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CONTACT Teresa B. Coates, AIA 880 New Jersey Avenue SE, Apt 704 Washington, DC 20003 405.513.4682 tcoates.ma@gmail.com http://issuu.com/tericoates/docs/portfolio


personal

experience 2017-Present

Teresa B. Coates, AIA, NCARB Registered Architect | MA, DC, OK NCARB Certificate #87111

CANVAS ARCHITECTURE WASHINGTON, DC Owner | Architect Founder of CANVAS, an architecture and development firm focused on mixed-use, multi-family housing and commercial projects.

2016-2017

PGN ARCHITECTS WASHINGTON, DC Studio Director | Project Manager Director of studio operations and project manager for mixed-use, multi-family housing projects in Washington, DC.

2015-2016

BERGMEYER ASSOCIATES, INC. BOSTON, MA Senior Job Captain | Project Manager Managed design and production of various museum, retail, commercial, hospitality, adaptive re-use and building repositioning projects in Massachusetts and New York.

2014-2015

BUTZER GARDNER ARCHITECTS OKLAHOMA CITY, OK Intern Architect | Project Manager Developed design and managed production of various urban infill projects including multi-family housing, hospitality, education, corporate, adaptive re-use, retail, restaurants, mixed-use and urban design/planning.

2011-2014

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE OKLAHOMA CITY, OK Intern Architect | Project Manager Project manager or co-manager for varying scale renovations, additions and new construction projects up to $75 million.

2008-2011

BOCKUS PAYNE ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS OKLAHOMA CITY, OK Intern Architect Assisted in managing client and consultant relationships from conceptual design through construction documents for projects in corporate, healthcare, higher education and retail sectors.

2007

PAGE SOUTHERLAND PAGE HOUSTON, TX Student Intern Aided leaders in various firm departments to improve firm management, project production, presentations and marketing.

education 2011-2014

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA NORMAN, OK Master of Architecture, May 2014. Student Ambassador, Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society in Architecture and Allied Arts Awarded for Distinction in Architecture.

2004-2008

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY COLLEGE STATION, TX Bachelor of Environmental Design. Best All-Around Design awarded by executives of HKS Dallas and SWA Group.

affiliations

Registered Architect – Massachusetts, District of Columbia and Oklahoma American Institute of Architects (AIA) AIA | DC Emerging Architects Committee & Health and Wellbeing Committee Young Real Estate Emerging Professionals (YREP), DC Chapter National Council of Architectural Registration Boards – Certificate holder

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CIVIC / GOVERNMENT 2012-2014 2011-2014

2007

CORPORATE / COMMERCIAL 2014 2014 2011-2014 2011-2012 2008-2011

2008-2011 2008-2011 2007 HEALTHCARE 2011 2008

MASTER PLANNING 2014

RETAIL / MIXED-USE 2015-2016 2015-2016 2014 2014 2013-2014 2010

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Select Project Experience Oklahoma Board of Engineers Building and Parking Lot Renovation Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality Interior Remodel - 5th Floor Window Retrofit Restroom Renovation (11 Floors) Houston Police Department Property Room

Oklahoma City, OK

Center for Economic Development Law - Renovation & Remodel SandRidge Energy Field Offices and Shops Enid - Addition Alva - New Construction First Mortgage Headquarters - Renovation & Addition Chaparral Energy - Interior Remodel MidFirst Bank New Bank Branch Locations Main & Flood 8th & Lincoln (Oklahoma Blood Institute) 33rd & Broadway 61st & Lewis 111th & Elm 101st & Elm 61st & Lynn Lane Chickasha MidFirst Bank - Remodel & Renovation MidFirst Bank - Corporate Office Space Planning and Remodel MD Anderson Corporate Offices - New Corporate Building

Oklahoma City, OK

Stillwater Medical Center, Surgery Center - Addition & Remodel Destination Healthcare: A Sustainable Resort and Hospital (Design Research Project - Not Built)

Frisco Road Retail Development - Consulting Preliminary Design Research & Survey

Corning Museum of Glass - Glass Market Renovation 2 Liberty Square - Adaptive Reuse, Feasibility Study Main Street Arcade - Adaptive Reuse, Mixed-Use Facility Midtown Service Center - Adaptive Reuse, Mixed-Use Facility The SHOPS and LOFTS at Gordon Greene - Mixed-Use Facility (Thesis Research Project - Not Built) Red Coyote Running Store @ Classen Curve - Tenant Build-out

