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GUEST

TRACKING THE BELMOND FEELING FUTURE WATCH Our market indicator digest

MALENE BIRGER The designer’s dream hotel

HEILIGENHAFEN A recipe for tourism success


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CONTENTS TRACKING BELMOND

FUTURE WATCH

When Roeland Vos became CEO of Belmond in 2015, he was given five years to double their fortunes. We met the Dutch hotelier to learn more about luxury brand development.

How are hotel bookings stacking up? And where are room rates heading? We’ve partnered with the market’s strongest number crunchers to offer an industry digest.

THE TRUE VALUE OF INFLUENCERS

NEW AGE OF THE SPA

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The influencer market is booming worldwide, yet many hotels experience it as a veritable jungle. We give you a heads-up on how to make influencers work for you.

THE DESIGNER’S DREAM HOTEL 28

For Danish fashion designer Malene Birger, good vibes are far more important than run-of-the-mill luxury. We’ve asked her to design the hotel of her dreams.

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Spa offerings have become key sources of revenue for hotels worldwide, offering tailored wellness experiences rooted in local traditions.

THE LABOUR SHORTAGE CHALLENGE 44

A widening shortage of labour within the Scandinavian hospitality industry is making it ever more challenging to hire the right people and retain promising talent.

CREATIVE HOTEL CONVERSIONS 52

New hotel operators are emerging – from budget to luxury – with a can-do approach to repurposing industrial buildings as hotels for modern travellers.

THE HOTEL UNIFORM 60

The classic buttoned-up hotel uniform is experiencing a designer makeover, offering new branding opportunities for wardrobe-conscious hotels.

A RECIPE FOR TOURISM SUCCESS 64

Sixteen years ago, the small German seaside town of Heiligenhafen was a withering rose when an ambitious masterplan changed its tourism fortune.

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EllekĂŚr 2-4 DK - 2730 Herlev Denmark - Tel. +45 44921065 e-mail: gandc@gandc.dk - www.gandc.dk


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WELCOME

Photo: Thomas Andersen

Dear reader, As hospitality consultants, we at Telling & Nesager contribute daily to the development of the Scandinavian hospitality industry, offering our advice to investors seeking to purchase hotel properties, upgrade existing ones or engage with the right operators to ensure success. We are there every step of the way – from everyday guidance to more strategic decisions. In every aspect, our clients look to us for valuable insights into the future of our industry: How are the markets developing? How do you benefit most from digitalisation? And how do you access qualified labour for future growth?

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With our unique position, it was natural for us to consider new channels through which to share our knowledge and offer inspiration. We soon discovered that there is no media dedicated to the Scandinavian hospitality industry despite the synergy this market promises.

This gave us the idea to create GUEST magazine. And now you and other movers and shakers on the Scandinavian market are holding the result of our editorial efforts in your hands. GUEST magazine aims to nurture debate, convey relevant information about emerging market developments and inspire the industry’s many talents to be innovative and creative so that we can together ensure continued growth and success for the Scandinavian hospitality industry. As a new and responsive magazine, we are naturally open to reader suggestions and therefore encourage you to share your thoughts and ideas with us for future issues. We hope you will welcome GUEST magazine and wish you happy reading! Michael Telling & Preben Nesager


Designer fittings in the finest brushed brass, equips the deluxe rooms at the luxurious Hotel Skt AnnĂŚ in Copenhagen.

Photographs by Morten Jerichau

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GUEST

Roeland Vos photographed by Louise Kragh

PUBLISHER

Telling & Nesager Gammel Strandvej 16 DK-2990 Nivaa Denmark www.tellingnesager.com

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Michael Telling

EDITOR

Eva Kirstine Brünnich editor@guest-magazine.com

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION Louise Kragh Peter-Emil Witt Thomas Blankschøn

ART DIRECTION

Mads Lehn Kruse, MK Agency www.mkagency.net

ADVERTISING

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FrontMedia ApS advertising@guest-magazine.com

PRINTER

Paper-Made Production GUEST Magazine is published quarterly by Telling & Nesager No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission from Telling & Nesager. Telling & Nesager does not accept liability for omissions and errors.


