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MODERN DAY PROGRESSIVES TASMANIAN BAND, SCOPARIA IS FILLING THE PROGRESSIVE METAL VOID IN OUR LIVES WITH THE RECENT RELEASE OF THE BAND’S DEBUT EP, THE IDOL’S DREAM. FREE THE GYPSY OVERCOMING FAST FASHION LOVE IS A (CYBER) CRIME

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FASHION EDITORIAL RYDE CLOTHING MADE FOR THE RYDERS. CALLING ALL ART LOVERS: TAKE A TRIP THROUGH THE WORLD OF ALEX SABA A TALENTED ILLUSTRATOR, WITH AN OVER-FLOWING POT OF IDEAS, CREATES A WORLD NOT ONLY FOR HERSELF BUT ALSO FOR THE VIEWING PLEASURE OF OTHERS.

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COSMETICS WITH CONSCIENCE HOW LUSH AND GETUP! ARE MAKING AN IMPACT ON CLIMATE CHANGE, SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY AND PUBLIC ACTIVISM. WAV Y BABY DIVE INTO A NEW ERA OF SWIMSUITS WITH SNRKLBR. THE EVOLUTION OF ALTER BRIDGE

EMECIA IS BACK TALKING THE PROCESSES OF WRITING AND RECORDING, AND THE ADELAIDE MUSIC SCENE. 14STRK: INSTAGLAM GETTING CONNECTED WITH THE FACE BEHIND INSTAGRAM’S 14STRK. ADL INK WE TALK INK WITH THE TEAM AT ADELAIDE’S UNSEEN TATTOO BEASTO BLANCO IS BACK BROTHER LATHAM DISCUSSES BAND DYNAMICS AND OFFERS SOME EXCITING NEWS FOR BEASTO FANS. CREATING WITH I ONLY EAT DESSERTS AMERICAN SWEETS RECIPES A DAY TO REMEMBER IS BACK WITH BAD VIBRATIONS RHYTHM GUITARIST, NEIL WESTFALL TALKS NEW ALBUM AND THE BAND’S UPCOMING AUSTRALIAN TOUR.

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THROW BACK TIME KILLERS ARTWORK BY CREATIVE PEAR-SPECTIVE TECHNOLOGY POEM BY BIANCA IOVINO

CONTINUES FIVE ALBUMS DEEP AND SURROUNDED BY BLISTERING GUITAR SOLOS AND SOARING VOCALS—ALTER BRIDGE IS KILLING IT.

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MIND GAMES FASHION EDITORIAL

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FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS

BIANCA IOVINO

JESSIE SALAMON

I’m listening to ‘Tragedy’ by The Wombats, on my laptop while I study. It’s upbeat and aurally satisfying—so much that the studying is often paused to just listen.

My favourite 2016 album release was Misadventures by

JOURNALIST

JOURNALIST

The best technology themed film is probably Nerve, with Emma Roberts and David Franco. I don’t watch a lot of techbased films but the concept of Nerve seems cool and scarily achievable in the real world.

Pierce The Veil. The way technology has progressed is making the future look very scary. Adelaide’s best live music venue is Fowler’s Live.

My favourite poet is Charles Bukowski. He’s raw, real and bitter enough to relate to. Some of his work doesn’t make sense, but you can usually take something from whatever he’s saying. I think he would have been content with that.

One band I’d love to see live is PVRIS.

The best technological device I own is my laptop—mainly because I’d be ruined without it and it has some great memories stored on it.

If I could be a character from any ’80s or ’90s game I would

Technology has helped me find my passions and helped me nurture them.

love to be Princess Peach from Mario Kart.

My favourite colour is purple? I don’t really like to choose though. All colours are beautiful. My dream holiday destination is the UK, and I’m super excited to finally be going there over Christmas and New Year’s. I’ve been fascinated with the place since I was about 10; mainly because of the scenery, the history, the cold weather and Harry Potter. D E C E M B E R

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SUSANNAH WEARS

Bandit Brand Bad Liver Lace Tank from Midwest Trader

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EDITOR’S LETTER It’s not often that I get to express my inner nerd or revisit my gaming days, but issue 15 has allowed me to share my love for all things IT—thanks to my team and the wonderful worldwide web! I was a ’90s kid and had a family full of IT enthusiasts so it didn’t take long before I was challenging my brother to Tekken battles or spending my downtime playing Jill of the Jungle. Many late night Spyro sessions were had and when my eyes weren’t glued to a screen, my ears were entertained by the family boombox or my Walkman. It’s easy to list all the benefits technology brings, but there’s no denying the hold it has over us and the consequences of our addiction to it; Bianca Iovino’s poem, ‘Technology’ puts this into perspective perfectly. We explore technology’s dark side but also celebrate the light it brings to our lives. Technology has the ability to connect an entire world. We took full advantage of this, speaking to musicians across the globe. In this issue we connect with three US rock bands, as well as an Australian post-hardcore outfit and a progressive metal group. Let’s not forget the way technology has also shaped our music industry, connecting guitars to amps, connecting those first conversations that form new bands. Social media allows musicians to scope each other out and even record an album without ever meeting in person. The power of technology is excitingly scary—flip over and feel the thrill! Susannah x

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FOUNDER & EDITOR

SUSANNAH IOANNOU DEPUTY EDITORS

ESTHER REYNOLDS-VERCO VANESSA LOCAMPO ART DIRECTION & DESIGN

COURTNEY ROBINSON MARKETING CONSULTANT

OLGA WINTER LOGO DESIGN

JANICE CUI

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CONTRIBUTORS JOURNALISTS Alexzandra Barilla Bianca Iovino Ebony Story Hayley Mackereth Jessie Salamon Lucy Ahern Zoe Butler

PHOTOGRAPHY Alex Long Baxter William Bernadette Chan Carlos Amoedo Gabriela Fleur Hayley Jessup Jack Fenby James Coomer James Hartley James Tucker Josh McCawley Marisa Taschke Natalia Britt Neon Theory Peter Pap William Greenberg

ST YLING Chloe Jade Miller Crystal Dench Susannah Ioannou

HAIR AND MAKEUP Natasha Keneally Ruby Van Leuven Rock Retro Scissors Katie Kromwijk Paige Johnston

ARTISTS Lusid Art

Creative Pear-spective

MODELS AZALEA Models Finesse Models Pride Models

PARTNERS Rock Retro Scissors Tit4Tat Designs

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COVER IMAGE MODEL

AZALEA Models Gemma Cowling HAIR AND MAKEUP

Natasha Keneally STYLING

Crystal Dench PHOTOGRAPHER

Neon Theory

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MODERN DAY PROGRESSIVES TASMANIAN BAND, SCOPARIA IS FILLING THE PROGRESSIVE METAL VOID IN OUR LIVES WITH THE RECENT RELEASE OF THE BAND’S DEBUT EP, THE IDOL’S DREAM.

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Ebony Story PHOTOGRAPHY James Tucker ALBUM ART Mitchell Nolte WORDS

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Tasmania is known for its unique wilderness, hip arts

Scoparia’s creative workings. “Oh, we definitely get a

mainland, the island has been making a name for itself as

there, and then I hit a black metal phase, but I’m a big

and incredible local produce. Sectioned away from the

a beautiful holiday destination but what people may not know is that Tasmania also boasts a fast-growing music scene, with some noteworthy up and coming bands.

