{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1


2

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

3


www.TerrierGroup.org

Table of Contents Volume 5 Number 1 • Winter 2019

8 Editorial Muriel Lee 12 Three Dogs of Christmas Kris Kibbee

16

Everyone Likes a Happy Ending Deb Bednarek

20

Interview with David Kirkland Dr. Theresa Nesbitt MD

22

MCKC in Pictures Olga Frolicz

28

MCKC Wrap up

34

Life with a Rat Terrier

36

Look at Books

38

Captain Will Judy

42

Interview with Rosalind Kramer

Dr. Theresa Nesbitt MD Stacy McWilliams Muriel Lee Muriel Lee

A TerrierGroup Interview

50 Personalized Medicine for Dogs Canine Health Foundation 52

Fun With Your Terrier in Sports Dr. Barbara A. Gibson Ph.D

54

Title Stats for AKC Hunting and Working Terriers Jo Ann Frier-Murza

4

TerrierGroup.org


Advertisers • Winter 2019 Chris Brill-Packard......................................................... 40-41

Stacy McWilliams............................................................... 33

Peggy Browne............................................................... 62-63

Dr. Theresa Nesbitt MD.......................................... Cover, 15

Alex Geisler....................................................................... 2-3

Reita and Craig Nicholson.......................................... 56-57

Melanie Feldges Fine Art.................................................. 44

Steve and Debi Russell..................................................... 6-7

Nick and Doreen Fletcher................................................ 27

Lindy Sander...................................................................... 19

John and Kathy Garahan................................................ 37

Colette V. Seror-Secher................................................. 62-63

Margo and Douglas Hyman................................ Cover, 15

Cheryl and David Stanczyk.............................................. 45

Gigi Lorenze-Reiling..................................................... 10-11

Henry Sutliff III................................................................ 62-63

Jo Ann Frier-Murza............................................................. 61

Sally Sweatt................................................................... 62-63

Cheryl L. Jennings........................................................ 62-63

United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club................................ 49

Eric and Lisa Leady........................................... Back Cover

Ann White............................................................... Cover, 15

Van Purcell............................................................. Cover, 15

Gerry Yeager...................................................................... 37

Ron and Maurine McConnell......................................... 6-7

Stacy Zimmerman............................................................. 33

Thank You Advertisers! TerrierGroup 2019. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Disclaimer: the editor reserves the right to refuse, edit, shorten or modify any material submitted. The editor’s decision on all printed material is final. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publisher. The publisher can not be held responsible for breach of copyright rising from any material supplied. No responsibility is taken for errors and inaccuracies or claims in advertisements. Anyone wishing to contribute their artwork, short stories or comments can submit them to melanie@terriergroup.org

©Melanie Feldges

Winter 2019

5


6

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

7


Muriel Lee • EDITORIAL

TerrierGroup Editorial

2019 is drawing to an end. The Montgomery County show is over, but there are thoughts of the Westminster Kennel Club show lurking in the background. However, for many of us at this time of the year we are able to let our minds travel along the journeys of holiday festivities, presents and great meals with family and friends. However, the new year will be upon us shortly and the dog activities will be with us again. Montgomery County Kennel Club was a great success for all and we were especially pleased as to how well TerrierGroup was received. In this issue Theresa Nesbitt has a terrific interview with the show’s best in show judge, and Olga Forlicz has her excellent photographs to go along with it We are now starting our fifth year and hope to bring you articles, photographs and dog show reports that will keep you educated and entertained throughout the year. A letter to the editor! These are few and far between, so don’t hesitate to send us a letter. Mary Larson from Manitowoc. WI. Wrote, “There was a reference to your magazine in our Border Terrier Club of America newsletter

8

TerrierGroup.org

about our specialty. I was at the specialty with my friends and their Borders. I brought my Border and we competed in senior barn hunt. He found three out of four rats on his first time at that level and I was pleased. What really surprised me was a photo of him in barn hunt! It was a special day! What a great magazine! Just wanted you to know I will be reading your magazine in the future – great articles and nice photos for ads.” We are pleased that Dr. Sharon Albright, Manager of Communications and Veterinary Outreach for The AKC Canine Health Foundation, will be bringing us timely articles on new health innovations in the field of veterinary medicine. In this issue she has an outstanding article on Targeted Health Treatment and Plans for your dog. We have a good interview with the well-known and well-liked judge, Roz Kramer,and there is an educational article on the newest breed to the terrier group, and a new breed that is not wasting any time in gaining popularity, the Rat Terrier. Kris Kibbee brings us a seasonal The Three Dogs of Christmas and there is an good article about a retired Kerry Blue Terrier that was previously handled by Bill McFadden. Westminster has to be mentioned, with the show coming up in February, and the odds are with the terriers for winning best in show, as they have been the winningest group since Westminster’s beginning in 1907. Barbara Gibson writes about the many working venues that are open for the terrier breeds, and Jo Ann Frier-Murza covers the terrier statistics for the 2018 working titles…of course, the smarty Border Terriers won the most awards. And speaking of training, I saw a short column


the other day that noted the seven commands that your pet needs to know: sit, down stay, come, heel, off and no. The AKC Canine Good Citizen class offers all of these. I’ve always found pet insurance interesting and when I had several dogs this was not available. A recent article in Better Homes and Gardens noted to look into the following before buying pet insurance: have a discussion with your veterinarian and see what he knows about the various plans and your veterinary clinic may offer its own wellness plan. Find out the cost of treating conditions that your breed is likely to have and “choose a plan with an affordable annual deductible and weigh the reimbursement percentage against the monthly premium.” There are usually three types of insurance: accident and illness, accident and illness embedded with wellness, and preventive care. It’s noted that before purchasing insurance, you should read the fine print as some plans increase as the animal ages. The Washington Post Weekly had an excellent article on Michael Vick’s dogs. Remember the shame of the big football player, Michael Vick, when it was found he was running a dog fighting ring? The newspaper tracked down the 47 dogs that were taken from the operation and noted that the dogs “became ambassadors, tailwagging proof of what’s possible through rescue and rehabilitation.” From across the national, all 47 dogs were tracked down. Some remained fearful throughout their lives and others blended well into their new adoptive homes. Because of Vick’s fame, the animal rescuers realized that this was an opportunity to teach the public what a terrible operation this and all dog fighting is, and in turn they worked to redefine what makes a dog adoptable. Eight organizations worked with these dogs and all but one dog was adopted into loving and responsible homes. “The dogs were seen as victims, not irreparably damaged… all animals, even from a fighting background, should be treated as individuals.” Dog fighting continues to be a problem in certain parts of the county and it has been a felony in all fifty states only since 2008.

The news from England is always interesting and thanks to my British friend she sends me dog articles along with news about the Royals. The headline in the Daily Mall says, “Just Dandie! Litter of five pups boosts breed that’s rarer than the giant panda.” What breed it that? The Dandie Dinmont Terrier, appearing on the Kennel Club’s top ten list of vulnerable breeds. The article notes that “the average litter is three, four is lucky, so to have five is fantastic news.” The Kennel Club says, “The breed is rarer than the giant panda, whose numbers stood at 1,864 in the latest census in 2014. There are between 5,000 and 12,000 blue whales, and around 5,000 snow leopards.” Very interesting that a Dandie litter is compared to giant pandas and blue whales!

To all of you who will have a dog entered at the Westminster Kennel Club show, the best of luck to you. And for those of you who go to watch the show, I wish good seats, good weather, good times and, of course, beautiful dogs to watch.

Don’t forget to send us your ads and any suggestions for articles or interviews. AND we like to receive Letters to the Editor!

Muriel Lee • Editor Winter 2019

9


10

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

11


Kris Kibbee

The Three Dogs of Christmas I couldn’t have been but five or six that Christmas—still young enough to believe that a jolly man in a red suit could shimmy down a zillion chimneys in a single night just as implicitly as I believed that cooties could kill me in seconds flat. I remember that particular Eve before Christmas crisply, because it was the first white one I’d experienced in my young life. As I perched at my Grandmother’s elbow and watched the silvered cedars gleam outside her window, I knew I’d finally seen magic. She was a born storyteller . . . my Gran . . . and she often said that I was her favorite audience. At that age I was still ravenous with wonder and on the night question I saw a bit of it reflected back in her weathered green eyes. “Tonight I’m gonna tell you the story of the three dogs of Christmas!” she’d clucked after three sips on what I can only now suppose was a rather randy batch of eggnog.