Oklahoma City, OK

Houston, TX

Enid, OK Alva, OK Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Norman, OK Oklahoma City, OK Edmond, OK Tulsa, OK Broken Arrow, OK Broken Arrow, OK Tulsa, OK Chickasha, OK Woodward, OK Oklahoma City, OK Houston, TX

Stillwater, OK Dubai, UAE

Yukon, OK

Corning, NY Boston, MA Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Louisville, KY Oklahoma City, OK


*Projects in bold are featured in portfolio

HIGHER EDUCATION 2014 2012-2013 2010 2010 2009 2007

HOUSING / HOSPITALITY 2016-2017 2015-2016 2015 2015 2014 2014 2011-2013 2010 2009 2007

RELIGIOUS / FAITH-BASED 2013-2014

SPORTS / RECREATION 2011 2008

TENANT IMPROVEMENT 2011-2014 2012 2011 2010-2011 2008-2011

Southwest Covenant School - New Elementary School Gould Hall New Facilities - New Graduate Facility CoA (Graduate Research Project - Not Built) Francis Tuttle - Renovation OU Health Sciences Center Services Center - Preliminary Design OU International Programs Center - Interior Renovation U of H Brazos Hall - New Facilities

Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Norman, OK Sugarland, TX

T Street - Multi-family Housing, Mixed-use Ames Boston Hotel - Renovation Page Woodson Building B - Affordable Multi-family Housing Military Residence - Custom Single Family Home Sycamore Square New Build - Multi-family Housing Facility Sheraton Hotel - Public & Amenity Space Renovations OU Headington Hall (Sooner Center) - Athletic Housing Facility Caraway Cabana - Home Addition Campbell Commons - Multi-family Housing, Mixed-Use Acoma - Residential Tower, Multi-family Housing

Washington, DC Boston, MA Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Norman, OK Oklahoma City, OK Edmond, OK Denver, CO

Bridgeway Church - Master Plan and Programming Renovation + Addition

Oklahoma City, OK

OSU Indoor Practice Facility - Athletic Sports Practice Facility Isaiah’s Place - 40 Acre Master Plan & Equestrian Facility serving the hearing impaired (Design Research Project - Not Built)

Waterford Properties Paychex @ Waterford - Tenant Build-out Wiggin Properties - Remodel BancFirst - Remodel and Renovation Northwest & South Bank Branches MidFirst Bank - Renovation and Expansion of Coporate Offices Rockwell, 3 Grand and 2 Grand Bank Branches

Yukon, OK Norman, OK

Stillwater, OK Whitney, TX

Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK Oklahoma City, OK

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PROFESSIONAL 6


Ames Boston Hotel | 08

Two Liberty Square | 14 Corning Museum of Glass | 20

Sycamore Square | 24 Headington Hall | 30

First Mortgage | 40 MidFirst Bank | 46

WORK 7


AMES BOSTON HOTEL Boston, Massachusetts SCOPE

OWNER ARCHITECT OF RECORD DESIGNER OWNER’S PROJECT MANAGER SIZE BUDGET

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Ames, a Romanesque Revival structure, was constructed in 1887-1889 to serve as the headquarters for the Ames Agricultural Tool Company. Reaching 15 floors and 196 feet tall, it was considered the tallest masonry skyscraper upon completion. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 and designated as a City of Boston Landmark in 1993. Since that time, Ames has been restored to function as a luxury boutique hotel. Commissioned by new ownership, Bergmeyer Associates stepped into the role of Architect of Record to conduct extensive renovations and improvements throughout the building. The underlying goal in re-desiging the space is to improve the guest experience and remain competative with other local boutique hotels. Ames Investor, LLC Bergmeyer Associates, Inc Glen and Company Stys Hospitality 102,000 SF Undisclosed


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MY ROLE PROJECT MANAGEMENT

During the course of this project, I oversaw the staffing needs, schedule, and fee utilization in addition to orchestrating the successful completion of the project phases. As the scope of work grew and need arose for additional services, I composed ASRs for the owner’s review and approval.

DUE DILIGENCE

In order to understand the historic preservation, accessibility, code and structural implications for the building, we began by conducting building evaluations and due diligence. Leading a team of consultants and design professionals, I was able to provide the client with feedback regarding the building and renovation implications. This valuable information served to inform their decisions as the project progressed.

FEASIBILITY STUDIES

The owner had a desire to correct design flaws from previous renovations and to generate revenue from underutilized spaces within the building. In order for the client to better understand potential improvement opportunities, I administered multiple feasibility studies associated with acoustics, structural infill and hotel operations.

