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Process Journey BEHIND THE SCENES OF CREATING ARTICLE

by Teodora Bankovska


Process Journey BEHIND THE SCENES OF CREATING ARTICLE


PROJECT JOURNEY: WEEKS 1 - 30

Initial Research

Building a concept

Uncertainties/ Obstacles/ Insights/ Experiments

Clarity

Design: Experiments, Interviews, Sketching, Testing, Research


Rushing to “solve� it all at once

The change in trajectory

Taking a break

Starting to lose focus

Drawing, rendering, rendering, drawing, rendering...

I began this journey having the buildings chosen and the atmosphere that I wanted to create into the space. I chose to write an open brief which would allow the project to evolve throughout research, discussions and experiments. It was a risk and I am glad I took it. The most challenging task over the past few months was to refine the research and the various ideas that arose in order to create a rich, layered experience with a simple and clear concept. Balancing the different roles involved into the creation of the project was very interesting and also very challenging due to the frequent inner discussions.

Clarity, Design

Final Production


PROJECT JOURNEY WEEKS 1 - 30

CONTENTS

4


5

Part 2

DEFINING A CONCEPT 40

Week 6 Defining connections and activities

48

Week 7 Initial ideas explored through sketching and a mock model

Part 1

INITIAL RESEARCH 10

54

Site Visit. Measuring the arches on site

64

Week 2 Choosing the site. Urban design research

26

Week 3 Exploring Merchant Lane through sound, photographs and timelapse videos

28

Week 4

68

Week 5 Defining considerations for creating a social venture

Week 10 Exploring the volumes of the Corner building through sketches

74

Week 11 Developing a vision for annual content of a magazine

78

Week 12 Production of initial drawings and visuals

Interviews with a photograph and an urban planning designer

32

Week 9 The initial concept emerges: A culture magazine, realised in physical spaces

Week 1 The image of the city

16

Week 8

80

Week 13 Time to weigh things up and reflect


PROJECT JOURNEY WEEKS 1 - 30

CONTENTS

6


7

Part 3

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT 86

Week 14

Part 4

FINAL PRODUCTION 174

Looking at things with fresh eyes. First major changes

94

Week 15 Spatial planning inspired by the printed medium. Lights and shadows study

104

Week 16 The 5 “Why?”. Site visit. First proposal for Arch 1

112

Production of drawings and visuals for Spring submission

178

182

184

Week 19

186

162

Week 20

188

Week 27 Modelling and visuals of the studios. Attending a Flowers Bouquet workshop

Interviews. Jesmonite experiments

190

Week 21

192

Visitors journeys. Events planning. Annual curation

Week 26 Attending a Riso printing Workshop

The change in trajectory. Experiencing thresholds

134

Week 25 Team - creating the personalities. Meeting room and editorial creating the visuals

Poster 2. Screen printing studios - visits and interviews

124

Week 24 Café - modelling and rendering

Week 17 Week 18

Week 23 Making the Arches model. Initial visuals of the Café

Poster 1. Sketching of Editorial

116

Week 22

Week 28-30 Final Production

Bibliography


9

Part 1 of the project is focused on researching the possible sites and topics for my personal project.

Part 1

INITIAL RESEARCH


10

Week 1


11

OBSERVING GLASGOW Glasgow has seen significant regeneration over the past twenty years and continues to invest in the future city centre experience. Projects like Glasgow Avenues and Strategic Plan for Cycling are already in action. However, a project that intrigues me the most, is looking at the Glasgow lanes as a potential starting point for further development of the City centre experience. There is a system of around 90 lanes in the City Centre which has developed over many centuries but most significantly during the past 300 years. The lanes, in combination with the large number of Listed Buildings, present a remarkable and rich architectural heritage. Currently misused and underdeveloped the lanes in the city centre, hold great potential to enrich even more vibrant Glasgow. They could offer a very different journey compared to the busy main streets in terms of scale and human experience and thus create a unique public realm for the locals and the visitors of Glasgow.

PERSONAL MOTIVATION I have always been interested in discovering the hidden gems of each city I visit because they carry a unique character and manage to reveal the city’s genuine identity that has been developed over the centuries. I also enjoy the challenge of discovering them because this adds exclusivity to the experience. Glasgow is a city with very rich history, a significant part of which is held by its Lane system. For years I have been avoiding using them because they currently suffer from a series of negative characteristics. However, I feel that by proposing a development, I could create the change I seek for. From the position of a future interior designer, I am interested in creating a flexible space that encourages social interaction and is located in the context of Glasgow’s Lane system.

Week 1


12

Sauch

iehall

Str.

River Clyde

A map of the lane system journey

Week 1


13

DISCOVERING THE LANES PHOTOGRAPHS AND NOTES

My initial encounter with the Glasgow Lane Strategy was when I read an article about the future development of the city. I then, researched the published strategy in order to get myself familiar with the approved plan for Glasgow. However, I was missing a more detailed information about the lanes and thus I began my personal journey towards exploring them. I began by walking across the lane system whilst taking pictures and notes about my observations.

Week 1


14

ICONIC ARCHITECTURE IN A GHOST TOWN My discoveries pointed out that the lane system is currently used mostly as parking lots, garages and storing trash bins. However, within all that misused space, some of the most iconic buildings in Glasgow take place. Mackintosh’s Daily record, designed in 1901 is located on Renfield Lane. Whilst on Renfield Lane, I met a group of tourists taking pictures whose enthusiastic chatter was interrupting the otherwise quiet environment. Apart from a few clearly maintained lanes, the rest of them showed obvious underdevelopment and misuse. My observations were that the majority of the lanes were acting as “ghost towns”. They were dark and intimidating. The noises coming from them were caused by the air-conditioners of the tall office buildings and the restaurants and bars on the main streets.

Week 1


15

Week 1


16

CHOOSING THE SITE During my journey of discovering Glasgow’s Lane system I came across Merchant Lane. The site is unique due to its beautiful archways. The lane is spacious, quiet and accessible to daylight. Moreover at the junction of Merchant Lane and Clyde street is situated the corner block of the old Fishmarket, which attracts with its beautiful architecture.

THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE CORNER BUILDING, THE BEAUTIFUL BRICK ARCHWAY OF THE BRIDGE AND THE LANE CONNECTING THEM, MERGED TOGETHER, FORMING MY CHOSEN SITE.

Week 2


17

The site is located in the centre of a busy and thriving surrounding, offering a great potential for development. The buildings I have selected are next to the River Clyde, surrounded by Glasgow Green, Glasgow City College, The Briggait and close to the bustling High Street.

Week 2


18

SITE LOCATION PHOTOGRAPHS Week 2


19

Week 2


20

Week 2


21

SITE BUILDING

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES Constructed in 1903 as the third extension of the Fishmarket, the Corner block is a Category A listed building. Previously it had a mezzanine level. There are no records of the original drawings of the building in the Mitchell Library. However, it is possible to be measured on site. Now, the building is at risk, which may cause its future demolition. I have contacted the architecture company involved in the development project of the Briggait, but I have not yet received a reply about the future of the Corner Block. The potential of the Corner block lies in its architectural merit, proportion, location, outlook, visibility, access to daylight. It offers great possibilities to be developed and by this becoming a starting point for activation of the lane it is situated on.

Week 2


22

THE IMAGE OF THE CITY As I discovered through my research, Glasgow has experienced a great regeneration during the past 20 years and it is continuing to invest into its future development.1 I am interested in undertaking the challenge of turning an abandoned area into an inviting urban environment. My aim is to create a public space which holds an open character, offers a cultural journey and tells stories.

St. Enoch is an area with lower property values which also holds great opportunities for arts/culture/maker development.