I told her that “didn’t sound right.” Who’d ever heard of DOGS of Christmas … much less three of them? “It’s quite right,” was probably her way of telling me to hush if I wanted a story, but at five or six or whatever naïve age I was at the time, the art of subtly was pretty much lost on me. I remember coming back with some whinny business about Rudolph or Frosty the Snowman, but I’m glad she was too stubborn to listen. “Nope,” she’d said, “Rudolph and that silly lump of snow are a bunch of hair-brained

hooey. But there are indeed three dogs to every girl’s Christmas, and I mean to tell you about them right now.” Well, that’d shut me up. I recall a humph of some sort as she drew her nubby shawl close to herself and stared out at God spreading his icing all over her front lawn. “The First Dog of Christmas,” she’d said, “comes to a girl when she’s young. Mine was an Airedale, named Rusty. He was just a little scamp when Papa brought him home. Got him at the feed store, as I recall. Papa said that little pup just marched right up to him with this look that said he’d been waiting ages to come home.” I remember Gran grinning just then—the wrinkles around her eyes bunching up like ribbon candy as she went on, “Papa said he didn’t want a dog—too much of a pain. He’d swat me down every time I asked for one. But here he come up on my eighth birthday, holding that Rusty little pup, just beaming.” I must’ve beamed to match Great Grandpa, because Gran’s eyes got a nice twinkle as she watched me, watching her. Then she went on, “That pup—he followed me all over the farm. Up the hills and down the dales. He steadied me when I was ready to fall. He stood guard over me when the coyotes’d come up after the hens. He walked beside me on the dark paths and led me across the narrow logs, until I wasn’t afraid to cross them no more.” Gran’s eyes got soft as they faded back into memory and a lone tear broke from the ribbon candy and traced its way down her cheek. Her attention fell heavy on me, as all adults’ seemed to at that age, and even though I


didn’t fully understand why, I got this urge to cry along with her. “That was Rusty,” she’d said. “That was my first dog of Christmas— the dog of Christmas past.” As if he’d been listening from the other room, Gran’s old Skye Terrier, Toby, appeared about then, lugging a shaggy mop of grey hair that belied his old age. She smiled as he waddled in and crowed, “Ah, and so comes the second dog of Christmas!” Toby’d never been anything but cranky with me, and I made a proper fuss about him being any part of Christmas before Gran confessed that it wasn’t Toby, but rather a Skye Terrier my late Grandfather had given her shortly after they wed who was actually her second dog of Christmas.

Oh, and how she laughed. I remember Gran’s laugh—the kind that could rattle the dust right off the rafters. She giggled on, telling me how Murphy would, “eat toilet paper right off’a the roll,” and “pull our underthings out the doggie door into the yard, and then bring the filthy sticks and mess from outside, in!” “Sweet Jesus, how that dog tested me,” she’d drawled. “But I tell you what . . . he was loyal as the day is long. That little fella would’a laid down his life to save me. He would’a followed me to the ends of the earth until his paws were bloodied and worn down to bone.”

“The Second Dog of Christmas,” she’d explained, “is the present dog. He arrives when the girl is ready to learn to be a woman. And from the moment your Grandpa set little Murphy in my arms, I knew that dog was sent by the Lord himself to test me!”

©Melanie Feldges

Winter 2019

13


Three Dogs of Christmas

fair share herself, and she gave me that knowing smile—the one that always made me feel as if she had the world’s secrets tucked in her back pocket. “I see,” she’s said, with a wink that would’ve put Kris Kringle to shame. “Well, dog three . . . dog three is the dog of Christmases yet to come.” I perked. Any mention of a new dog was, is, and will always be, welcome news to my ears. I wanted to know the dog’s name. I wanted to know what color his hair was. I wanted to know if he liked squeaky toys or those furry ones that get their guts torn out and scattered all over the living room. I think Gran was on her third or fourth moonshineeggnog by now, and I recall her eyes falling on me as if I’d grown overnight. When she told me that Murphy’d, taught her, “how to tolerate a numbskull man and see his dog-gone goodness, rather than all his fool mistakes,” I made an uncomfortable wiggle beside her. My Mom’d swanned in about then, complete in gingham apron and a halo of flour around her temple. Her face fell softly on Grandma as she explained, “I think that’s probably it for story time tonight, honey.” I’m not sure who made a bigger fuss about that— me or Gran. And so Mom plopped down on the ottoman beside her mother with a promise to finish the story. “It’s the Three Dogs of Christmas,” I’d exclaimed, like I was suddenly hot-snot, or knowing about this secret story that I’d never heard of up until half an hour ago. “Ahh . . . ” Mom’d trailed. “So where were we?” I was quick to offer, “Dog three! Dog three!” only to glance over for confirmation from Gran and find her three sheets to the wind and snoring into what remained of her spiked eggnog. But, as one might suspect, Mom’d heard the story a

14

TerrierGroup.org

“I can’t say yet,” Mom confessed, “what Gran’s third dog’ll be. It’s out there waiting for her . . . probably after old Toby here makes his trek over the rainbow bridge. “ Then I recall Mom once again gazing gently upon my dozing Grandmother—breathing in time with the rise and fall of her fragile chest; smiling the kind of smile that tells you a person’s insides are warming. “Maybe a little Yorkie,” she’d said. “Maybe a soft, sweet little girl dog with paper-thin paws that won’t tear Grammys skin and a small round nose that looks like a lost button.” “A little dog?” I’d blurted, immediately picturing me dressing this poor thing up in Barbie clothes and forcing it into the hot pink baby stroller I’d been eyeing in the Sears toy catalog. “How little?” Mom . . . and I recall this as sweetly as the smell of Sunday’s wash drying on the line . . . Mom just stared at Grandma then. She stared right at her chest--at a little pocket in that crocheted shawl that was probably big enough to cradle a Yorkie pup—and she said, “Little enough to take up that spot in her hand where you’re Grandpa’s used to be. Little enough to tuck close to her heart, and make sure that it keeps beating strong for many Christmases to come.”


Winter 2019


TG

Deb Bednarek

Everyone Likes a Happy Ending Since I was 12 years old I’ve always owned at least one dog and all but one have been terriers. There’s just something about terriers’ quirky personalities that speaks to me. My first was a Welsh terrier and we started with another Welsh when we got married. Then we fell in love with Kerry Blue Terriers and, much as I like other breeds, Kerries became our passion. Their personalities and looks are so unique and each dog has added so much to our lives. Besides being such beautiful and fun loving dogs, the people we met and the experiences we had over the years involving them have been priceless. With our dogs, my husband Russ

and I participated in agility classes, the Chicago St. Patrick’s Day parade and Milwaukee’s Irishfest. We joined the Chicago Kerry Blue Terrier Club as well as the United State Kerry Blue Terrier Club, meeting many wonderful people and establishing several lifelong friendships. Reita and Craig Nicholson, of Kerrisel Kerries, bred two of our dogs and introduced us to the dog show world. Fortunately Russ enjoys dog grooming and soon became interested in showing. He showed our Raza boy and had fun finishing him while I started using these beautiful dogs as inspiration for much of my artwork. You can’t get too far into our house without seeing something “Kerry”, whether it’s my work, Melanie Feldges’s or many other Kerry inspired artists. Raza lived a wonderful life and passed away last summer at the age of 15. Every pet owner knows how devastating that loss is and how your home and heart become so empty and sad. While Russ had thoughts of travelling and not being tied down to a pet, all I could think about was getting another dog. After all, a house is not a home without one. One day last fall I was at work and received a text from Julee Manahan, a Kerry person I knew slightly through the Chicago club. She wanted to know if we would be interested in taking on an adult Kerry. My first thought was “no, I want a fat little puppy” but of course I asked for details. She replied that this 3 year old female was Bill McFadden’s. He got her from Croatia and had finished her but was having some difficulty finding the right home for her as a pet. Bill and his wife Taffe are well known and respected dog handlers in the dog

16

TerrierGroup.org


show world. He and his famous Kerry Blue Mick won the Westminster dog show right around the time we started going to dog shows. The Bill and Mick duo have been legendary in our house since then. My mind was whirling; how did Julee know we were without a dog and how was it possible we could get a dog from Bill, of all people? The pros and cons of taking on an adult dog ran through my head all day and I couldn’t wait to get home to discuss this with Russ. We really hadn’t talked about adopting an adult dog before this so I wasn’t sure how he would react or actually how I felt about it. All I knew is that a quality champion Kerry was possibly being offered to us and my enthusiasm for this prospect was growing. Maybe bypassing the puppy chewing and housebreaking and having a chance to get a dog under these circumstances could change Russ’ mind? It did!!! Surprisingly it didn’t take much to convince him. He told me to call Bill and I calmed my nerves down to do this. I quickly realized there was no need to be nervous; Bill is one of the nicest down to earth guys you’ll ever meet. We had a great conversation and when he said “Cindy is a real sweetheart and just needs her own people” my heart melted and I would’ve walked from Wisconsin to California to get her. Cindy flew to O’Hare airport and 4 of our friends were with us to greet her. We stood in the Delta airline cargo garage late that night and out of a crate walks this drop dead gorgeous Kerry Blue Terrier princess.

I’d been so excited about getting her that somehow I’d never asked Bill for a picture! So now not only were we getting a sweet dog who needed us as much as we needed her, she was stunning! One of our friends who was with us that night, Mark Langguth, kept saying “this dog just won the lottery” but I felt we were equal winners. Wow! Adopting an adult dog versus getting a puppy is very interesting. Most of us know the highs and lows of raising a pup. When you take on an adult dog, we found you need to look at everything from a different perspective. First of all, we now had a dog who is an adult yet has never really lived in a house. She’s been well taken care of but doesn’t know us or any expectations we may have. None of this was bad, just unique and sometimes unexpected. The first day or two she acted like a polite visitor, looking around carefully and not leaving the room unless we did. She fixated on the tv for the longest time and wasn’t real familiar with stairs, though she did act as if she could fly down them. She doesn’t, to this day, beg for human food! She’s the first dog we ever had who doesn’t like carrots! Walking on a leash for a stroll was not the same for her as running in a kennel or going around a show ring. Also, at first Cindy didn’t know she had to go outside to do her business and looked confused when we’d put her on a leash to do so. Fortunately we figured out she preferred being loose in her fenced in dog yard for that so that issue was quickly solved. It was so interesting and educational for us to watch her experience our everyday world and adjust. Puppies do that too but they’re