PRE-DESIGN SERVICES

As preliminary design commenced, I directed a team to conduct an existing conditions survey of the hotel, including all 114 guestrooms. This information proved valuable in the design, documentation and construction phases.

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

Working hand-in-hand with the owner’s project manager, I kept the client informed about preservation, code, accessibility and structural implications of the interior design team’s proposed solutions.

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS AND PERMITTING

I directed both internal and external team members through the production of construction documents, specifications and applications as required for construction and permitting.

CITY APPROVALS

The various proposed improvements to this building required review and approval by the local authorities having jurisdiction including the Massachusetts Architectural Access Board, the Boston Landmarks Commission, and the Boston Redevelopment Authority. I successfully received the approvals and variances required to proceed with the building improvements through facilitating due diligence, managing consultants, initiating and leading design review meetings with the city, submitting applications and presenting at a public hearing.

PRE-CONSTRUCTION

Working with the contractor and owner’s project manager, we determined staging and phasing necessary to keep the hotel in operation throughout the renovation. I provided associated documentation and specifications as needed for successful implementation of temporary (acoustic) partitions, signage, fire protection, egress, wayfinding and accessibility as required during phasing.

CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION

Since construction commenced after my relocation to Washington, D.C., I used the month prior to onboard the susequent project manager.

NOTE: Design renderings shown on opposite page are a product of the NYC inteior design team.

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LOCUS PLAN AMES BOSTON HOTEL 1 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MA

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PERSPECTIVE

ELEVATION

PAST

PRESENT


PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS RETRACTABLE AWNING The addition of a retractable awning will aid in protection from the elements while improving the sense of human scale at the ground oor. SIGN RE-WORK In order to identify the new restaurant while minimizing alteration of the historic fascade, we proposed utilization of the existing sign and replacing the 3D letters in-kind. BI-FOLD WINDOWS/DOORS The addition of bi-fold doors provide the opportunity to increase the restaurant’s connection with the outdoors while still maintaining the existing aesthetic.

BUILDING REPOSITIONING Occupying a prominent corner in downtown Boston, the Ames Boston Hotel has been ripe for investment opportunity. Over the years it became home to various bars and restaurants bringing a sense of vitality to the ground-floor and the adjacent Washington Plaza. After only a few years of under-utilization, the effects on the patio and the plaza were evident. In order to bring a new sense of life and vitality to the hotel, changes needed to be made, not only from the inside-out, but also from the outside-in. The time was right to bring the patio and plaza back to life.

BLC APPROVALS Due to the historic nature of the building, any improvements visible from the exterior require prior approval from the Boston Landmarks Commission. The applicable exterior changes for this project included operable windows and doors, retractable awnings and sign re-work. The commission approved our proposed upgrades and relayed their enthusiasm to see further improvements to the area.

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TWO LIBERTY SQUARE Boston, Massachusetts

OWNER

The WINHALL Companies

ARCHITECT

Bergmeyer Associates, Inc

SIZE BUDGET

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5,000 SF Undisclosed


SCOPE

The WINHALL Companies is a commercial real estate management and development company in Boston, Massachusetts. As Boston’s downtown continues to undergo renovation and infill, The WINHALL Companies have a desire to respond to the changing market needs. As property manager for Two Liberty Square, they decided to explore improvement opportunities at the ground-floor to create a viable location for a retail tenant.

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GROUND FLOOR RE-POSITIONING FEASIBILITY STUDY AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT

EASE OF ACCESS VISIBILITY • Create new, visible, and easily-accessible • Replace highly-reflective glass with clear entrance(s) glazing while maintaining existing historic • Lower a portion of the existing structure and storefront slab to align with the current sidewalk • Re-configure basement utilities and access to accomodate for lowered slab

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ACESSIBILITY SCALE BRANDING • Incorporate handicap lift or • Introduce elements to • Signage opportunities ramp as required at new main create a more human entrance scale at the street level

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MY ROLE PROJECT MANAGEMENT During the course of this project, I oversaw the design and production process. Managing a talented team of external consultants and design professionals, we conducted necessary due diligence and feasibility studies. I worked directly with the client to establish necessary deliverables, review research findings, determine next-steps and present design possibilities to actualize WINHALL’s development goals.

DUE DILIGENCE In order to understand the historic preservation, accessibility, code and structural implications for the desired building improvements, we conducted building evaluations and due diligence. I directed a team of professional consultants, to conduct the necessary research and provide reports for the client to highlight such implications for the project.

FEASIBILITY STUDY Knowing the challenges at hand, we studied various solutions for the desired building-repositioning endeavor. After presenting various solutions to the client, we reached a design solution that met their goals for the building improvements.