Hobart band, Scoparia has been hard at work for the past few years and, with much excitement, the guys

have recently released their debut EP, titled The Idol’s Dream. Guitarist, Jason Morice, says their progressive

metal sound has evolved over the writing period, with The Idol’s Dream sounding completely different

in its original state. “After experience and playing it constantly, you understand what works better. We

wanted to write something that’s really complex and different,” he says. And complex it is; ‘The Idol’s Dream’

little Opeth-y. I was into Dream Theatre somewhere in

fan of Ne Obliviscaris at the moment. Their latest album has been in my car since it was released,” Jason says.

Although the guys have been gigging around since

2012, they’re still a young band with only one EP under

their belt. But they’ve got a good working relationship with a fix-it attitude towards collaborative efforts and— thanks to their writing years—a truck load of material for

the next release. With stimulation from cups of coffee

and crisp beers to help the process along, Scoparia is steam rolling ahead. With an acoustic EP on the way and plans for a debut album next year, look out for Scoparia when they storm the mainland.

starts in your regular 4/4 time pre-chorus, before

changing to 7/4. Vocalist, Ben Ridgers admits that the crazy time signatures were a steep learning curve. “At the time I had no idea what I was doing, but I loved

the sound of it!” Jason says. Ben adds, “I think the songs we started out with were more of a thrash-metal vibe, and we moved on in favour of more melodic and atmospheric music.”

Alongside Jason and Ben in Scoparia are: Luke Tucker (guitar), Alastair Boon (bass) and Joshua Bowling (drums). Jason and Ben met through another band, and they spent a year writing music just for the hell of it, until

they decided they needed a drummer. And a bassist.

And another guitarist. Ben, who was originally on guitar, decided to let Luke take the reins. “Luke has done a

degree at the Conservatorium of Music in Hobart, and his guitar skills are just off the charts, so we got him on

guitar,” he explains. The swap makes sense, and Jason agrees that it’s a better dynamic for their live shows to have a commanding frontman.

The progressive genre is definitely on the rise in Tassie, with so many bands experimenting with prog sounds,

while still incorporating their own style. And while a

FOLLOW SCOPARIA

it allows musicians to break out of the typical formulas

facebook.com/scoparia

But it’s practice and inspiration that feeds the fire of

youtube.com/channel/UCvaLx0GZhJHFFhlYL6jpxfQ

troublesome genre with its technicalities and intricacies,

scoparia.bandcamp.com

and gives a certain weight and credibility to their music.

twitter.com/scopariao

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Esther Reynolds-Verco PHOTOGRAPHY Hayley Jessup WORDS

FREE THE GYPSY OVERCOMING FAST FASHION

With the fashion industry slowly warming up to ethical and environmentally-friendly fashion, young designer, Bianca Markovic is miles ahead with her sustainable fashion label, Free The Gypsy. From a young age, Bianca’s escape has always been sewing. Her specialty? Creating new garments from old op-shop fabrics. “I realised how happy it made me to breathe life into old fabrics and to surround myself with beautiful, bright vintage fabrics,” Bianca says. But it was only when she reached the age of 18 that she truly began to appreciate the artistic processes of sewing and pattern making. After studying fashion design, Bianca became aware of the harmful nature of fast fashion and so she took the plunge and created her own label. “I decided to spread some good vibes through handmade clothes and inspire others to get a little wild and free their inner gypsy spirit,” she says. For Bianca, saving the planet begins with the small things. “I have a darling garden that I love dearly; it nourishes me regularly and I always harvest and replant the seeds,” Bianca says. “I also keep my power and water usage to a minimum because I believe us little guys can make a big difference with little changes.”

And with this mindset, sourcing fabrics becomes something of an adventure for Bianca. “My favourite way is to letter drop my neighbours and offer up the herbs and veggies from my garden for their forgotten boxes of vintage fabrics—often untouched for decades! I get to hear their sweet story of how the fabrics were acquired all those years ago and that simply melts my heart.” She also takes her old school approach of visiting op shops, her favourites being those that are independently owned, run by volunteers and supportive of small charities around the world— there’s no end to this girl’s love. A strong believer in the no-bra life, Bianca describes her designs as, free fitting and always adjustable. Free The Gypsy’s range includes gypsy wrap pants, halter crops, flared sleeve crops, matching sets and festival attire. Bianca’s influences are broad: nature, music, love, acts of kindness and, of course, recycling and sustainably. But she’s most inspired by the people who wear Free The Gypsy. “I love the market days, with beautiful happy faces and sunny days with lots of coffee,” she says. “It’s quite special being able to design and create colourful and fabulous garments and watch the lovely bodies take it to amazing places around the world.”

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LOVE IS A (CYBER) CRIME HAIR AND MAKEUP

Natasha Keneally STYLING

Crystal Dench MODEL

AZALEA Models Gemma Cowling

PHOTOGRAPHER

Neon Theory GRAPHICS

Janice Cui LOCATION

University of Adelaide Electrical and Electronic Engineering Lab

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T E O WEARS M A G GEMMA

THE RAGGED PRIEST WORTHY TOP GORMAN POLKA FACE SKIRT GORMAN GRETA CLOG

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HUNTER THE LABEL MOON CAMISOLE HUNTER THE LABEL TULIP SKIRT MAT LEE TINSEL HEELS TATTY DEVINE X LAURA CALLAGHAN SIENNA NECKLACE

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GEMMA WEARS

MAT LEE BOBBIE TASSELED JACKET MAT LEE VAG BALLOON SKIRT

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T E O WEARS M A G GEMMA

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WORDS

Esther Reynolds-Verco Long

PHOTOGRAPHY Alex

RYDE CLOTHING MADE FOR THE RYDERS.

At only 16-years-old, Nathan Woodrow is making tracks with his minimalistic street wear label, Ryde Clothing. Founded in May of this year, Ryde is inspired by Nathan’s undeniable love of sports. “The name ‘Ryde’ came about because I love to skate, wakeboard, snowboard—all things you can typically ride,” Nathan says. The collection includes unisex hoodies, tees and caps. “By making my designs unisex it doesn’t assign articles of clothing to a specific gender,” Nathan says. “I’m attempting to make my designs attractive towards both males and females, while still incorporating the skate vibe that Ryde is all about.” Nathan first discovered his passion for fashion design after helping out with a friend’s clothing label. “I started to get really interested in the clothing business,” Nathan says. “I started sketching up some rough designs and I really liked them, so I thought I’d start my own line.” While Ryde takes a minimalist approach, Nathan adapts his label to the latest trends. “I think to appeal to buyers you need to keep up with the current trends,” Nathan says. With a clear ’90s influence, Ryde features longline tees and washed out fabrics. “’90s fashion offers street wear a carefree minimalism, a trend that undoubtedly returned to fashion in 2016,” he says. Nathan also draws inspiration from other parts of his life. Music is a huge influence for this young

designer and, unsurprisingly, Kayne West makes the cut. “The ‘Yeezy’ Season 3 look book especially has been a point of inspiration for me in terms of colours—the earthy colour palette has become the latest trend,” Nathan says. For Nathan, the focus of his label is on the designs. “I want Ryde to be recognised for the designs on the shirt, not just the shirt itself,” Nathan says. He first started by sending his designs off to a printing company and letting them handle the rest but Ryde Clothing has swiftly transformed into a self-made label. “I found screen printing really interesting and wanted to learn how to screen print myself, so now all the printing is done by me,” Nathan says. He starts by hand drawing a design, before sending it off to an artist to finalise and exert onto a silk screen. From here, Nathan uses the silk screen to print the design onto an article of clothing. “The ink is pushed through the screen and transferred onto the attire using a squeegee, the ink transferred onto the shirt is then heated set so it doesn’t run off the shirt,” he explains. For Nathan, screen printing has turned from a stressful process to an enjoyable one. “It has to do with the designs actually being a product of my creation,” he adds. With aspirations for Ryde to become an Australian known brand, the future is looking bright for this young entrepreneur.