Winter 2019

17


Everyone Likes a Happy Ending

experiencing everything for the first time without prior experiences shaping their reactions. The adjusting and observing went both ways as we tried to figure out on our end what would make her most happy and secure and she tried to figure us out. There is no better way to develop a strong bond between you and your dog than this kind of observing and adjusting because trust and love develop along with the way as well. In the beginning, she stayed very close to us physically. She had a few separation anxiety issues about a month after arriving that we worked through. As the weeks grew into months, it was so heartwarming to watch Cindy’s personality blossom. It’s been so rewarding to see her confidence build. She has established her own routines, such as going upstairs after breakfast, where it’s quieter and she can be alone, for a morning nap and then coming to find you right before lunch for some outside running. She lets you know her preferred schedule as most dogs do. I have to say that this dog is the most expressive and affectionate dog I have ever owned. It didn’t take long for Cindy to stop being the polite visitor! She lets you know what she wants when she wants it and how she feels about everything in a very endearing way. She is a comic and catches on quickly, as has been the case with all of our Kerries. Everyone who meets Cindy comments on her interesting personality as well as her fabulous looks. She loves her toys like a puppy would and, when one of us has been gone

18

TerrierGroup.org

for a while and we are both home and settling down for the day, she’ll grab a toy and roll around on her back happy as can be. I’m pretty confident she is as happy as we are. This experience certainly opened my eyes to the advantage of taking on an adult dog. Cindy came to us at the age of 3 so hopefully we’ll have many more years with her. Many people go to rescue shelters and experience the joys of giving an adult dog a forever home as we now have. We could’ve gone that route. Even though we were involved in showing dogs for a while, I never thought of a dog handler as being an excellent resource for adult dog placement and still can’t believe we were so lucky to find this connection. I’d highly recommend that as an option for people looking for a pet if they’re familiar with the dog show world. Ask around and also check with dog clubs. Bill and Taffe made sure that Cindy was well socialized with other dogs and very well taken care of. Bill may not have had Cindy living as a pet in his house but he knew what she needed. These are pluses that shelter dogs usually don’t have unfortunately. Our thanks goes out to Julee for initiating the connection to Bill. She started this improbable story and let us work it out. Our thanks also goes out to Bill and Taffe for trusting us with this sweetheart. Cindy’s new life as a part of our family continues to unfold and this is a happy ending for everyone!


Winter 2019

19


TerrierGroup Interview by Theresa Nesbitt

INTERVIEW WITH Best in Show Judge at MCKC, David J. Kirkland TN: You have judged all of the big shows. How would you characterize Montgomery County weekend in comparison? Some people love it and others hate it. What’s your perspective? DK: I started in the dog fancy with Miniature Schnauzers and attended Montgomery County weekend every year as an exhibitor. It was the most anticipated weekend in my dog show calendar. Montgomery itself is so rich in tradition, and I have so many fond memories of past shows. It’s the greatest Terrier show on earth, a must for any serious competitor or aspiring judge, and a place to see sizeable Terrier entries of the highest quality. I was humbled and honored to be asked to judge the group.

TN: There are lots of specialties at this show. How do you think it affects (or affected) the terrier group BOB winners on Sunday? DK: My understanding is that the specialty clubs pick their own judges. Since it is their specialty show, this is how it should be. It was also a special day for the breed judges. They arrived at their breed decisions based on their interpretation of the standard and their experience in the dog fancy. My job was to evaluate the dogs that entered the group and I was certainly thrilled with my top four choices. As a continuation, I guess there are often “surprises” when top ranked terriers are not in the ring, but there can be surprises at any dog show and Montgomery is no different. This is part of the

20

TerrierGroup.org

sport of competition. We must remember that a top-ranked dog still needs to earn its win. No extra passes are given. One of the wonderful things about Montgomery is the possible discovery of a new great one who makes your heart beat fast with excitement and you think, perhaps this one will fulfill its promise and become a future top-ranked dog.

TN: What makes the terrier group different than other groups? What makes a terrier a terrier? DK: All seven groups have their own distinctiveness. The character of the Terrier is what sets it apart. It’s their indomitable spirit, always alert and attentive, keenly aware of their surroundings, standing their ground but ever ready to jump into action. A Terrier on tiptoes of anticipation is a beautiful sight for any Terrier enthusiast!

TN: I noticed, and was particularly impressed, by your breed specific examinations. To me that is an indication of a judge that is judging the dogs against their standard rather than against each other. Can you tell me some of your thought processes of how you go over the dogs? DK: Every judge, no matter what the breed, must judge to the written breed standard. The examination is the time to check for things that you can’t easily see - the desired characteristics that make this breed different from other breeds, and the qualities that enable this breed to perform its original function. In the Terrier Group some examples are the loose hide of the Border, the


antique features of the Glen, the spannable chest of the Parson, Border and Russell. Breed-specific examinations must be the rule rather than the exception. One of the ways an exhibitor can tell if the judge is knowledgeable is how they examine their dog.

TN: I have heard that the “enemy of type” is the generic dog and “that form follows function.” Terriers have different jobs and many of them wouldn’t need the impressive tremendous reach and drive (unless they are all-rounders that herd like the Kerry Blues and the Wheatens.) Geographically, they have terrains that have shaped them. Can you talk a little about what you look for in typey movement? DK: I don’t believe any of the Terrier breeds should have “tremendous reach and drive.” Let’s omit the word “tremendous.” Terriers should have reach and drive in movement appropriate for their breed. Movement of each breed is dictated by its structure and is also tied to type. The light springy gait of the Bedlington immediately comes to mind. The movement of any of the Terriers must be free and unrestricted. Anything else would prohibit them from performing their job.

TN: Do you think when it comes to terriers you have something that you are known for, like looking for coat quality or expression, or do you consider all things equally? DK: There are traits that are difficult for me to accept in a Terrier e.g. bad bites, poor temperaments, poor tail carriage, bad feet

and poor coat quality. All of these are untypical of a Terrier and would not be beneficial to their original function. Expression is also important in a Terrier. Light eyes or incorrectly carried ears certainly can ruin it.

TN: Do you think there is a general statement you could make about how the group has improved or declined in the past 20 years that you have been judging them? DK: There are great Terriers now and there were great Terriers in the past. I do believe that breed quality can cycle through the years though. A breed can be strong and then suffer a setback for any number of reasons. I’ve seen it happen. I can immediately think of two things that have changed. Entries are so much lower now. Many of the breeds in the group require labor-intensive grooming. This takes time and dedication to learn. I am so grateful to those who have accepted the challenge. Also, I am concerned that some of the low entry breeds may eventually become extinct due to a lack of interest and a limited gene pool. Kudos to those breeders who are working hard to preserve these special Terrier breeds! Thanks for the opportunity to share my thoughts! David J. Kirkland And Terriergroup thanks Theresa Nesbitt for this thoughtful interview with Judge Kirkland.

Winter 2019

21


Olga Frolicz

The Greatest Terrier Show in Pictures Montgomery County Kennel Club

22

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

23


MCKC in Pictures

24

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

25


MCKC in Pictures

26 TerrierGroup.org 26 TerrierGroup.org


TG

Dr. Theresa Nesbitt MD

2019 Montgomery County Kennel Club Wrap Up As summer drew to a close, I started to think about what to wear for the weekend. I always hope for the best and plan for the worst because you never know whether you’ll be soaked, sweaty or freezing. And some years it’s all three over the weekend. But, like the pony express, “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night” stop breeders, handlers and terrier aficionados from all over the world from making the trek to compete at this historic cluster. It’s an exceptionally grueling endeavor with three large all-breed shows preceding the main event at three different show grounds, but it’s always worth the effort. This is not only an opportunity to see over a thousand impeccably turned out terriers, it’s a hubbub of humans meeting up with friends, fellow breeders and exhibitors - people that they may only see once a year. The many national specialties held during the exciting week provide an opportunity for education, club activities and an incredible display of talented terriers competing not only in the conformation ring but also in performance events.

Wednesday in Wrightsville was a sweltering 94 degrees making it feel more like Hotboro than Hatboro. But in typical Montgomery fashion, the next four days would bring in a range of temperatures, precipitation and wind gusts to keep the shows “exciting.” It’s not just weather conditions that differ, but perspectives about this show vary appreciably. Perceptions have always interested me - I’ve always loved the Indian fable about the six blind men and the elephant. Each individual describes an elephant based on their particular perspective - the man feeling the tail thinks an elephant is like a rope while another feels the ear and describes the pudgy pachyderm as a fan. So, I thought it would be interesting to get perspectives from a variety of people winners, losers, newbies, veterans, exhibitors and observers, as they all have something to add to the big picture. Probably no one understands perspective better than a photographer and I was fortunate to be able to speak to the very talented Diana Han. Diana and her partner, Shelli Petrali of NorCal Bulldoggers, are known for their ability to capture special moments of dogs and handlers and then post the proofs on Facebook - it’s the next best thing to being there. Diana first photographed Montgomery in 2015 and swore she would never return, but when I saw her this year she was supercharged with anticipation. I asked her how her perspective had changed over the past few years. “The reason why I vowed never to come back is that just like any breed/group, it takes a while before people accept you for what you are and what you offer. As hard as I worked in 2015, I got

28

TerrierGroup.org


numerous messages about how terrible my photos were and that I didn’t understand Terriers. And I truly didn’t. I admitted it then and I admit it now. But just like any other Breed/Group, through perseverance and helpful people teaching me the importance of the breeds (level topline, tails erect, ears facing forward, and so on) slowly people accepted my work, and I began to enjoy it more. As the years went on, I became more confident in what to look for and, more importantly, what to photograph. To have the opportunity to teach it to Shelli, who has never been to a dog show before this June, and for her to pick up on Terrier characteristics through her own photography, is how I feel I’ve come full circle. I’m not done learning yet, but I sure as hope my photos continue to get better as the learning goes on.” As terrier numbers dwindle at the all-breed shows, a chance to see so many terriers is enough to stir even those who have been coming for decades. Desi Murphy has been attending Montgomery regularly for over 50 years and it’s always fun to ask him about a dog that has caught his eye. This year the “one to die for” was a young Dandie Dinmont Terrier from Bangkok. I’ve often heard that the Terrier Group is at least partly a grooming competition. For many of the exhibitors and handlers Montgomery is like Fashion Week in New York — a great time to check out new trims and techniques. But to groomer extraordinaire, Rebecca Cross, Montgomery is more like the Superbowl. Months before the big day, training camp means choosing likely prospects and making sure there is adequate time to get each one in superb coat and condition. Yet after all the hard work and preparation, the excitement is always combined with the inevitable sense of dread about the unpredictable weather and dealing with disasters, like rivers of mud and the white Westies. In a matter of minutes, “Project Runway” can turn into “Survivor.” According to Rebecca it’s the sense that everyone else is in the same boat and that keeps the frustration controllable.

