Page 1

GET LOST

W W W.T EO M AG A Z I N E .CO M . AU

I S S U E // S I X T E E N


T E O M A G

2

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

Lingerie. Photography. Collaborative. M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

at

whistleblwr.com

3


T E O M A G

IN THIS ISSUE

16

72 12

32

60

4

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

12 14 16 30 32 58 60 72

2017: THE YEAR OF COLIBRIUM ADELAIDE’S ROCK SCENE IS ALIVE AND WELL, WITH NEW MUSIC ON THE CARDS FOR COLIBRIUM FANS. GET LOST IN MY QUIRKS EXPLORING THE FEMALE FORM WITH MADISON ROWE EVERYWHERE AND NOWHERE FASHION EDITORIAL RAISED ON ROCK YOUNG TALENT IN AN OLD GENRE, AARON KEYLOCK IS BRINGING BLUES BACK. GET LOST FASHION EDITORIAL LET’S GET LOST ARTWORK BY CREATIVE PEAR-SPECTIVE ESCAPING TO SUBURBIA FASHION EDITORIAL GLOBAL MUSIC REVOLUTION: THE HOME OF MUSIC ADELAIDE MUSIC SHOP TRANSFORMED INTO A LOCAL HOTSPOT FOR BUDDING MUSICIANS AND GIG-GOERS.

76

M A R C H

I S S U E

COMMON STREETS FASHION EDITORIAL

1 6

5


T E O M A G

6

T E O M A G A Z www.mondaysuck.com / www.instagram.com/mondaysuck

I N E . C O M . A U


FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS

JOSH MCCAWLEY

PETER PAP

Music photography takes me all bloody night to edit, but it means that while everyone else is asleep, I can relax and create images—and enjoy every second of it.

I’m listening to Pierce the Veil—these guys rock!

PHOTOGRAPHER

The craziest gig I photographed was for a local band called Ventolyn, in a little Adelaide venue. I had no idea what to expect going in, and when they played their set the whole venue went nuts. Drums in the middle of the crowd; crowd surfers, and the guitarist jumped on top of the drum kit mid-song. It was hectic. My favourite part of music photography is when someone is really excited about how they look in one of the shots, whether it is a candid photo around the show or a shot of them looking like a rock star on stage. Something few people know about me is that I love the Scott Pilgrim books (and movie). I’ve got a full collection of the Scott Pilgrim comics, in black and white and the hardcover colour editions, as well as all the other books by Bryan Lee O’Malley.

T E O M A G

PHOTOGRAPHER

When I’m feeling lost I reach for my drumsticks. I’m passionate about music photography because I have lived and breathed the local music scene since the ’90s, and being able to capture history is magic. When I’m not taking photos, I’m editing them! If I could get lost anywhere in the world I’d choose Europe— you can’t see it all in a five week holiday. One band you need to see live is Queen, with its original lineup; in the next life.

My dream gig to shoot is Rammstein, hands down. Their shows are absolutely insane and I could only hope to try to capture a part of it. It’d be even better if I could be shooting from the stage, as well as the pit. A few bands I listen to on repeat are: Free From Burden, Ocean Grove, Childish Gambino, Blonde Doctor, and Trophy Eyes. They’re all so damned groovy and get me psyched enough to work until 3.00am. M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

7


T E O M A G

SUSANNAH WEARS

Double Trouble Girls Girls Girls T-Shirt from The Birdcage Boutique

8

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

EDITOR’S LETTER This issue is about adventure; restless nights, exploring the unknown and bending the rules. We want to evoke memories of your wildest nights and craziest days, those moments where you experienced a sense of complete freedom. Picture being on the open road—with friends or a lover—driving without a destination, completely carefree. Loud music and campfires; evening dips, falling asleep under the stars—this is living. Appealing to your inner-rebel, we’ve created an issue that speaks for—and to—those of us who are a little lost, by choice or otherwise. We chat with 19-year-old Aaron Keylock from The UK, a blues-rock guitarist who’s spent his life on the road. Aaron reveals the challenges of working in rock ‘n’ roll as a pre-teen and how his determined disposition helped him get through. Escape with Adelaide based artist, Madison Rowe as she explores the female form through illustration, often driven by her own experiences; bringing light to some of her darker moments. We take you on a journey through pages of art, fashion and music—always seeking to inspire a new adventure of self-discovery. Join us on the journey. Let’s get lost. Susannah x