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GLASS MARKET RENOVATION

CORNING MUSEUM OF GLASS Corning, New York SCOPE

OWNER ARCHITECT SIZE BUDGET

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The Corning Museum of Glass, founded in 1951, is dedicated to telling the story of the art, history, technology, science, craft and design of glass. Over the years, the facility has grown and established a name for itself in the architecture community. The Museum is home to an 11,000 square foot Glass Market retail gallery, visited by thousands of tourists and shoppers yearly. Corning Incorporated commissioned Bergmeyer to re-invent the Glass Market; to cultivate an experience for their shoppers commensurate with that of the museum. In addition to a complete renovation of the retail gallery (currently underway), Bergmeyer’s touch spills over into spaces throughout the facility to enhance wayfinding and the visitor experience.

Corning Incorporated Bergmeyer Associates, Inc 11,000 SF $1.2 million


GLASS MARKET - PROGRESS PHOTO

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

PRE-RENOVATION (FUTURE PHASES)

OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW In order to continue sales throughout the project, the Glass Market renovations will be completed in five phases. The image above, taken June 2016, shows evidence of the transformation taking place as Phase III construction is underway. The new retail gallery will introduce a clean, bright aesthetic, in keeping with the newest museum addition. The crisp, white, custom mobile fixtures against a muted back-drop and new lighting begin to highlight the glass displays in a compelling manner. Key issues such as lighting, line of sight, way-finding, increased capacity for lockable storage on the floor, custom and versatile displays and design consistancy are addressed in the new design. Implementation of these improvements aim to enhance the shopper experience and increase sales. MY ROLE • Champion the re-design efforts for phases three, four and five of the Glass Market. • Improve upon the design of several custom floor fixtures, perimiter wall fixtures and display hardware from the first two phases (prior to my involvement). • Conduct design review meetings with the client and design team. • Lead the production of revised design development and construction document packages for phases three, four and five. • Carry out construction administration for the renovation of the Glass Market and new custom (perimeter and floor) fixtures for phases three, four and five.

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PROGRESS PHOTOS - PHASE III

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AXONOMETRIC VIEW - CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS


PROGRESS PHOTOS - PHASE I

PARTIAL FLOOR PLANS (NTS) - CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

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SYCAMORE SQUARE Oklahoma City, Oklahoma SCOPE

Downtown Oklahoma City suffers from under-utilization of real estate, low density and large building setbacks. Over the years, the city has adopted form-based codes in order to improve walkability and maximize density within the urban core. This urban infill, multi-family housing facility will act as an extension to an existing apartment community. In order to activate the streetfront, the building is situated along the property line on land formerly occupied by surface parking and drive ways. The three to four-story building will be home to fifty-seven varying-size residential units located within walking distance of local businesses, restaurants, entertainment venues, healthcare facilities, essential service centers and public amenities.

OWNER

GFO Companies, Nimes Real Estate, Burnette Equity LLC

ARCHITECT

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Butzer Gardner Architects

SIZE

41,000 SF

BUDGET

$7 Million


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MASTER PLAN

Sycamore Square ‘New Build’ Existing Sycamore Square Civic Center Flats Alley Court Walk-up Unit Patios Parking Buffer Planters

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SITE PLANNING CONCEPTS The project addresses many important urban design factors. The building hugs the property line in order to activate the street-front and prioritize the comfort and convenience of pedestrians. Low planters will screen the adjacent existing parking lot and provide intermittent seating opportunities for passer-bys. Tree-lined boulevards with new onstreet parking will aim to slow traffic and provide protection for pedestrians. One challenge we had to address was how to appropriately connect the new building to the existing apartment complex. Our solution was to improve the alley between the existing Sycamore Square Apartments and Sycamore Square New Build in order to create useable public space for residents. Pervious paving and landscape planters will define pedestrian walk-ways while creating a privacy buffer for the existing apartments. Increased lighting will provide opportunity for improved safety and ambiance for social gatherings.

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4th Level

3rd Level

2nd Level

1st Level

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First Floor

Third Floor

Second Floor

Fourth Floor

MY ROLE The success of this facility requires thorough understanding of the developer’s goals, the project budget and the city’s downtown development requirements. In some cases, the goals and interests of the differing parties can be conflicting. Cooperation between the groups can be accomplished, but only through clear communication and setting realistic expectations. We began this process by looking at flexible ways to create building efficiency within the project. Working with various sizes of modular residential units, we created multiple floor plans and building design variations to provide the developer with numerous avenues through which to achieve maximimum efficiency and profit. The modular units aid in meeting the diverse needs of tenants while minimizing the cost and timeline needed for construction. Through ongoing collaboration between the developer, consultants, contractors, and downtown design review committee (DDRC) representatives I was able to provide critical information for feasibility studies and proforma analysis. In this process I gained a greater understanding of the teamwork necessary for successful urban infill projects. I made it my goal to ensure this level of cooperation and momentum remained intact throughout the design process.

