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2014/15 Annual Trust Report

Students graduating at Ngariam Vocational College

James Seager


Contents INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................... 1 REFERENCE AND ADMINISTRATION DETAILS ................................................................................................... 2 NAME, REGISTRATION AND CONTRACT DETAILS ............................................................................................................. 2 TRUSTEES .............................................................................................................................................................. 2 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ........................................................................................................................................... 2 ADVISORS.............................................................................................................................................................. 3 ADMINISTRATOR..................................................................................................................................................... 3 INDEPENDENT EXAMINERS ........................................................................................................................................ 3 BANKERS ............................................................................................................................................................... 3 STRUCTURE, GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................ 4 TYPE OF GOVERNING DOCUMENT ............................................................................................................................... 4 TRUSTEE SELECTION METHOD .................................................................................................................................... 4 GOVERNANCE ISSUES ............................................................................................................................................... 4 NETWORK AND CONNECTIONS ................................................................................................................................... 5 PARTNERSHIPS ....................................................................................................................................................... 6 OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES ............................................................................................................................ 7 OBJECTIVES ........................................................................................................................................................... 7 AIMS .................................................................................................................................................................... 7 SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN FOR THE PUBLIC BENEFIT .................................................................................... 7 ACHIEVEMENTS AND PERFORMANCE .............................................................................................................. 9 RELIEF .................................................................................................................................................................. 9 WATER ................................................................................................................................................................. 9 ENTERPRISE ......................................................................................................................................................... 10 EDUCATION ......................................................................................................................................................... 11 HEALTH .............................................................................................................................................................. 12 CHRISTIAN MINISTRY ............................................................................................................................................. 13 VISITS ................................................................................................................................................................. 14 OTHER ................................................................................................................................................................ 16 CONCLUSION ....................................................................................................................................................... 16 FUTURE PLANS ............................................................................................................................................... 17 GENERAL FUNDS BUDGET FOR 2015/16 ................................................................................................................... 18 FINANCIAL REVIEW ........................................................................................................................................ 19 RESERVES POLICY .................................................................................................................................................. 19 FUNDS IN DEFICIT .................................................................................................................................................. 19 INCOME .............................................................................................................................................................. 19 EXPENDITURE ....................................................................................................................................................... 21 BALANCES ........................................................................................................................................................... 21 RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS ACCOUNTS 2014/15 ......................................................................................................... 22 INDEPENDENT EXAMINERS REPORT .......................................................................................................................... 24 DECLARATION ................................................................................................................................................ 25


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Introduction Teso Development Trust (TDT) was formed in 1989 and registered as a charity in 1991 to help provide relief and development to the Teso people of North East Uganda, working through the Christian Churches in the area. This followed a relief campaign conducted by Christians in the UK in response to a major humanitarian crisis caused by: 1) unrest arising from the military takeover of the country by the Museveni regime, and 2) devastating incursions by raiders from the Lord’s Resistance Army and the neighbouring tribe of Karamojong. Since that time, TDT has continued to provide relief and resources for development and mission, working through churches and Christian organisations in Teso.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Reference and Administration Details Name, registration and contract details Charity name:

Teso Development Trust

Other names the Charity is know as: TDT Registered charity number:

1005139

Inland Revenue Number:

XN84557

Charities principle address:

16 Heatherwood Court, Bransholme, Hull, HU7 4JR

Email: info@teso.org.uk Phone: 02482 826731

Trustees Name

Office

Name of person (or body) entitled to appoint trustee (if any)

James Sampson

Chairman

Executive Committee

Clement Dixon

Secretary

Executive Committee

Andrew Third

Treasurer

Executive Committee

Executive Committee David Watts Catherine Emaru Dr Hugh Mason Florence Odeke Dr Peter Walker Philip Good Andrew Third Lucy Hefford Christine Moyes Dr Frank Guinness Rev Robert de Berry 2


