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patient’s head is moved into a specific position to elicit symptoms of dizziness. Clinicians watch for nystagmus, or jerky eye movements, which are characteristic of a loss of balance control in the inner ear. In BPPV, brief episodes of vertigo are triggered by certain head motions, such as those that occur when lying down or walking. The condition develops when calcium carbonate crystals known as otoliths, which normally are contained within the utricle, become displaced, usually in an adjacent inner ear canal. Abnormally positioned otoliths can displace fluid in the inner ear and transmit incorrect information to the brain about head position. Often, the condition is successfully treated by

moving the head through a specific sequence of positions that helps guide the otoliths back into place. The diagnosis of Ménière’s disease, on the other hand, may require extensive testing with VNG, VEMP, auditory tests, and electrocochleography (a test to evaluate inner ear pressure). In especially difficult cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning may be needed to confidently rule out other disorders. The cause of Ménière’s disease is unknown. The disease is characterized by fluctuating hearing loss and sudden attacks of vertigo, which result from a buildup of pressure in the inner ear. “Ménière’s disease often is disabling,” Pastalove says. “Patients FALL 2016 | TEMPLE HEALTH MAGAZINE |

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Profile for Temple Health

Temple Health - Temple Health Magazine - Fall 2016  

Temple Health - Temple Health Magazine - Fall 2016

Temple Health - Temple Health Magazine - Fall 2016  

Temple Health - Temple Health Magazine - Fall 2016