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

9


T E O M A G

FOUNDER & EDITOR

SUSANNAH IOANNOU DEPUTY EDITORS

ESTHER REYNOLDS-VERCO LUCY AHERN VANESSA LOCAMPO ART DIRECTION & DESIGN

COURTNEY ROBINSON MARKETING CONSULTANT

OLGA WINTER LOGO DESIGN

JANICE CUI

CONTRIBUTORS JOURNALISTS Ebony Story Melina Scarfo Rebecca Copeland Zoe Butler

PHOTOGRAPHY Austin Hargrave Chris Loutfy Dimitra Koriozos Dylan Starczak Grystphoto – Jeremy Gryst Josh McCawley Sarah Shen Tim Gauci

MAKEUP Alexis Priest Lauren Kay Leah Metaxas

VIDEO PRODUCTION Grystphoto – Lexi Pratt

MODELS AZALEA Models Pride Models Two Management Deena Marie Ebony Boadu

BEHIND THE SCENES

ST YLING Cassidy Cooper Chloe Jade Miller Dylan Starczak Elle Hioe

HAIR

John Lo

ARTISTS Madison Rowe Creative Pear-spective

PARTNERS

Alexis Priest Kinky Curly Straight Cherie Falco

Rock Retro Scissors Tit4Tat Designs

Rock Retro Scissors Katie Kromwijk

10

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

COVER IMAGE MODEL

AZALEA Models Kiarra Jeromin HAIR

Rock Retro Scissors Katie Kromwijk MAKEUP

Lauren Kay STYLING

Chloe Jade Miller PHOTOGRAPHER

Grystphoto – Jeremy Gryst

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

11


T E O M A G

2017:

THE YEAR OF COLIBRIUM

Zoe Butler GPHOTOGRAPHY A Z I N E . C O M . A U Supplied WORDS

12

T E O M A


T E O M A G

ADELAIDE’S ROCK SCENE IS ALIVE AND WELL, WITH NEW MUSIC ON THE CARDS FOR COLIBRIUM FANS. Adelaide’s Colibrium is going from strength to strength. After filling an impressive support slot and playing a string of successful headline shows, 2017 is looking to be a big year for the local band. To find out more about what the boys have been up to, TEO got chatting with lead guitarist Christian Tassone. TEO: The last time we caught up, you were prepping for TEO’s Hard Rock Halloween. What’s been happening since then? Christian: We have done a couple of shows and we‘re still in the process of writing; we’ll probably do a release later in the year, which is cool. We’ve played a couple of shows—supporting Twelve Foot Ninja being one of the highlights. It’s a bit of an achievement from a band perspective, considering those guys are just massive now.

Congrats! How did that opportunity come about? We knew the ninjas were coming, so we touched base with their management early on. Then on Facebook, the ninjas asked their Adelaide fans who they wanted to support and we saw a crap load of ‘Colibrium’ requests, so we’re like, ‘aw yeah, this might happen!’ Then we got an email from their management a few weeks later and it was on like Donkey Kong! Definitely one of the highlights during our time in Colibrium— that’s for damn sure. Such a rad show! And now? Basically we’re just looking at doing a release. We’ll probably do a series of singles; albums don’t hold a lot of inherent benefit from an exposure perspective—you get a lot more value out of doing a series of singles over, say, three months. The good thing is that we are going to be writing with a lot more of Chris’ influence, whereas the first body of Colibrium work didn’t have much of it. He’s been a really good presence in a creative sense. I think for the next lot of work, we have grown up but we aren’t going to sound different, just better. We’re still striving for an interesting verse and a big chorus, which means big fat songs that people can enjoy, start to finish, but which also musically make a lot of sense— as opposed to a lot of riffs sort of strung together.

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

I hear you were also nominated for a SAM award! Yeah we were but unfortunately, we didn’t win. We made up for it with the free food and booze, which worked out really well…until the morning after. The SAM Awards was a really good night though; it proves that the Adelaide and South Australian music industry is really healthy. And Jay Weatherill was there! The Premier of South Australia actually attends music awards because he supports the South Australian music industry. There is a lot more going on here than people think. There were so many different types of artists there and it was great to see such camaraderie; there wasn’t any tallpoppy syndrome bullshit going on. We were honoured to be nominated and be a part of it. What goals does Colibrium have for 2017? To focus on not doing things just to do them; to actually sit down and have a think about why we’re doing them. So we’re cutting out rehearsals and adding in creative sessions. We know the live set off by heart and we always score ourselves after a live set; like, we will sit down with a beer and give the performance a score out of 100. We are looking at playing as much new material as we can, putting the old stuff at the back of the cupboard—working on new stuff and growing.