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Advisors Martin and Elaine Harrison, Management Consultants Stewart Hills, Public Relations Louise Third, Public Relations

Administrator James Seager Office: 16 Heatherwood Court, Bransholme, Hull, HU7 4JR Telephone: 01482 826731 Email: jamess.tdt@gmail.com

Independent Examiners Laurie Fearon LEF Consulting 107 Beeches Road Rowley Regis West Midlands B65 0BB

Bankers NatWest Bank 10 Station Road Clacton on Sea Essex CO15 1TA

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Structure, governance and management Type of governing document Constitution adopted 21st September 1991

Trustee selection method The charity’s chairman, secretary and treasurer are appointed as trustees by the Executive Committee through nomination and a majority vote.

Governance issues Trustees are required to familiarise themselves with up to date guidance from the Charity Commission regarding the execution of their duties. Currently this is published as the booklet ‘The essential trustee: what you need to know (CC3)’. The Executive Committee meet five times a year to discuss new applications for funds from organisations in Teso, consider reports from projects we are / have supported, assess the current organisational and financial health of the charity and plan future fund-raising activities. Whilst the Trustees have overall responsibility for the management of the trust and allocation of funds, they abide by the decision of the Executive Committee, expect in extenuating circumstances. In certain situations, the Trustees may make decisions and allocate finance between Executive Committee meetings. In such cases all decisions are brought to the Executive Committee for ratification. The charity employs a Coordinator, for 15 hours a week, who is not a member of the Executive Committee. The Coordinator manages the day to day administration, communication and financial controls of the Charity. He is responsible for providing the Executive Committee with accurate financial information and reports, and provides general guidance to the Executive Committee.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

The Trust is aware of the risks entailed in its operation. These are outlined below with measures taken to reduce the risks. Risk

Measures to reduce

Partners misusing funds

ongoing communication between with Trust partners, a requirement to acknowledge funding transfers, regular reports (including the provision of receipts), physical checks of projects during an annual visit a requirement that partners have their own independent auditing regimes

Funds being ‘lost’ during transfers

the use of ‘Ebury Partners UK Ltd’, who have a proven record of transferring funds to Uganda on behalf of many charities.

Travel to Teso

Trips are planned and confirmed by partners in Teso, Only staying or traveling with established partners who are known to TDT Ensuring appropriate travel insurance is in place Briefing of visitors by members of TDT who have extensive travel experience in Teso

Network and connections The Trust is a member of Global Connections – an evangelical umbrella group for Christian organisations engaged in mission and development. This provides helpful management advice and input through its staff, information bulletins conferences and workshops.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Partnerships We work closely with organisations on the ground in Teso, with our main partners being:    

Pentecostal Assemblies of God Church of Uganda Revival Time Ministries (a non-denominational development agency). Soroti Women’s Cooperative Limited (a humanitarian developing co-ops and loan associations in the Soroti area).

We also work with a number of UK partners for the mutual objectives of supporting the people of Teso. These include:   

Friends of Teso Nottingham Health Group Tenauld Trust

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Objectives and activities Objectives The objectives as set out in the constitution are: To promote in Uganda (particularly the Teso District) and elsewhere 1. The relief of poverty, sickness and distress and to preserve and protect health 2. The advancement of education 3. The advancement of the Christian religion

Aims The aims of the charity, reflecting the objectives, are to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Support the education of children. Help create jobs and Income. Improve agriculture through training and restocking. Provide clean water through water improvement projects. Provide relief for those who are displaced persons (IDPs). Provide emergency relief. Support the Improvement of health provision. Support Christian ministry.