Fig. 1

Week 2


23

Fig. 2

Site Location

1

WMUD, “Lane strategy for Glasgow City Centre”, (Glasgow, 2016), p.1 Fig. 1 City Dynamics, WMUD, “Lane strategy for Glasgow City Centre”, (Glasgow, 2016), p.17 3 Fig. 2 Integration with Avenue project, WMUD, “Lane strategy for Glasgow City Centre”, (Glasgow, 2016), p.60 2

Week 2


24

Through the analysis of Agnes Sandstedt and Johanna Rosvall, master design students who graduated from Urban Design at University of Strathclyde in 2015, I discovered what the demographics along the river Clyde are. “Our analysis showed an open wound in Glasgow. Along the River Clyde, the urban fabric seems particularly weak: lacks access to services, features irregular and incoherent densities and large impenetrable barriers, is marginal to the wider urban network and out of human scale. � 4

Fig. 3

Fig. 4 4

Agnes Sandstedt and Johanna Rosval, http://www.udsu-strath.com/msc-urban-design/future-glasgow-the-peals-of-the-clyde-strategy/ Fig. 3 Demographics of the city: Children, http://www.udsu-strath.com/msc-urban-design/future-glasgow-the-peals-of-the-clyde-strategy/ 6 Fig. 4 Demographics of the city: Students, http://www.udsu-strath.com/msc-urban-design/future-glasgow-the-peals-of-the-clyde-strategy/ 7 Fig. 5 Demographics of the city: Professionals, http://www.udsu-strath.com/msc-urban-design/future-glasgow-the-peals-of-the-clyde-strategy/ 8 Fig. 6 Demographics of the city: Retired people, http://www.udsu-strath.com/msc-urban-design/future-glasgow-the-peals-of-the-clyde-strategy/ 5


25

Fig. 5

Fig. 6

Week 2


26

HUMAN INTERACTION WITH THE SITE What I have noticed during my visit to Merchant Lane is that it appeared to be radically different from its surrounding area. THE LANE AND THE BUILDINGS, SITUATED ON IT, ARE AS IF ISOLATED FROM THE REST OF VIBRANT MERCHANT CITY. THE SITE APPEARS TO BE A GHOST TOWN IN THE CENTRE OF A BUSY LOCATION. I have documented my observations through a number of timelapse videos. The videos capture the interactions: at the lane, across the street from the lane and at the junction between Clyde Str and Saltmarket. People: Whilst filming on the lane only one person walked on it. In contrast to this, whilst under the bridge and across the lane I have counted dozens of people walking, cycling, young and old, solo and in groups. Further from the site, at the street junction, the traffic became times busier. Sound: It was absolutely silent at the lane. As I moved across the lane, under the bridge, the noise from the street and the people talking passing by me increased dramatically. At the junction, it was so noisy and busy that it was hard to differentiate the sounds coming from people, vehicles, birds, dogs...

Week 3


27

Week 3


28 MY FURTHER RESEARCH CONTINUED WITH TWO INTERVIEWS. I HAVE ARRANGED MEETINGS WITH WILLIE MILLER, WHO HAS DESIGNED THE DRAFT FOR “LANE STRATEGY FOR GLASGOW CITY CENTRE”, AND CHRIS LESLIE WHO HAS SPENT 18 MONTHS DOCUMENTING PADDY’S MARKET (PREVIOUSLY LOCATED NEXT TO MY CHOSEN SITE).

INTERVIEW WITH WILLIE MILLER URBAN DESIGNER

During the talk we discussed broadly the work that he had already done for the Glasgow Lane project and the challenges related to execution. We also talked about the dynamics of the city, the recent changes in the infrastucture and the plans for the future.

Week 4


29

INTERVIEW WITH CHRIS LESLIE PHOTOGRAPHER I have arranged the talk with Chris in order to better understand the sociological aspects towards my chosen site. By knowing the history of the area I could later make informed decisions about my proposal. During the meeting Chris shared his memories and impessions about Paddy’s Market - a flea market that has existed in Glasgow for 200 years until it was closed in 2009 by the City Council. He shared that he considers the way the traders were treated as unfair. Paddy’s market has been a social hub and a meeting place for many and now it is a neglected ghost town. We have also discussed how the city and this specific area of it has been revamped over the last decade. Little has been left from its past, for good or worse.

“ IT IS A CHANGING GLASGOW. THERE’S NO CROSSOVER BETWEEN THE NOSTALGIA FOR THE PAST AND THE PLANS FOR THE FUTURE, BUT IT IS GOOD TO BE AWARE OF BOTH STORIES.”

Week 4


30

THE CONCEPT

A SOCIAL VENTURE By observing the city from an eye level, I have realised that there is a need for improvement in terms of social interaction, comfort and sense of community. This could be realised by creating an interior space, which holds an open character. Such space would increase the volume of pedestrian traffic and thus the interaction with the lanes. “CITYSCAPE MATTERS, ESPECIALLY THROUGH SMALL SHOPS WITH AN OPEN CHARACTER”. -Thaddeus Muller , “The city at eye level” The people in public space form a huge reservoir of diverse cognitive, tactile, emotional, aesthetic, sensational and relationship building experiences. They are the driving force for a city’s prosperity. Small shops with open facades not only create the context for the thriving city, but allow for movement between the public and the private. Public life makes it possible to traverse these borders and transition from one experience into another. This movement creates interactions, meaning, histories, and narratives through which we become attached to the city, its possibilities, and its transformations.

Week 4


31

Week 4


32

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT HOW WILL I WORK TOWARDS REALISATION OF THE PROJECT?

As Design is an iterative discipline, through my project process I am aiming to constantly answer 3 main questions: What?, Why?, How?. Currently, I am still exploring the possible functions for the building, gathering information and ideas. It will then follow a process of narrowing down the different ideas in order to define a concept, which will go through a development stage where it will be tested with various methods and broken down to its components. The outcomes will be then gathered, narrowed down in order to create a final solution.

Week 5


33

CONSIDERATIONS In order to create a detailed and well executed proposal within the timeframe, my efforts must be focused. From the position of a future Interior Designer, I am intrigued in how interior spaces in the context of Glasgow’s Lanes can be revamped, having a positive impact on the lane ecosystem. I will work in detail with the corner building. Additionally, I will consider a development for a number of arches. These spaces will be linked into one project. For this reasons I will develop an identity (name, visual characteristics and tone of voice, behaviour, atmosphere) and its tangible translation into the chosen interior space. This will act as a beacon for further development. The space will be flexible and will provide a holistic experience, integrating a variety of functions.

- THRESHOLD - TRANSITION BETWEEN THE OUTSIDE AND INSIDE - CONNECTION BETWEEN THE INTERIOR SPACE , THE LANE, THE ARCHWAYS? - TIME SCALE: DURATION OF INTERVENTIONS? - ACTIVITIES: WHAT COULD THEY BE AND HOW/ WILL THEY CHANGE OVER DAY-NIGHT, WEEKDAYSWEEKENDS? - SPACE ORGANISATION AND SERVICES? - FLEXIBLE ASSETS? - REALISATION THROUGH DETAIL AND CONSTRUCTION? - FURTHER DEVELOPMENT: ROLL-OUT ?

Week 5


34

TOOL SET The tool set that I will need in order to complete the project will include:

TAKING INTERVIEWS PHOTOGRAPHY VIDEO MAKING SKETCHING 3D VISUALISATIONS KNOWLEDGE OF MATERIALS UNDERSTANDING AND APPLYING LIGHTING MODEL MAKING DETAILING TECHNICAL DRAWING GRAPHIC DESIGN URBAN DESIGN CURATION DISPLAYING

Week 5


35

OUTPUT SKETCHES DRAWINGS (PLANS, SECTIONS, ELEVATIONS) VISUALS DETAILS MODEL(S) MATERIAL PALETTE LIGHTING FIXTURES FITTINGS

Week 5


36

According to the suggested Calander on Canvas I have created a project timeline outline. I have divided the time between now and the final submission deadline into 3 main stages: Discover and Define, Develop, Deliver. DISCOVER AND DEFINE: The aim is to expand the research and then define an initial response to the brief. This will include interviews, site measuring of the building and creating drawings. DEVELOP: By the end of this stage I must have a resolved response to the brief and have began working towards implementing the concept. The stage will include sketching, model making, experiments. DELIVER: This stage will provide the time to create the final outcomes of the project: Visuals, Details, Materiality selection, Lighting, 3D Model.

Week 5


Essay writing

37

Week 5


39

Part 2 explores the possibilities for development of the chosen site. By reflecting on the insights of the research and the experiments that I carry out throughtout the second part of the project I define the concept. Finally, I take time to weigh things up, let go some of the ideas and consider the proposed concept for the two buildings as a whole.

Part 2

DEFINING A CONCEPT


40

In a study, undertaken by FranklinTill Studio, Germany, explores how the urban future will shape the spaces in which we live, work, shop and socialise. 9

The MAKER space Inspired by the internet’s disruption of communications, the rapidly growing Maker Movement is bringing about a revolution in manufacturing. It has the potential to fundamentally change the nature of production, thanks largely to the democratisation of digital fabrication technology, which allows anyone, anywhere, to create their own items. Brands and manufacturers are getting wise to the demand for self-realisation through making. They are becoming educators, to satisfy the demand from those seeking new learning experiences. These changes are leading to a popular vision of the future city as a place of selfsufficiency. Cutting-edge technology and handson practical skills will enable citizens to power, feed and fix themselves. Offering connection to a community of like-minded individuals, the internet is bringing people together to participate in the culture of making.10

9

https://www.heimtextil-theme-park.com/the-film/ https://www.heimtextil-theme-park.com/lifestyle-trends/#the-maker-space

10

Week 6


41

Week 6


42

Defining connections between the spaces The aim of my project is to open a discussion. Whilst experimenting with different concepts for the site I will be looking for a solution how to turn it from a pass-by to a destination. I imagine the space as a social hub where art as one of Glasgow’s main assets will be experienced differently. Due to its visibility, open arched windows, access to daylight and architectural merit, the Corner building would be the beacon of the project, the flexible space that integrates a variety of functions. Within the arches I recognise spaces that add even more layers to the overall experience. Week 6


43

Due to the architecture of the site (the big arched openings in both the corner building and the archways) the interiors hold a close connection to the outside. Inspired by the Danish architecture, I will reinforce the connection “interior-exterior� which already exists at the site by exploring materials, shapes, textures from the surrounding and integrating them in the context of the interior.