FOLLOW COLIBRIUM

facebook.com/colibriumofficial instagram.com/colibriumband colibrium.com.au youtube.com/channel/UCRXqkKztEed3CRi66OW3yjA

13


T E O M A G

GET LOST IN MY QUIRKS EXPLORING THE FEMALE FORM WITH MADISON ROWE

Madison Rowe is an Adelaide-based artist whose artistic style explores the animalistic nature of women. With big doe eyes and exaggerated features, Madi often blends the female form with the characteristics of woodland creatures. Her illustrations can be considered quite satirical; each of her ‘girls’ are beautiful for their individual oddities and quirks and share common themes of nature, the cosmos and self-awareness. She is passionate about inspiring young adult females to keep pursuing and persisting with their dreams. TEO: What do you do when you feel like you need to escape? Madi: I need to be moving and creating, otherwise I procrastinate. I like to put on some tunes, make a coffee and set myself up in my makeshift studio. I have everything I need in there to become lost in a new drawing. I like to be with nature as often as I can; being outdoors inspires me to create as well. Has there been one moment—or a series of moments— that led you on your path with art? I used to draw what I thought other people would relate to or find aesthetically pleasing. These pieces weren’t coming from my heart and in turn were unrewarding.

Does your inspiration come from a place of love, loss or restlessness, or is it all of the above?

All of the above but I find that the pieces I enjoy the most are the ones that came from a dark time in my life.

Creating is my way of coping, and the pieces that come from an emotional place are the most fulfilling.

What is it about the female form that inspires you to create?

I relate to women more than men—I have always enjoyed

portraying a female energy in my art. What I enjoy most

is stylising their features to be very dramatic. Their skinny lanky bodies that hold giant heads with big eyes and petite noses just makes me smile. There is something so ‘off’ about them that makes them interesting. I feel as if I drew men the same way, the effect may be lost.

Do you get a sense of liberation when you explore the female body through this creative platform?

Absolutely, I do. Most of my girls are topless. I first started drawing them naked to gain exposure from

the ‘free the nipple’ movement. Now, I think I’ve drawn so many nipples that it’s normal for me. When I create

pieces that advocate for women’s rights, I feel liberated

too. A large majority of my audience is female and so I think they can relate to my work.

When I began to find my own style and stay true to it, I learned much more about myself and saw major progress. Now I just want to keep going and see where these strange little girls take me.

14

FOLLOW MADISON ROWE ART

facebook.com/madisonroweartist instagram.com/madisonrowe.art

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

Rebecca Copeland ILLUSTRATION Madison Rowe TITLE Anywhere But Here WORDS

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

15


T E O M A G

EVERYWHERE AND NOWHERE

STYLING

Elle Hioe MODELS

Deena Marie Ebony Boadu PHOTOGRAPHER

Chris Loutfy

SET ASSISTANT

Jon Lo

16

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

DEENA WEARS VINTAGE TEE FROM CREAM ON KING VINTAGE PLAYSUIT FROM CREAM ON KING EBONY WEARS VINTAGE TEE FROM CREAM ON KING STYLIST’S OWN OVERALLS EBONY’S OWN SHOES HER OWN SOCKS

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

17


T E O M A G

18

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

DEENA WEARS VINTAGE TEE FROM CREAM ON KING VINTAGE PLAYSUIT FROM CREAM ON KING HER OWN SHOES HER OWN SOCKS

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

19


T E O M A G

DEENA WEARS VINTAGE WINDBREAKER FROM CREAM ON KING LOW TON ONSEN TEE STYLIST’S OWN PANTS STYLIST’S OWN BELT STYLIST’S OWN SUNGLASSES DEENA’S OWN SHOES HER OWN SOCKS EBONY WEARS VINTAGE WINDBREAKER FROM CREAM ON KING LOW TON ONSEN TEE HER OWN PANTS STYLIST’S OWN SUNGLASSES EBONY’S OWN SHOES HER OWN SOCKS

20

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

21


T E O M A G

22

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

23


T E O M A G

EBONY WEARS LOW TON TURTLENECK STYLIST’S OWN OVERALLS EBONY’S OWN SHOES HER OWN SOCKS DEENA WEARS STYLIST’S OWN TEE VINTAGE JERSEY FROM CREAM ON KING HER OWN PANTS HER OWN SHOES HER OWN SOCKS

24

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

25


T E O M A G

26

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

27


T E O M A G

28

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

29


T E O M A G

RAISED ON ROCK YOUNG TALENT IN AN OLD GENRE, AARON KEYLOCK IS BRINGING BLUES BACK.