Summary of Activities Undertaken for the Public Benefit The trustees are aware of the guidance on public benefit issued by the Charity Commission and have taken it into account when making decisions regarding the management of the charity and the allocation of funds. The benefit of the charity’s activities under objectives 1 and 2 (‘The relief of poverty, sickness and distress and to preserve and protect health’ and ‘The advancement of education’), clearly benefit the public living in the Teso region of Uganda. The charity’s activities under objective 3 (The advancement of the Christian religion) benefit the people of Teso through providing a moral and spiritual framework that adds meaning to their lives. This in turn promotes mental health, spiritual wellbeing and community cohesion. As the Christian churches are also at the forefront of community development, advancing the Christian religion in Teso brings many added benefits including increased educational and healthcare provision. Also, the Charity expects its partners to help those in need, regardless of faith, gender, disability or race within the Teso districts.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

The main activities undertaken by the Charity in fulfilling its’ objectives for the public benefit include, but are not limited to:  

   

Giving technical assistance through supporting training, management consultancy and aid in kind (e.g. by supplying equipment /literature etc). Making Grants and loans to help business development, provide clean water, the building and improvement of schools, improvement of churches, provision of hostels and children’s nurseries, agricultural improvement, equipment (e.g. for hospitals, schools and training centres), provide food and equipment for people in need. Gifts to individuals to help their education and training. Support to individuals or teams from UK visiting the area to teach or assess needs. Promoting the cause of the Iteso people to a UK audience through personal contacts, promotional visits, literature and via our website. Undertaking fund-raising activities such as sponsored walks, selling books, etc.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Achievements and Performance The area of Teso in North East Uganda remains one of great poverty, poor health and a weak economy. During 2014/5 we have been able to support the people, aid agencies, the Church and the government as they address the many challenges in the region. Our overall performance has been comparable to the previous year. Income was down 4%. Due to a surplus at the end of 2013/14, we were able to increase our annual expenditure by just over £25,000. The greatest beneficiary of this increase was healthcare. Our activities during 2014/15, in fulfilling our aims and objectives, fall into seven broad areas: relief, water, enterprise, education, health, Christian ministry and visits. Our achievements and performance in these areas are outlined in detail below.

Relief In October 2014, an area in the sub-county of Amuria, experienced extensive flooding. This occurred at the harvest time, and resulting in many crops being ruined. There was also much structural damage to homes. Through launching an appeal and receiving a grant from the ‘Souter Foundation’, we were able to provide £5000 worth of aid. This was sourced and distributed by the Pentecostal Assemblies of God (PAG) church development arm in the area, PAG KIDO. 200 families (approx. 1000 people) were provided with tarpaulins, water purification tablets and emergency food (see photos to the right).

Water The provision of clean, safe water for local communities remains a high priority for the charity, accounting for over 20% of our annual expenditure. Just under £23,000 was spent during the financial year on water projects, which have provided an additional 916 households with an accessible source of clean, safe water (estimated at 5,500 people). The planning and construction of the water projects were managed by the Church of Uganda, PAG Soroti and PAG Kumi. In total 17 projects were funded during the year, which include:    

The completion of 12 wells, with a further 3 being under construction at the end of the year; 1 borehole refurbishment; 1 spring source being renovated and upgraded; Additionally, 6 further wells were in the process of community planning, but their construction was awaiting funding.

During 2014/15 we completed our 100th project, spending £150,000 over the past decade, and benefitting an estimated 55,000 people in Teso. 9


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Enterprise Revival Time Ministries run a number of projects in Wera and Abarilela sub-counties, to empower people in the setting up of Income Generating Activities (IGA’s). These projects include:   

A small loan programme, which benefitted about 200 households over the year; 87 literacy classes; Tailoring training for 45 students.