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CALLING ALL ART LOVERS:

TAKE A TRIP THROUGH THE WORLD OF ALEX SABA A TALENTED ILLUSTRATOR, WITH AN OVER-FLOWING POT OF IDEAS, CREATES A WORLD NOT ONLY FOR HERSELF BUT ALSO FOR THE VIEWING PLEASURE OF OTHERS. If you ask an artist about the music playing on their

Walkman and what pre-Y2K movie everybody should watch and they answer Hanson Brothers and the Spice Girls movie, you know you’re in for a treat.

Alex Saba is a Gold Coast-based artist, the creator and

illustrator of Lusid Art. The eclectic and vibrant art she produces is not only for your viewing pleasure but also a window into her lucid mind.

After moving to Sydney to pursue a fashion internship,

she discovered that she had become quite lonely but found solace in drawing. With her internship completed and lease fast approaching, Alex decided to return home

to work on her art. Since then, she has created a strong following on social media and has continued to stun with her artwork, collaborations, and her blog series.

In order to make her work stand out from the crowd, Alex started switching faces for objects, layering ideas,

and striving to create something that no one has seen

before. With the use of intense lines, amazing pictures, pops of colour, and not to mention the badass women she draws, Lusid Art takes you to all the places you want to go when viewing art.

When creating her pieces, Alex works in her studio, which

is filled with artworks and images of muses she constantly draws from. It all starts with the inspiration; her main sources are drawn from both the fashion and music

industries. “Music is something I try and use as much as

Photoshop to play around with it a bit more, and then viola! You have a Lusid Art piece.

Since she first started, Alex says her artistic style has

changed and her ideas are more thought out. She now takes a fair amount of time building a reference, finding the right ideas and making sure they fit well.

When speaking of her work, Alex reflects on her time before Lusid Art and states, “It’s honestly turned my life around—it’s not just my work now.”

Alex further explores this idea in her new blog series, Project Full Transparency, which talks about her journey so far and is no-bullshit; purely honest and open. More

than just a recollection of her journey, she states that

the main goal of the blog is to, “show more of what you want to see.”

When she’s not drawing, creating, brainstorming, blogging or watching The Simpsons, Alex is a sucker for the weekends. During her days off she will completely

switch off, talk shit with her friends, sleep, and see bands whenever she can—all of this helps with clarity for the week ahead.

With Project Full Transparency, her artwork and constant

evolving ideas, Alex Saba has created a growing brand

that allows the viewer to interpret her work in their own unique way.

possible because it has so many different layers and the attitudes of the musicians—it can lead me anywhere.”

Then, after browsing Pinterest, Alex will build the

piece up on Photoshop, draw it, scan it—maybe watch a couple episodes of The Simpsons—put it back into

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FOLLOW LUSID ART

facebook.com/lusidArt instagram.com/lusidart pinterest.com/lusidart lusidart.com

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Alexzandra Barilla ILLUSTRATION Lusid Art D E CThey’re E M B EComing R I S S U E TITLE WORDS

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COSMETICS WITH CONSCIENCE

Lucy Ahern PHOTOGRAPHY Supplied WORDS

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HOW LUSH AND GETUP! ARE MAKING AN IMPACT ON CLIMATE CHANGE, SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY AND PUBLIC ACTIVISM.

12, 500+ how-to-vote cards. 29 stores. 1845 pledges. 1 campaign. An ethical cosmetics powerhouse and a community campaigning force might seem like an unlikely match to fight climate change—but not for Lush and GetUp!. Peta Granger, Lush Australia Director, describes the first meeting as like a “perfect first date”. “It was probably one of the most powerful meetings I’ve been to in years,” Peta says. “We each outlined who we were, what we believed in, the issues that were important to us and what we had done in that space over the last few years…we were really blown away by their passion, motivation and impact,” she says. Lush and GetUp! partnered on the ‘Vote for the Reef’ campaign, pushing for real action from Australia’s leaders in the 2016 federal election on climate change and its effects on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). “Australia has some really beautiful natural places, like the Great Barrier Reef,” Adrian Dodd, GetUp! National Director, says. “But they’re under real threat from the mining and burning of coal. It heats the reef’s waters and bleaches the coral. Climate change causes extreme weather events; it causes sea levels to rise and makes it harder to grow food. But if we stop mining and burning coal, and move to renewable energy, we can reduce the impacts of these looming issues,” he says. Adrian says that this is the first time GetUp! has partnered with a major retail outlet for a campaign, and they were excited to harness Lush’s consumer power. “It was a really exciting opportunity,” Adrian says. “It’s awesome to work with an organisation who is prepared to put their values where their mouth is and stand up and send a message about what’s at stake.” Lush’s second campaign to help save our Great Barrier Reef saw windows, stores and staff across Australia being utilised to inform their customers and the public about climate change and the GBR. The aim was to assist their customers in making informed decisions about how they cast their ballot.

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How-to-vote cards outlining the environmental policies of the Greens, Labor and the Coalition were distributed in-store, acting as a catalyst for conversation and action. 1845 pledges were received online from Lush customers, pledging to vote for the reef in the federal election. “If we truly want to use Lush to affect the social and political change we want to see in the world, then the week before an election was an important time for us to campaign this issue,” Peta says. “We were trying to stop whoever won power from propping up the destructive coal industry and instead rapidly transitioning to 100% clean renewable energy if we want the GBR to survive.” Founded more than 20 years ago by animal and environmental activists, Lush has a strong history of involvement with human and animal rights, as well as political issues, which directs every part of the company from their supply chain to innovating new products. “We’re lucky that those founding activists still run all the major parts of the business and invent all our products, so the drive to innovate sustainable products truly comes from the top,” Peta says. “We invent products with little or no need for packaging, like our solid shampoo bars, which last for 80 washes and replace three plastic bottles of liquid shampoo. Last year we sold 4.5 million of these!” she says. “We invented a palm-free soap base and didn’t patent the formula because we want other cosmetic companies to use it in striving to reduce the use of palm oil around the world. We were using plastic glitter, but after working alongside so many conservation organisations we realised how damaging this is for our oceans and replaced it all with sparkle made from mica and seaweed.” Lush staff and customers seem to be a unique breed; brought together by a personal alignment to the brand’s social and environmental ethics as well as a love of their product. Peta believes Lush customers are “very switched on”, highlighting that consumers are becoming much more aware of the impact of their purchases, as well as who they’re actually buying from. And it’s that access to increased levels of information —like Lush’s how-to-vote cards—that can really make