One of my favorite moments of the cluster is watching the terrier group at Hatboro 1 as it sets the tone for the mix of old favorites and exciting newcomers. Anything can happen and it often does with all the specialties going on, and sometimes the top winners don’t make it out of the breed ring. The winning terrier for Hatboro 1 was GChB Ch Kallehan Super Power, a dark and dramatic Kerry Blue Terrier with explosive presence. Handler Stuart McGraw did an impressive job channeling Bosco’s fiery energy into an “on his toes” terrier attitude. Stuart has been an ardent fan of the breed since his days with Bill McFadden and the iconic “Mick.” The terrier entry is so wide and deep at the Montgomery cluster, Stuart told me, that winning that group was more exhilarating than a best in show win. Bosco also won a Terrier group\second at the Devon show. I enjoyed talking with Ed Thomason. He traveled a long way, from Spokane, but he can’t imagine missing what he considers to be the show of shows. I vividly remember watching Ed win Bred-ByExhibitor BIS in 2017 with his American Staffordshire Terrier puppy “Pancho” (GCHG Alpine’s Lbk Living On The Road). Pancho has indeed followed through on his promising start as he was the only Terrier to place all four days of the cluster, including a group one win at the Devon show. From Ed Thomason’s perspective that kind of consistency is a tremendous honor to a breeder and a breeding program. Although the groups are exciting, you don’t get over a thousand terriers in one place without having some real competition in the breed rings. Most of the breeds have specialties that not only draw breeders and exhibitors together for the shows, but also for club activities, award ceremonies, some special competitions and of course, socializing. I spoke with Jan Parcel, who has been breeding and showing West Highland White Terriers for over 40 years, and from her perspective there is nothing comparable to Montgomery to get a feel for

Winter 2019

29


TG

how your breed is doing. There are many special events, but one that is near and dear to a breeder’s heart is the Futurity - Maturity. Futurities require a series of nominations and fees starting after a bitch has been bred, nomination of the litter after it is whelped, and/or nomination of individual puppies. It’s a chance to see how well a breeder is able to make their dreams a reality and it requires substantial commitment to make events like this possible. A special show like Montgomery attracts its share of observers as well as exhibitors. Many “dog people” have a favorite show, and for professional handler and breeder, Kaileigh Gonzalez, that show is Montgomery. Although she is known more for her spaniels and hounds, Kaileigh’s love of the fancy came from traveling with her grandmother and her Miniature Schnauzers to dog shows. Attending her first Montgomery at age 12 was like a right of passage. She makes the annual autumnal trek to Pennsylvania whether or not she has a terrier to show and she has never regretted it. They say that Disney is where dreams happen. Still, for one very special “dream team,” all the magic happened this year in Bluebell, Pennsylvania, on the 90th anniversary of the Montgomery Kennel ClubTerrier Show. It was a dream long in the making and a team that has lasted longer than many marriages. For over 20 years, breeder Keith Bailey and professional handler Tracy Szaras have campaigned many top winning Welsh Terriers. The dream finally became a reality when “Dazzle”, GCh. Ch. Brightluck Money Talks, owned by Keith and Janet McBrien (Brightluck), after winning best of breed for all four days and Terrier group first on Hatboro Day 2, took the ultimate prize, the holy grail of terrierdom, with best in show at Montgomery under the highly respected judge Mr. David Kirkland. What a tremendous tribute to the power of dedication to a breed.

30

TerrierGroup.org

I’m grateful for these perspectives because, without them, I would not be able to appreciate something that has become my passion. It’s been almost ten years since my first Montgomery, and I still remember how completely overwhelmed I felt the first year. I couldn’t even identify all the breeds - forget about evaluating quality. The fall cluster was my first big show with my first show dog. I didn’t know a point from a pointer, and after four days, I was sure I would never go to a dog show again much less attempt another Montgomery. But each year I learn and change and appreciate so much more. It’s about thousands of small moments, things I could never have understood without taking the time and making an effort to learn and grow. So that’s the “big picture” of my changing perspective. But there was also a single magical moment that I will always remember as “that Montgomery moment.” I had perhaps the best seat in the house, directly in front of the table with a great view of Judge David Kirkland’s excellent breed-specific examinations. I was aware that the individual breed standards, which once seemed overwhelming and arbitrary, became purposeful and obvious under his proficient and practiced hands. I noticed that the misty haze turned first to drizzle and then to a steady rain. From the parade of stunning terriers, Judge Kirkland made his cut. He put them through their paces again and then he walked over to his winner and extended his hand. The smile that spread across Tracy Szaras’ face was so infectious that it was as if she shared her absolute joy with all of us. That smile was sunshine on a cloudy day. Her smile said it was worth the wait, that some wins are just more special than others. The winning dog might be named Dazzle, but that memorable, magical smile was befittingly dazzling.


2019 MCKC Wrap Up

Winter 2019

31


TG

Congratulations • AIREDALE TERRIER CH TNC'S GONE WITH THE WIN OF SINGING HILLS.

• AMERICAN STAFFORDSHIRE TERRIER GCH ALPINE'S LBK LIVING ON THE ROAD DS TKN CGC

• AUSTRALIAN TERRIER GCHB SAMABEL SILVER BULLET.

• BEDLINGTON TERRIER GCHS LAMZ A SONG OF ICE & FIRE AT SILVERWOOD CGC

• BORDER TERRIER GCHB FIRELANDS HAWKEYE

• BULL TERRIER (COLORED) GCHB MADCAP JUMP OVER THE MOON CGC TKI AXP OJP

• BULL TERRIER (WHITE) GCHS AMAIZE SUPERNOVA

• CAIRN TERRIER GCHS TUJAY'S N HAMPTON COURTS IS A BELLE OF THE BALL

• CESKY TERRIER GCHB NORKINSTEIN BAVARIA

• DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER GCH VON MASER'S HARPER LADY OF THE LAKE

• FOX TERRIER (SMOOTH) CH HIGH MTN RED RED WINE!

• FOX TERRIER (WIRE) CH HAMPTON COURT'S MACHIDA

• GLEN OF IMAAL TERRIER GCHB ABBERANN LAMENT FOR OWEN ROE

• IRISH TERRIER GCHS ROCKLEDGE MR MURPHY OF MEATH

• KERRY BLUE TERRIER GCHB GAELGORM SHADES OF DARKNESS 32

TerrierGroup.org

MCKC Winners! • LAKELAND TERRIER CH ELLENSIDE RED IKE AT ESKWYRE

• MINIATURE BULL TERRIER CH RHINESTONE TOO HOT TO HANDLE AT BRILLIANT

• MINIATURE SCHNAUZER CH MINUTEMAN COLDER WEATHER

• NORFOLK TERRIER CH JUSLYN CHOPTANK DREAM ON TENTERRA

• NORWICH TERRIER PARADYM COOL YOUR JETS

• PARSON RUSSELL TERRIER GCHS HIGHLAND DOWNS HELLTOUPEE

• RAT TERRIER  CHG RIVER RIDGE'S LEVEL OF INTRIGUE FDC G MX MXJ MJS NJP XF T2B TKN

• RUSSELL TERRIER GCH ALL JACKS BE SPECIAL

• SCOTTISH TERRIER GCHP WOBURN BARBARY IRON MAN

• SEALYHAM TERRIER CH GOODSPICE MISS EMMA OF SALT CREEK

• SKYE TERRIER  CH DECRUX IN MONTANA BOHEMIA COKO G CGC TKI

• SOFT COATED WHEATEN TERRIER GCHB DOUBLOON'S EXTREME GAMER

• STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER CH BALLYHOO ALL ON BLACK DCAT CGC TKN

• WELSH TERRIER GCH BRIGHTLUCK MONEY TALKS

• WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIER GCH TULLYBLOOM'S JUST RIGHT


Winter 2019

33


Stacy McWilliams

Life with a Rat Terrier...