In total TDT provided £2850 during the year. About half was used to pay a programme manager, and half for equipment and materials. Village Loan and Savings Associations (VSLA’s) have also received £1250 in funds during the year, being delivered through our partner Soroti Women’s Cooperative Limited (SOWCUL). This has financed salaries for the trainers, materials for book-keeping and the provision of bicycles for the loan collectors. These schemes operate in a similar way to Credit Unions in the UK, with local people saving into one large ‘pot’ of money, from which they can borrow. In all, SOWCUL’s project manager leads 37 groups, with each group having their own management team (i.e. treasurer, chairman, committee, etc.). VSLA groups have grown in popularity over recent years due to their proven benefit (see box below). Aiso Florence is one of the members in Moruapesur Market, she bought a computer for her son who had just finished his computer course with her VSLA Savings. He now owns a personal business and finds the computer to be of much help, helping to create jobs for the youth. Egweu of Moruapesur VSLA, used his savings to open up this stall in Moruapesur market. He was thinking of going back to his village to become to be a peasant before joining VSLA, because life had become very hard for him in Town. He could not afford rent and food. He now sleeps in his stalls which he has portioned. Egweu belongs to several VSLA groups and hopes to increase his stock as well as buying a plot to build his shop in the near future.

Florence

Egweu

The Church of Uganda Mothers’ Union has also been supported by the Charity, through providing £3000 to build a shop. This shop will be a place where the Mothers’ Union members can sell craft items that they have made, along with books and other products. It is situated in the grounds of Soroti Cathedral. The shop main structure of the shop was 10


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

completed during 2014/15, but remained unfinished, due to running over-budget. However, the Church of Uganda have agreed to fund the works necessary to bring the building into use in the near future.

Education The charity has continued to advance education in Teso during the year through three building projects. Ngora Parents’ School, which has been supported by TDT for a many years. The school is considered to be one of the best in the area, and with fees lower than majority of nearby schools. Historically, this has been a day-school. However, due to its’ popularity with communities further afield, a decision was made to house students who live some distance away. A class-room was converted into the accommodation block, which was far from ideal. During 2014/15 the Charity funded the building of a dormitory at a cost of £12265 (see photo above). This funding was secured in part from the British and Foreign Schools Society and in part from St Peter’s Church, Ruddington, UK. It is due to be opened in the spring of 2015, and will house 60 girls. A further dormitory to house boys is being considered. During the year 2013/14 the Charity awarded a grant of £2043 for the upgrading of the Peace School, in Kapir. TDT recovered this from a donation made by the Marr-Manning Trust which was received in May 2014. Peace School, which is overseen by PAG Kumi, have been using rooms in the home of a local woman to teach classes. This space became acutely inadequate due to considerable growth in the number of students over the past three years. The total number of students in December 2014 was 230. Following community consultation, it was decided that the best way to use their current resources to create more teaching space was to utilise the nearby PAG church building. Through the grant, the church building has been improved to the level required by the government Education Department and movable partitioning is being installed. This enables the church to be divided into 4 classrooms during the week and partitions removed for Sunday worship. It is expected that the project will be completed by the summer of 2015. Takaramiam School has had a long association with TDT, with the charity funding a number of class rooms in previous years. During 2014/15 a further classroom has been built using TDT funds. A total of £1230 was sent for this building project, which also includes enough finance to purchase desks to furnish the classroom.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Besides these school building project, we have supported the education of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC’s) who attend the Vocational College at Ngariam. This college is a partnership between the Church of Uganda and the government, and specialises in teaching skills such as carpentry and tailoring to young teenagers. £2875 was provided to pay for teachers, and training materials. The funds also paid for each graduate to receive a tool-kit or sewing machine depending on the course they took, to enable them to start their own businesses. (See photo above of children receiving their sewing machines.) 38 children benefited from the training and tool-kits or sewing machines. A final activity of the charity in advancing education has been the personal sponsorship of 7 girls. A small number of UK donors have given towards the upkeep and school / university fees of these girls. This has been managed in Teso by Revival Time Ministry.