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the difference. Let’s be real: while many of us are taking much more care when purchasing items like cosmetics or food, a large amount are still undereducated—and perhaps a little apathetic—about climate change and its effects. But this could have more of an affect on us than we might think. Extreme weather events, sea levels rising, acidification of oceans, coastal erosion—it doesn’t stop there. The WWF also lists potential water shortages, increased risk of death and illness, especially among the elderly, and of course severe impact on our environment as the fallout of climate change. Damaging a huge number of ecosystems and wildlife, Australia’s GBR is hardly the first natural treasure to be affected. These environmental catastrophes then have an economic and social roll-on effect, impacting huge proportions of businesses worldwide, from coffee and tourism to fisheries and even the automotive industry, and finally impacting consumers at the checkout. Lush is no exception; its supply chain and global suppliers—many of whom are multi-generation family businesses—could be put at risk if climate change is not addressed ASAP. “Climate change and associated natural disasters could impact every step of our supply chain to some degree,” Peta says. “One potential problem stemming from changes to weather patterns is crop failure, where weather patterns change drastically. Most crops have traditionally been grown by producers because they are well-suited to a region. As ‘normal’ conditions and patterns change—hotter summers or colder winters, more or less rain—it is common to find that regions are no longer as well-suited to their traditional crops or that other areas have become more suited, so we need to be mindful that things change,” she says. Lush’s major supplier of rose oil, a third-generation family-run business called Sebat, is based in South West Turkey. Sebat employ a large proportion of their village of Senir, and also temporarily engage Romany Gypsies during their short harvest period. Lush has also assisted Sebat in funding a primary school by increasing the amount per kilo they pay for rose oil. And it’s this type of family-run supplier that could be dramatically affected by climate change—perhaps bringing down a business over a century old. “For many years we have had a policy of aiming to purchase our materials direct from producers: the farmers, growers and processors—wherever possible—in order to learn the true story of each ingredient,” Peta says. 34

The Sustainable Lush Fund was established in 2010 and focuses on creating a sustainable supply chain for ingredients, as well as working with growers to help diversify crops where possible to avoid loss of income. “Anything that is grown, and therefore ingredients that are derived from these materials, is vulnerable to climate change and the effects it could bring to some extent,” Peta says. “One of the things we look to do with partnerships through the Sustainable Lush Fund is to work with our partners to diversify, meaning having a few different potential cash crops, so that our partners have more stability. Even if one crop fails, there should be other potentials for income.” Peta stresses that preparedness is key here: “it’s important for Lush to have a diverse, robust supply chain that offers some resilience.” And Lush continues to be a leader in this respect, kicking goals all over the place—not just in the cosmetics industry but globally. In addition to diversifying and strengthening their supply chain, Lush continues to focus on innovative sustainable products—such as their mica-based glitter—as well as utilising their staff and store power to campaign for change. GetUp! also continues to fight climate change and increase public awareness with their ‘Better Power’ campaign in NSW and Victoria, and the ‘Fight For The Reef’ campaign, putting the pressure on Queensland’s Premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk and Federal Environment Minister, Josh Frydenberg. GetUp! and its people power combined with Lush’s social and consumer influence is just one instance of likeminded entities coming together for change. In this case, maybe the election didn’t quite pan out the way they wanted it to for the sake of our GBR but their campaign got people taking notice—and that’s a start. More organisations participating equals more reach. More people reached equals more minds informed, more minds changed. And more minds equals a combined voice. A combined voice to help create change to our governments, our environment, our economies and our health. And that’s something we should get started on. FOLLOW LUSH

facebook.com/lushaustralia instagram.com/lush_ausnz twitter.com/lush_ausnz au.lush.com youtube.com/c/lush T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


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Lucy Ahern PHOTOGRAPHY Marisa Taschke WORDS

WAVY BABY

DIVE INTO A NEW ERA OF SWIMSUITS WITH SNRKLBR. When gem-encrusted bikinis, laser cutouts and teeny sets are the new norm on the sand, the charming simplicity of retro swimwear might seem all but lost.

the label’s Instagram feed—it’s clear Laura has an eye for marketing on the platform, which features a sunsoaked feed full of eye candy.

Enter SNRKLBR: a Byron Bay-based label delivering vintageinspired bikinis and one-pieces with a contemporary feel and dash of cheekiness. Founder, Laura Smith moved to Byron from Victoria two years ago, launching SNRKLBR (pronounced ‘Snorkelbear’, and originally a childhood nickname coined by her mother) in late 2015 with boyfriend, Karl Barron.

“I care a lot more about Instagram [than Facebook],” she says. “Because I know that sales come through Instagram.”

A lover of vintage and op-shopping, Laura describes the label’s aesthetic as ‘updated vintage’, recreating the classic style and sass of retro swimwear with a modern sensibility. “I had my own vintage one-pieces and bikinis that had all gotten very old and started to wear out and I thought, why doesn’t anyone make these anymore?” Laura says. “So I decided to do it myself.” But it wasn’t quite as easy as that—Laura had no experience in fashion or design, and has to work four days a week at a town planning agency to fund the label. She needed to significantly expand her skillset— she designs all swimsuits and prints personally—to really give SNRKLBR the go it deserved. “I’ve learnt so much,” Laura says. “I hadn’t really had anything to do with art since high school, or really anything to do with fashion but my boyfriend just kind of convinced me to do it. Laura envisions the SNRKLBR girl to be bold, confident and “comfortable in her own skin”, citing Miley Cyrus—a new Byron resident herself—as someone she would love to see in her designs. This confidence also radiates into D E C E M B E R

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This natural business savvy has carried SNRKLBR from the beginning, with Laura and Karl even setting off on a trip from the Sunshine Coast to Sydney to personally meet potential stockists. But she says that—apart from doing your research before diving in—staying true to yourself is a crucial business move. “Not that I have any regrets but the thing I wish I did differently was not listening to people too much,” Laura says. “Not everyone is going to like what you’re doing, and as long as you like what you’re doing, you’re going to find the right followers.” Up next is a smaller collection very close to Laura’s heart; already a favourite with stockists, customers and the Insta-famous alike. “My favourite piece is the Babysitter Bikini—which is based on this one piece that I’ve just worn to death,” Laura says. “So I guess it’s very personal to me. It’s very sexy and high cut, and very vintage,” she says. Hello SNRKLBR, hello summer—and hello being the best vintage-dressed gal on the beach. FOLLOW SNRKLBR

facebook.com/snrklbr instagram.com/snrklbr_swimwear snrklbr.com/ 35


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THE EVOLUTION OF ALTER BRIDGE CONTINUES FIVE ALBUMS DEEP AND SURROUNDED BY BLISTERING GUITAR SOLOS AND SOARING VOCALS— ALTER BRIDGE IS KILLING IT.