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CONTRIBUTORS EVA BRÜNNICH, EDITOR For the past decade, Eva Brünnich has contributed to the Danish press, including Danish daily Dagbladet Børsen, with stories of emerging trends and other developments within the world of hospitality. As a partner in TN Communications & PR, Brünnich lends her talent to sharply targeted and engaging communication with the hotel and MICE industries as her core areas of professional interest.

MADS LEHN KRUSE, ART DIRECTOR Based in Copenhagen, art director Mads Lehn Kruse creates visual solutions for the arts, fashion and lifestyle industries. With his business acumen, extensive technical expertise and distinct creative signature, Mads offers creative and digital direction for an international clientele within graphic design for print, online and film.

LOUISE KRAGH, PHOTOGRAPHER Louise Kragh is a London-based Danish portrait and fashion photographer internationally recognised for her elegant and refined style with a subtle erotic twist. She is fascinated by people and always pursues images that are authentic and emotionally moving. Her commissions are both private and commercial and she has contributed to international magazines in Europe and the USA.

PETER-EMIL WITT, PHOTOGRAPHER Based in Copenhagen, Peter-Emil Witt became a photographer to garner insight into the world through his encounters with people. He has worked for Danish daily Dagbladet Børsen and currently contributes to a number of Danish newspapers and magazines. “The camera has a unique ability to open doors to new people and to new stories. It offers a unique opportunity to gain an insight into people’s lives”

THOMAS BLANKSCHØN, ILLUSTRATOR 10

Thomas Blankschøn is a Copenhagen-based art director and illustrator working within branding and illustration. Thomas divides his time between personal projects and working with such major international clients as Nike and Hermés Paris. He has previously worked as an art director of Cover magazine.


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As a child, Roeland Vos travelled all over the world with his parents. He met many different people and cultures, which inspired him to keep travelling and experiencing the world.

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Roeland Vos took over the helm as CEO of Belmond in 2015 and was given five years to double EBITDA and the number of hotels. GUEST magazine boarded the Belmond British Pullman to learn more about what drives this luxury hotel brand. By Eva Kirstine BrĂźnnich Photo Louise Kragh

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While Roeland Vos attended the hotel management school in The Hague as a young man, he took on a traineeship at a hotel in Brussels where his first job was to assist the dishwasher. “Twenty years later I returned to the same hotel as the manager. And suddenly this Turkish guy came up and gave me the biggest hug. I immediately recognised him because I had worked with him doing the dishes, and he was still doing housekeeping after twenty years. That’s why the human qualities are so important in our industry.”

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Band playing swing music at the Bellman British Pullman, London Victoria station.

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he ‘Belmond feeling’… two inviting words that feed the imagination. So where do you start? On the platform by a private Pullman carriage, I and a group of business-suited guests eagerly await our host – Roeland Vos, President and CEO of Belmond – while ladies gowned in sassy red play live swing music and the champagne flows. The occasion is an event for members of the travel press, who during a luxury rail trip through the English countryside are given an opportunity to get acquainted with the British luxury hotel company whose soul permeates all their hospitality offerings, whether you are staying at their legendary Belmond Hotel Cipriani in Venice or – as we are now – luxuriating aboard the Belmond British Pullman from 1926, which is just about to depart from London Victoria station. “Our single most duty is to create an intimate feeling – a unique experience – and to af-

ford our guests a sense of personal time to reconnect, whether travelling with family, friends or simply reading a book. We seek to create an atmosphere of relaxation and indulgence. That’s what we call the ‘Belmond feeling’,” Vos says while warmly shaking hands with the train staff. The Belmond adventure started in 1976 with the keys to the legendary Cipriani Hotel in Venice. The following year, they began collecting vintage rolling stock and opened the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express. And today, Belmond has over 46 hotels, trains and riverboats in 24 countries from Africa to the Swiss Alps and beyond. A collection of travel experiences, all of which have their own story to tell, Vos emphasises. “When it comes to destinations, it’s crucial that they fit into our kind of experience. What we look for is the right hotel offering the right experiences, and we don’t engage simply at any cost.”