Health Kumi Hospital has been the focus of our health improvement activities during 2014/15. TDT paid £1400 for Martin and Elaine Harrison to conduct a further visit to the hospital, where they provided a consultancy and mentoring role for the senior managers. This built on their visits during previous years, which were also paid for by TDT. Their work has enabled Kumi Hospital to employ more staff, implement more stringent management controls and become more financially stable. In particular staff salaries, which were paid three months late, are now paid on time. To further support the hospital, £5,500 was provided to purchase neo-natal maternity equipment (see photo on right). It is anticipated that this will be the beginning of a fully equipped neo-natal unit, and save the lives of many babies. The finance was made available from a fund that was designated for the purpose of Ngora Freda Carr Hospital. However, as Freda Carr, was not being supported during the year, the donors agreed to release the money for Kumi Hospital. Additionally, the Charity was keen to help Kumi Hospital fulfil its mandate as a Christian hospital in providing healthcare to those who cannot afford it. To enable this to happen, Martin and Elaine Harrision implemented the creation of the ‘Compassionate Fund’. This is a fund of about £1000 per month, which is used at the discretion of social workers in Kumi Hospital, to fund the urgent treatment of people who cannot afford treatment. An average of 70 people each month receive life-saving or life-changing treatment through this fund. The box on the following page highlights one example of how the compassionate fund has been used.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Okuku John Michael is a 6 month old baby boy from Oseera Aduuka Ongino. While being fed breakfast by his mother, Okuku choked on his rice and fish and inhaled some of the food into his lungs, including a fish bone. Okuku began coughing and had serious breathing difficulties. He was rushed to Kumi Hospital and given treatment which stabilised him for an hour. His condition then worsened and the doctor referred him to Mbale Hospital (55km away) to see the ENT surgeon. He was driven immediately to Mbale using the Kumi Hospital vehicle and the fishbone was removed from his lung. Okuku is now fully recovered. The Kumi Hospital Compassionate Fund paid 15,000 UGX consultation fees and 86,000 UGX transport fees, £25 in total, and guaranteed the surgeon’s fee. Okuku’s parents sold their cow and paid the 300,000 UGX surgeon’s fee at the government Mbale Regional Hospital, the cost of an emergency procedure. The Kumi Hospital Compassionate Fund impressed that petty cash reserve was immediately available to both fund and guarantee the emergency transport and treatment. Okuku would have died without this cash being available

The Maternity Unit in Ngora also benefited from TDT support during the year. The charity funded £796 for the visit of a senior midwife from the UK, who was able to provide training and improve systems of care. The Maternity Unit, along with the government Health Clinic in Ngora were visited by the TDT team in December 2014. This provided an opportunity to discuss TDT’s future involvement with healthcare in Ngora. Following the visit a number of projects have been planned, which are due to be implemented during 2014/15. Funding for the healthcare projects in Ngora have mainly come from the ‘Nottingham Health Group’ on of our partner organisations in the UK.

Christian Ministry The church in Uganda is on the forefront of providing social leadership as wells as spiritual and emotional support for local communities. Many people have experienced war, food shortages and on-going poverty. Church leaders are well placed to provide encouragement and guidance to these people. The Churches’ development departments are also taking a lead in implementing projects that increase the quantity and quality of education, healthcare, water supplies and income generating activities. TDT has been pleased to be able to finance the training and ongoing support of Christian Ministers, who provide a solid foundation to the social, development and spiritual work that takes place in local 13


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

communities. Over the past year 3 Christian training centres have received funds from us, as well as 1 scheme that provides financial support of church leaders who are experiencing severe hardship. The Church of Uganda lay-readers training centre, which is attached to St Peter’s Theological College in Soroti, has had a long-standing relationship with TDT. During the past year we have been able to contribute £675 towards the running costs of the centre. We have also been able to support the centre through personal visits by members of the TDT committee, who have encouraged the staff and provided teaching for the students. In particular, Rev Robert de Berry, who is a member of the TDT committee, spent 2 weeks at the centre as a guest lecturer. The Charity also funded the roofing of a new multi-purpose hall which has been built at the Soroti layreaders centre (see photo on right), at a cost of £3000. The roofing work is due to be completed in the summer of 2015. During the annual visit in December 2014, the TDT team had the opportunity to encourage the Church of Uganda Kumi Diocese in their plans to re-open the lay-readers training centre in Ngora. No training had taken place there for the last 2 years. The Charity has committed some initial finance to be sent in 2015/16 to support the re-launch of this centre. During 2014/15 we have also funded £1000 to the Pentecostal Assemblies of God in Katakwi to provide training to 60 of their church leaders. This has been conducted through the InService Bible School. This training is conducted in local venues in order to reduce costs, and make the programme as accessible as possible to the majority of PAG church leaders in the area. Communities in the sub-county of Amuria are among the poorest in the region. During 2014/15 we have provided financial support to Church of Uganda clergy in this area, which has enabled them to focus more fully on their social and spiritual duties. £150 per month has been given for this purpose.

