8. Painting Cr 9. Digital Teac 10. Film and 11. Digital La 12. Screening 13. Projector 14. Screening 15. Drawing S 16. Alt. Proce 17. Acid Room 18. Welding S


11

8 8

22

33

44

99

15 15

10 10

16 16

17 17

77 11 11 55

18 18

66

12 12

13 13

14 14

North-South Building Section

1. Campus Conference Room 2. South Lantern Corridor 3. Faculty Lounge 4. South Lantern Corridor 5. Entry Vestibule 6. Lebanon Street Entry Lobby 7. Art Forum 8. Painting Crit. 9. Digital Teaching 10. Film and Media Seminar 11. Digital Lab 12. Screening Vestibule

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Projector Room Screening Room Drawing Studio Alt. Process Studios Acid Room Welding Studio

View of Campus Conference Room

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Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center Interior Details and Millwork During the Construction Document phase, my primary tasks in the document set regarded the unique interior and exterior details. All of the interior door, finish and millwork details were developed by me with the guidance of my project manager and in consultation with various product representatives. Of particular focus on my part were the exectution of the interior glazing systems that faced the central Art Forum and the millwork that the students and faculty would occupy and interact with on a daily basis. In close coordination with the faculty through meetings and discussions, we developed a system for the work spaces that would be consistent throughout so as to not favor one department over another. An inherent flexibilty in this system allowed for the variation in use and durability. This also involved the careful planning of faculty requirements for equipment being transferred from their existing spaces as well as coordinating any new equipment the new building provides. The original intention for the Art Forum was to have a series of levels with built-in seating nooks of a range of sizes to promote the use of the space by both individuals and groups. My millwork drawings reflected a unique set of carrels with integrated lighting systems, which unfortunately were taken out and replaced by a simple flat floor with moveable furniture. The sculptural light poles were a later addition at the behest of the primary donor.

Interior Forum Details Steel Window/Door Details: To provide the primary public spaces a common and unifying feature, thin steel frame windows and doors were selected to line the walls facing the Art Forum. As students circulate around this space, each departmental entry door uses steel and glass doors rather than standard hollowaluminum doors used elsewhere. The two interior glass lanterns also utilize this feature in order to maximize the translucency and cleanliness not afforded by a standard curtain wall system.

66 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer

Detail Section Through Interior Glazing

Plan Detail of Steel Frame


Reception booth and Cafe

Faculty Mail boxes

Section Through Cafe Counter

Plan of Reception Desk

Section Through Mail boxes

MILLWORK: While most of the millwork for the VAC consisted of work surfaces, built-in desks and seating, the Reception Desk/Cafe and the Faculty Mail Boxes offered an opportunity to have a little bit more fun. A nook at the entry to the departmental offices on each floor greets visitors an integrated bulletin board along with angled slots for faculty to collect their mail. The Reception desk is a playful feature that integrates into the stairs leading into the main public entry into the auditorium with the top surface of the counter.

Plan

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Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center Exterior Envelope Plan & Section Details Conceptually, the idea behind the facade was to express each department of building in a slightly different manner, thus what appears to be a wide variety of disparate materials, through a couple of unifying elements, the entire composition begins to come together. Norwegian slate panels are used on the upper floors of the east, west and south facades, while pre-cast concrete, board formed units clad the lower floor. The base of the building is dark Vermont Slate. An inner liner of vertical standing seam zinc panels are used to interweave the various materials together; they are exposed whenever the program volumes are pushed to reveal views into the interior circulation zones or at the corners. Beginning during the Design Development phase of the project, I worked in developing the exterior rain-screen system for the Norwegian Slate facade and the zinc-metal siding. Because of the many different conditions, plan details for nearly every corner of the building were developed to ensure that the feeling of the slate panels slipping over the zinc-panels would be interpreted correctly during pricing and construction.

Section Details

68 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer


Plan Details

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Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center Silkscreen Glass Pattern Studies As a key feature of the VAC, the glass lanterns signifying the entry points from the west (campus side) and the south (Lebanon Street side), and house the featured programmatic elements of the building for display. The West Lantern houses a communal crit space and the Artist in Residence studio space, while the South Lantern contains the faculty lounge and the All-Campus Conference Room. To provide some degree of glare control while still offering views in and out, I developed a silkscreen pattern that increases in translucency from bottom to top. A simple dot-gradient was deemed to simple, so I undertook several studies examining the effects of using half-toning of various images. The client seemed to gravitate towards a foliage based scheme, so the use of elm trees and oak trees, overlayed upon several other patterns were used to generate the final image.

The structural glass wall comprises of triple-insulated glass units of approximately 11’x5’ supported laterally by glass fins. The silkscreen pattern was applied to the 3rd surface. Grey silicone sealant between the glass units were used to minimize the joints.