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Belmond Hotel Cipriani in Venice was the first in the Belmond collection and remains the most famous. Photo: PR

STEAMING AHEAD

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Whereas slow travel may lie at the heart of the Belmond brand, there is no holding back on ambition when it comes to corporate growth. Belmond seeks to double both earnings (EBITDA) and the number of hotels in their collection in just five years. This is partly to be achieved by refurbishing their existing properties to enhance the luxury experience, giving the Belmond brand a stronger profile on the market, as well as through the acquisition of new properties at destinations in current demand among modern travellers. “So far, I’ve spent time getting the organisation in place. We’ve rid ourselves of silo mentality and have embraced teamwork throughout. We are developing the Belmond brand and focusContinued...

ing on the digital aspect and the tighter. That requires learning website. We have five new desti- more about travel behaviour. nations opening this year and 12 “Generally, people have more are under negotiation,” he adds. money, more time and easier acThe ambition is to end the year cess to travel. But a luxury travwith an EBITDA eller today is of between US$ “We have five new perfectly will140-150 million. ing to travel to destinations And when asked Mallorca with opening this year if they’re on track, easyJet. They and 12 are under he replies: may be load“We will ed with money negotiation” achieve our goals. but business Roeland Vos As long as we stick class no lonto our plan, we will ger makes any be the world’s leading provider sense. Our job is to understand of unique travel experiences.” what our guests want. The maWith new destinations such jor brands will survive and grow, as a small hotel in the Peruvian but if you don’t understand your Andes, a city hotel in London guests there is no reason to be on and several riverboats in Alsace the market,” he says and adds: and Champagne in France, Ro“To stand out, we must have eland Vos acknowledges that the something that the competitors company must live up to con- do not have. We must ensure stant challenge. For although the that guests come to us for someglobal demand for luxury travel is thing special that they cannot growing, the competition is ever find elsewhere. We usually say:


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‘We’re different, we’re better, we’re special’.” But what do travellers seek today? “More and more people want to experiment when travelling. For just how many houses and yachts can you own? Suddenly, with ownership, there’s a limit to experiencing new things. People have always travelled the world, so what else is there to experience? Now, people are seeking to visit places that allow them to return home and tell stories

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about an experience none of their friends have ever had. People are seeking more than simply the safety of the hotel chain experience. That’s not our competition. We compete with individually owned hotels,” he says, pointing out that guest needs also change depending on who you travel with and for what reason. “In the past, we described our guests as wealthy 50-somethings. Not so anymore. Our guests still have a high income, but we do

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not categorise them according to gender or age. What we look at is their network and the reason they are travelling. When I travel with my wife, I will experience something different than when I travel with my yachting friends. We as a hotel chain should be able to satisfy all needs. That’s why it’s absolutely crucial to learn why people travel. It also makes it much easier to communicate on social platforms,” he says.

Belmond La Résidence d’Angkor in Cambodia is located close to the fabled Angkor Wat. Photo: PR

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Bibliotekshaven

Hotel Bella Sky

Hotel Herman K

CPH Airport, Kastrup

Welcome to Deichmann Planter Deichmann Planter - Specialists in procurement and maintenance of special plants and trees for hotels, restaurants and businesses focusing on creating green environments for their customers. Founded in 1927 by E. M. Deichmann the company is now owned and run by Janne and Søren Johansen. Through more than 40 years of work and development of indoor planting solutions, the company has built up a large customer base and a solid expertise of developing, implementing and maintaining green solutions in companies around the country. Deichmann Planter employs 26 employees and have a customer base at approximately 700 companies. Visit www.deichmannplanter.dk for further inspiration and references. If you are thinking about implementing plants or trees for your next project, may we suggest a visit to our company, Deichmann Planter a little north of Copenhagen. In our beautiful greenhouses, you will find a vast variety of exotic plants and trees in all shapes and sizes. From small decorative plants to trees of several meters.

Plant walls – A wall of living art With a vertical plant wall, the green atmosphere changes in a completely new, different and less space-consuming way. Based on years of development and years of experience with plant growth and living conditions, Deichmann Planter has placed themselves at the top of the tier when it comes to establishing and maintaining unique and individual types of their patented DP-V12 plant wall, which, when finished, appears as a living work of art. You can experience the product at various locations around Denmark including AC Hotel Bella Sky, Copenhagen Airport and the IT company “Elbæk & Vejrup” to name a few. More green - more atmosphere In recent years, plants and trees has seen a significant rise in popularity as being part of the indoor or outdoor decor in many companies. Deichmann Planter has noticed a growing demand from restaurants and hotels that want to create atmospheric ar-

eas for their guests. There is often a need to add a final touch in terms of some warmth and coziness to the interior/exterior design. Incorporating pots and plants that support the design and theme of the project will help tremendously in achieving a unique and welcoming environment for both customers and employees alike. Deichmann Planter works in close dialogue with architects and interior designers to make sure that the delivered product is in line with the overall project. Please visit our website at www.deichmannplanter.dk for inspiration or contact us for a talk about your specific project. Visitors are always welcome at our office and greenhouses for a tour of the premises.