Visits The annual visit from the TDT was conducted in November and December 2014 (see photo of team with their host in Soroti on the right). The purpose of these visits are:   

to evaluate the projects that have been funded by TDT over the previous year; build relationships with church and development leaders in the region, in order to assess what TDT can do to further support the Iteso people; encourage project managers, churches and Christian ministers in their work.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

The 2014/15 visit team comprised of Andrew Third (TDT Treasurer), Louise Third, Christine Moyes (Committee Member) and James Seager (TDT Coordinator). Over 2 weeks they visited 15 projects and 4 churches. The conclusion to the visit report (written by James Seager) is included in the box below (a full copy of the report being available on request).

2014 Annual Visit Report Conclusion The sights and sounds of the past two weeks will stay with me for many years. My first trip to Teso (in fact, my first trip to Africa!), was filled will experiences that have shaped my thinking about the world and my understanding about how God has called us to impact our world for Him. I have seen children in rags and water being collected from road-side puddles, but I’ve also seen teenagers educated and businesses started. I have seen how people live with poverty, and how they aspire to rise from the cycle of dependency. I have seen joy and peace in the middle of despairing situations. I now have first-hand examples of what it really means to know that the ‘joy of the Lord is our strength’: people who will remain strong in Christ despite difficult circumstances. And, right at the heart of all this I have seen the love of God and the work of the church in action. I have come away from Teso feeling very privileged to be part of the world-wide family of God, who support each other in our times of trouble. Many of you reading this will have given to the projects that I have now seen. You, too, are part of this world-wide family. You are making a difference! I have heard it said that ‘you can take a man out of Africa, but you cannot take Africa out of a man’. The people of Teso are now part of my experience. I have had the privilege of sharing just a few days with them, but they are now part of who I am. They have left an impact on me that will continue. And, I pray that we, as TDT, will continue to have a lasting impact in Teso as we give and support them as part of the global Church of Christ! Common Themes During the visit some common themes were noticed across the projects. 1. There is a need for investment in people. It is clear that Teso has a lot of resources of its’ own, and its’ people are very adaptable and capable. What they appear to struggle with is how to use their skills and resources to the best of their ability. When they have the right training and encouragement, they can achieve a tremendous amount themselves. (Great examples of this are Kumi Hospital, VSLA’s and the PEP programme.) There appears to be a greater desire for this type of work. In the words of a local councillor at Ngariam ‘The time for gifts is over, help raise us up to new levels’. 2. There remains a need for outside investment to support internal investment. There are some larger infrastructure projects that would take too long for the Iteso people to complete without external funding. However, the most successful projects are happening when local people are investing in the projects, and supported by external funding, rather than external funders giving all the resources they need. (Great example in Peace School.) 3. There must be an exit strategy from long-term projects. Some projects can continue taking resources indefinitely, and are not working towards being self-sustaining. It is important that TDT supports existing projects to move towards being self-sustaining. This can be done through business training.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

During the course of the year TDT has been represented in Teso through the personal visits of TDT committee members. As mentioned previously, Rev Robert de Berry spent two weeks as guest lecturer in the COU Soroti Lay-Readers Centre. Lucy Hefford also spent time visiting projects, and in particular creating interest in producing a children’s Bible in the Ateso language.