Week 6


44

SPACE TO SOCIALISE, WORK, TAKE A COFFEE - CORNER BUILDING Week 6


45

GALLERY AND RETAIL - CORNER BUILDING Week 6


46

ARTISTS’ WORKSHOPS, ART INSTALLATIONS - LANE AND ARCHWAYS

Week 6


47

Week 6


48

AS I AM PROGRESSING WITH RESEARCHING ON THE TOPIC OF MY ESSAY, WHICH EXPLORES THE NOTION OF THE HOLISTIC EXPERIENCE IN RETAIL, I BEGAN TO FORM IDEAS FOR THE PROJECT. THE CONCEPT I WILL EXPERIMENT WITH, IS TO CREATE A FLEXIBLE SOCIAL SPACE WHICH IS FOCUSED ON THE WORK OF GLASGOW’S ARTISTS. THE SPACE WILL ACT AS A MEETING SPOT AND WILL ALSO PRESENT GLASGOW’S ART.

East Elevation

Finding the drawings of the Corner building of the old Fishmarket was essential for the further development of my design. During the first few weeks of the semester my research at the Mitchell Library did not lead to a success, as the original drawings of my site turned out to be , as explained to me “missing from the archives”. This week I managed to get in touch with the City Council and talked to the planning authority contact person. She suggested contacting the architects that were involved into the renovation of the Briggait building in 2015. South Elevation


49

My next step was to begin making sketches of the possible design layout of the space.

Ground floor: CAFÉ, CAFÉ SEATING AREA, RETAIL, WC Mezzanine level: CAFÉ SEATING AREA, GALLERY

Week 7


50

The drawings I have and the sketches I have created seem to be insufficient for me to thoroughly understand the interior space which helped me realise that the a mock model will be necessary. I visited the Tearoom at the Hidden Lane to draw inspiration of a cafĂŠ/tearoom, located in a creative hub.

Week 7


51

The mock model I made is in scale 1:50, it’s flexible and allows me to play with it and to test different ideas whilst exploring the possibilities the interior offers.

Week 7


52

Along with creating the initial layout for the space I made a stop motion video. The purpose of the video is to test new ways of presenting motion in a space.

Week 7


53 At the end of week 7 I created a schedule for the rest of the semester, in order to keep my research and design focused.

Week 7


54

Site Visit

Week 8


55

After creating a number of possible layouts for the Corner Building, I focused my attention on the archways. My initial research at the Mitchell Library did not give any results for drawings of the railway arches and therefore I decided to measure them on site after which I created a scaled model of the entire site. As I couldn’t gain access to the archways next to the corner building, I visited the ones, just on the south side of the river. They are open and free to access. This gave me a good insight of the space. Whilst surveying the site I also found a sign stating who is currently maintaining the arches on Merchant Lane and contacted Network Railway in order to arrange a viewing. Week 8


56 The majority of the days in week 8, I spent on writing my essay, as well as researching about examples for railway arches redevelopment.

Interior design, cognitive psychology and the experience of holistic retail environments Extended Essay Synopsis

This essay examines the dynamic shifts in the retail experience since the 1850s through observations on the industry behaviour to develop and establish an opinion of what its future may be. Chapter one shows the emerge of the department stores, examining the architectural, cultural and sociological role in the context of their current times. These early instances brought the retail to the masses and offered them a completely new shopping experience which allowed free roaming with no obligations to purchase. Moreover, they gathered different classes under one roof and turned the shopping into a leisure activity. Au Bon Marche, Peter Jones, Biba are within the reviewed case studies. Chapter two explores the cognitive psychology in relation to the shopping experience. Drawing upon the writings of Martin Lindstrom, who examines the brain’s “mirror neurons”, responsible for our shopping behaviour and referring to Paco Underhill’s book Why we buy. The science of shopping, I argue that the physical store is a tactile environment, which must be designed to integrate all senses in order to enhance the shopping experience. Additionally, bringing up the concept of “brandscaping”, which transforms the brand into a location, I explore the studies of Otto Riewoldt who suggests that store design merges with the brand image.

Week 8

The physical retail environment will not phase out, but rather transform to fit the local culture and demography and complement online shopping.

Chapter three examines the notion of the experiential shopping and the perceived need for reshaping the retail for the current era of technological development. By pulling ideas from an interview with a design practitioner I compare the discovered theories about the contemporary shopping to the reality of designing store environments. The essay continues by suggesting speculations about the future of the retail experiences and finally concludes that the physical retail environment will not phase out, but rather transform to fit the local culture and demography and complement online shopping.


57

The Third Place The third place is a comfortable space to browse, relax and meet people. The environment is homely, and the experience is focused on bringing a sense of immersion and emotional reconnection. The third place is shaped by its users and is designed to enable conversation and engagement. It could be found in concept stores, cultural spaces and fairs.

Week 8


58

Story, New York “Point of view of a magazine. Changes like a gallery. Sells things like a store.� Changing every 6-8 weeks, Story, New York, collaborates with designers, makers, companies to create its dynamic look.


59


60

Sonos, London Home of a brand. A social space where everyone is welcome. Experiential place to try the products, work, relax, meet people, a third place.


61

Markethall, Rotterdam Part of the new inner city heart of the Laurens Quarters, the original pre-war centre of Rotterdam. The building is a sustainable combination of food, leisure, living, parking, all fully integrated to enhance and make the most of the synergic possibilities of the different functions. The hall is formed from an arch of privately developed apartments, strategically allowing private investment and initiate to provide a public space. The result is a covered square which acts as a central market hall during the day and, after closing remains lively due to the restaurants on its first floor.


62

Railway Arches, Redevelopment, London London’s railway arches offer a culture trip. The activities they provide span between cinemas, galleries, restaurants, bakeries, independent shops, bars.


63

Railway Arches, Redevelopment, Edinburgh Edinburgh’s Waverley arches are also undergoing a revamp. The Waverley arches on East Market Street, Edinburgh - part of the £ 150 million New Waverley development which is transforming the heart of the Old Town.


64

Week 9 began with a reply from Robert Greenhorn, Network Rail, who had managed to find the existing drawings of the railway arches. Also, after spending a few days researching for my essay I gained ideas and started developing a concept for my project.

Issued quaterly, Art Story gathers different artists and makers, who create upon a common topic. Visual arts (painting and photography), jewellery, pottery, textiles are within the featured crafts. Week 9


21

Week 9


20

Week 9


67

Week 9


68

I have spent week 10 working on clarifying the volumes of the interior spaces that I have chosen to work with as well as creating sketches that portray the concept I have for my project. The pin-up review was very helpful in order for me to communicate my ideas and most importantly receive feedback from my peers and tutors. The concept seemed to be engaging for the audience, however it still needs a lot of work on clarifying and narrowing down.


69

4

1. PRESENT + CREATE 2. PARTICIPATE 3. INTERACT 4. ENGAGE 1_ CONNECT

1_ 1

3 2

Week 10


70

ARTICLE TALES OF THE CITY ART DESIGN ARCHITECTURE JUNE - AUGUST 2018 ISSUE 1

Week 10


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To further develop on the concept of the a magazine that transforms into a space and tells stories about Glasgow, I created a number of coloured sketches that began to inform how I imagine the interior spaces and what activities I am considering. I found the method of sketching a great way to portray an idea, to explore volumes, materiality, atmosphere.

Week 10


72

Week 10


73

What could be observed by the presented visuals is that with this proposal, the Corner building performs well enough as a coffee place and a meeting spot. However, it leaves a limited space for a showroom.

Week 10


74

After the pin up review in week 10, it became clear to me that the concept of a magazine that materialises into a physical space is engaging. In order to strengthen the concept I began working on vision for the annual content of the magazine.

Week 11


75 ARTICLE is issued quarterly. Each edition captures the current

season through a leading theme. The items in the magazine’s showroom are curated according to the theme. The artists/makers creating these chosen items occupy the studios in the archways.