DEICHMANN PLANTER APS - GØNGEHUSVEJ 253 - 2970 HØRSHOLM - DENMARK


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Belmond riverboats meander through the beautiful French landscape. Photo: PR

PERSONAL TOUCH

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Scandinavia is still waiting to become part of the Belmond world. But this is not the result of a deliberate deselection, Vos points out. First of all, entering the Scandinavian market would require the right property – Belmond doesn’t have much of a heart for big hotels and most of their properties have 75-100 rooms. Secondly, the Scandinavians have an altogether different sense of what luxury is due to social equality being higher on the societal agenda. Subsequently, standing out from the crowd is less desirable, according to Vos. But although there is definitely a demand for luxury hospitality in Copenhagen, Oslo and Stockholm, Belmond focuses more on

the outbound potential of Scandinavians when they travel: “If we were to create a Belmond feeling in Scandinavia, it would be the chance to travel to the very north and see the northern lights or spend the summer where the sun never sets. The kind of properties we fall for are in limited supply, but there are definitely hotels and buildings in Stockholm, Oslo and Copenhagen that would fit the Belmond brand,” he says with a wry smile. On the other hand, with people as a decisive competitive parameter for the company, Vos is inspired by the Scandinavian personalised service ethos. “There is only one way you can offer unique added experiences – employing the right people. If you have the right people and the right team, everything else becomes easy. People who are free to be themselves and

have a real understanding for guests bind the whole experience together. I worked in Sweden at a hotel where they addressed the Swedish king by his first name. That’s typical of the Scandinavian way of letting people simply be themselves. You can teach people to serve coffee, but the attitude with which they do so should come from within. Otherwise it will feel artificial,” he says, adding: “The letters I sometimes receive from guests are always about, for example, that the concierge was amazing. Guests seek social experiences that they can tell other people about, and that’s infectious. Smart people and a good strategy provide a very loyal customer base.” “Did you know that he’s the third generation on this train,” he interjects, referring to the waiter, Michael, who serves us another


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glass of champagne. Michael, his father and grandfather all served on the train that for almost a century has rolled out of London Victoria station. Indeed, both father and son are still on duty together, on different carriages so they don’t get in each other’s way, they say with a friendly laugh. A human story that according to Roeland Vos is among Belmond’s strongpoints. “I always emphasise that people are the main strengths at Belmond. Service is something that comes from the heart. It is so important that they have the freedom to be themselves, attending to their guests the way they would interact with their family at home. We do not instruct our employees to remember to say good morning to our guests, for instance. They do so on their own free account. Other industry players devise rules for their service. That’s not luxury in our eyes,” he says. Roeland Vos came to Belmond with more than 30 years of experience from the international hotel industry, including as President EMEA for Starwood Hotels & Resorts. Like many others who enter the industry, he was drawn by the opportunity to experience the wide world. “Every new place I visit is an experience in itself. Very few people get that opportunity.” And even though he entered the industry in the classical way from the hotel management school in The Hague, it is important today to attract people into the industry who do not necessarily come with a diploma from an international hospitality academy, he says.

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MULTIPLE DESTINATIONS With destinations in far-flung countries such as Peru, Belmond seeks to create a balance between, on the one hand, hiring local heroes, who will stay at the destination and love it, and on the other hand employing classic industry people drawn to the business because they love travelling. This is why you need to shuffle the cards when recruiting, he says. “The tendency to primarily hire within your own ranks will change. Coming from an international hotel management school with top marks or being a highly skilled waiter is no longer sufficient for a luxury hotel. We often hire people with a different background from the hotel industry and have just hired a revenue manager from the banking sector. Another staff member has a background in the consulting industry, a third in the fashion industry. For our new London hotel, we have just hired a head chef who is a new, locally grown talent who turns everything somewhat upside down. We are entrepreneurs and have a broader perspective than that of classic luxury. If it’s not fun, why do it?” he concludes. That’s also the personal urge I’m left with when stepping onto the platform at London Victoria station. The plane home is about to depart and I should hurry. But I’m smitten with the Belmond feeling and contentedly wait for the next available flight.