Ebony Story PHOTOGRAPHY Carlos Amoedo WORDS

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With a universally recognisable sound and name, Alter Bridge has broken the three year silence and released a fifth album, titled The Last Hero. Through this, the band explores the concept of a hero: the need for heroes, the lack of and how we tend to view our heroes and leaders. And what a time to be questioning leadership and exploring a sense of disillusionment in light of the 2016 US election. Sure, the men behind Alter Bridge have been together since the band’s conception in 2004, but recording is still a tough process. Myles Kennedy (vocals, guitar), Mark Tremonti (guitar, vocals), Brian Marshall (bass) and Scott Phillips (drums) were joined in the studio by long-time collaborator, Michael ‘Elvis’ Baskette—and it was Michael that kept spirits high while they all put in 18 hour days. After over a decade in the industry, Myles says that they find recording is easiest when they stay focussed and hit the studio hard. “We just drink a lot of coffee and we survive,” Myles jokes. No wonder these musos have become so well known for their powerhouse vocals and unique, heavy riffs—they work so damn hard to develop it. Democracy. It’s not something that works for every band but in Alter Bridge’s case, democracy is a definite for the song writing process. The album theme developed from a hook that Mark teased from his guitar—which later turned into the song ‘Show Me A Leader’—and that left Myles to figure out what direction to take with the lyrics. “I remember hearing the TV in the other room and it was the campaign coverage, and I remember thinking to myself, you know they’re selling another messiah here tonight but we’re all way too divided to buy it. And I wrote that down and then it just came really quickly,” Myles says. Scott and Brian add their own elements throughout the creation process and Myles admits that if Mark and he were left to their own devices, Alter Bridge would be a very different sounding band. “We’ve really come to rely on the team and the rock and roll democracy that we’ve built,” Myles says. Throughout the whole process, ‘Elvis’ was a constant voice in the back of their minds. “He’s a true producer in the sense that he understands song arrangements, he understands how to get good performances and how to get incredible sounds—he can do it all,” Myles says. And having worked on many past albums with these guys, he’s able to pick out elements from previous records that make appearances in their current music. Incorporating your past into your present is a tough thing to do, and yet

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at the same time adding in new elements and ideas to keep revolutionising the music is even tougher. And if you were a fan of their One Day Remains era, you could almost call ‘My Champion’ a throwback song, the classic anthem type. They’ve drifted away from these anthem type songs for a while and Myles says that maybe they were afraid of that part of their repertoire. “I think we realised that there are a lot of fans that still really like that [anthem songs] and they want something that’s positive. And when Mark played me that riff, it felt good and made me feel a certain way, so we ran with it,” Myles says. Possibly their most ‘mainstream’ track in years but, surprisingly for the band, it’s a favourite. And despite the album having some great highs, there are songs that address the darker corners of life. ‘Losing Patience’ takes a look at experiencing any type of adversity and how you’re going to deal with it. Music is almost always an expression of personal experiences and Myles talks about a period in his life where he was going to quit being a musician: “I was going to hang up the cleats so to speak and I was thinking about what my psychology was at that point and what my feelings were. So I went back and analysed that, extracted it and put it to a lyric and you’ve got ‘Losing Patience’.” A tumultuous album that pulls you along for the ride, The Last Hero is a juggernaut of talent and passion, of which the Alter Bridge guys prove they have tonnes to burn. They’re a band that’s been around for over a decade and still continue to evolve their music with each album. If you now have the urge to see them live, they have a string of dates taking them from the US to Europe and then down to Australia and New Zealand. Alter Bridge is here to stay. The Last Hero is available on Nerve Gas: nervegas.com.au/alterbridgelasthero

FOLLOW ALTER BRIDGE

facebook.com/alterbridge instagram.com/officialalterbridge play.spotify.com/artist/4DWX7u8BV0vZIQSpJQQDWU twitter.com/alterbridge alterbridge.com youtube.com/user/alterbridgevevo

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MIND GAMES HAIR

Rock Retro Scissors Katie Kromwijk Paige Johnston MAKEUP

RVL Makeup STYLING

Chloe Jade Miller Susannah Ioannou MODELS

Finesse Models Elisabeth Pride Models Gabriel Richardson Imagen PHOTOGRAPHER

Baxter William

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T E OWEARS M A G ELISABETH

FREE THE GYPSY PIXIE CROP MINK PINK ECHO FRAY A-LINE SKIRT GABRIEL WEARS STYLIST’S OWN TEE VINTAGE JACKET FROM SWOP HIS OWN JEANS

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GABRIEL WEARS VINTAGE TEE FROM SWOP VINTAGE SHIRT FROM SWOP HIS OWN JACKET HIS OWN JEANS HIS OWN SHOES IMAGEN WEARS BANDIT BRAND BAD LIVER LACE TANK FROM MIDWEST TRADER VINTAGE OVERALLS FROM MIDWEST TRADER DR. MARTENS 1461 FROM BARLOW SHOES STYLIST’S OWN SCARF

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ELISABETH WEARS FREE THE GYPSY PIXIE CROP MINK PINK ECHO FRAY A-LINE SKIRT D E C E M B E R

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45 DR. MARTENS 1460 CHERRY FROM BARLOW SHOES


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ELISABETH WEARS LACK OF COLOR THE JOPLIN MINK PINK BALI HIGH BODYSUIT VINTAGE SHORTS FROM SWOP

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ELISABETH WEARS VINTAGE TEE FROM SWOP GABRIEL WEARS 50

VINTAGE LONG SLEEVE FROM SWOP

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T E OWEARS M A G ELISABETH

ESQ HEART SPEQZ VINTAGE TEE FROM SWOP

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HIS OWN JACKET T E O M A G A Z I N E . C O M . A U


EMECIA IS BACK

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Zoe Butler PHOTOGRAPHY Josh McCawley WORDS

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TALKING THE PROCESSES OF WRITING AND RECORDING, AND THE ADELAIDE MUSIC SCENE. It’s been a busy year for the progressive post-hardcore boys of Emecia. There’s been a new lyric video clip for ‘Even If It Kills Us’, which was featured in Australian Motocross champ, Jackson ‘Jacko’ Strong’s promo clip, and the boys have also been hard at work in the studio. Formed in 2013, we told you that they’d be here to stay. The new lineup is like one big family, with vocalist Scott Middlin, Trevor Lehmann on guitar, Ben Craven on Bass and Pete Beveridge on drums. TEO got to sit down in a loud café on the east side of Adelaide with Scott, Ben and Pete to chat about their work and what the Adelaide music scene is like right now.

FOLLOW EMECIA

facebook.com/emeciaofficial instagram.com/emeciaofficial twitter.com/emeciaofficial

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TEO: Emecia started back in 2013. How has the sound

going to go. We’ve played Pirie before and we always do

Scott: It got better! We used to be a bit more raw and

the first show back.

developed since you brought in these guys?

punky before but now I think we are a bit chunkier and

well-rounded. We are more professional too, and this can

set you apart because there is a lot of good stuff coming out and you can’t get away with those garage, rawsounding records. Unless you’re a grunge band, of course.