Spring - CHANGES Summer - COLOUR Autumn - SHAPE Winter - REFLECTIONS

CHANGES /spring/

COLOUR /summer/

Brighter colours Freshness Grass Blossomes Birds (Singing) Being outside Longer days Motivation Walks Happiness Hope Change

Free time Leisure Outdoor activities Relaxation Adventures Parties Late nights Festivals Music Movement Brightness Sun

SHAPE /autumn/

REFLECTIONS /winter/

Crisp Cozy Wind and Rain Indoors Shorter days Pumpkin Apples Tea Falling Tree Leaves Warm Colours

Holidays City lights Festive season Friends Family Warmth indoors Coziness Self - reflections

Week 11


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Business Model Canvas KEY PARTNERS

KEY ACTIVITIES

Creative Scotland DRS Glasgow People Make Glasgow Make Works Network Rail

Pitch Nights Artists’ & Makers’ Talks Classes Glasgow Experience ARTICLE Experience Shopping

VALUE PROPOSITION

KEY RESOURCES

Studios facilities Mag. Editorial facilities Makers and Artists Editor and Designers

2 Large studios - fixed type facility with classes space (eg. pottery, screen printing, jewellery)

Customers: Transparency Openness Exclusivity Authenticity Learning Platform Social Platfom Third Place

CUSTOMER SEGMENT

Direct Relationship Social Media Channels Magazine

Young - minded Students Professionals Crafts Enthusiasts Art Lovers

CHANNELS

Makers, Designers, Editor: Workspace Community Crafts/Arts Display Connection to Audience

STRUCTURE

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP

Showroom Magazine Workshops Online presence

REVENUE STREAM

Classes Showroom Cafe Magazine Online channels

3 Medium Size studios - fixed type (eg. painting) 2 Med. Size Studios - flexible type facility 1 Large Flexible Type Studio with classes space (Headliner) Magazine Editorial Office Showroom Cafe

Studio Tenancy Type: 3, 6, 9, 12 months

The Business model canvas helped me identify significant points of consideration: Audience, Relationships, Channels, Key activities, Partners, Revenue stream, Structure and most importantly Value Proposition (the reason why this proposal is of value).

I also researched what are the positions of the people involved into creating a magazine. Using Hole&Corner, Cereal, Frame as case studies I found out that the majority of creators are contibuting writers, photographers, illustrators. The Chief editor, Creative director and Graphic designer, however must have a permanent work station. Week 11


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What makes you pick a printed magazine? I held quick interviews to understand what they appreciate in a printed magazine

Textures of the pages /paper type/ Eye-catchy title The smell of the ink Playfulness Nostalgia Relationships

Flipping through the pages Nostalgia Feeling engaged to it

The quality of the print The possibility to grab a magazine anytime Tangibility

I love to take notes in magazines

Interesting topics The beautiful graphics It’s a different experience Hands on Tangible Creating a collection Perfect when you travel

Tangible item Nice read Engaging Discussions

Week 11


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ARTICLE is a culture magazine,

issued quarterly. It celebrates and promotes creativity, crafts and art. It shares stories of dedication about the Scottish artists and makers. The creators of ARTICLE believe that no matter how much technology develops, certain eternal principles can still be applied to organise and present information. The fact that we live in a digital age with new media does not mean that classical concepts of harmony are any less important. Every new issue explores the balance between the contemporary and the established. Home

Production

Week 12


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I spent week 12 producing the visuals and drawings for the Winter submission. The photograph above shows the collection of booklets that formed my portfolio for the Formative assessment.

Week 12


80

What? Who?

Why? Week 13


81

A magazine realised in a physical space

Art Lovers Craft Enthusiasts Students Professionals

Offering a Holistic Experience Strengthening the Relationship between Maker and Audience Creating a Third Place Discovering New Talents Redeveloping Abandoned Buildings

Week 13


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By reflecting on the insights of the research and the tests that I carried out throughout the previous weeks, I created the initial proposal for my project. I have considered initial layouts, activities, materiality, content of a magazine, displays for the showroom. The most challenging tasks over the past weeks were to narrow down the research, leave out some ideas and finally bring everything together in a clearer concept. Balancing different roles (interior designer, graphic designer, maker, visitor, art director, editor, business manager) was very interesting and also very challenging due to the constant inner discussions. During weeks 12 and 13, I had to reconsider the choices that I had made previously. My initial idea was to invite artists and makers who would create in the studios at the arches over a timescale of 3 months, after which they would be replaced by new artists. However, this idea proved to be unappropriate and inconvenient. Thus, I took a step back and undertook a different direction which led me to propose a concept for creating a home and production of a culture magazine, called ARTICLE. Based in Glasgow, the magazine gives voice to Scottish creatives. It materialises into a physical space and provides a layered and rich tangible experience. It has its own showroom where items, made by Scottish artists, are available for purchases. The core values of ARTICLE are Dialogue, Openness, Transparency, Learning, Cocreation. The magazine organises weekly events such as the “Pitch night” and “Meet the Artist” in order to discover new talents and to reinforce the relationship between the makers and their audience.

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Part 3 explores pivotal and transformative moments in the creation of ARTICLE. The issue experiments with boundaries, graphics, new techniques and materials aiming to create new experiences. It challenges the balance between contemporary and established, seeks to test out its concept with different audiences and carries out interviews with artists and makers.

Part 3

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


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Narrative

Atmosphere Experiences Every building and every city can tell stories. As we pick up these narratives, we start with concepts, then there is an organic evolution, reiterations, repetition, events, sequences, all holistically combined to create ‘experiences’. The magic in this is forgetting about ‘the end product’ for a moment, and learning and absorbing the places with their unique atmosphere. This allows you to look outside the box, to become the creator of your own narrative and to write the script. After all, this is what an interior designer does - bringing life to architectural boundaries.

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During the winter’s break I had the chance to pause the active production of my project and take some time to reflect on the “What?” and “Why?”. When I began working again, I was able to look at things with fresh eyes. This was the time when I realised that the proposed at the end of semester 1 layout for the Corner building is not as good as it could be. Reconsidering my sketches and floor plans, it became clear to me that the Editorial office should not be situated at the Corner building as the space remaining for the showroom seemed insufficient. Moreover, after expanding my research on the different positions of people involved in a creation of a magazine I discovered that my magazine needs a team of 6 permanent creators: Editor in Chief, Creative Director, Art Director, Marketing and Events Manager, Designer Graphics and Designer Environments. In order to keep the issues’ content fresh and to support the emerging new creative talents, ARTICLE would also be hiring 2 interns (one in Graphics and one in Environments) with a work placement of 3 months. With the introduction of the reconsidered Editorial team, the step forward for the project was to move the office space at the arches and to reflect on the caused changes at the Corner building.

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atmosphere:

Home of a Brand

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The Creative City CONNECTING PEOPLE, PLACE AND IDENTITY

The notion of the Creative City as a prominent urban and economic idea is thoroughly investigated in Prof. Richard Florida’s (an American Urban Studies theorist focusing on social and economic theory) highly influential book titled Cities and the Creative Class. He argues that ‘human creativity is the ultimate economic resource’ and therefore cities that encourage the development of the urban creativity within their activities and population will flourish. Furthermore, Florida presents The Creative City as a method for urban regeneration and redevelopment. The Creative City however, should not be merely seen just in terms of economics. It has been argued that it is an important factor in a place to have a strong sense of community and identity. The prominent urban planner Edward Bacon writes that ‘true involvement comes when the community and the designer turn the process of planning and building into a work of art’. This thought suggests that The Creative City is about participation and collaboration, where the population possess a sense of empowerment and belonging resulting from this involvement, which allows the city to reflect the characteristics and personality of its people. Florida writes that ‘all human beings are creative, and all, are potentially members of the Creative City’, and as such if a city allows this creativity to flourish, a city can gain a strong sense of individuality and identity. The relationship between people and place is central to The Creative City with it being a place that through its diverse and vibrant activities and opportunities, is extremely livable and welcoming. What exactly is that constitutes a creative city? From new creation to problem solving, to imagination, to innovation and adaptation, creativity is a broad topic, encompassing many different disciplines and activities. According to Neil Gray (Urban Studies, University of Glasgow), there are three key dimensions to the Creative City, which are Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Openness. Week 14

‘True involvement comes when the community and the designer turn the process of planning and building into a work of art.’

Creative Rivers ‘The Clyde made Glasgow’ is a well-known phrase. It shows the importance of the Clyde to the success of Glasgow and its role in the evolution of the city. In the beginning of Glasgow as a city, the Clyde was only a shallow cobbled stream with the lowest fording point at the end of the High street leading up to the Cathedral. The Clyde grew from then onwards and reached its peak during the industrialisation era. Waterfronts are distinctive natural environments that give character to the city. Rivers that are taken care of and integrated into the city can help to shape its image, add value to the local economy, and boost desirability of the adjacent land.