Rat Terriers are considered a quintessential breed that is very versatile. A few words that best describe a Rat Terrier would be intelligent, loyal, extremely attentive, successful, multi-tasked, driven and tenacious. The physical characteristics are, for their size, great strength, stamina and agility. This breed, moderate in size, excels in agility and is breaking into the conformation ring even though it is still considered a relatively new breed in the American Kennel Club. It is recommended if looking for a Rat Terrier that you purchase your dog from a reputable breeder who does heath testing. The Rat Terrier breed, in general, does have health conditions which should be of concern, so please make sure that you are purchasing a Rat Terrier from a reputable breeder who has fully health tested the parents. Visit the Rat Terrier Club of America and the American Kennel Club sites for more information about the breed. www.akc.org www.ratterrierclubofamerica.org The Rat Terrier became fully recognized by the American Kennel Club in June of 2013. A truly “made in America� breed, the Rat Terrier is a moderate, multipurpose companion terrier bred to rid the farm of rodents above ground and to course small game. Fearlessly tenacious and alert, the Rat Terrier has keen eye sight and a very strong hunting drive that is prized by farmers for its working ability and service to the farm. 1n the early 1900’s farmers had use only for those animals that could contribute to the operation of the farm and cared little for anything more than a serviceable sized dog with hunting proficiency. Color and markings were immaterial. The breed quickly became known as a multipurpose performer and a versatile companion. A sturdy dog, the Rat Terrier should give the impression of a fit, wellmuscled yet elegant dog that can cover ground efficiently and confidently. The stance, build, strength and expression should leave no doubt that the Rat Terrier would excel at extinguishing rodents.

34

TerrierGroup.org


Over the years the easy-going nature and quick intelligence of this versatile breed brought families and exhibitors to the Rat Terrier. The Rat Terrier today has become the quintessential breed, which many are looking to for both the show and performance ring. As a result, the size and temperament have become an important part of a breeders program. Predicting size in a breed with such a wide range is never easy. In 2014 the breed was invited to the Westminster Kennel Club show for the first time. From farm dog to the big city the breed took to the show ring with one of the largest terrier entries that year. At long last the rare breed was making headway into the American Kennel Club’s terrier lineup! Today, the rat terrier remains a favorite of rural people everywhere, but it is also an ideal family dog that is just as much at home in the house as on the farm. Their small size makes them economical to feed and kennel, and their short hair makes then less messy than many shedding breeds. They are among the friendliest of terriers, making them excellent pets for children. A growing child couldn’t ask for a better, more loyal friend than a rat terrier. And while they may be tenacious when on the trail of a rat, at home they are just as comfortable snuggling next to you on the couch for a long winter nap. Outside the home, we get to see another side of the rat terrier. Those unfamiliar with the breed are quick to notice its keen intelligence and eye-popping athleticism. These two traits—along with exceptional bravery—are indispensable for a dog that makes its living dispatching ground quarry. The athleticism and intelligence of the rat terrier can also be found on display in a simple game of fetch. There are few things more enjoyable than watching a “rattie” race across an open field, leap high in the air after a ball, and then return it with a huge grin on its face. When looking at the Rat Terrier there is a wide range of sizes allowed within the standard. Dogs and bitches must be at least 10 inches at the withers and must not exceed 18 inches. No matter what height the breeder

chooses to exhibit the breed standard is still the same for a 10” to 18” dog. When looking at substance they should have moderate bone in proportion to size. The Rat Terrier should be a well-balanced, hard-muscled dog with smooth lines under taut skin. This dog should not be rangy nor fine boned, toyish, and never bulky or coarse. They are shown in good, hard physical working condition. Rat Terriers are a diversified breed when it comes to colors. Intense shade of color with clearly defined and delineated coloration is preferred. White on the body is to be between 10% and 90% of the dog. A solid color dog with no white is a disqualification in the show ring. The Rat Terrier has also made many statements in the performance venues with incredible talent and speed. Many sport dog owners are looking to the rat terrier for their biddability, strength, stamina, speed and brains. Aesthetically, the rat terrier is among the most pleasing of dogs in the world. Rat terriers are structurally balanced with a well-defined, expressive face. They are sturdy, but not bulky or cumbersome. In many ways, the rat terrier is a study in artistic balance, a combination of chiseled musculature and effortless grace. Such traits lend themselves naturally to the show ring where they have been a fixture in the United Kennel Club show ring for some time and now in American Kennel Club.

Winter 2019

35


Muriel Lee

A Look at Books

John T. Marvin Collection Published by Howell Book Housee, New York

John T. Marvin was a well-known AKC judge, as well as a popular writer of the Scottish terrier breeds. John and his wife, Bertha Slade German, raised Wire Fox Terriers under the kennel name Cranbourne. He wrote the following books on the Cairn Terrier, the Scottish Terrier and the West Highland Terrier in the 1970s and all were published by Howell Book House, New York. The revised books were written in the 1980s. • The Complete Cairn Terrier and The Revised Cairn Terrier

• The Complete Scottish Terrier and The Revised Scottish Terrier

• The Complete West Highland Terrier and The Revised West Highland Terrier

• The Books of All Terriers and The Revised Book of All Terriers.

He also wrote and had printed in England, A Study of the Fox Terrier. This was a private printing of 500 copies. In addition to his writing John was also an avid collector of photographs of dogs, major dog events and the family life of dogs, covering a period of 150 years. A year before his death, in 1988, these photographs were donated to the American Kennel Club library where they have been catalogued and are available to the public. He was approved to judge all terriers in 1949, judged the group at Westminster Kennel Club four times and was an AKC delegate representing the West Highland

36

TerrierGroup.org

White Terrier club for 21 years. He was also on the Eastern Trial Board of the AKC from 1970 to 1985. John and his wife made a yearly trip to England at the time of the Windsor dog show, around the fourth of July, where John scoured the bookstores and other venues looking for books and prints. Although his prints went to the AKC library. I found his books on sale at the Devon dog show the year after his death, and found it sad to see a collection, that took years to build, being sold piece-meal at an outdoor show. The above books are all available on the internet at reasonable prices, except A Study of the Fox Terrier, which sells for around $150. When buying the Complete books, be sure to watch for the condition of the book. These have been popular books and well used over the years. And they still are a great addition to any library.


Winter 2019

37


Muriel Lee

A DOG MAN OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY – CAPTAIN WILL JUDY For those of us who have been around for decades the name Will Judy is familiar, but for those of you who are younger to the world of dogs, Will Judy may not be known. Will Judy was born in Garrett, PA in 1891, attended local Juniata College graduating in 1911 he earned a degree in law, In 1917 he joined the U. S. Army, became a captain within two years and was awarded the Silver Star “for gallantry in action against an enemy of the U. S.” Upon release from the army he moved to Chicago. In 1923 he purchased Dog World magazine, which was about to go out of business, for $1200, whereupon his world in dogs started and he never looked back. Americans were becoming aware that the role of the dog was no longer to serve as a guard dog, the farm dog, or the run-about-theneighborhood dog. They were beginning to see that the dog could become a member of the family, not just a mutt running around having puppies under the front porch. Judy saw this coming and saw the potential for him to turn Dog World into a successful trade magazine that would be of help to this new type of dog owner/ breeder. Judy was smart, had a way

38

TerrierGroup.org

with words, and he planned to educate the new dog owner about their family pets. He would show the world that he wanted to improve the life of the dog, as he advocated the benefits of good dog breeding and good dog ownership. In 1945 Dog World sold for 35cents a copy and you could buy it on the newsstand or have it delivered to your home. It consisted of dog news, articles and breed advertising. I recall that when I bought my first purebred dog I found it through an ad in the magazine. Dog World was simply a must if you were active in dogs, if wanted to know more about a certain breed, or if you wanted to sell your purebred puppies. However, not only could Judy write with a flair, but he was eager to hire other dog writers who had similar interests. Maxwell Riddle, well known judge and newspaper man, and William W. Denlinger, who wrote many breed specific books, both were writers for the magazine. Dog World was on the market for forty years and old copies can be purchased on the internet. Judy travelled the world and wrote about his travels and the dog shows he attended and judged. Not only that, he was pleased to act as a somewhat travel agent in his writings, mentioning to readers where to go, where to eat and he even noted his favorite cocktail: “Bourbon straight, a 3-ounce portion – no ice.” Sounds like a James Bond of the dog world! He was also very active in obedience and believed that every dog, not only deserved a good life, but should be obedient and act like a gentleman, whether in the household or outside. He was a strong supporter of dogs in the military and remained so throughout his life.


A style of his writing from The Dog Encylopedia

Illustration from Judy’s book, Don’t Call a Man a Dog, 1949

He was a founder of the Dog Writer’s Association of America and he was also founder, in 1928, of National Dog Week, a week devoted to dogs and their lives, which is now a one day event in October. In 1936 Will Judy received the Ellie Sheets Memorial Trophy as the Outstanding Personage in the Dog World, and in 1949 he was named Man of the Year by Gaines Dog Food. In 1973 Will Judy and died and was buried in his beloved city of Chicago.

FoxTerrier: The Fox Terrier is decidedly popular. His size is in his favor, particularly in modern city apartments. He is much dog in small compass. Afraid of nothing, he is everlastingly out for adventure. He is an ideal watchdog, hearing the faintest sound. He is a good vermin chaser, being death to rats. He is always the spirit of youth for he never tires of play. He is cocky, saucy, impertinent, mischievous, gay and delightfully annoying.” Another description: French Bulldog: One must learn to like the Frenchie just as one learned to like olives…” A photo shows a Frenchie, celebrating his second birthday. The Frenchie, is dressed, of course, sitting in front of a cake with two candles.

The DWAA noted: “…I think his greatest legacy was the way in which he enlightened a new generation about the spiritual and emotional bond that existed between humans and dogs. Long before it was “fashionable” or widely acknowledged: Judy understood the potential for dogs as healers. He encouraged VA hospitals to include dogs in helping veterans to recover and promoted them as guide dogs for the blind. July also understood that the caring for dogs developed strong character in young people.” Books by Will Judy that are available.