ABOUT ROELAND VOS Appointed by Belmond’s Board of Directors as President and Chief Executive Officer in September 2015. Over 30 years of hospitality experience, including 12 years as the President of European, African and Middle Eastern divisions of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, where he grew the number of Starwood Hotels in the regions from 127 to 243 and increased revenues to over US$ 4 billion. He joined ITT Sheraton in 1982 and held progressively senior hotel operating and management positions, including President, Europe and Senior Vice President and Area Director, Italy and Malta. In addition to serving on the Board of Belmond, Roeland Vos is also a member of the board of Albron B.V., a Dutch foundation that operates catering and restaurants in the Netherlands and Belgium.

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THE TRUE VALUE OF INFLUENCERS By Eva Kirstine Brünnich Illustration: Thomas Blankschøn

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Influencer marketing is a booming global business. But does it deliver on its golden promises?

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he influencer blogoThe use of influencer marsphere was up in keting has exploded worldwide arms when the since 2015, as has requests from owner of the Dub- bloggers, YouTubers and Instalin hotel Charleville Lodge and grammers. According to a study the White Moose Café in Janu- by US influencer marketing agenary this year stated that he would cy Mediakix, the global market no longer sustain collaboration for influencer marketing will reach with influencers. His decision was US$ 5-10 billion annually by 2020. prompted by an inquiry by British This year, companies globally will influencer Elle Darby, who with spend US$ 1.6 billion on Insta135,000 YouTube and 114,000 Ins- gram influencer marketing alone, tagram followers proposed a col- and that figure will rise to US$ laboration in exchange for a five- 2.38 billion in 2019, according to day stay with her boyfriend – free the statistics portal for market reof charge. Hotelier Paul Stenson search statista.com. posted this answer to Facebook: “It takes a lot of balls to send an email like that, if not much self-respect and dignity. If I let you stay here in return for a feature in a video, who is going to But what is the real value of pay the staff who look after you? working with an influencer? Is it a (…) Maybe I should tell my staff waste of money? they will be featured in your vid“No,” says Zeth Edwardsen, eo in lieu of receiving payment founder of Woomio, the Danish for work carried out while you’re influencer data service. “But too in residence?” many companies are fumbling in Later, Stenson wrote that the the dark when it comes to chooscontroversy “puts into question ing the right influencer for their the authenticity of influencer brand. Simply because too few marketing,” because “she would are aware of the online reach and have spoken results of their ponicely about the tential influencer “It’s very difficult hotel only bepartnerships. for brands to know cause she was “The general what to invest in getting it for perception among free.” and what the businesses today The examis that they should return is.” ple from Dublin focus on the numZeth Edwardsen, is not one-off. ber of followers founder of Woomio Based on inindividual influencterviews with ers have and how a number of luxury hotels in the many posts they make monthly. Maldives and Bali, The Atlantic But you need to dig into the figMagazine reported that many ures to build a sound foundation such hotels get up to 20 requests for your marketing. It’s equally a day and have had more than important to know what topics enough of Instagrammers seek- influencers write about and what ing to stay for free. target audiences they’re reach-

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ing. You should be asking which posts are the most liked among their followers and what engages them. You also need to know in which time zones the followers are active. It’s very difficult for brands to know what to invest in and what the return is,” he says. Zeth Edwardsen created Woomio due to the lack of available data on influencers. He was annoyed at how opaque this market really is. Woomio’s purpose is to make the relationship between brands and influencers more transparent using data and visualisations of user behaviour on blogs, Instagram, YouTube and Facebook. Woomio currently has more than 20 terabytes of data on influencers worldwide. “For example, you can’t see if an influencer with 213,000 followers perhaps only has 10,000 followers in Denmark unless you check each individual follower. At the same time, a girl with 15,000 followers can reach 26,000 relevant people, while someone with 8,200 followers may actually reach just 1,400 relevant people. For example, if an influencer has 30,000 monthly views on their blog, one very relevant thing is to know how much content there is on the blog. You need to know how people visit. Are they looking for new or old content? You may end up with a paid collaboration not generating near the 30,000 views you had hoped for because the blog contains city guides or a popular food recipe of older date that continuously boosts the numbers,” says Edwardsen. As an example, he mentions Danish sportswear company Hummel which for a campaign found an influencer with only 4,000 followers on Instagram, but