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Creative Cafés Cafés support cities far more than just the simple provision of coffee. (Independent) cafés can provide the perfect social conditions for creativity to thrive. Creative Cities focus on the importance of people themselves and bring together communities, in which people take an interest in what goes on in a city and actively participate. There is also an importance for creative cities to take a holistic approach that doesn’t restrict creativity to just the arts and culture, but they show an open mindedness to invest in a wider sense, allowing people in all communities to express their creativity and therefore give more people the opportunity to be creative and to innovate. Cafés also have a prolific history in terms of providing a platform to host music, performances and other forms of entertainment. They also have a reputable tradition of inspiring creatives, and countless literary figures and artists have been known to frequent cafés, ranging from Picasso and Renoir, to Voltaire and Hemingway, all of whom have been inspired within cafés.

Cafés are one of the few private places in a city where people can have such a public experience and social interaction is in fact their main purpose.

The convivial atmosphere found in coffee shops is shaped by key architectural features, such as their small, human scale that leads to social interaction, the close intimate table planning, and the decoration and music which express a cafés overall intentions. Cafés are one of the few private places in a city where people can have such a public experience and social interaction is in fact their main purpose.

Week 14


The sketches present the methaphor for designing the showroom space using the layout of a printed magazine.

Week 15


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Discovering possible approaches towards designing the spaces.

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Reading a Magazine THE EXPERIENCE - No ‘fixed’ order; - Articles - coincise, ‘catchy’ titles, no chapters - Provides dialogues - Different voices/views graphics styles - Selected/curated content - Collection of information, views - Suggests continuity/ sequence - Gives a portion of a whole - Develops in time

Showroom Journey CONSIDERATIONS - Approach - Transition fom outside-inside - What to do once in the store - The elements bringing the customer in and around - Environmental concerns - Identifying the product clearly - Honour the customer - The transaction - The exit

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Light and Shadows

IES OUNDAR B , S E M U G VOL E STUDYIN ON TO TH I T A L E R SHAPES IN LE CA HUMAN S


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This light study has a few purposes: -to explore the architectural boundaries of the arches; - to test the light and shadows in relation to the site; - to examine the exiting forms; - to introduce the human scale; - to experiment with different model making techniques and materials and to study the limitations of each one; For this study I have created 3 scaled models - paper, untreated foam, foam covered with emulsion and painted in white. The day when I took the photographs was very brightly sunny which helped me enhance the contrasts between light and shadow.


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The big arched opening of the Corner building and the Railway Arches seem to provide sufficient daylight. The darkest area in the arches is their central part. The strong visual connection between the Corner Building and the First Arch could be observed from the photographs. Moreover the study shows that the first arch has a good exposure to the street, which will be helpful for the wayfinding.

Morning Sun - Corner Building

Morning Sun - Arches


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Afternoon Sun - view from Clyde Street

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The 5 Whys?

WHY THIS SITE? It holds rich history/heritage; It is located in a developing part of the city; It holds a great connection to the nature - River Clyde and Glasgow Green; It is already a creative environment.

WHY TWO BUILDINGS? The Corner Block is the “Pearl at the Waterfront�, the physical materialisation of a printed magazine in a space The Third Place. The Arches are the production zone, the space to learn, work and socialise. The position of the two and their architectural similarities present tension, balance, contrast, alignment. The two buildings simultaneously are separated and connected, as the activities that they will host.

WHY COULD IT NOT BE ANOTHER SPACE? The two spaces are in close proximity, yet separated. This gives the visitor the option to enter/explore the spaces from a great range of starting points, just like a magazine is read quite freely, with no strict order.

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WHY THIS CONCEPT? Offering a holistic experience Strengthening the relationship Maker - Audience Creating a ‘third place’ Creating a social and learning platform Discovering Talents Developing Abandoned Buildings

WHY THE CHOICE OF ARTICLE’S COLOURS? The colours reflect the preexisting juxtaposition of manmade industrialised materials at the site with the natural aura of the River Clyde.

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Site Visit: Morning Inspiration Corner Building - Light study on site

View from Corner Building


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I have experimented through sketches with a few different layouts for the first arch. The isometric coloured sketches begin to explain the different materiality, volumes, activities and relations between the spaces.

Office - Meeting room at mezzanine

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Café - view from Arch 2

Café - view from Clyde str. Week 16


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Office

Meeting Room

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The Reception Area

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After reconsidering the layout of the Editorial I have decided to locate the meeting room at the ground floor and the office on the mezzanine level. This way the team working on the magazine’s issue will have privacy, with less distractions and less noise.The more social space (the Metting room) in this way will be next to the CafÊ.


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The assignment for Week 17 was to create an A1 poster which explains our Learning and Understanding Processes, Our Design Approaches, the Project Concept and the Outcomes. I found this very useful as through the assignment I was challenged to practice how to present a lot of information briefly. It also was a good way to begin experimenting with different formats than the usual A4 and A3. From the peer feedback I lernt that the concept is very well explained and everybody managed to get engaged with it. However, what was missing was the ‘What is next’, on which I worked for the second iteration of the poster.

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Week 17


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Reception area

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ARTICLE

celebrating passion and creative skills

WHY?

WHAT?

Offering a Holistic Experience Strenghtening the Relationship Maker-Audience Creating a ‘Third Place’ Creating a Social and Learning Platform Discovering Talents Developing Abandoned Buildings

ARTICLE is a culture magazine, issued quarterly. It celebrates and promotes creativity, crafts and art. Each edition captures the current season through a leading theme. The magazine shares stories of dedication about the Scottish artists and makers within its printed pages and through their physical materialisation at the showroom. Every new issue explores the balance between the contemporary and the established.

WH0? Art Lovers Crafts Enthusiasts Students Professionals

DIALOGUE

TRANSPARENCY

LEARNING

CO-CREATION

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OPENNESS

Chief Editor

Graphics Environments PR and Events Manager

Creative Director

WHERE?

The Changes Issue

ARTICLE is located next to Glasgow Green, at the River Clyde. Through the project I aim to explore the juxtaposition between man-made and natural. The rich history of the buildings, combined with the ongoing development of their location, challenges the balance between contemporary and established. By creating a fluid flow between these separated, yet close in proximity buildings, the spaces will be experienced as if reading the pages of a magazine - without a defined order, however intriguing every time.

ARTICLE’s team is currently focused on designing the Editorial studio, the Printing Studios and Workshops and the Café. At the moment the team is expanding the ideas range. The process is based on experiments with layouts and materials, arranging interviews with artists, curating the Showroom merchandise for the Spring, Summer and Autumn issues. Juggling between hand sketching, CAD drawings and model prototyping, they are about to create a new holistic Glasgow experience. Home

Week 18

Art Director

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Second iteration of the Poster Review The process has mostly taught me that ... My project concept is clear and well understood. I have achieved the balance between giving information, yet keeping some aspects unexposed. Poster 2 aimed to explain what I am currently doing and to start suggesting forms, shapes, materiality (The Changes Issue). It also suggests a look (resembling a Magazine cover) that most likely will be my Degree show poster.

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CafĂŠ

Reception Meeting Room

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Mezzanine Level

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In order to research what the requirements for a functional Screen printing studio are I visited the two studios available at the GSA campus. The two studios are incredibly different from one another, which was a great source of information for my research. The Haldane Studio is tiny, very flexible and creatively designed so that despite its small layout it can provide the opportunity to work with screen printing and etching. The studio at JD Kelly Building is much larger, with great exposure to dayllight and it has all the facilities needed for the process of screen printing at one place.

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How would you describe the ideal screen printing studio for you? TALK WITH DAVID FARRAR, SCREEN PRINTING STUDIO, HALDANE BUILDING, GSA 01/02/2018 Lots of light. You could have big windows, if possible. Natural light is very important for the process. If you cannot get it, I suppose, a good alternative is LED lighting. I would invest in big, daylight bulbs so that the light is evenly dispersed. What we do here is to add lights on the presses. These in particular are not the best, because they generate heat and you don’t want that as it quickens the drying process of the ink. In here we have 4 screen printing tables, 3 of them are table-top ones, where you can print up to A2 image size, and the large screen printing table we have could print to A0 image size. The larger one is more of a standard size, which you would find in the majority of printing studios. The table-top ones are mostly designed for the uses of school environments, smaller spaces. I do not totally recommend them because they are not the most intuitive design, but also they could be quite flexible, especially in smaller spaces. The larger one we have is also a vacuum one, which means that when you turn it on, the paper you will print on will be held in place to the table by vacuum. The table-top ones worth around £3000 and you could get the larger ones as secondhand for around £2000. Instead of having 3 to 1 tables here, I would invest into 2 table-tops and 2 standard screen printing tables. They are much more versatile, more sturdy, intuitive to use, and more custom. This workshop is quite a good example of how to get the most out of the space you have. We have everything needed in a limited space - the sink, wash-up, frames, lockers, tables, drawing area, etching presses, variety of storage. The marble dryers are really really good (they hold the paper whilst it is dry). Instead of having a big drying rack, you would dry the prints hanged on the marble dryers and this would not take much floor space. What happens in big studios is that they have the big scale drying racks on the floor, which takes up a lot of room. If you have the head space and the floor area is limited, the marble dryers are ideal.