Pete: We sound a bit more technical. I think it’s got more drive.

really well there—always have the best time—but it was

The reason we made it secret was if we did a bad job, we could say, ‘we didn’t advertise that we’d play there.’ But it went well. Is it hard not to get star-struck around the bigger bands you support? S: Most of the dudes are very chill. We find it’s a bit more

S: We’re not just playing songs anymore; we’re tweaking them and asking, ‘is this the best it can be?’

Ben: We are going back into the studio to fix what we

cutthroat in the local scene. We find it easier to hang out with bigger bands because they’re not threatened by anyone; they’re already having a good time touring, so you can just bro down with everyone. With Adelaide you

don’t like about the current songs before we release

look at someone the wrong way and then…

done before.

P: We need to get the feeling of community back. The

Does that mean the writing process has changed since

than this, like shitty schoolyard.

S: Yes, heaps. We used to just write in the band room and,

S: Even at the regional shows, every band is ready to hang

them. This is something that these guys wouldn’t have

music community needs to feel like family again, rather

you first started out?

as well as it worked, it’s just too slow and time consuming.

Now we’ve all got some form of a home studio. Our guitarist, Trevor has a really cool set up at his house. He actually made me a vocal booth—I’m really tall and he’s catered it to me.

P: We end up pretty much having a song as a digital file that we each get and listen to. We are learning our own songs before we play them in the jam space.

Tell me about working with Andy Kite and Kyle Bloksgaard.

P: Andy has his studio in Thebarton (Against The Grain Studio) and we tracked the drums there. I managed to

out with beers. For some reason here, you go ‘hey’ and they give you a blank stare. I don’t know if that’s because they don’t like us. B: Maybe we’re just old and jaded. Is it the culture or because Adelaide has so many bands competing for a much smaller audience? S: Exactly right. You find that when bands get a bigger show, supporting a US band or something, you’d think Adelaide bands would be like, ‘oh sick they got that spot!’ But no. Everyone wants to be supported but they don’t want to

smash them out in three hours, including set up and that

support. We just want to play our music and have fun.

everything. Then we took those files to Kyle and the other

And what now for you guys?

meant that in the afternoon we just sat down and edited guys did their stuff.

S: It feels right this time. We’ve been in different bands

And you guys played as a secret band for The Daily

done what we needed to do. But this time it feels

S: Yes! It was really fun and we didn’t know how it was

balance everything.

and we’ve done the grind, the shit shows and we’ve

Chase Foundations Tour, correct?

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different. I mean, it’s still hard, and we’re still trying to

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14STRK: INSTAGLAM Alexzandra Barilla PHOTOGRAPHY James Coomer WORDS

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GETTING CONNECTED WITH THE FACE BEHIND INSTAGRAM’S 14STRK. Danielle Hioe (Elle for short) started her Instagram to

share photos, just like any other teenager. However, her love for fashion and her unique vintage style has landed

her over 13.7 thousand followers in a year. We had a chat

with Elle about her rise to the social media spotlight and her life in the limelight.

TEO: Who is Danielle Hioe?

Elle: I’m Elle aka @14strk! I’m 18 and currently studying Communications (Media Arts and Production) and International Studies at University of Technology, Sydney.

So you’re at uni, you vlog and run your popular Instagram account. What else do you do in your spare time?

I usually binge watch Netflix, catch up with friends, thrift

and eat my way around Sydney. On the weekends, I usually head to Plan B to dance out my uni stress.

Technology plays a major role in many of your projects,

so would you say you struggle to disconnect when you’re in need of some downtime?

Yes, definitely! I don’t even know if I ever fully disconnect to be honest. Sometimes, when I find I’m getting a little too obsessive over Instagram, I delete the app for a few

hours so I can chill out a little. I definitely have trouble not going on the internet—I’m plugged in 24/7. I feel

like those kids whose parents send them to camps about internet addiction; all I need is Wi-Fi to live.

You’re studying a mix of degrees at uni, what job do you hope to land when you graduate? I have a whole list of things I’d like to do: cinematography/ directing/editing for music videos, styling or working in art direction for a label. But I’m not too sure. Anything creative would be good! Hopefully somewhere that pays alright as well! What have been the main benefits of using Instagram? It’s allowed me to meet amazing people in my city and all over the world, collaborate with sick brands and offered me great career opportunities. Having Instagram has also allowed me to become more comfortable in my own style and personality. The fact that people all over the world like my style is crazy. You’ve done styling and promotional work for a collection of fashion labels, what have been some of the highlights? Low Ton, for sure. They’re a local Sydney brand and have a great brand aesthetic—I feel like they’re on the way to getting big so I’m excited. Where is one location that you would love to visit the most in the world and why? Shinjuku in Tokyo. I love really busy cities, I’m a massive metropolitan lover—plus I think the fashion scene in Japan is so vibrant and interesting. Shinjuku seems really alive and interesting. I’d love to do a shoot at night there.

What is your staple clothing item?

Definitely my shiny black boots from Vagabond that I

picked up in Copenhagen! They’re my beloved kids—I don’t know what I would do without them. Knowing me,

I’ll probably wear them until they fall apart. I get super attached to items.

What is your favourite store to shop at?

I usually thrift around the city or hit up Paddy’s markets for items.

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FOLLOW 14STRK

instagram.com/14strk youtube.com/channel/UC7NJyM92cM1uSxPYqPilVsQ

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ADL INK

A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

WE TALK INK WITH THE TEAM AT ADELAIDE’S UNSEEN TATTOO

Lucy Ahern PHOTOGRAPHY Jack Fenby WORDS

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Nestled just off the Norwood Parade, alongside

with daggers, snakes, skulls and Japanese tattoos

contemporary art space, Hugo Michell Gallery, lays

among their most requested. But if there’s one

a rather different kind of art purveyor. Created by

thing they won’t do, it’s copy.

Giac and Reanna, Unseen Tattoo offers a welcoming environment for Adelaide’s ink enthusiasts.

“It’s great for people to have a reference of what they like, however it’s always best to put your own spin on it. Why

“It’s always been my dream to have my own space,”

wouldn’t you want a tattoo that was made just for you?”

says Giac. “I’ve been tattooing for 13 years and working in different studios around the world with friends and

Not so in love with that dragonfly tatt you committed

great artists, so I wanted to put all those influences I

to at 18? Unseen have you covered there too. Reanna

collected over the years into my own studio.”

is the laser technician at the studio, specialising in noninvasive tattoo removal and lightening.

Giac moved to Australia from Italy four and a half years ago, travelling the country with wife, Reanna before

“I’m erasing the tattoos people no longer love,” she

settling two years ago in Adelaide.

says. “Sometimes to give them their bare skin again, but mostly to lighten to make way for a better tattoo that

“What I wanted to create for Unseen is a relaxed

they’ll love forever…hopefully.”

atmosphere, where everyone is welcome to get tattooed,” Giac says. “I didn’t want to open a private appointment

And the best part? It’ll be gone quicker—and

only studio and I didn’t want to open a street shop, so I

cheaper—than you might think, with Unseen’s results-

created something that’s in between; we’re in a great and

over-profit approach.

discrete location, always open to public—but you’re not getting tattooed in a display window.”

So how do we avoid ending up with regrettable ink in the first place?