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HEADINGTON HALL | Norman, Oklahoma SCOPE

OWNER ARCHITECT CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

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The athletic housing facilities at the University of Oklahoma were bursting at the seams and in great need of renovation. After considering several options, a decision was made to build a new facility that could adequately accommodate the growing student athlete population. This six story, LEED Certified [pending], on-campus housing facility combines live, study and play spaces and is now home to 384 students, of which fourty-nine percent are student athletes. A lower-level, retail bay activates the street-front while providing additional amenities and conveniences for the students and student-athletes. Levels two through five are comprised of two and four bedroom suites, each containing a living room and kitchen. Additional amenities include banquet halls, study rooms, conference rooms, a computer lab, game room, media room, living spaces, a dining facility and retail stores. University of Oklahoma STUDIO Architecture (Architect of Record) + Newman Architects FLINTCO, LLC.

SIZE

240,000 SF

BUDGET

$75 Million


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ARCHITECTURAL AESTHETIC In keeping with the Cherokee Gothic architectural style of the existing buildings on the University of Oklahoma’s campus, Headington Hall celebrates this traditional style while incorporating modern detailing, state of the art construction systems and sustainable technologies.

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MY ROLE This project, completed under a very tight timeline, required the collaboration and hard work of a dedicated team. Just after space planning, I was brought on to the team to conceptualize the interior architecture and design of the facility. Working in collaboration with the University’s architectural and design representatives, senior athletics administration and the President of the University, we received approval on all proposed designs. I then oversaw a team of peers to efficiently develop and complete the required documents for construction. In response to the short timeline, I developed innovative coding and scheduling mechanisms that could seamlessly respond to inevitable owner or value engineering changes. The Revit consultant working with us at the time now uses this innovative scheduling approach on all new projects at his architecture and engineering firm. SITE PLAN

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INTERIOR DESIGN + ARCHITECTURE This project presented unique design challenges. In addition to the short timeline, there are many differing aesthetic preferences to which we needed to appease through the interior architecture and design. The donors and alumni raising money to build the facility prefer a more traditional look and feel while the students and young athletes living in the space prefer a more modern and progressive approach to design. Throughout the building, we were able to appeal to both parties through the use of varying textures, vibrant colors, soft lighting, traditional architectural elements and dynamic forms.

FIXTURES, FURNITURE + EQUIPMENT In addition to directing the interior architecture and design,I had the opportunity to conduct the selection,approval, purchase and delivery of a $4 million fixtures, furniture, and equipment package. Outfitting the 240,000 square foot facility required thorough planning, organization, attention to detail and innovation. Each piece of furniture in the building needed to accomodate for the varying weight and size of the athletes as well as non-athlete students. A demo sample obtained from the manufacturer allowed the current athletes to provide feedback on each product’s durability and comfort before final selection. The high-quality, custom furniture throughout the facility appeals to varying aesthetic tastes and employs durable construction, comfort and flexibility.

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Club Room - Sixth Floor

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FIRST MORTGAGE | Oklahoma City, Oklahoma SCOPE

OWNER

After decades of successful business and significant company growth, the First Mortgage Company was outgrowing their rental space and ready to build a place of their own. STUDIO Architecture helped transform a 1970s pre-cast concrete structure into their new company headquarters. Despite major budgetary constraints, this four story commercial building underwent a phased gut and rebuild that included new mechanical, electrical, fire supression and smoke evacuation systems, structural reinforcement, code upgrades, two new main entrances, elevator upgrades and site improvements while continually occupied. The newly renovated facility is now home to First Mortgage’s Oklahoma City employees and additional tenants.