What are the absolute essentials? It depends, but I suppose that for a fully functioning screen printing studio, you would have screen printing tables, space to store screens (you will need as many as you can clean and reuse), drying racks/ marble dryers, sinks. You would also need a dark room, where you could coat the screen with UV sensitive emulsion. Applying the emulsion is not a very long process, however I would recommend having a technician doing this for artists, because of 2 main reasons - quality control and if just one person is at the dark room, you will need smaller space for it. You would then need a dark space where the screen with the applied emulsion can dry - it could again be a system of racks. Outside the dark room you would usually have a UV light box, which applies a very strong light to the screen to expose the image. You would also need a space to mix the ink, and storage. Etching The process is that the ink got stuck into all the marks that you have created and then you wipe off the excess, put a wet paper on and press it. Once the image is printed the paper has to dry on a varnished wooden board. With etching you could achieve a variety of tones and depth of lines; it is more subtle in that way than screen printing. For that you will need etching press(es), drawers like these, to wipe down the ink you need cheese cloth, rags for cleaning, ink. The great thing about these etching presses is that you could also use them for wood and Lino cuts, mono prints. Last things you need for the etching process are towels, a sink and a washing machine for the towels. The paper has to be soaked before it is printed on it. For storage, I would recommend the architectural drawers. The bigger you go with the sizes of the printing facilities, the bigger the risk becomes. However, etching and screen printing are considered workshops at low risk. Another thing that I have came across is in Edinburgh’s printing studio; they had a room on a mezzanine level; through an opening when you look down, you could see the workshop below. That was a really nice experience. Week 18


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JD Kelly’s Screen Printing Studio


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Haldane’s Screen Printing Studio


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During the chat at the tutorial with Anna and Digger, they helped me notice that by locating the Editorial between the Showroom and the CafĂŠ, a barrier is being created which disrupts the fluid flow between the spaces meant for public use. After the tutorial I reworked the layout, creating a much more intriguing and fluid proposal.

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Barrier

Showroom

Showroom

Ground Floor - week 18

Mezzanine Level - week 18

Ground Floor - after the tutorial

Mezzanine Level (Editorial and CafĂŠ) - after the tutorial

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After I have rendered a few views of the new layout I realised that the suggested mezzanine level over the Café creates the feeling of ‘heaviness’ in the interior and as if everything seemed cluttered. Thus I removed the mezzanine level over the Café and achieved the desired spacious and light, airy atmosphere.

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The chat with the structural engineer was very helpful as it resolved a few of the matters I was hesitating about. He helped me establishing the position of the pillars, beams and also he suggested possible solutions for the thickness of the mezzanine floor slabs in both the Corner Block and the Arches.

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Threshold Spaces BY TILL BOETTGER, 2014 “ The Percipient Human “ What is a threshold space? Prelude, between-ness, barrier? Inside or outside? A threshold space is all of these, often all at the same time. It thrives on the spatial ambivalence between open and closed whilst shaping expectations of what is to come. There are two basic ideas of space in architecture— presented space and experienced space. Until the nineteenth century, theoretical discussions of space in architecture were consistently carried out on the level of presented space. The discussions were informed solely by aesthetics, proportions, and geometry. In other words, presented space in architecture was analysed and evaluated. Space was long seen as a static system, one that, since the Renaissance, had indeed dealt with the proportions of the human body, but which had established no direct connection to human perception. Experienced space distances itself from the concept of purely geometrically presented space but remains in dialogue with this idea of space. The space delimiters are depicted in geometric space and eventually translated into what is built. It is more a matter of an intermediate state that results from the dynamics between individual, subject, and presented space. Otto Friedrich Bollnow cites Martin Heidegger, who, while he does not differentiate between presented and experienced space, formulates the relationship between man and space on a fundamental level. “The subject (Dasein), if well understood ontologically, is spatial.” Man is the centre of attention and forms, in every sense, the starting point. As this space-forming and space-spreading being, man is however necessarily not only the origin but also the lasting center of his space.”

Week 19

What is particularly important for the perception of spatial experience is, according to Joedicke,“ the introduction of a system of basic orientation, which includes the sense of above and below,in front and behind, or left and right.” Various studies demonstrate the importance and prominence of this sixth, or rather new fifth, sense. Perception of Movement Spaces that offer transitions often present themselves as open spatial bodies that are experienced in motion. For the most part they are only partially delimited by spatial boundaries and provide access in an open or a circumscribed manner. Perception of connecting movement spaces occurs in a manner analogous to the general perception of spaces, namely in interaction among various sense organs. A movement space is characterized by its function as a transitional space; in other words it is a “passage space” which distributes and redirects. This means it is primarily perceived as we stroll through it, as opposed to a “place space,” which serves as place to stay or rest. Barring visual or acoustic stimuli, movement to the right within a building seems to be the natural direction for most people. When shopping areas are designed, the products with the greatest turnover are often positioned to the right of the entrance. Furthermore, planned circuits usually operate with systems in which the customer is first led to the right and then follows a path that continues counter clockwise. Such a pathway for movement spaces with items for sale is a reaction to studies that demonstrate customers’ natural orientation toward the right. This “pull to the right” can be explained by our dominant left brain for movement patterns, which controls the right side of the body.”


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Upon reflection of Till Boettger’s book “Threshold Spaces” I identified the “passage spaces” in my spatial design. This helped me begin mapping the journey of the visitors.

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Experiencing Doorways “DOORWAY” BY SIMON UNWIN, 2007

“ Passing through Imagine the sensation of approaching and passing through the doorway in this photograph. Its dimensions are large enough to accommodate you comfortably; you can walk through easily, without stooping, brushing against the walls or turning sideways. And yet you sense the frisson as you go in. You know it is safe to enter but you are not quite sure what you will find inside. It is a sensation we all experience so often that, until reminded of it, we hardly acknowledge it. Subliminally, you sense the implacability of the wall as you pass through. Its mass is made visible by the separate smooth and chambered quoins and voussoirs around the doorway. You can empathise with the arch bearing all that weight. You might touch the jamb as you go through, feeling the hardness and texture of the stone with your fingers. As you go through the doorway, the atmosphere changes. The warm sunshine penetrates a little way inside but as you pass through the doorway you pass from light to dark; your eyes have to adjust to the new light level. The air and its movement change. Inside, any slight breeze is stilled. It is cooler. You sense the different quality of the air as you breath it and it touches your skin. There is a slight change in ambient sound: outside noises are muffled; your footsteps reflect off the hard surfaces of the more enclosed space. You feel separated from the world, from other people, from the sky. Inside there is more privacy, a greater sense of security. The space you enter contains art objects. Almost immediately your mind turns to them. But after a little while you might turn around and see that the opening, which from the outside was dark, is now bright with light, with different things framed in it. You have experienced two very different environments, linked by an opening through which you can pass, to and from, in an instant. “ Week 19


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The beautiful and rich description of the passing through the doorways experience that Simon Unwin wrote in his book “Doorway� helped me consider in a greater depth the importance of the threshold.

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More Than the Flat Medium A CONVERSATION WITH FIONNUALA MCGOWAN AND DAVID FARRAR


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Fionnuala McGowan and David Farrar are two Glasgow based artists, the creators of The Mobile Print Studio. They both share an interest in the relationship between 3D forms and their 2D representation and a passion for print making. Through their studio they try to make this art form more accessible. Their workshops introduce lesser known techniques to those who otherwise may not be exposed to them outside of a specialist art school.

“Quite often screen printing is associated with this kind of dusty stigma - a print, on the wall, in a frame, but in fact you can do so much more than that.�

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ARTICLE: Could you tell me a bit about yourselves?

D: I am David and one half of Mobile Print Studio. I work part time at The Glasgow School of Art as a printmaking technician and part time at the Mobile Print Studio. I am an artist, print maker. F: I am Fionnuala. I am the other half of Mobile Print Studio. I also work part time at the Art School. I am from Belfast and came in Glasgow to study. I got into print making, loved the city and decided to stay. D: That was good, about the city. I double that! ARTICLE: What is the inspiration behind your work?