Lining the walls are flash tattoos and art from the team and international artists, creating an immersive visual

“Do your research! Choose an artist that does the style

experience. “A lot of our clients will get inspiration for

you want and trust them,” Reanna says. “Giving your

their next tattoo from looking at the walls whilst being

artist the freedom to put their creative spin on the

tattooed,” says Giac.

design always deems a better tattoo. And don’t get fooled by the internet; go into shops, meet the artists

Specialising in traditional tattooing—from American to

and choose who inspires you.”

Japanese and tribal—Giac has a masterful technique, precise linework and measured use of colour but he also

We’ll ink to that.

has his business hat on, lending his needle to all styles. “I really try my best to tattoo almost everything,” he

Get inked at Unseen Tattoo at 260 Portrush Road,

says. “I think it’s an essential skill to have.”

Beulah Park.

Unseen’s second artist, Aimee also works with traditional

Find Giac’s work at instagram.com/jack.unseen

styles, with an eye for delicate botanical creations and

Find Reanna’s work at instagram.com/aimeedoestattoos

pop culture iconography (think Kurt Russell and Silence FOLLOW UNSEEN TATOO

of the Lambs). It’s this commitment to the traditional style—with a personal touch—that is getting Unseen noticed;

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facebook.com/unseentattooadelaide instagram.com/unseen_tattoo unseentattoo.com

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BEASTO BLANCO IS BACK

PHOTOGRAPHY Natalia

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PHOTOGRAPHY William

Britt

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BROTHER LATHAM DISCUSSES BAND DYNAMICS AND OFFERS SOME EXCITING NEWS FOR BEASTO FANS! With an ongoing US tour, a new self-titled album and

a gig on the Monsters of Rock Cruise lined up, Beasto Blanco is making a splash. After talking to lead guitarist

and co-founder, Brother Latham, it’s clear that Beasto Blanco’s energy and enthusiasm is magnetic.

Coming from all walks of musical life, you would

assume there would be some butting of heads in the

recording studio but according to Latham that could not be further from the truth.

“Chuck and I—if you put us in a room together for a

month, we’d probably have nine records written. We’ve

been brothers for almost 30 years now so personality complex? Not at all,” he says. “We write really well

“We want to incorporate both the first record and, of course, the new record.” And although Australia is sometimes forgotten about, when it comes to tours, Latham assures us that Aussie Beasto fans won’t be left feeling neglected. “We have been wanting to get down there forever now. When Chuck was down there with Mötley Crüe and Alice Cooper, about a year ago, Chuck was talking with some promoters to try to get us onto some festivals, so we’re working on it!” You can grab a copy of the new album, Beasto Blanco, via livefastdieloud.com.

together and also with the other band members: Calico,

and Jan and Tim—it’s probably the coolest project I’ve

ever done just because of these people. Everybody is just so down to earth and grounded, it’s great.”

WORDS

Bianca Iovino

Beasto Blanco’s name was further cemented in the rock music scene after playing the NAMMJam 2016 in California.

“It was such a great event. It was cool to be asked to do it and it was an honour to be able to share the stage and bill with John 5 and LA Guns, and have Alice Cooper join us for a song. The response was electric.”

In February next year, Beasto Blanco is due to feature on the Monsters of Rock Cruise, which departs from Tampa, Florida and travels through Mexico, George Town and the Grand Cayman. Latham and the band are pretty excited for the gig.

“…It’ll be the first cruise that we’ve done as a band and for this tour. We’re really excited about it and from what I’ve heard, that cruise is supposed to be a really good time.”

Although the cruise is still a couple of months away, the

band is already hard at work preparing their set list.

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FOLLOW BEASTO BLANCO

facebook.com/beastoblanco instagram.com/beastoblanco twitter.com/beastoblanco beastoblanco.com

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CREATING WITH

I ONLY EAT DESSERTS WORDS Bernadette

Chan PHOTOGRAPHY Bernadette Chan

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AMERICAN SWEETS RECIPES These recipes are inspired by my obsession with American sweets. I love American TV so the mere mention of twinkies, s’mores and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups will leave me curious and salivating. It’s because of this that I’ve tried my hand at making homemade peanut butter cups. Peanut butter is mixed into the chocolate to give it that deliciousness before you reach a salty sweet peanut butter filling (FYI they are super easy to make). Another love that I have are s’mores, which I’ve experimented with in a macaron form. Digestive biscuits are blended into the macaron batter and then filled with a dark chocolate ganache and a homemade marshmallow fluff.

BIO Bernadette Chan is an Adelaide based food blogger and an aspiring photographer. A giant sweet tooth at heart, her love for beautiful desserts and photography collided when she created the blog I Only Eat Desserts back in 2012. Her love for photography led her to quit a job in engineering to study it full time. She now holds a Diploma of Photo Imaging and is working towards her dream to become a food photographer.

FOLLOW I ONLY EAT DESSERTS

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S’MORES MACARONS T E O M A G

MAKES 25

INGREDIENTS 150g almond meal

GANACHE

MARSHMALLOW FLUFF

150g pure icing sugar

125g dark chocolate

40ml water

40g digestive biscuits 4 egg white (2 per bowl and ensure eggs are at room temperature) 150g caster sugar 40ml water 68

100ml cream 5g sugar 25g butter

3/8 cup white sugar 3/8 cup corn syrup 1½ egg whites ¼ tsp cream of tartar E O Mextract A G A Z ½ tsp Tvanilla

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METHOD 1.

2.

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Process the almond meal, pure icing sugar and digestive biscuits, using a food processor, until a fine powder is formed. Sift the almond meal, pure icing sugar and digestive biscuits into a bowl. Throw away any parts that can’t fit through the sifter. Set this aside.

3.

Mix one of the bowls of egg whites with food colouring and set aside.

4.

Combine caster sugar and water in a saucepan on medium heat (ensure sugar is damp).

5.

Once sugar and water has reached 50°C on a candy thermometer, begin whisking the egg whites (not coloured) with an electric hand whisk until the peaks curl down when the beaters are lifted up (known as the soft peak stage).

6.

7.

15. Leave the trays at room temperature for 30 minutes and until nothing sticks to your finger when you

gently touch them (this forms a skin which helps develop feet on your macaron).

16. Preheat oven to 150°C (130°C fan-forced) and bake

for 15–18 minutes (heat source is from the bottom of

the oven). If you want to check if your shells are done,

lift one off and if it’s sticking to the baking paper pop the tray back in for a few more minutes. You may also sacrifice one macaron shell and break it apart to see

if it’s set inside—when it looks like the inside is set and it’s not too moist, then the macarons are ready. 17.

Cool the macarons on the trays. Pair the shells up according to size.

When the sugar syrup reaches 118°C remove from heat and wait for the bubbles to stop (few seconds). Pour it in a thin stream slowly into the egg whites while still whisking them. Whisk until the meringue is warm and forms stiff, glossy peaks (around 8 minutes).

To make chocolate ganache:

In a separate bowl, mix almond meal and pure icing sugar with the other coloured egg whites until you get a smooth paste.

To make marshmallow fluff:

8.

Fold a third of the meringue to the almond meal mixture and then fold the rest of the meringue in.

9.