30

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

Oh, to be young, talented and driven: a hope for many, yet so few are. When these young prodigies burst onto the scene, there’s nothing more interesting than watching them grow through their music and through life. Aaron Keylock was born in Oxford, England 19 years ago and, while we don’t want to put any pressure on him, you could say he’s the next big thing in blues and rock. With his debut album hitting stands earlier this year, Cut Against The Grain is the first foray of this young musician into his sparkling future. Aaron had a guitar in his hands by the time he was eight years old, and instead of playing with toys or doing regular kid things, he was stringing his Les Paul and developing an understanding of songwriting. By the time he was 11, he was playing in clubs almost every night of the week. “I kind of got taught how to jam at the age of 11 and I started going to blues jams and playing with people who had been doing it for 20 years,” Aaron explains. He was the kind of youngster who never had any trouble picking up chords or techniques, and learned a lot while up on stage. “…That was one of the best things I could’ve done, just got out there and did it the old school way,” Aaron says. Obviously being so consumed with music at such a young age—learning new things and listening to lots of Johnny Winter—there wasn’t much time for school. “I just got through it as well as I could,” Aaron admits. “It wasn’t really my thing.” And if you’re playing shows by the end of primary school and arguing with club doormen who won’t let you into venues you’re booked to play, sure, school might seem a little dull in comparison. While it’s easier to learn things at a young age, learning to improvise on stage is a skill worth mastering over time, and Aaron has definitely put in the hours in that area. He played with people he’d never met before and learned to improvise in the moment. “For me, it’s just being able to play different styles with how you feel on stage. It’s how you present yourself through your music in the space of a song,” he says. It can also become something that you can share with a stranger—just pulling up another blues player on to the stage and having a jam. And now, at 19 years of age, he has a record label behind him and his first full length album out. The title of the album Cut Against The Grain is a statement he wanted to make when he released the album, and the

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

idea behind it sums up a lot of lyrical content. His writing style consists of piecing a lot of his song ideas together. For instance ‘Down’, whilst it has about three different time signatures, sounds like a blend of a Mississippi John Hurt riff, a Jimi Hendrix riff and a Johnny Winter riff all rolled into one country/blues song. He’s smashed through everything so far and left the pieces where they lay. With Mascot Label Group, he’s dodged the major issue most bands have, and found a record label that supports him and lets him make the music he wants to make. Aaron has known he wanted to make music and play shows since he saw The Black Crowes in London when he was 10, and he’s been stubborn enough to chase it. Cut Against The Grain is an inspired piece of work from an exciting young prodigy, and when you listen to it you should take some advice from Aaron himself and switch off the outside world; listen to it in the dark with headphones on, and immerse yourself in the moment.

FOLLOW AARON KEYLOCK

facebook.com/aaronkeylock instagram.com/aaronkeylock twitter.com/aaronkeylock aaronkeylock.com youtube.com/user/aaronkeylock

Ebony Story PHOTOGRAPHY Austin Hargrave WORDS

31


T E O M A G

GET LOST HAIR

Rock Retro Scissors Katie Kromwijk MAKEUP

Lauren Kay STYLING

Chloe Jade Miller MODEL

AZALEA Models Kiarra Jeromin PHOTOGRAPHER

Grystphoto Jejremy Gryst

VIDEOGRAPHER

Grystphoto Lexi Pratt LOCATION 1

Port Wakefield Motel and Holiday Homes

32

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O WEARS M A G KIARRA

HER OWN TEE

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

33


T E O M A G

KIARRA WEARS DOUBLE TROUBLE THE LONELY HEARTS T-SHIRT FROM THE BIRDCAGE BOUTIQUE VINTAGE JEANS FROM LUNA WOLF VINTAGE STYLIST’S OWN SUNGLASSES