• Dog Encyclopedia, 1936, Judy Publishing Company, 1936. • Care of the Dog, Judy Publishing Co., 1948 • Handy Dog Booklets, first published in 1934, the 1955 edition noted that 30,000 copies had been printed to date. Sources: Dog’s Best Friend by Lisa Begin-Kruysman, Dog Writer’s Association of America and the Internet Winter 2019

39


40

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

41


TerrierGroup Interview

INTERVIEW WITH

Rosalind Kramer, AKC JUDGE Roz has been an AKC judge since 2005 and judges the Terriers, Toy, Hound groups and the Poodles. Roz lives in Charlottesville, VA with her husband Andrew, who also judges the terrier group. TG: What breed of dog did you grow up with and how was that breed selected? RK: Wire Fox Terriers!!!!!! As a kid, we looked in the want ads in the Minneapolis Star and Tribune Sunday paper for AKC Fox Terriers.

TG: Tell us about your first contact with the world of show dogs. RK: The breeder of our dog suggested we could get his championship, so she trimmed and then taught me how to strip the dog. We went to training

classes held by the Minneapolis Kennel Club, taught by John Sheehan and Muriel Lee, and they taught me how to show a dog. From there my mother and I went to our first dog shows at Green Bay and Fond du Lac, WI. I won, and was hooked!

TG: In your early years you went to work for a well-known handler. How did that come about and what did you learn? RK: My mother and I bought a bitch from George Ward and a few years later he had an opening for kennel help, so I applied and went to work for him. I learned everything from proper trimming and animal husbandry, to client relationships and business practices.

TG: What followed next in your life? Didn’t you do some work for the American Kennel Club and for the Grand Hotel on Mackinaw Island? RK: After I stopped handling I went to work for my Westie/Wire Fox clients, Dan and Amelia Musser, at Grand Hotel. Although I did not think I was “qualified” to work in the hospitality industry— Dan said, “Yes you are—it’s all common sense!” I started from the bottom and learned various departments and eventually worked my way up to Convention and Sales Manager. I was with Grand Hotel seven years and then had a call from the American Kennel Club so went to work for them as an Executive Field Representative and Head of Judges Education. I worked at dog shows as a Rep, but also worked in the office during the week, working on Judges Education as well as complaints about judges, helping judges and answering their questions etc.….

2011 Westminster Kennel Club Wire Fox Terrier Best of Breed: CH Steele Your Heart. Owner/Breeder: Tori Steele and Maryann Roma • Handler Gabriel Rangel.

42

TerrierGroup.org

TG: When did you first apply for judging and what interested you in judging dogs? You now judge Terriers, Hounds, Toys and Poodles. Do you eventually plan to apply for more groups?


RK: Dogs had been my life and I wanted to continue in the sport, showing and breeding my own dogs. I thought it might be fun to judge dogs, so thought I would try judging. Eventually I would like to apply for one more group and a few breeds that I really love, but I have absolutely no aspirations to be an all-rounder.

TG: What interests you about judging and what has been your favorite show to judge? RK: I enjoy the challenge of sorting through the classes/specials, and trying to compare each dog against the standard. AND - it can be quite challenging at times! My favorite show to judge was best in show at Montgomery County. It is a Terrier Enthusiasts dream of a lifetime to judge best in show there. Judging a breed at Westminster is an honor as

2011 Westminster Kennel Club Airedale Terrier Best of Breed: GCH Sherwood’s King Arthur. Owner/Breeder: Lisa and Scott Bryan. Co-bred by Pamela Macomber and Kenneth Cook. Handler: Jenny Wornall-Rangel

well. My second favorite, which is also an honor, was judging the Terrier Group at Westminster.

TG: How do you see the state of the terrier in the 21st century? RK: Terriers, as a whole, are not in good shape right now. I think the Bull breeds are in better shape than they ever have been and they are quite magnificent. There are pockets of various terrier breeds across the countries that are good, but in general the terrier group is at a low ebb. I find that “groups” go up and down quality-wise, like tides. A few years ago the toy group was absolutely magnificent no matter where in the country you went. Today, it is good, but not as good as a few years ago.

Unfortunately, we have lost our great terrier breeders over time—combined with the advocacy and marketing forces of animal activists, we are slowly being diminished. We all need to band together and bring new people into our sport, in a positive environment that encourages breeding and showing. We need better marketing for ourselves!

2014 Montgomery County Kennel Club Best in Brace Miniature Schnauzers, Ch. Gangway’s Mission Descent and GCh. Gangway’s Mission Countdown. The pair of sisters were shown by co-owner and co-breeder Mary Jo Larsen.

Winter 2019

43


44

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

45


Muriel Lee

WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB – TERRIER FACTS FROM 1907 TO 2019

The following has been taken from THE DOG SHOW: 125 YEARS OF WESTMINSTER by William F. Stifel. Of all the groups, terriers have had the greatest number of best in shows, followed by the sporting group.

1907 Smooth Fox Terrier • Ch. Warren Remedy

1917 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Conejo Wycollar Boy

Perfect of its kind.” Homebred and and owner/handled.”

“The most perfect dog.”

1908 Smooth Fox Terrier • Ch. Warren Remedy

1918 Bull Terrier • Ch. Haymarket Faultless

“An excellent animal that had become better”

“The crowd went wild.”

1909 Smooth Fox Terrier • Ch. Warren Remedy

1919 Airedale Terrier • Ch. Briergate Bright Beauty

Third win in succession, never repeated.

1910 Smooth Fox Terrier • Ch. Sabine Rarebit American bred. Decision was well received.

1911 Scottish Terrier • Ch. Tickle-Em-Jock A rags-to- riches story – Englilsh bred.

1912 Airedale Terrier • Ch. Kenmore Sorceress

“She got a warm reception.”

1920 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Conejo Wycollar Boy A second win! “Swamped with congratulations!”

1922 Airedale Terrier • Ch. Boxwood Barkentine “First, last, and best of all!”

Welsh bred. Exhibited by owner who judged WKC ten times.

1924 Sealyham Terrier • Ch. Barberry Bootlegger

1915 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Marford Vic

1926 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Signal Circuit of Halleston

Englilsh bred. Kennel mate took reserve BIS.

1916 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Matford Vic “One of the best that ever stood on four legs”

“As though trotting through a pasture!”

English bred, shown by Percy Roberts

1927 Sealyham Terrier • Ch. Pinegrade Perfection English bred, shown by Percy Roberts

46

TerrierGroup.org


1928 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Talavera Margaret

1967 Scottish Terrier • Ch. Bardene Bingo

“Margaret had never looked better”

UK bred, “He is a great dog.” P. Roberts

1930 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Pendley Calling of Blarney

1968 Lakeland Terrier • Ch. Stingray of Derryabah

“Received with great applause”

UK bred, Peter Green’s first WKC win

1931 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Pendley Calling of Blarney

1969 Skye Terrier • Ch. Glamoor Good News

Defeated 167 wires and 48 Smooths.

1933 Airedale Terrier • Ch. Warland Protector of Shelterock Judge Geraldine Dodge

1934 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Flornell Spicy Bit of Halleston UK bred, shown by Percy Roberts

1936 Sealyham • Ch. St. Margaret Magnificent of Clairedale UK bred, shown by L. Brumby

1937 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Flornell Spicypiece of Halleston UK bred, shown by Percy Roberts

1942 West Highland White • Ch. Wolvey Pattern of Edgerstoune UK bred, “of notable ancestry”

1944 Welsh Terrier • Ch. Flornell Rare-Bit of Twin Ponds UK bred, “left nothing to be desired”

1945 Scottish Terrier • Ch. Shielling’s Signature Owner, breeder, handler. “a superb showman.”

1946 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Hetherington Model Rhythm “She showed like a queen”

1948 Bedlington Terrier • Ch. Rock Ridge Night Rocket His victory was well accepted by all

1950 Scottish Terrier • Ch. Walsing Winning Trick of Edgerstoune UK bred, winner of M & E

1962 West Highland White • Ch. Elfinbrook Simon

“She practically knew what she was there for.”

1976 Lakeland Terrier • Ch. Jo Ni’s Red Baron “He was all confidence and quality.”

1977 Sealyham Terrier • Ch. Dersade Bobby’s Girl Peter Green’s second win

1985 Scottish Terrier • Ch. BraeBurn’s Close Encounter “She’s the perfect Scottie bitch.”

1992 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Registry’s Lonesome Dove “Close enough to Perfect for Me.”

The following taken from the internet 1994 Norwich Terrier • Ch. Chidley Willum The Conqueror 1995 Scottish Terrier • Ch. Gaelforce Popstscript 1998 Norwich Terrier • Ch. Firewood Frolic 2003 Kerry Blue Terrier • Ch. Forums Scarf Michael 2006 Colored Bull Terrier • Ch. Rocky Top’s Sundanced Kid 2010 Scottish Terrier • Ch. Roundtown Mercedes of Maryscot 2014 Wire Fox Terrier • GCh. Afterall Painting The Sky 2019 Wire Fox Terrier • GChB. Ch Kingarthur Van Foliny Home

“A little white sprakling meteor.”

1965 Scottish Terrier • Ch. Carmichaels Fanfare “Honest all the way”

1966 Wire Fox Terrier • Ch. Zeloy Mooremaides Magic

The Wire Fox Terriers are the winningest coming up with 12 bests in show and the Scottish Terrier follows with six wins.