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her content was of high quality petitors within the same period and the brand match was good. (…) Brands must wake up and To ensure that the campaign make demands, such as on which reached out broadly, Hummel hashtags to use and for content supplemented their strategy by choice, etc. If an influencer is collaborating with also a photogramicro and macro “Brands must wake pher, make sure influencers, which you have access up and make allowed them to and the rights to demands achieve their reach the images so and engagement that you can use Zeth Edwardsen, goals. them yourself in founder of Woomio By comparison, your marketing. the popular Norwegian actor Always think in terms of what you Thomas Hayes from the teen dra- want to get from this collaborama series Skam has 1.3 million tion,” Edwardsen says. followers on Instagram, which With the boom in the use of could seem relevant for a brand influencers they will also start seeking exposure in Scandinavia. to encounter content requireHowever, if you delve into the ments in other ways, says Kirsten numbers behind his Instagram Østergaard Poulsen, founder of profile, it turns out that over 60 Firstmove, a Danish company percent of his followers come that studies emerging consumer from Russia, Ukraine and Poland. trends. It will increasingly become necessary for influencers to offer documentation for their reach in line with that offered by newspaper publishers in terms of circulaWhile the US market for influ- tion and readership, she says. “First movers are retreating encer marketing is increasingly from digital channels. They install becoming performance-based, the Nordic countries lag behind online ad blockers and seek inforin terms of measuring the bene- mation and objective news. They fits of their collaborations, Zeth are becoming critical of the surge Edwardsen points out. In Scan- in influencers, and very few follow dinavia, many companies build classic bloggers. Instead they foltheir influencer collaborations on low, for example, a journalist who trust, believing the influencer to has something at heart,” Poulsen concludes, adding: be the expert. “Consumer behaviour is em“It may therefore be useful to bracing sustainability and immaalso nurture long-term collaborations, establishing a relationship terial values, and this will generwith the individual influencers to ate shockwaves since influencers ensure greater involvement. This are largely contrary to such valwill also allow you to add require- ues. A blogger or influencer must ments, such as stipulating that an provide information and content influencer must stay several times that support this development a year at your hotel and refrain – generating likes for a smart from mentioning specific com- dress or pair of sunglasses isn’t enough.”

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MAKING INFLUENCERS WORK Zeth Edwardsen’s rules of thumb Don’t expect anything the first time an influencer visits you, but ask for feedback. Instead, develop a strategy for your entire campaign, including when to engage with different influencers. You should ask yourself what the goal of each visit should be. Should it be to engage followers or make them take part in a competition, such as for a table for two on Valentine’s Day? Think about it in terms of concepts. Find five bloggers to match your brand. Require that they post in the same blog post. That ranks much higher in Google and increases visibility. Currently, there is often no unifying direction in the influencer collaborations that hotels engage in. Define clear key performance indicators for what you want to achieve. Get a grip on whether the influencer in question reaches the target audience you are seeking.


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CREDIBLE REVIEWS

- Why one hotel ditched paid-for exposure

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n Oslo boutique hotel and part of Nordic Hotels & Resorts, The Thief is one of many hotels in Scandinavia that receives daily inquiries from bloggers and influencers from all over the world. The requests are for free stays in return for exposure on social media. The hotel has introduced clear guidelines, says press officer for The Thief, Siri Løining. She has had to respond to inquiries from influencers since 2013, and the requests have kept increasing year after year. However, most are declined. Instead, the hotel offers influencers a special media rate, and according to Siri Løining, this provides more objective reviews. “Generally, we don’t exchange free hotel stays for publicity on social media. We focus on developing good stories within our key interest areas, such as art, design and music. We work closely with journalists visiting Oslo and suggest that they experience a different side of the city. Since we have many British guests, having an article in The Telegraph has greater value to us than if an influencer were to post

something about us online in exchange for a free weekend stay. We believe in credible reviews and not paid-for exposure,” she says. But if this is to generate an effect it requires that you are spoton with defining your target audi-