34

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

35


T E O M A G

36

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O WEARS M A G KIARRA

VINTAGE JACKET FROM LUNA WOLF VINTAGE VINTAGE TEE FROM PEPPERMAYO VINTAGE STYLIST’S OWN GLASSES

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

37


T E O M A G

38

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O WEARS M A G KIARRA

VINTAGE TEE FROM PEPPERMAYO VINTAGE VINTAGE DRESS FROM SWOP CONVERSE HI WHITE FROM BARLOW SHOES HER OWN SOCKS

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

39


T E O M A G

40

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

41


T E O M A G

42

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

43


T E O M A G

44


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

45


T E O M A G

46

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

KIARRA WEARS VINTAGE SWIMSUIT FROM SWOP

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

47


T E O M A G

KIARRA WEARS VINTAGE TEE FROM LUNA WOLF VINTAGE VINTAGE SWIMSUIT FROM SWOP

48

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O WEARS M A G KIARRA

VINTAGE SHORTS FROM LUNA WOLF VINTAGE

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

49


TKIARRA E O MWEARS A G

VINTAGE TEE FROM LUNA WOLF VINTAGE STYLIST’S OWN DRESS STYLIST’S OWN SHOES

50

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

51


T E O M A G

52

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

53


T E O M A G

54


T E O M A G

She spent two days in that motel room. Some of the lights were broken, and those that weren’t would flicker. The room was dark and quiet at night, the only noise from a leaky tap and the occasional car on the highway. She told herself that this was what she needed; an escape. She told herself that she could run away from what was caging her. But as she looked at herself in the mirror, she didn’t recognise the bloodshot eyes. She wasn’t familiar with the lifeless expression reflected back at her. She didn’t know who was trapped beneath her skin. She never thought she would become that absent girl, staring down the crossroads, looking for a sign. Perhaps she should have spared a moment to question if it was the right thing to do. But all she could feel when she walked outside was a longing to feel anything at all. She decided whether her moments were worth fighting for. And then she did what she had to do. She left. If she comes back, She will tell stories. The dangers of being too safe, too comfortable. And the liberation she felt for doing something new, regardless if it was wrong. She would explain how feeling lost helped her find herself again. If she comes back at all.

Rebecca Copeland instagram.com/becreflects WORDS

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

55


T E O M A G

56

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

57


T E O M A G

58

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

/creativepear-spective

59

creativepear_spective


T E O M A G

ESCAPING TO SUBURBIA

HAIR AND MAKEUP

Alexis Priest STYLING

Cassidy Cooper MODEL

Two Management Morgan Cunningham PHOTOGRAPHER

Sarah Shen

60

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

61


T E O M A G

62

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

63


T E O M A G

64

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

65


T E O M A G

66

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

67


T E O M A G

68

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

69


T E O M A G

70

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

71


T E O M A G

WORDS

Melina Scarfo McCawley

PHOTOGRAPHY Josh 72

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

GLOBAL MUSIC REVOLUTION: THE HOME OF MUSIC

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

73


T E O M A G

ADELAIDE MUSIC SHOP TRANSFORMED INTO A LOCAL HOTSPOT FOR BUDDING MUSICIANS AND GIG-GOERS.

Global Music Revolution was born from a desire to follow your passion. Long time high school friends Mark Hosking and John Blum opened the Klemzig instrument store three years ago. Drawn together by their love of music, the duo dedicates their time to giving young musicians the help that’s so crucial to industry success. Growing up on a diet of Queen and Led Zeppelin, Mark’s first memory of music was standing on a chair and trying to reach the battery-operated radio on top of the fridge, just to turn up the volume. As a teenager, his friend John rocked up at his house and heard him making a racket. They played pub gigs together for a few years until Mark got sucked into working. “If I’ve got a regret, it’s that I should’ve stayed mucking around playing in bands. You only live once,” Mark says. Eventually Mark and John acted on their dream to open an instrument store but it was a humble beginning for Global Music Revolution. At first they didn’t have any major brands, just Mark’s imported gear from China. Now, every inch of the store is filled with brands such as Fender, Gibson and Yamaha. It has everything you could possibly need to start a band; from guitars, keyboards and drum kits, to tambourines and egg shakers. But this is not your typical store. If you look through the glass window behind the counter, you will see a small control room, and past that a rehearsal and recording space which doubles as a live music venue. “We want music to live here,” Mark says. “When people come in they can grab a guitar and amp off the shop floor, put it in a real working environment and get that rock star experience. It’s also a great venue for musicians to come and play.” At Global Music Revolution you are encouraged to break the rules. Music stores can often be intimidating; the shiny gleam of expensive guitars and heavy amps