Tree Branch Pattern

Water Ripple Pattern

70 tetsuo takemoto Lantern Perspective

architectural and urban designer

Abstract Pattern

Lantern Perspective 27 February 2009

Lantern Perspective

27 February 2009

Curtain Pattern

27 February 2009

Lantern Perspective

27 February 2009


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Dartmouth College Visual Arts Center

Before and After - SE Corner

South East View of the Pre-Existing Conditions

72 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer

Before and After - SW Corner

Current South East View of the VAC

South West View of the Pre-Existing Conditions

Current South West View of the VAC


West Campus Entry at Night

West Campus Entry

Arts Plaza Of course I believe that the architecture and interior spaces of the VAC are phenomenal and I’m excited that so many of the features we worked hard to design came out as intended, but looking at the larger picture, this building is but a lynch pin for a larger effort by the college to increase attention towards the visual arts. I hope that the success of this building will help to encourage the college to continue funding its arts program and that I hope this in turn will continue to attract strong students and exceptional artists to visit. Already, the Arts Plaza is graced by a series of abstract panels by Ellsworth Kelly and a Louise Bourgeois sculpture at the entrance. I look forward to seeing the Arts Plaza continue to be used as the gateway to Dartmouth’s arts precinct.

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Summer Studio in Rome Summer 2002

My visit to Rome enabled me to live and work as Romans do, commuting every morning from Trastevere into the historic center to attend a studio a mere block and a half from the Pantheon. It’s fun to look back on my experiences and relive those moments through photos and sketches.

Studies Abroad: Rome

Travelling abroad to Italy gave me the opportunity to see architecture and urbanism from a completely different perspective. Seeing architecture in person that up to that point I only saw in books or journals, opened up new avenues of thinking and rejuvenated my creativity. I take every opportunity I can get to travel because I find it one of the best ways in which to see new ways of thinking and designing.

Conceptual Plan Diagram of Existing Geometries

Drawings from Sketch Books

74 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer


Various Drawings

IL MUSeO INTORNO AL PANTHeON For the final project of the summer, I took a combination of issues related to the many visits throughout the summer to museums, cathedrals and contemporary architectural spaces around Rome and Italy. I wanted to explore the relationships between historic structures and new interventions, and the layers of interactions between historic structures and the new elements added over time for better or for worse. In the case of the Pantheon, I wanted to look at the use of the disused interstitial space created between the historic grade level of the Pantheon and the new street level that has developed over thousands of years. I wanted to find a way in which people could occupy this “moat� around the building to create an interpretive museum about the Pantheon and its surrounding environs below the current roadways.

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Samothrace BACKGROUND For the summer of 2004, following my first year at the GSD, I managed to find work drawing for archaeologists for the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. Their site, located on a small Aegean island of Samothrace near Turkey (and the original home of the sculpture, “Winged Nike of Samothrace� now prominently displayed in the Louvre), gave me the chance to further hone my hand drawing and rendering skills, using ink on mylar. While on Samothraki, I produced several sets of diffferent kinds of drawings. The first set of drawings and elevations of the temple located on the Eastern Hill of the Sanctuary. I developed three different schemes for the small ionic porch that was an addition to the original doric temple dedicated to Phillip and Alexander. Because the site is now in ruins, the drawings were all potential conjectures of what it may have looked like based upon existing evidence. In addition to those main reconstruction drawings, I also developed a sereis of block drawings which required me to go out into the field to carefully measure and dimension various blocks that made up the building in order for me to return to the drawing studio to carefully draft and render in ink. This helped me greatly appreciate and understand the craftsmanship of the ancient Greek builders.

Archaeological Draftsman

Summer 2004

West Elevation With Pitch Roof

76 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer


Views of the Sanctuary

Sima Fragment

Geisson block

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2ndSkin System NextGen Competition Entry SIze 1,000,000 SF

For this particular site, the 2ndSkin™ system combines additional insulation, air-tightness, and solar shading systems that minimize thermal losses and gains; building-integrated photovoltaic and wind systems that provide renewable energy, and light shelves that reduce demand for artificial lighting to achieve a 67% reduction in space conditioning and lighting loads.

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2ndSkin System

PROjeCT DeSCRIPTION In response to the Metropolis NextGen competition call to drastically reduce energy and water consumption at an existing federal building in Los Angeles, I collaborated with a fellow friend and architect, to develop 2ndSkin™ to transform the existing building envelope into an energy conserving and renewable energy generating surface, converting energy expenditure into infrastructure investment. 2ndSkin™ is a lightweight unitized cladding system that provides an advanced supplementary envelope for existing buildings. By providing integrated energy use reduction and production capabilities through standardized modules that can be adapted to project-specific conditions, these modular units can be applied on any existing building/structure using existing building technologies.

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Unit Assembly

before and After efficiency Analysis PASIVe GAINS AND LOSSeS 48% reduction in annual passive gains and losses due to increased insulation, airtightness, and solar shading.

78 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer

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Attachment Clips Unit Frame Module Inserts Insulation Cladding Glazing Light Shelf PV Louvers


ROOF

green roof panels, photovoltaic louvers, solar hot water panels

NW

photovoltaic louvers, vertical wind modules, vegetated facade tiles, triple-glazed low-E glass units with and without integrated pv, pollution absorbing tiles

SE

photovoltaic louvers, vegetated facade tiles, vacuum insulated glass units with and without integrated pv, pollution absorbing tiles

SW

photovoltaic louvers, vacuum insulated glass units with and without integrated pv

NE

Facade Design in Response to Climate

triple glazed low-E glass, pollution absorbing tiles, vegetated facade tiles, vertical wind modules

site response

Occupiable Roof

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80 tetsuo takemoto

architectural and urban designer

Tetsuo Takemoto - Portfolio 2013  

Architecture and Urban Design

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