In Scandinavia, there are only a few influencers who represent the volume of followers that through a collaboration would allow us to reach our target group. That’s why we often end up choosing to partner with influencers outside Scandinavia. We have a very clear perception of who our major customer group is: where they come from, what age group they represent and what interests they have, which also makes it easier for us to choose the right collaborators. Before we enter into partnership, we need to know what to expect in terms of return on investment. We shouldn’t just be guessing. We need to be sure that the followers of these influencers share our target audience,” she says, adding: “Of course, we can experiment and try to reach new audiences, but I think it will take The lobby at The Thief. Photo: PR time, and much depends also on the price. ence, Løining emphasises. I also think that micro-influencers “It’s easy to be tempted into often have greater effect than looking at the number of follow- those with many followers, since ers rather than whom they are we know that micro-influencers reaching. It is extremely import- most often speak directly to their ant that the influencers we choose target audiences.” for, say, Instagram collaborations represent our target audience.


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By Eva Kirstine Brünnich

Danish fashion designer Malene Birger has the whole world as her workplace and home. Here, she shares her own personal vision of her eponymous dream hotel. Malene Birger has always had the whole world as her workplace and home. Here, the Danish fashion designer behind such leading brands as Day Birger et Mikkelsen and By Malene Birger shares her own personal vision of her dream hotel – and how she would design her very own home away from home. What kind of hotel do you look for? “I look for hotels that manage to create something personal, and often there’s an individual person or family behind it – a travelled person living out his or her dreams. Hotel Esencia north of Tulum in Mexico is one such place. It’s modern and fresh, but still comfortable and cosy. Good design, good food, nice bars, beautiful green palm groves, beaches, pools and lots of activity – or no activity, depending on your mood. You really don’t have

to leave the premises. The hotel was created by a travelled American, an avid art collector. I have also always been a great fan of Anouska Hempel, who designed the world’s first ‘couture’ hotel, Blakes in London, in the late 1970s. She stood out from the crowd and took all us hotel-lovers by storm. The new owners have retained her style, but I think the spirit and energy seeped out when she sold the place.” Are first impressions important? “First impressions are very important. A hotel is first experienced from the outside, then from the lobby, the bar, the restaurant, and finally the rooms. The exterior is incredibly important: Do you feel like entering? Do you get inspired? I believe a hotel should beckon you – so you simply have to take a look, or drink a quiet coffee, enjoy the

atmosphere, listen to the music and perhaps consider checking in. I love striped awnings, green plants and cosy outdoor lighting. It should be old-school, but in a modern way. Also, there should be white curtains facing the street in the restaurant, if visible from the outside. If the building has nice details and is historical and beautiful, you need to build on that. A hotel needs to be active, full of energy and should be used. It should be a second home where you dine, meet with friends in the bar, hang out. Creating a boutique hotel will cost more, but it will be an investment that makes a difference. The hotel will become an institution rather than just a place to sleep.”

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Personal artwork plays a key role in Malene Birger’s authentic styling and also features in two grand coffee table books published by teNeues, Germany and sold in over 72 countries. Photo: Liselore Chevalier

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How important is atmosphere? “Good atmosphere comes from the heart and must come naturally. It’s about people, the staff, music, scents and lighting. For a period, a hotel is your second home. I would want to recreate the exact same atmosphere and enjoyment as when entertaining guests at home. They should feel welcome from the minute they arrive. The hotel needs patina, and I want to feel the good vibes from the second I step over the doorstep. Whether an expensive or cheap hotel, Continued...

the feeling must be there. Patina and a sense of spirit are either already manifestly there due to

“I wish to create an atmosphere that makes the guest never want to return home” Malene Birger

the history of the building, or perhaps a new owner has managed to create it. That’s how a hotel

experience becomes memorable. Hotel Sanders in Copenhagen is a good example of a very successful project. It makes you feel the hotel has always been like that, although it’s almost just opened. Around the world there are oceans of stylish and chic hotels, but those little gems of life, creativity and classic service are far and few between – those capable of attracting a good mix of leaders and followers who lend it a good reputation and define its DNA. Be cool, sweet, natural but never be snobbish.”