The Ron McCord Family

ARCHITECT

STUDIO Architecture

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Lippert Brothers, LLC

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SIZE

40,000 SF

BUDGET

$6 Million


Before

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East Entrance Water Feature

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MY ROLE This project was significant in my career as it was the first project I had the opportunity to independently direct from conception to certificate of occupancy. Although it was a rather “small� project comparatively, the budgetary constraints, unforseen conditions and contractor woes made it a very challenging project to oversee while also managing many other projects and earning my Master in Architecture degree. Through the duration of this project, I learned many valuable lessons in time management, managment of people (delegating tasks), and how to handle very difficult situations in a professional manner without the immediate aid of my superiors. It was an important time of personal growth that prepared me to confidently take on complex future projects. 43


UNIQUE DESIGN CHALLENGES AESTHETICS The brutalist form of the building, comprised of predominately precast contrete and face brick, projected a sense of cold, static rigidity. The 1970s design needed a major renovation and face-lift and the owner’s limited budget forced us to be innovative in how we could lighten the exterior appearance. PHASING Another challenge lay in the owner’s desire to keep the building occupied through the duration of construction. Tenant spaces would need to be vacated, gutted and renovated in phases while also enduring a complete systems upgrade throughout the building. STRUCTURAL UPGRADES As construction commenced, it was discovered that the building was structurally un-sound. Lateral forces were not accounted for in the original building’s structural design. Rather than viewing this obstacle as a negative, we redirected our attention toward how we could innovatively incorporate this necessary structural reinforcement into the character of the design. UTILITY RELOCATION Over the years, the expansion of the interstate forced the occupants to switch the location of the front door. What used to be the front door was now a difficult-to-access back door and what used to be the back door now needed to function as the front door. This required strategic relocation of utilites both for the new structural members and the main entry additions. CONTRACTOR Once the design drawings were complete, the owner expressed the desire to have the tenant fit-out work completed by their own contractor. As a result, the core, shell, and addition work was allocated to a larger contractor and the tenant improvement work remained to be completed by the owner’s contractor. The two contractor’s work overlapped in some areas requiring cooperation to strategically coordinate schedules and logistics. 44


West Entrance

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MIDFIRST BANK | Oklahoma (Various Locations) SCOPE

OWNER ARCHITECT CONTRACTOR SIZE BUDGET

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MidFirst Bank prides itself on exceptional performance, an attitude that carries over into their approach to the company’s facilities. Knowing that financial security is very important to it’s customers, Midfirst Bank hopes to evoke a sense of comfort and stability through the bank branch design. The residential-inspired exterior aesthetic and hospitality-driven interior design work together to create a sense of “home”. This approach has proven successful for their business and they continue to expand and implement this approach at all new and existing bank branches. MidFirst Bank Bockus Payne Associates Architects + Rottet Studio Varies (Timberlake Construction, Landmark Construction, etc..) Varies (+/- 4,300 SF) Varies ($1.2-2.5 Million)


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MY ROLE A large part of my role in working with MidFirst Bank was to ensure that each new branch location was built with equal design quality and consistency. Unlike most bank branches, characterized by low cost and low quality products, these branches are set apart in their high cost per square foot and unique design features. BPAA and Rottet Studio worked together to determine the overall design concepts for the bank branches. Following preliminary design, I led a team of consultants to turn the initial concepts into a build-able set of drawings. Working directly with the owner, contractor and trades-people, I finalized the design approach and developed constructible solutions for the unique, custom features within each bank branch. Throughout my time with BPAA, I was involved in and coordinated the production of eight different bank branch projects as well as corporate office renovations for MidFirst Bank. As a result, I strengthened my abilities to lead project teams, direct the construction of complex design features, and grew in my understanding of the value of detailing in order to achieve the desired level of quality in construction.

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50 Transaction Counter & Feature Wall


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ACADEMIC 52


Gordon Greene | 54

Gould Hall New Facilities | 62

Destination Healthcare | 68

WORK 53


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The SHOPS and LOFTS at GORDON GREENE | Louisville, Kentucky SCOPE

For my Master of Architecture thesis, I chose to focus on “the role of sustainable urban design and human health”. Research shows that the way we design our buildings and cities can either decrease or increase the opportunity to live active lifestyles within the urban realm. After conducting thorough research on the subject, I applied this newfound knowledge through designing an urban-infill, mixed-use facility and plaza in Louisville, Kentucky.