Other Practical support for the people of Teso has been provided through a container of items being sent by one of our partner organisations in the UK “Friends of Teso”. TDT made a contribution towards the transport costs, and provided items for our various projects, including school and medical equipment as well as books for trainee Christian church leaders. A significant achievement with regards to the overall running of the Charity has been the appointment of a new coordinator. David Watts, the out-going coordinator, has provided excellent administrative support, advice and leadership to the Committee over the past decade. The Trustees and Committee record their great appreciation for all of David’s work. He stepped down from his duties as coordinator in June 2014, but has been co-opted onto the Committee and continues to provide advice on development issues, fund raising through various trusts and grant-making bodies, and managing the water projects. After a process of advertising for the post, assessing applications and conducting interviews, the Trustees appointed James Seager as the new coordinator. He is employed by the Charity for 15 hours a week with a salary of £6000 per annum. The Charity has continued to maintain and develop its’ support base in the UK. Inevitably, some donors have ceased to support the Charity during the year, but this was off-set by approximately the same number of donors joining our support base. We have been able to generate this new support through:   

visits to churches and other groups by members of the TDT Committee a re-designed news letter being distributed to approximately 500 people the introduction of a monthly e-news bulletin distributed by email.

Conclusion The Trustees feel that 2014/15 has been a positive year, with many projects being supported, and donations being generally in line with the previous year. We have been pleased to support literally 1000’s of people through supporting relief, water, enterprise, education, health and Christian ministry in the Teso region of Uganda.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Future Plans The objectives for 2015/16 arise from the need to continue supporting current projects and respond to the issues identified during the annual visit and from grant applications submitted by partners in Teso. The projects we are aiming to support during 2015/16 include:         

Water projects in 20 locations Ngora Parents’ School Takaramiam School Kumi Hospital Ngora Maternity Unit Income generating activities through Revival Time Ministries and SOWCUL Literacy training through Revival Time Ministries Youth skills training at the Ngariam Vocational College Christian leadership training with the Church of Uganda and Pentecostal Assemblies of God

Some of these projects will be funded through specific fund raising activities and designated giving. Others will be supported through our general funds. An initial budget for general funds has been produced for 2015/16 as guidance only. Whilst we remain optimistic that we can support the projects identified, this will be dependent upon the level of income. We also value our flexibility to respond to needs as they arise, and therefore our budgeting may alter through the coming year to reflect changes in needs and priorities in Teso. This budget can be found in the box on the following page.

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Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

General funds budget for 2015/16 (for guidance only)

Anticipated General Income

£ 30,000.00

Budget Expenditure

£ 27,550.00

Projects:

Total RTM Sowcul Food Security PAG Ministry COU Ministry Kumi Hospital Refund to 2014 reserves Contingency

Admin:

Total

£ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £

16,600.00 4,600.00 1,500.00 3,000.00 1,500.00 1,500.00 2,000.00 1,000.00 1,500.00

Administrator Admin Annual Visit

£ 10,950.00 £ 6,000.00 £ 1,500.00

Just Giving/ Bank Accounts Inspection

£ £

News Letter Promotional Printing Printing Admin AGM/room hire General Corresponence Contingency

£ 1,600.00 £ 200.00 £ 250.00 £ 250.00 £ 150.00 £ 350.00

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500.00 150.00


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Financial Review Reserves Policy The Trustees have agreed to hold a permanent reserve of £5000 which is deemed sufficient to cover the winding up of TDT administration should that course of action be agreed upon at any time. In addition a sum of £10,000 is held as a flexible reserve to meet urgent aid needs or to provide resources for prompt matched funding requirements. Any withdrawals from these flexible reserves will be made up from general funds within 12 months of the date of withdrawal. The Trustees hold most of the charity’s resources in interest bearing accounts with balances in the charity’s non-interest bearing current account being maintained at a level not exceeding that sufficient to facilitate transactions. The Trustees have taken the view that as at any time the charity hold funds from donors who have designated the gift and that otherwise apart from reserves funds move quickly through the TDT accounts, funds will not be held in investments which place the principal of the investment at risk. The Trustees will take professional advice on investments which give a good rate of interest while maintaining necessary liquidity of funds.