UK bred, “A real sample of the F.T. Winter 2019

47


NEXT ADVERTISING DEADLINE February 20th Publishing March 25th Contact Reita at reita@terriergroup.org The Only Terrier Magazine

www.terriergroup.org

www.terriergroup.org TerrierGroup Headquarters TerrierGroup 7013 Clarendon Hills Rd. Darien, IL 60561 For Deliveries TerrierGroup 7013 Clarendon Hills Rd. Darien, IL 60561 Article Submissions Muriel Lee, Editor 7204 Perry Court West Minneapolis, MN 55429 Phone: 763.566.6795 murabiy@terriergroup.org

48

TerrierGroup.org

Subscriptions by Mail TerrierGroup 7013 Clarendon Hills Rd. Darien, IL 60561 melanie@terriergroup.org Annual Cost Online subscription - NC Printed subscription USA - $80.00 International - $100.00 Publisher Melanie Feldges 630-220-9743 Advertising Sales Reita@terriergroup.org

TerrierGroup Publication Volume 5 Number 1 Winter 2019 Editor Muriel Lee • Editor muriel@terriergroup.org Designer/Illustrator Melanie Feldges melanie@terriergroup.org Special Contributors Dr. Barbara Gibson Ph,D Olga Forlicz Kris Kibbee Muriel Lee Jo Ann Frier-Murza Dr. Theresa Nesbitt MD adinfo@terriergroup.org


Winter 2019

49


TG

Sharon M. Albright, DVM, CCRT Manager of Communications & Veterinary Outreach AKC Canine Health Foundation

Personalized Medicine for Dogs

• Would your dog benefit from targeted health treatment and prevention plans tailored to their own unique physiology? • Would you like to work with your dog’s veterinary team to determine the most effective medical treatments with the highest safety margins? Personalized medicine, also known as precision medicine, is poised to do just that. The field of personalized medicine is flourishing in human and veterinary healthcare and the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) and its donors are funding research to advance the health of all dogs, on a personal level. CHF-funded researchers recently published a review article in Human Genetics1 summarizing the presence and impact of known genetic variations affecting drug metabolism in dogs. They also discussed precision medicine in canine cancer treatment and offered considerations for canine pharmacogenetics 50

TerrierGroup.org

testing. While veterinarians have long known about breed sensitivities to various drugs, improvements in genetic technologies mean that we can now more fully study the spectrum of genes that may be involved in an individual animal’s drug response. These pharmacogenomic studies can improve our understanding of why and how individuals respond to drugs differently – either with toxicity or a failure to respond – in dogs and humans. Some examples of pharmacogenomic research benefitting dogs discussed in this review include:

MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE The multiple drug resistance, or MDR1, gene mutation has been called the single most very important pharmacogene’ (VIP) in dogs. A specific mutation results in a nonfunctional P-glycoprotein transporter protein. Since transporter proteins function to move substances out of the body or away from sensitive tissues, a decrease in their function alters the safety and efficacy of drugs in affected patients.


The MDR1 mutation is relatively common and has been described in herding breeds, sighthounds, numerous mixed breed dogs, and other breeds. Affected dogs show extreme sensitivity to drugs such as the commonly used parasiticide ivermectin, chemotherapy drugs such as vincristine and doxorubicin, and others. Thanks to important research on this mutation, it is now standard practice in veterinary medicine to test for the MDR1 mutation prior to using P-glycoprotein transported drugs in dogs.

SIGHTHOUNDS AND ANESTHESIA Genetic mutations that alter the function of Cytochrome P450 enzymes are suspected to contribute to the prolonged recovery seen in sighthounds (particularly Greyhounds) after administration of injectable anesthetics such as thiopental and propofol. Cytochrome P450 enzymes are located primarily in the liver and intestinal mucosa and are critical for drug metabolism and elimination in dogs and people. Genetic mutations that affect these enzymes result in great variation in an individual’s ability to metabolize certain drugs. With grants awarded by AKC Canine Health Foundation, studies on this topic are underway. Grant 02242: Understanding the Genetics of Adverse Drug Reactions in Sighthounds allowed Washington State University researchers to identify two mutations in sighthounds and Border Collies that decrease drug metabolism in vitro (such as in a test tube or culture dish). Their research continues, with CHF Grant 02529, as the investigators work to prove that these mutations affect drug metabolism in dogs. Results will hopefully lead to a drug sensitivity test to identify affected dogs and guide the safe use of drugs in these veterinary patients.

PRECISION MEDICINE FOR CANINE CANCER Precision medicine research for canine cancer takes a different approach. Instead of looking for genetic mutations that predict adverse drug reactions, these studies identify mutations in tumor DNA that are not present in the host DNA and can therefore be used as treatment targets.

An example of precision cancer medicine in dogs is the treatment of mast cell tumors with the drug toceranib (PalladiaÂŽ). Toceranib is a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and dogs with mast cell tumors containing a specific c-kit gene mutation are more likely to respond to this drug compared to those without the mutation. Mast cell tumor prognostic panels which test for this c-kit mutation and others are now available. Additional research, such as the study funded by CHF Grant 01426: Personalized Medicine for the Treatment of Canine Mast Cell Tumors, may also help determine the best treatment options for dogs affected by mast cell tumor. Researchers are also developing a diagnostic tool that may rapidly describe the mutational profile of canine lymphoma with funding from CHF Grant 02502: Precision Medicine for Canine Lymphoma. They are exploring mutations in canine lymphoma biopsy samples to guide selection of the most effective treatments and determine if such mutational profiles predict clinical outcome.

IMPROVING THE TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR YOUR DOG As genetic studies continue to improve our understanding of individual variations in drug response in dogs, scientists continue to urge caution. Pharmacogenetics is a relatively new field in veterinary medicine and results must be interpreted by a veterinarian with adequate training in clinical pharmacology and genomics. CHF remains committed to funding studies with the highest scientific standards that have the greatest potential to advance the health of dogs. Research that improves our understanding of how an individual dog will respond to a particular drug or that identifies the best treatment for a dog with a specific illness means a continued shift toward personalized veterinary medicine. CHF and its donors are working together so that all dogs can live longer, healthier lives.

Learn more about AKC Canine Health Foundation funded research at akcchf.org. 1. Mealey, K.L., Martinez, S.E., Villarino, N.F. et al. (2019) Personalized Medicine: Going to the Dogs? Hum Genet, 138: 467. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00439-019-02020-w

Winter 2019

51


Dr. Barbara A Gibson Ph.D

Fun with your Terrier in Entry-level Dog Sports

Our terriers were bred to do a job. And though they may no longer be needed or afforded the opportunity to do that job they still have a strong “work ethic” where they need to be challenged and stimulated, both physically and mentally. Otherwise, we can discover how quickly their “work ethic” gets directed to more destructive pursuits think goodbye flower garden!. There are many activities and sports that you can do with your terrier that will not only meet their working drive for a purpose, but also strengthen the bond between you and your terrier. Some of the sports, like agility or even earthdog, take special equipment or training. For agility the time investment to train can be extensive, and unless you find a club who offers classes near you the equipment can be very pricey. Moreover, the space you need to practice in can be very large, depending upon what obstacles you are training with. For earthdog exercises, while the hunting instinct is ingrained in our terriers, how AKC wants our terriers to “work” may be different from their natural instinct. For example, some terriers were bred to stare at the prey and then kill once the prey bolted out of their den or hiding place. This “death stare” is not considered “working” by AKC. Moreover, some breeds are rightfully more cautious about entering tunnels, thus exceed the maximum time that is allowed. Very few clubs offer practices, and those that do are sparse across the country, thus being able to practice and train your terrier to meet AKC rules may, on occasion, prove to be challenging. But there are multiple other options for sports you can do with your dog, which they will greatly enjoy and these can easily be taught in your home or in a small yard with a low investment. In addition, there are a few AKC sports that truly require no training and simply test your breed’s instinct to give chase.

52

TerrierGroup.org

Fast CAT and Coursing Coursing Ability Tests (CAT) and Fast CATs afford your terrier the opportunity to fully enjoy their instinct to chase. CATs has been around for close to ten years, though Fast CAT has been an AKC sport for less than five years. Both sports test your dog’s natural instinct to give chase. That’s it. No real training is required. You just let your dog go at the start line and watch him give chase to a lure! And since these are tests, dogs do not compete against each other like they do in other sports, such as agility. Thus they earn either a pass or a fail score. What’s the difference between the two sports? CATs have a longer distance associated with them. Each dog runs individually and chases after an artificial lure where the course is either 300 or 600 yards long. The exact distance your dog has to run depends on your dog’s height. Besides competing the expected course distance, dogs must finish in less than 1 ½ and 2 minutes, depending on the expected length of the course they have to run. These maximum times may seem short, but they are not difficult to achieve as long as your dog runs (not walks) after the lure. The basic CAT title (which is the CA) requires only three passes. The CAA title requires 10 passes, while the CAX is achieved once your dog has 25 passes. A Fast CAT is a timed 100-yard sprint for your dog while chasing a lure. Dogs running Fast CATs run one at a time, and they are timed as they run the course. Based on course time, their speed in MPH is calculated, and based on your dog’s height, a handicap multiplier is applied to the MPH number to calculate speed points. The basic title is BCAT, which is earned when your dog has accrued 150 speed points. Additional titles which can be earned in Fast CAT are DCAT (500 speed points) and FCAT (1000 speed points).