74

are not to be touched. But here you can shred until your heart’s content. “In a shop, you’re sitting right on top of the guitar amp that’s made to throw the sound miles away and you can’t hear it properly. In the rehearsal space you can crank it, let it off the chain and do what it’s meant to do,” Mark says. “If you’re shopping online you can get all sorts of stuff. We’ve heard horror stories of people who’ve bought knock-off guitars and paid thousands of dollars and it wouldn’t be worth 200 bucks. I’m a firm believer that if you’re spending that sort of money on a guitar, you want to pick it up and play it ’cause they’re all different.” Whether playing music is in your blood or you’ve never touched a guitar before, Mark and John can help find the instrument that’s right for you. Mark recalls a visit from a young girl who wanted to start playing guitar. But it needed to be pink. “Now, there’s not a lot of offering in pink guitars that aren’t gimmicky. So they went to Target—of all places— and they got a pink guitar but she can’t play the thing. The action on it is 50 millimetres high,” he says. “Why should you come here? Rather than sell you something you don’t need, we’d rather sell you something you want and love. Rather than be highpressure sales guys, we’d rather work with you and make sure you’re happy. We prefer to see happy people and have them come back, repeat offenders,” he says. “We’re as excited to sell a bottom of the range, cheapas guitar for under a hundred bucks as we are to sell a Gibson for thousands of dollars,” he says. But it’s about more than sales at Global Music Revolution. It’s a place where musicians of all skill levels can come together to practice, perform and build

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

friendships. They have already held a few gigs, including a Battle of the Bands, won by local punk act Radix. “I get a massive kick out of helping the young bands that are coming in. No one helped us when we were younger, and it’s not like we’re sitting here trying to be Godfathers about it, nothing like that. We get a genuine kick out of seeing them play,” Mark says. “There’s heaps of people coming through the shop that don’t ever get to play with a band. We give them a low-key environment because it can be really daunting walking into a pub and stepping on the stage. But here, people are more sociable because they know each other and will be chatting, and they can just get up and go.” On the future, Marks says there’s still so much more to do. After putting the finishing touches on the rehearsal room, they plan to create video content, stream live demonstrations and host monthly open mic nights. The duo is also toying with ideas of adding teaching rooms and opening a rock school—the possibilities are endless.

Big dreams live at Global Music Revolution but Mark just needs to find the time to keep pursing them. “I also own the store next door, selling safety gear and it’s so boring. No one goes home and cranks up their witches hats,” Mark says. “If I could do what I love all day long, I’m here.” So next time you need a new instrument or you’re looking for a place to jam, drop by Global Music Revolution. “There’s always a beer floating around on a Saturday arvo if you want to come down. And if we’ve got nothing on, we’re happy for you to light the place up,” Mark says.

FOLLOW GLOBAL MUSIC REVOLUTION

facebook.com/globalmusicrevolution instagram.com/globalmusicrevolution globalmusicrevolution.com.au youtube.com/channel/UCLVgGdWYFq4aZdkC3UnFHcw

PHOTOGRAPHY Tim PICTURED Thomas

M A R C H

I S S U E

Gauci Boyd and Tyler Keen from Radix

1 6

75


T E O M A G

COMMON STREETS

HAIR

Kinky Curly Straight Cherie Falco MAKEUP

Leah Metaxas STYLING

Dylan Starczak MODEL

Pride Models Olivija PHOTOGRAPHER

Dylan Starczak

76

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

OLIVIJA WEARS ASHLEE GRAHAM PRISTINE CROP ASHLEE GRAHAM PRISTINE WRAP SKIRT STATUS ANXIETY PEOPLE LIKE US BACKPACK FROM MISS GLADYS SYM CHOON CONVERSE CHUCK TAYLOR ALL STAR CLASSIC FROM MISS GLADYS SYM CHOON

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

77


T E O M A G

78

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

OLIVIJA WEARS PRETTYLITTLETHING BASIC WHITE OVERSIZED ROUND NECK T-SHIRT FROM MISS GLADYS SYM CHOON ASHLEE GRAHAM PRISTINE WRAP DRESS STATUS ANXIETY PEOPLE LIKE US BACKPACK FROM MISS GLADYS SYM CHOON CONVERSE CHUCK TAYLOR ALL STAR CLASSIC FROM MISS GLADYS SYM CHOON

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

79


T E O M A G

80

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

81


T E O M A G

82

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

83


T E O M A G

84

T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


T E O M A G

M A R C H

I S S U E

1 6

85


ISSUE 16 // GET LOST  
ISSUE 16 // GET LOST