Funds in deficit At the year-end 4 designated funds were in deficit, as outlined below. This is due to the Charity allowing the amount expected on gift aid rebates to be spent from the designated funds before the rebate is received. When all gift aid rebates for 2014/15 have been received these funds will be replenished. Revival Time Ministries (Child Sponsorship) Soroti Mothers Union Water projects Baptists ministry support

-£1147.56 -£5.00 -£1298.00 -£58.75

Income The Charity’s income for 2014/15 was £88518, compared to £91910 in 2013/14. Donations came from:  7 Charitable Trusts, giving a total of £19577 o BP Foundation (£3299.59) o British & Foreign Schools Society (£9500) o Chawn Hill Foundation (£500) o Jersey Evangelical Trust (£1750) o Marr-Munning Trust (£2043) o Souter Charitable Trust (£3000) o The Tenauld Trust (£3260)  23 Churches 19


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15 o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 

  

Bournemouth Deanery Bournemouth Town Centre Parish Carrigrohane Parish Chawn Hill Church Edwinstowe Parish Church Hanbury Baptist Church Holdenhurst PCC Holy Trinity & St Jude, Halifax Quary Bank Congregational Church Romsey Methodist Church Ruddington Baptist Church St Andrew's Church, Ilford St John's & St Barnabas Womens Fellowship St Martin’s Church St Michael’s, Billington St Paul’s Church, Throop St Peter’s Church, Ruddington St Saviour’s Church ,Iford St Saviour’s Church, Bournemouth St.Andrew's Church, Sidcup St.Thomas’ Church, Bradwell The Endowed Mission, Rowley Regis Trinity Church

2 schools o King Alfred’s, Abingdon o James Peacock, Ruddington Romsey Brownie Pack 174 personal donors £7333 reclaimed from the Inland Revenue under the Gift Aid scheme and distributed to the funds related to the donations on which they were claimed (Due to the change in the HMRC system to online collection most of the funds due from 2012/13 donations were claimed in 2013/14.) Fund raising efforts by supporters

20


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Expenditure Total expenditure for the year was £104316, compared to £79037 in 2013/14. The expenditure per area of charitable activity is set out in the table on the following page.

General

Designated

Total

Admin

Administrator’s fee & expenses (including transport, correspondence, committee papers, etc.) Annual Visit Just Giving Bank charges AGM Committee Global connection Accounts (Pay roll & Inspection) Other Publicity (leaflets, banners, website, etc.)

8549.08 1331.69 216 681.5 70 318 220 307.5 63.05 2212.66 13969.48

Total Admin RTM Sponsorship

1250 2000 1600 3640 1049 1555.17 5546

Food Security Relief Income Generating activities Water Education Health Christian Ministry

7321.5 0 3000 250 19270 20808.5 15446.56 7343.75

265

Other

30874.65

Total Expenditure

7321.5 1250 5000 1850 22910 21857.5 17001.73 12889.75 265

73440.31

104315

Admin costs, which include the coordinators salary, evaluation and monitoring visits, publications and general office costs equate to 13% of the total expenditure over the year.

Balances At 1st April 2015, the Charity’s surplus was £34891. With £15810 unrestricted and £19081 restricted funds. £14536 of the unrestricted funds is considered to be ‘reserves’. 21


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Receipts and Payments Accounts 2014/15 Copy of accounts filed with the Charity Commission for the year 2014/15

22


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

23


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Independent Examiners Report

24


Teso Development Trust Annual Report 2014/15

Declaration The trustees declare that they have approved the trustees’ report above. Signed on behalf of the charity’s trustees: Signature(s) Name(s) Position (e.g. chair, treasurer, etc.)

Date:

25

2014-15TTDT anual report  
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