CANDIDATE

Teri Coates

THESIS COMMITTEE

Ronald Frantz (Chair), Jerry Stivers, Blair Humphreys, Hanz Butzer

SIZE

240,000 SF

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Figure Ground

Cultural Centers

Bicycle Routes

Public Transportation Routes

Market Study

Pedestrian Corridors

Flood Plain

Land Use Map

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Market Analysis + Site Study

Contextual Map (Proposed Final Site Design)

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West Elevation

North Elevation

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East Elevation


NATURE COMMUNITY ECONOMY CREATIVITY

SITE AND BUILDING FEATURES KEY/LEGEND: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13

New LEED Platinum Mixed-Use Facility Ground-Floor “Townhome” Entrances Retail Plaza with interactive water feature Parallel Parking with Pervious Pavement Back-In Parking on Pervious Pavement Flat Activity Lawn Tiered Event Lawn Performance Pavilion/Bandshell Tree Grove Large Dog Park Small Dog Park Outdoor Seating Loading Dock

South Elevation

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Preferred Parking for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Compact Bicycle Storage Operable Windows for Natural Ventilation Low Emitting Materials Locally Sourced Materials Daylight and Views Vegetative Roof Roof-top Photovoltaics Outdoor Bike Storage Rainwater Capture and Reuse Pervious Paving Low Flow Fixtures Curb-side Bioswales

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Floor Plans

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Level 1

Level 4

Level 2

Level 5

Level 3

Level 6

Floor Plan Legend

Level 7


Ground-Floor Plaza Perspective

Gordon Greene Aerial Perspective

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GOULD HALL NEW FACILITIES | Norman, Oklahoma SCOPE

The Architecture program at the University of Oklahoma, dating back to 1916, has experienced many transformations over the last century. The building where the college now resides underwent a complete renovation and re-opened in the fall of 2011. For the first time, students from all five disciplines (including architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, construction science and regional and city planning) can be housed under one roof. Although the newly renovated space successfully meets many needs, it still struggles to keep up with the growing number of graduate students, faculty and staff. Additionally, the college also lacks the ability to hold large assemblies and is required to borrow space from other colleges for large meetings and presentations. This project explores the opportunity for an addition that can provide space for the college’s graduate programs as well as functional spaces to support large gatherings.

CLIENT

University of Oklahoma College of Architecture

MASTER CANDIDATE PROFESSOR SIZE

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Teri Coates Dr. Khosrow Bozorgi 42,000 SF


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North Elevation

South Elevation

West Elevation

DESIGN GOALS The new facility’s design aims to appropriately reflect the interior function and forward-thinking mindset of the college while also responding to the campus’ Cherokee Gothic architecture. A study of precedents (both on and off campus) helped to guide the decision-making process in regard to form, function and aesthetics. Volumes, lines and materials correspond to the existing College of Architecture facility and respectfully acknowledge the neighboring journalism building. At the same time, progressive design features and technologies give the addition a sense of individuality and speak to the educational aspirations of the college.

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PROJECT CHALLENGES Due to the project’s extensive program, it was a challenge to fit the long list of needs into such a small space. A contextual model of the site, built by my classmates and I, helped provide scale for our study models. Both the overall site model and study models were used to aid in the exploration of lighting and shadows, view corridors, pedestrian flow, use of exterior space (outdoor rooms) and proportion.

Northwest Axonometric

Southwest Axonometric

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BUILDING FEATURES In addition to the required academic, administrative and presentation spaces, it is important that the communal spaces receive just as much attention. Every space, both interior and exterior, is strategically designed to provide opportunity for social, cultural, and educational development opportunities. An outdoor classroom provides space, for students and professors alike, to move their learning outdoors on pleasant days. The bridge connection between the existing and new building is enclosed by an arched, double-skin curtain wall that provides a bright, sun-lit space for circulation, studying and socialization. The structure is exposed in this area to provide a dynamic experience as well as an educational opportunity for users and visitors. Roof terraces provide an outdoor oasis for building users on the upper levels. This feature provides a cooling effect for the spaces below, technologies for potential rainwater recapture and filtration and hands-on educational opportunities for landscape architecture students. Bridge Curtain Wall | Physical Model Perspective

Bridge Curtain Wall | 3D Model Perspective

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Landscape Plan

Section Perspective

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DESTINATION HEALTHCARE | Dubai, UAE SCOPE

The World Islands, located just off the coast of Dubai, UAE is a collection of 300 islands constructed in the rough shape of a world map. Our objective, was to design an island to function as a destination, resort-style healthcare facility. Our team, comprised of Texas A&M Landscape and Architecture students, chose to design the island of “Hawaii.� Not only do the facilities accomodate for surgical procedures, post-operation treatment and healing for each patient, but it also provides comfort for visitors within the microclimate and promotes sustainability. To meet this objective the island itself plays a major role in the holistic healing approach to healthcare. The island becomes the fusion of organic and built environments that meet the physical, spiritual, and social needs of each patient. The island supports the marriage of hospitality and healthcare as the resort amenities serve not only the patients healing process, but also provide family members with recreational and leisure activities.