Lift some of the batter and slap it on the side of the bowl (this removes the air from the batter to get it the right consistency.) To test if your batter is ready, lift the spatula out of the bowl and try to draw a figure “8”

10.

Fill the batter into a piping bag with a 1cm round tip.

11.

Line baking tray with a stencil below it (the one I use has 4cm diameter circles with the circles 2cm apart).

12. Pipe batter onto the baking paper. Have the piping bag vertical and about 1cm from the baking paper. Aim the piping tip to be at the centre of one of the stencil circles. When you pipe, the batter will spread and form a circle. If you have a little tip at the top after piping, it should sink back into the batter 13.

Lightly tap the baking tray a few times on a towel on a bench.

14.

Use a toothpick to poke out all the air bubbles left in the batter.

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1. Put dark chocolate, cream, sugar and butter into a saucepan and melt over low heat, stirring often.

2. Place in fridge to set.

1. Place water, sugar and corn syrup in a saucepan and stir to combine. Place over medium-high heat and wait until it has reached 115°C.

2. Meanwhile, once sugar syrup has reached 105°C, whip egg whites and cream of tartar until soft peaks form. When sugar syrup has reached 115°C, slowly pour it into the egg whites and whip it until it is thick and glossy (about 8 minutes).

3. Add vanilla and whip it until marshmallow fluff has reached room temperature.

To assemble: 1. Fill piping bag with ganache (I use the same circular nozzle as for the macaron) and pipe onto half of the macaron shells.

2. Fill another piping bag with marshmallow fluff and pipe on top of ganache.

3. Top with the other half of the macaron shell. 4. Place macarons in fridge for 24 hours for flavours

to develop. Remember to store them in an airtight

container and to bring them to room temperature when you are about to eat them.

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HOMEMADE PEANUT BUTTER CUPS MAKES 10 MINI CUPS

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INGREDIENTS 142g milk chocolate 116g smooth peanut butter 32g soft icing sugar, sifted 8g brown sugar Pinch of salt

METHOD 1. Line mini cupcake tray with 10 mini paper cups. 2. Place milk chocolate and 1 tablespoon of the peanut butter into a saucepan and melt over low heat. Stir often until melted. Remove from heat. 3. Spoon a teaspoon of melted chocolate into the bottom of the paper cups and using the spoon, push some of the chocolate up to the sides to create a layer of chocolate. 4. Refrigerate tray for about 10 minutes or until it sets. 5. Mix the rest of the peanut butter, the icing sugar, brown sugar and salt in a bowl using a spoon. Mix until it is all incorporated. 6. Take tray out of fridge and spoon out about half a tablespoon of peanut butter filling. Roll into a ball with your hands and place it into the centre of the chocolate cups. Press to flatten it and ensure it fits into the cup. 7. Refrigerate tray again for 20 minutes. 8. Reheat melted chocolate until it is runny again. 9. Take out tray from fridge. Spoon 1 teaspoon of melted chocolate over peanut butter cup and tilt the tray to cover the whole cup. Do this one at a time. 10. Refrigerate for 1 hour or until set.

TAG US IN YOUR SNAPS WHEN YOU TRY THIS AT HOME

@ionlyeatdesserts @teomagazine #teoxioed

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A DAY TO REMEMBER IS BACK WITH BAD VIBRATIONS

Jessie Salamon PHOTOGRAPHY James Hartley WORDS

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RHYTHM GUITARIST, NEIL WESTFALL TALKS NEW ALBUM AND THE BAND’S AUSTRALIAN TOUR. It only seems like yesterday when American metal band, A Day To Remember graced our shores with a tour. Now the guys are back and better than ever after their September release, Bad Vibrations. A Day To Remember has spent the year completing the band’s biggest North American tour yet, alongside Blink-182, All Time Low and The AllAmerican Rejects. In the midst of touring, rhythm guitarist Neil Westfall was able to catch up with TEO and discuss the new album and the Australian leg of the Bad Vibes Tour. TEO: With Bad Vibrations now released, are you keen for Australian fans to hear the new content? Neil: Yes! The Australian fans love this shit. They love it so much that they let us in the country to play. Do you expect any songs from the new record to be declared fan favourites? I think the song ‘Reassemble’ is going to be a pretty cool song live; it’ll be one to sing along and mosh around to. The record release date was delayed. Why did you decide to push it back? When we were working on the artwork for the album— basically they said we could put it out on the original release date or we could push it back and we could make the packaging and artwork perfect and exactly what we had in our heads. I’d much rather have what someone intended it to be and have it later, rather than get it early and have something they’re not happy with.

just a rad place to go and the fans are just awesome— you can tell they’re really excited that we’re coming and playing for them. As a band, you create this energy in the room that really revs up the crowd. How do you feel when you’re watching the crowd from where you are? It’s pretty surreal. I mean, you’re up there and you’re just watching these kids having the time of their life and I’m on stage having the time of my life. I’m having as good a time as they are and that’s probably why there’s that energy throughout the whole room. You’re also brining along Of Mice & Men so it should be a real fun tour for both bands. Yeah. They’re great guys and they’re awesome live. I’m excited to see them. I haven’t seen them in a while. Bad Vibrations is available on iTunes: itunes.apple.com/au/album/bad-vibrations-deluxeedition/id1118511694?app=itunes&ign-mpt=uo%3D4 Tickets to the Bad Vibes Tour are available at: livenation.com.au/artists/a-day-to-remember

What was your favourite part about recording Bad Vibrations? Just the process in general. We record our albums a certain way almost every time and this was one of the first times we went out of our comfort zone and tried to be creative. I think that was the best part about it; not knowing what to expect and kind of being scared. FOLLOW A DAY TO REMEMBER

It’s been a year since you’ve toured Australia. Are you excited to be back? I wish Australia had like 50 cities that were as big as the ones we already play so we can just stay there forever. It’s

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facebook.com/adtr instagram.com/whereisadtr twitter.com/whereisadtr youtube.com/user/adaytoremember

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THROW BACK TIME KILLERS by Creative Pear-spective

FOLLOW CREATIVE PEAR-SPECTIVE

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TECHNOLOGY POEM BY BIANCA IOVINO Growing gadgetry and mutating mechanisms encoding the blame for ADHD and brain tumours. Everything has to happen now— now— now. Nothing’s ever gradual or perfected over time. Overheating cyber-men sweating oil. Building products by the millions, pumped out at suffocating speed. Forcing people to digest and update. No time for malfunctions. We must build something: bigger, yet smaller larger, yet slimmer faster, yet slower— NOW. A paradoxical epitome, to be pushed into meek little hands who crave too much attention. Deleting patience and downloading antisocialism. Why aren’t you working? Supposedly designed in the name of freedom, but I feel imprisoned. Too fast, too fast I say. My nineteen years already ancient in the eyes of the next generation. I can’t catch my breath, or keep up. The Electronica drone, the music of the children. It leaves me for dead. The nonsensical sound of a high-tech revolution. “Keep the noise down!” I bellow— an immortal echo of those before me.

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ILLUSTRATION

Creative Pear-spective

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CELL AR DOOR OPEN 7 DAYS

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ISSUE 15 // TECH FIENDS  
ISSUE 15 // TECH FIENDS