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At first radiology was strictly about diagnosing. Now it’s evolved into treating and guiding therapy, too. It encompasses the ability to see and to intervene (hence the term interventional radiology).

SHOULDER: DREAMSTIME

Freeman is Chair of the Executive Governance Committee for the GE agreement at Temple University Health System. “Efficiency means better service and better products at a lower cost — in other words, value,” she explains. To this end, the agreement projects $39 million in operational savings for Temple over the life of the contract. Both organizations, in fact, will be rewarded for meeting performance goals that demonstrate higher-quality imaging at a lower cost. As Freeman notes, cost-savings will help defray equipment purchases down the road — ensuring the rapid introduction of new technology. If Temple’s radiology-related costs ultimately go down, the savings can be passed along to insurers and patients, she says. “Higher-quality medical care at lower cost — real value — is the driving aim of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which took effect in March 2010. To navigate health care reform, medical centers must find innovative ways to approach cost management while enhancing the quality of care,” Freeman explains. These goals are challenging for all health care providers — and especially so for Temple. Because in addition to its immersion in the cost-intensive business of advancing clinical care, medical education, and research, Temple also provides health care to one

of the nation’s most indigent communities. In fact, the system’s flagship hospital provides more free and under-reimbursed care than any other single provider in Pennsylvania. “Such are the factors that make Temple’s agreement with GE a strategic priority,” says Larry Kaiser, MD, FACS, the health system’s CEO and medical school dean. “The pioneering approach we are taking with GE — aligning financial incentives to work collaboratively in pursuit of higher quality and greater efficiency at lower cost — represents a new frontier in value-based health care contracting.” Jeffrey Immelt, Chair and CEO of GE, agrees. “Like many health systems throughout the country, Temple faces considerable clinical, operational, and financial demands. GE Healthcare understands these market challenges, and we are dedicated to helping customers deliver the best outcomes in today’s environment,” he says. Both leaders predict that agreements like this will become a preferred business model over the next few years, with vendor and purchaser both putting “skin in the game,” working side by side to achieve shared goals.

PICTURE PERFECT he techniques of radiology come into sharper focus, with more clinical import, every year. GE Healthcare is a leader in enhancing established modalities and in bringing new modalities on line. Several imaging modalities are based on tomography. A tomogram, Belden explains, is an image of a single plane or slice through the anatomy. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanning depicts blood flow, glucose metabolism, and other biologic functions as they are occurring. PET can even detect metabolic changes associated with cancer before tumors form. Computed Tomography (CT) is a mainstay technology that works by passing X-rays through the body from several angles, then consolidating them with sophisticated computer software to create an image. CT images of the heart and its arteries can be “snapped” in just one heartbeat. Another tomographic technique is called SPECT, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography. SPECT uses gamma camera data from many projections to create 3-D images that can be reconstructed in different planes. Like PET, SPECT detects regions of biologic activity associated with disease. Another technology with exceptional capabilities is Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). “With GE’s new MRI technology, we can provide brain examinations and whole-body imaging — quickly and quietly — in just a few simple steps,” Belden says. A number of different tests are performed with MRI technology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), for example, is great at depicting SPRING 2016 | TEMPLE HEALTH MAGAZINE |

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Profile for Temple Health

Temple Health - Temple Health Magazine - Spring 2016  

Temple Health - Temple Health Magazine - Spring 2016

Temple Health - Temple Health Magazine - Spring 2016  

Temple Health - Temple Health Magazine - Spring 2016