D: Me as an artist, I like functional - non functional objects and looking at whether those two can be played around with. I do like bringing those ideas into the print making but I also work with sculpture and film. I would say print making is my main medium. I do like the idea of breaking down form into sort of playing with the relation 2D and 3D. One work that I did was to take a found object, burn it, crush it into a charcoal and then press that through a screen to print an image of the original object. It was kind of a concealed circle. I think it is quite indicative of what I do. F: I am interested in the relationship between 3D sculptural forms and their 2D representations. I try to use sculptural techniques into the print making. I also try to bring in different materials instead of solely use inks, I am trying to incorporate more sculptural techniques, whether that is embossing or folding the prints to create installations. The source material that I use is scientific imagery, abstract forms, geometric shapes. This is what I do as my own practice and then I bring an element of that into the work we do at the Mobile Print Studio. I use it as a way to have a bit more fun with print, still using a lot of geometric shapes in there but in a more playful manner. D: The great thing about having the Mobile Print Studio is to have an avenue to try fun ideas out. It doesn’t necessarily have to be this very conceptual fine art thinking, just some playful prints. We are also quite clear in separating those two, so that they don’t blur into each other.

“I am interested in the relationship between 3D sculptural forms and their 2D representations. I try to use sculptural techniques into the print making”. -Fionnuala

ARTICLE: You both share this interest in exploring the

relationship between the 2D and the 3D. Print making is considered a “flat medium” and it seems that you both try to challenge this common belief? D: I think you put it exactly on the point there. We both quite like that idea that screen printing and print making is quite a flat medium and so we try to play with that. F: When I got into print making I started really liking making sculptural forms and textured surfaces and then use them into folded, sometimes crumpled installations. D: We both enjoy breaking the traditional boundaries of what screen printing can offer. Quite often screen printing is associated with this kind of dusty stigma - a print, on the wall, in a frame, but in fact you can do so much more than that. Especially in Fionnuala’s work with this big installations where she printed an illusion picture looking crumpled; it is actually a flat print but it looks crumpled. It is layers within layers and when you actually look at the piece you are not quite certain of what you see - it is an illusion.

Week 20


Week 20

-David

“One work that I did was to take a found object, burn it, crush it into a charcoal and then press that through a screen to print an image of the original object. These works relate to my wider artistic practice as I am interested in the relationship between form and function. By physically breaking down the forms of these objects, reducing them to their raw parts or materials, I can then reconfigure them within an artistic framework so that they take on new identities.�

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ARTICLE: I suppose this comes through your Mobile

Print Studio work - the playfulness and the desire to break the stigma about what the screen printing can offer? D: Yes. We were just talking about that.

F: If you have a very professional print studio setup, which is really useful of course, but then you feel under pressure to make these pristine traditional images. Whereas what we try to do is to create a more accessible environment, have a play with it and found through these “happy accidents” some very interesting results that you might have never thought about before or would not have done if being in a more formal setup. D: What I say to participants in the workshops is: “ I am trying to give you the basic tools, you could experiment if you want to on the kitchen table at home, as a starting point”. ARTICLE: How did Mobile Print Studio come about

D: Quite an important thing is that a lot of schools don’t have the print making facilities. It takes up room, it is expensive, needs a technician. So what we decided to do was to flip that on its head and try go into schools, just for a day, give a crash course into how to screen print, wood cut and then let the teachers carry that on. In one school in particular, they had the press, but they hadn’t used it for a long while and we reignited that interest. ARTICLE: When did you start with the Mobile Print

Studio?

D and F: In 2015 F: It was a slow pace because it was a super part time at the beginning. I don’t think we had huge expectations back then. It was self funded. We firstly bought the very basics and then slowly built up. Things got quite well with the workshops and then we got excited about being able to get more equipment …

and would you tell me about the challenges of setting it up?

D: And now we are super excited about our studio opening.

D: I had this idea that I wanted to have a camper van with a print studio at the back that I could drive around and teach print making on the go. This is still our dream for one day.

F: Next step - camper van.

F: We couldn’t really afford a camper van at the start and we didn’t want to wait until we could so we just started with a bike. In fact it was just a back pack at the very beginning, going to schools and doing workshops.

ARTICLE: What is your view on the art landscape in

D: At the core of the Mobile Print Studio is that we want to reduce the scare factor of how to get into printmaking - “ I like drawing, but I don’t know how to …” We try to reduce all that and give the very basic tools in a casual setting. We pop up in cafés, different places around Glasgow and hopefully get people that first step on the print making path. F: Also not even that it is an expensive art but that when I was at school I didn’t have any access to print making facilities. It was quite unknown. So our concept is also about spreading knowledge so that people could try it and perhaps fall in love with it, like I did.

Week 20

D: It feels like a really good time at the moment. We really enjoy it. Glasgow and where do you fit in?

D: Excellent! There is an open up for more open studios, pop up events, GI (Glasgow International) is coming up. ARTICLE: What do you like the most about your job?

Is there anything that you dislike about it?

D: The satisfaction I get is teaching and seeing when someone lights up because they have created their first etching or printing - they peel back the paper and there’s a thing, an image that they have created. F: I have to agree with that, it is the best. And the annoying thing is, no surprise, the admin.


Fionnuala’s practice explores the tension between three-dimensional tangible surfaces and illusionistic facsimile and their roles in altering our spatial perception. Using a combination of print and sculpture, raw materials and photographic images she encourages the viewer to question how they interact with and understand what they are seeing.

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Jesmonite Jesmonite was invented in the UK in 1984 by Peter Hawkins. The original compound was an acrylicmodified gypsum composite which is still sold to this day. It was conceived as a safe alternative to fibreglass (GRP) and as a lightweight alternative to cast concrete. Jesmonite is the ultimate chameleon material of the building industry – it can be used to replicate the appearance and texture of any surface finish in any number of colours. The combination of natural raw materials with a special blend of water based pure acrylic polymers create a unique family of materials that have a number of product benefits that make Jesmonite superior to other building materials.

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Stronger Strong, flexible and more durable, making it high impact resistant. Lighter Lighter than stone, glass-reinforced concrete, sand and cement products – perfect for film sets. Safer Fire-resistant with a class zero fire rating, reduced smoke density and toxicity characteristics. Solvent free with no VOC’s. Finer Replicates the very finest detail. Greener Water-based not solvent-based, making it kinder to the environment. More choice Can be pigmented to any colour. It can also mimic any texture and reproduce the effect of materials such as stone, metal, wood, leather and fabric.


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Pigmented Jesmonite, crushed into pieces to be used for creating a new composite sample.

Week 20


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Casting Experiments

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Week 20

Crushed brick mixed with Jesmonite


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I have experimented with two different samples

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This sample is quite interesting as it shows the change to the material over time. I added metal powder to the jesmonite mix and then soaked the plate into salty water over night to achieve the rusty effect. Jesmonite as a material does not get affected by water. However, in case of combination with metal, it can get coloured by the rust over a period of 10 years.

Week 20


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Rusty Effect


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Pigmented Jesmonite Samples


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This sample is hand-made, literally. Whilst I was trying to achieve a specific colour the jesmonite mix started to set and at the time I put in the mould it was no longer a liquid. Even despite the cracks the plate is still very tough. Test-proven, as I used a pillar drill to make the holes.

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Jesmonite combined with a steel mesh

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Recipe CASTING JESMONITE


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Drawing

screen printing table A1

Side Table

Ink

screen printing table A1

Ink

Side Table

screen

Screen Printing

Screen Storage

UV Unit + Drying Cabinet

Screen Coating Rack

Plan t x2 Ches

Common Table on wheels

Light Box + Plan Chest

Ink

printing table A1

Paper Rack

Plan t x2 Ches

Side Table

Washout Bay

CHA

MER

r Pape Rack

Ink

screen printing table A1

Side Table

Ink

screen printing table A1

Side Table

Ink Storage Shelves

ANE NT L

Washing

Ink Storage Shelves

Carousel Screen Printing

Ink Mixing

Riso Printing

Drying Boards

Etching

Drying Boards

Reception desk

A1 Etch Presses

Magazine Showroom

CLYDE STREET

Week 20

SHIPBANK LANE

Side Table

screen printing table A1

Ink


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After the tutorial with Louise I have made a few more changes to the floor plan. Due to the fact that during the last 7 weeks I’ve had quite many tutorials, interviews and I heard and read many different opinions I started to feel that the project is losing my own voice. Thus I took a break, put the drawing aside and enjoyed a sunny weekend. After that much needed time off I will start over with mapping the overall visitor journey.

Week 20


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Risotto RISO PRINTING, STUDIO VISIT

I visited the vibrant printing studio, located in the Glue Factory, Glasgow on 23rd February 2018. RISOTTO is headed by designer Gabriella Marcella. RISOTTO is Scotland’s leading Risograph printing specialist, serving and supplying independents and organisations with playful print.

The evolving products that emerge seasonally through the studio create a platform for the house style to take the limelight, and showcase new patterns and print across an assortment of papers and products. Posters are the studio’s speciality, as the format and texture make a great pairing.