CLIENT

HKS Dallas & SWA Group (professional affiliate/jury panel)

DESIGN TEAM PROFESSOR

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Teri Coates, Mark Burgess, Randi Newman, Shawn Dressler, Kara Strong George J. Mann, Dr. Joseph J. McGraw, Jody Naderi, Jun Hyun Kim


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Electrolysis Coral Reef Grey Water Filtration under Hospital All Xeric Landscaping

Wind Turbines Green Roofs on Villas

Service Circulation Grey water Reuse System Fresh Water System Electrical System Wind Turbines on Shade Structures

Wind Turbines

Wild Life Preservation Citrus Trees for Food Production

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Large Wind Turbine


SUSTAINABILITY FEATURES Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, the ruler of Dubai, UAE, and the visionary of Dubai’s Architectural endeavors, requested that each of the World Island projects be as ecologically friendly as possible. The regions natural resources must be utilized accordingly. The structures on the island aim to portray traditional building methods and Arabic culture. PLANTING materials are arid varieties that reflect the local climate and can thrive with little water. Citrus plants can be used in accordance to Islamic traditions and provide some of the islands food supply. The entry minaret functions as a large scale WIND capture device providing some of the island’s electricity along with vertical TURBINES located periodically around the central ring. Low level horizontal turbines will also be located on the second floor roofs of the hospital and the spa. In order to address the effects of the Arabian heat, SHADE is provided in the form of fabric structures and planted materials throughout the island. To guarantee a low amount of air pollution on the island and within the service tunnels, ALL VEHICULAR TRANSPORTATION operates on electricity. To aid in replenishing any lost marine habitat during the island formation process, SEA WATER ELECTROLYSIS will be used to produce new reef habitats for coral and fish life. This central feature will eventually become a wildlife reserve. The AVIARY will also provide a new habitat for many of Dubai’s cherished bird species, and a venue for falconry demonstrations. GREY WATER from the utilities of every structure on the island will return to a treatment facility beneath the hospital where it is treated and reused for irrigation. Extra measures will be taken to ensure that fresh WATER waste is minimal on the island.

LANDSCAPE FEATURES The landscape program focuses on a holistic process that is comprised of three connected healing experiences. The three areas of healing include the physical, spiritual and social realms of healing. PHYSICAL HEALING During the physical healing experience the visitor will engage in activities that involve rehabilitation, exercise and interaction with nature. SPIRITUAL HEALING The spiritual healing pathway will lead the visitor through meditative experiences that will stimulate the senses and provide opportunity for reflection. SOCIAL HEALING The social healing process will allow the visitor to re-enter the community with renewed health in a relaxed and controlled recreational environment.

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PATIENT PROGRAMMING

GUEST/ PATIENT CIRCULATION

RESTROOMS

SERVICE CIRCULATION/ OFFICE SPACE

PRIVATE SPACE

SEMIPRIVATE SPACE

PUBLIC SPACE

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

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HOSPITAL


HOSPITAL FLOOR PLAN

LEVEL 01

LEVEL 02

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VILLA FLOOR PLAN

LEVEL 01

LEVEL 02

LEVEL 03

VILLAS

SPA

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

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PUBLIC SPACE

SEMIPRIVATE SPACE

PRIVATE SPACE

SERVICE CIRCULATION/ OFFICE SPACE

RESTROOMS

GUEST/ PATIENT CIRCULATION


SPA FLOOR PLAN

LEVEL 01

LEVEL 02

MY ROLE A large part of this project focused on collaboration. Our team consisted of architecture and landscape architecture students. The two disciplines worked separately for the first half of the semester, then merged design concepts mid-semester. Through this process, what was once a series of decent design concepts became a compelling project with depth and breadth. I took a leading role in the overall design concepts, sustainability features, island design, building design, sketches, physical model, presentation images and boards. Our team was awarded “Best All Around Design� by the executives from HKS Dallas and SWA Group. What set our project apart from the rest was the eagerness of our team members to learn from the other disciplines. This desire to learn from each other led to a unified partnership and a cohesive design.

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Name Address Phone Email Portfolio Website 76

CONTACT Teresa B. Coates, AIA 880 New Jersey Avenue SE, Apt 704 Washington, DC 20003 405.513.4682 tcoates.ma@gmail.com http://issuu.com/tericoates/docs/portfolio


CONTACT Teresa B. Coates, AIA 880 New Jersey Avenue SE, Apt 704 Washington, DC 20003 405.513.4682 tcoates.ma@gmail.com http://issuu.com/tericoates/docs/portfolio

Profile for Teri Coates

Teri Coates Architecture Portfolio  

Teri Coates Architecture Portfolio  

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