AKC Scent Work Besides playing chase games, our terriers love to sniff! AKC Scent Work is a sport that let’s your dog have a good time while they enjoy sniffing to their heart’s content. In dog sports, such as agility, you as the handler is in control, but this isn’t true in scent


work since you must rely on your dog’s keen sense of smell. Scent work is based on the work of professional detection dogs which have to recognize different scents under diverse situations and environments. This concept is simplified in scent work – instead of the smells sought by detection dogs, dogs search for cotton swabs that have the smell of either birch, anise, clove or cypress. The handler does not know where the target odor is hidden, so he must rely on his canine partner can make the call to the judge. It is definitely a teamwork sport. Compared to CAT and Fast CAT, this sport takes some practice and shaping of your terrier’s natural sniffing skills. But there are several good training videos online and minimal supplies are needed: the essential oil you wish to train with, cotton swabs and miscellaneous containers. No expensive equipment is needed and you can train in your home, yard, garage or even your local hardware store. I definitely recommend a search on YouTube for “scent work” to see how much fun competing in this sport can be for both you and your terrier.

Sergeant Stubby

AKC Rally

(1916 or 1917–April 4, 1926)

I like to think of AKC Rally as a hybrid of obedience and trick dog. It is a way to show off your dog’s talents and the teamwork between the two of you. In AKC Rally, you and your dog work as a team to navigate a course of “tricks”, containing between 10 to 20 different signs describing the task you and your dog must complete. Each of these signs provides instructions regarding the next skill that is to be performed. Rally is a timed sport, but time is not the primary goal: rather it is working as a team while performing the tasks in order and as described by the sign at each station on the course. As a team, you earn a score up to 100 points, with 70 being a passing score. Each level requires three qualifying scores for a title, except for the Master and RAE titles, which require 10 passing scores. You can also earn a championship in rally. AKC Rally is another sport that you can easily practice in your home, yard or park. The signs describing the “tricks” to learn at each level of rally can be downloaded for free off the AKC website. Like scent work, there are also helpful videos demonstrating how to perform each sign. It does take more effort to train your terrier for rally, but it helps to create a closer bond between you and your terrier since rally is more a team sport than the others described in this article. There are many sports you can play with your terriers nowadays, but there are options that do not require as intensive training or too specialized equipment. Another plus is if you do conformation, many of the sports mentioned in this article are done in conjunction with conformation shows. Regardless what sport you decide to try with your terrier, giving them an outlet to burn off physical and mental energy is a win-win situation!

Sergeant Stubby was the most decorated war dog of World War I and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat. America’s first war dog, Stubby, served 18 months ‘over there’ and participated in seventeen battles on the Western Front. He saved his regiment from surprise mustard gas attacks, found and comforted the wounded, and even once caught a German spy by the seat of his pants (holding him there till American Soldiers found him).

JJJJJ Winter 2019

53


Jo Ann Frier-Murza

Title Statistics for AKC and AKC-Recognized Hunting and Working Terrier Breeds

There are so many things to do with terriers and, of course, a terrier is always willing to try something new and exciting. Keeping active helps them channel their natural behaviors into games and activities that encourage their in-born strengths. Companion dogs can enjoy the novelty of getting a trick dog title, a therapy dog title, or a more complex title in obedience, rally or agility. The mental stimulation of learning new exercises and showing them off at home, in demonstrations, in service or just as a Canine Good Citizen are great for the dogs, their owners and for the public’s appreciation of a good dog. Some of our terrier breeds have some hunting skills bred into them that can be tapped by more field oriented sports, like AKC Earthdog tests (four titles), AKC Hunt tests (four titles), AKC recognized BHA (barn hunt - eight titles), AKC Tracking (five titles), or the newest—AKC Scent Work (32 titles)! Most of 54

TerrierGroup.org

our terrier breeds developed while living and working on farms, so the AKC Herding program, farm dog certification, is the perfect demonstration of a terrier’s ability to be polite and respectful in the farm environment. The AKC even offers a title for Search and Rescue, although none of our spectacularly adapted terriers have earned one yet. Annual statistics are available from the AKC web site in the spring following the new year. A close look shows that terriers with hunting and working origins (excluding the bull breeds) show their stuff in those stats for 2018. Here is a chart showing the titles earned in five hunting, searching and working venues. Most of the breeds are represented by some titles in at least one of these sports, and the lack of titles for some breeds assuredly represents dogs that didn’t get a chance to try. When terriers face a challenge, especially in their own world of hunting and scenting, they will dominate!


Terrier Breed

Earthdog/ Hunt Test

Barn Hunt Farm Dog Tracking Scent Work

Total titles

Airedale

N/E ed HT 2

18

9

2

46

77

Australian

0

4

2

1

9

16

Bedlington

5

6

0

0

4

15

Border

90

60

24

5

192

372

Cairn

9

10

13

0

62

94

Cesky

0

0

0

0

0

0

Dandie Dinmont

0

1

0

0

2

3

Fox Terrier (Smooth)

9

9

0

0

27

45

Fox Terrier (Wire)

3

23

2

1

24

53

Glen of Imaal

1

10

6

0

9

26

Irish

N/E

6

0

0

0

6

Jagdterrier (FSS)

2

0

0

0

0

2

Kerry Blue

N/E

6

9

0

0

15

Lakeland

4

10

10

0

32

56

Manchester (Standard)

0

0

0

2

18

20

Miniature Schnauzer

4

29

15

0

76

124

Norfolk

9

15

0

0

77

101

Norwich

0

4

4

0

30

38

Parson Russell

9

17

4

0

96

126

Rat

2

5

10

0

60

77

Russell

11

16

9

2

40

78

Scottish

4

8

3

0

47

62

Sealyham

1

3

0

0

1

5

Skye

0

0

0

0

0

0

Soft Coated Wheaten

N/E

19

3

0

37

59

Welsh

6

6

2

0

5

19

West Highland White

19

33

16

6

123

197

Teddy Roosevelt (Misc.)

N/E

0

0

0

5

5

N/E=Not Eligible

Winter 2019

55


56

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

57


TerrierGroup STATS The ONLY All Terrier Magazine

Reach thousands of Terrier fanciers throughout the world by advertising in the award-winning magazine - TerrierGroup! The digital magazine is emailed to AKC Terrier judges, handlers and online subscribers. Hard copy is also mailed to print subscribers and advertisers. Each issue is featured on our website at www.terriergroup.org and on our Facebook page reaching the maximum number of readers. TG’s Facebook page, which has over 3000 followers, will also showcase the current issue’s ads in a separate post ensuring the most coverage and exposure. The price of an ad includes ad design and a copy of TerrierGroup. Additional copies are available for purchase. To place an ad, please contact Reita reita@terriergroup.org adinfo@terriergroup.org We are fortunate to have a passionate

•Lifetime Stats are generated from Issuus.com

58

TerrierGroup.org

team of well respected professionals who consistently provide readers with insightful articles focused on this particular group of dogs. Articles on health and wellness, nutrition, conformation and performance, training, art, rescue, travel and judges and breeder interviews are in each issue. Deadline and Publishing WINTER: Deadline October 30th Publishing December 5th SPRING: Deadline February 20th Publishing March 25th SUMMER: Deadline May10th  Publishing June 5th FALL: Deadline August 20th Publishing September 20th

www.terriergroup.org The ONLY all terrier magazine!


Winter 2019

59


The ONLY all Terrier Magazine

TerrierGroup Advertising Rate Sheet Spring Issue • Publishing March 25th!

PREMIUM POSITIONS COLOR ONLY

REGULAR POSITIONS

Front Cover - 1 inside page

2 page spread

$275

$650

Inside front spread

375

1 page

175

Inside back spread

350

Juniors

90

Back Cover

425

Non-profit (Clubs)

60

Business Card

100 (4 issues)

TG is sent online to all terrier judges Ad design is included in the price of an ad. Advertisers get a printed magazine too!

Deadline: Spring - February 20th Extension for WKC ads available

Reita@terriergroup.org adinfo@terriergroup.org

SUBSCRIPTIONS Online subscription - No Charge Printed subscription - $80.00 USA International - $100.00 Single copies are also available for $20.00. melanie@terriergroup.org

CONTACTS: ADVERTISING Reita Nicholson • Reita@terriergroup.org adinfo@terriergroup.org Muriel Lee • Editor: Muriel@terriergroup.org Melanie Feldges • Design: Melanie@terriergroup.org

AD SUBMISSION SPECS Images must be submitted as a photograph or 300 dpi digital image. TerrierGroup will inform you if the quality of the pictures will result in a poor quality ad. Accepted formats: EPS, PDF, TIFF, JPG. Typed or emailed copy is best, and all copy to appear on the ad must be sent at the same time. Any additions or modifications must include all of the desired copy.

60

TerrierGroup.org

Advertisers will receive a PDF proof of the ad. There are limited opportunities for revisions to the proof. Payment must be made upon reservation of the ad space. Preferred placements are on a first-come, first-granted basis. Send advertising materials and payments: TerrierGroup 7013 Clarendon Hills Rd. Darien IL 60561 PLEASE CHECK FOR COVER AVAILABILITY BEFORE SENDING PAYMENT. WE HAVE PAYPAL TG is read online by over 11,000 people!

www.terriergroup.org


Winter 2019

61


62

TerrierGroup.org


Winter 2019

63


Profile for TerrierGroup

TerrierGroup V5N1 Winter 2019  

Welcome to the Winter issue of TerrierGroup, the ONLY all-terrier magazine. This issue is full of great articles and some amazing terriers.

TerrierGroup V5N1 Winter 2019  

Welcome to the Winter issue of TerrierGroup, the ONLY all-terrier magazine. This issue is full of great articles and some amazing terriers.