Mari Campriston, Gabriella’s business partner, welcomed me into the studio, showed me around and walked me through the process of riso printing.

The various strands of the studio have been shaped by Marcella specifically to fuel her different interests in outputs, processes and people.

RISOTTO was born out of Marcella’s love of being able to play and experiment with the equipment, and the speed and unpredictability of the process has proved extremely influential on the house style. The Risograph encourages experimentation with quick decisions and fast outputs, producing a fantastic range of printed matter through a limited ink spectrum. The relationships and collaborations that have emerged since launching RISOTTO have allowed Gabriella to meet and work with a whole spectrum of creatives both locally and internationally, regularly trading prints, skills and technical advice.

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Currently the design duo is busy organising workshops and Graphic Design events, which will be held at the Lighthouse in April. Mari apologised on behalf of Gabriella for not being able to schedule a meeting for an interview with me at the moment, yet I was promised to receive the answers via e-mail as soon as possible. The interview questions are the following: - Could you tell me a bit about yourself and the studio where you work? - How did Risotto come about and would you tell me about the challenges of setting it up? - The interest in riso printing appears to be growing recently. What is your view on the “risomania�? - You collaborate quite often with other creatives. Could you tell me about any collaborations which you are particularly happy with/stick out in your mind? - How did you develop your style as an illustrator and what tips would you have for others? - What do you like the most about your job? Is there anything that you dislike about it? - What is the design landscape like in your city and where do you fit in?

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This week I managed to outline a few possible scenarios for the use of the Showroom and the Arches. After having experimented with the volume of the spaces, possible materials to use for the design and various layouts, it was important to take a step back and refine the research outcome in order to begin creating the interior design in details. I also finalised the curation of the of the 4 issues of the magazine as well as the choice for the 4 headliners. Respectively I designed the editorial for the annual collection. Having finished with these last two very important steps, I now feel that the research part of the project is complete.

Week 21


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Week 21


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Week 21


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Events Planning

Week 21


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Week 21


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Weekends (Afternoon)

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Week 21


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Weekdays

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Weekends

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Week 21


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Weekdays (Event Evenings)

Week 21


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Week 22


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I spent week 22 producing the visuals and drawings for the Spring submission. The photograph above shows the collection of booklets, models and samples that formed my portfolio at this stage.

Week 22


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Part 4 brings ARTICLE to life. The final part of the project development is the production of the drawings, visuals, graphics and models of the Showroom and the Arches.

Part 4

FINAL PRODUCTION


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Week 23 was spent on creating the physical model of the 3 arches. With the model I aimed to capture the materiality and the shapes of the arches in comparison to the human scale, in order to portray the spaces. The next step of the model creation will be to add the elements of the circulation (lifts, stairs) and the mezzanine levels , which will define the connections and the movement in the interior space.

Week 23


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The role of the social CafÊ is not only to provide a space for relax and socialising, but also it acts as an entrance, a threshold space that leads to the printing studio spaces and gives a sneak peek to the magazine’s editorial studio. One of the most important elements of its design was to suggest in a clear way what is the next step of the visitor’s journey - attending the workshops, held in Arch 2 and Arch 3.

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Week 24


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The strong and very characteristic arched geometry of the space in combination with the beautiful bricks pattern suggested a minimalist and clear design for the CafĂŠ. I aimed to create a space that feels light and airy, as opposed to the heaviness of the stone architecture of the railway arches. The Merchant lane entrance is spacious, providing ease of movement and queueing at the coffee counter. The tall tables in the middle of the layout are on wheels, providing flexibility during the various events held in the CafĂŠ - movie nights, gigs, launch of a new issue.

Tall tables at daytime

Tall tables at event night Week 24


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Week 25

GORDON - Creative Director

EMMA - Art Director

EDWARD - Editor in Chief

REBECCA - Design//Environments

JONATHAN - Design//Graphics

JENNIFER - Events Manager


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An important part of the project’s concept is the strengthened relationship between makers/artists and their audience, this including the relationship between the creators of the magazine and their readers. As the editorial team plays a major part of the ARTICLE’s experience, I have created their personalities together with the visuals for of their studio.

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Having completed all zones in Arch 1, I finally created a drawing of its longitudinal section, which visualised the connections between all of the premises, the interactions between the visitors and the people working in the cafĂŠ and editorial. However, the highlight of the week was the Riso printing workshop, that I attended in the Lighthouse.

Week 26


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Some of the prints created during the workshop

Attending the workshop was inspirational and it helped me with ideas for the design of the riso printing studio in the arches. Moreover, I got the chance to experience in practice the unique printing method. It was also fascinating to see how many people attended the workshop and how interested they were. It truly was a joyful social event.

Week 26


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During week 27, I focused on the modelling and rendering of Arch 2 and 3. After having done the Riso printing workshop and the interviews with the Screen Printing technicians in GSA, I had a better understanding of the processes. The biggest challenge for me was to design the spaces attractive to visitors, yet not compromising the functionality of the studios. My idea was to use the ceiling height of the arches in order to create movement and to highlight on the bold colours that are characteristic for the printing processes. The distribution of the printing tables in the screen printing studio is at the periphery allowing ease of moving around, even with A1 screens.

screen g printin 1 table A

Side Table

Side Table

Ink

screen printing table A1

Ink

Side Table

Ink

screen printing table A1

Washout Bay

Guillotine

Side Table

Ink

screen g printin 1 table A

Plan st x2 Che

Light Box + Plan Chest

UV Unit + Drying Cabinet

Screen Printing

Plan st x2 Che

Common Table on wheels

Ink

screen printing table A1

Side Table

Ink

screen printing table A1

Side Table

Ink Storage Shelves

Screen Storage

r Pape Rack

ANE NT L

CHA MER

r Pape Rack

Screen Coating Rack

Drying Boards

Drying Boards

Taking off excess water

Soaking paper Soaking paper

Etching Check-in

Riso Printing Applying Ink

Table on wheels for workshop events

Week 27

raph

Risog

Ink Mixing

Applying Ink

Ink Mixing


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During week 27, I also attended a flower bouquet workshop, held in the florist studio of Little Botanica (one of the featured studios in the Spring edition of ARTICLE). This was another great experience, as not only we left the workshop with amazing flowers, but we spent 2 hours of relaxing hand-crafting.

Week 27


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Weeks 28-30


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The last 3 weeks of the academic year were spent on the final production of drawings, visuals and curation of supporting materials for the project’s portfolio.

Weeks 28-30


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Bibliography WEEKS 1-30

Ambrose, Gavin, The Layout Book, (New York, Fairchild Books, 2015) Boettger, Till, Threshold Spaces. Transitions in Architecture: Analysis and Design Tools, (Basel, Birkhauser, 2014) Evans, Brian and Barton, Rudy, The Creative City. Connecting People, Place and Identity in Glasgow and Portland, (Glasgow, MSA Publications, 2016) Calvino, Italo, Invisible Cities, (NY, Harvest, 1972) Gehl, Jan, Cities for People, (London, Island Press, 2010) Gehl, Jan, Life between buildings, (London, Island Press, 2011) Glaser, Meridith, The city at eye level. Lessons for street plinths, (Delft, Eburon, 2012) Lynch, Kevin, The Image of the City, (Cambridge, Mass: M.I.T. Press, 1960) Komirki, John, Risomania. The New Spirit of Printing, (Berlin, Niggli, 2017) Petermans, Ann, ‘Heritage, adaptive reuse and regeneration in retail design’ in Retail Design. Theoretical Perspectives, (London, Routledge, 2017) Reed, Peter, Glasgow: The Forming of the City, (Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press, 1999) Scott, Fred, On altering architecture, (NY, Routledge, 2008) Sandstedt, Agnes and Rosval, Johanna http://www.udsu-strath.com/msc-urban-design/future-glasgow-the-peals-of-the-clydestrategy/ Teufel, Philipp and Zimmermann, Rainer, Holistic Retail Design. Reshaping Shopping for the Digital Era, (Amsterdam, Frame, 2015) Unwin, Simon, Doorway, (Abington, Routledge, 2007) WMUD, Lane Strategy for Glasgow City Centre, (Glasgow, 2016) https://www.glasgowcitycentrestrategy.com/news-frotm-the-city-centre-team https://www.mvrdv.nl/news/next-stage-of-regeneration-strategy-for-glasgow-city-centre-launched https://www.heimtextil-theme-park.com/the-film/ https://www.heimtextil-theme-park.com/lifestyle-trends/#the-maker-space http://jesmonite.com/about/

ARTICLE- Process Journey  

Behind the scenes of creating ARTICLE

ARTICLE- Process Journey  

Behind the scenes of creating ARTICLE

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