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ABOUT MALENE BIRGER After graduating from the The Royal Danish Academy of Fine(Copenhagen) in 1989, Malene Birger’s design career began at Marc O’Polo in Stockholm, and by 1997 she co-founded her first fashion brand, Day Birger et Mikkelsen. By Malene Birger launched as her second fashion brand in 2003 and was over the years selling in

What would the Malene Birger Hotel be like? “The Malene Birger Hotel would express my personal style. The DNA of the hotel should reflect my passion for décor, fashion, design and art, and the way I combine things. I have travelled for over half of my life – checked in and out of hotels, and I love it. I’m even considering staying permanently at a hotel when one day I become an elderly lady. If I were to design my own hotel I would try and reconcile all the hotel experiences I have had – good ones and bad ones – and create a mood and experience that makes the guest never want to return home. I would create a hotel that is also a boutique – not just a boutique selling a scented candle or a strange necklace – but a hotel where the design, furniture, porcelain and much more can be purchased. You should be able to decorate your home with everything from the hotel if that’s what you wanted. The hotel should offer pleasant, professional and good-humoured service. The bar and restaurant need to know how to please you; they should be old-school, cosy and a bit cool. The bar should also be good for a little dancing on weekends; it should be a hang-out for the city’s creative crowd mixed with guests from near and far. The

more than 42 countries worldwide. Malene Birger sold her shares at BY MALENE BIRGER to the original investor IC GROUP in 2010, and by early 2014 she left the brand, shortly after she opened Birger1962, a design studio devoted to interior, design and art. Today she offers her creative work as a consult.

more eclectic, the better.”

both visible and non-visible. Details tell small stories and show How would you develop the that we’re making an effort. To style? me, details are about creative “My style is graphic: black, generosity and the sense of cowhite, cream and dark brown, herence that gives the hotel its which is reflected in my mood signature look. I would start with boards. I work with stripes, thick the logo and have a symbol or and thin, and plenty of strong, monogram integrated into varicontrasting patterns for logos, ous areas of the hotel, including graphic design, websites, cur- embroidery on the bedclothes, tains, flooring, specially dedecorative obsigned bath“The details of a jects, uniforms, robes, an edge Malene Birger etc. My own artalong the runner Hotel would be works should in the hallway, those guests talk be hanging on custom-designed about, the ones the walls and furniture and texbe available for tiles, porcelain, they purchase (…) I glass and even remember.” would work with a stamp in the a combination of breakfast butter... Malene Birger many different such a symbol materials, such as can be includwood, marble, steel, brass, glass ed many places. I would design and plenty of fabrics – materials a travel bag series for the hotel that will create contrasts and add store, where the logo and monoexperiences when developing gram underline and express the the overall look. The furniture and hotel’s DNA. The edge along the lamps need to add personality curtains would also be reflected and excitement to the décor. Soft in the uniform trousers. Graphand hard. Masculine and femi- ic design details are also super nine. Dark and bright. Old-school important. This applies to the and modern.” website and the printed material in the rooms. The details of a What is the importance of de- Malene Birger Hotel would be tail? those that guests talk about, the “Details come from the heart. ones they remember.” I have always worked with details,

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FUTURE WATCH FUTURE WATCH

Our market indicator digest

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The hotel industry often looks to history when seeking to predict the future, although history rarely repeats itself. All too often, we have experienced a decline in room rates simply as the result of market players making unfounded decisions and causing a vicious spiral. To offer greater clarity of vision, we have therefore studied a number of market indicators in association with two market-leading intelligence companies, Benchmarking Alliance and OTA Insight.

The first set of graphs shows the bookings that hotels in the three Scandinavian capitals have registered for the coming 12 months. This we compare with bookings registered exactly a year earlier. The second set of graphs shows the Best Available Rates (BAR) offered by hotels and OTAs for a double room over the coming 12 months compared to the same listing 12 months ago. Although these graphs cover differing sections of the hotel market we still believe they are good overall indicators that offer

a snapshot of how hoteliers see the market development in the three Scandinavian capitals. In the upcoming editions of this magazine our ambition is to study even more market indicators, allowing readers to gain a clearer understanding of what lies ahead for the hotel industry. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as to relevant tools for our hospitality Future Watch. Write to us at editor@guest-magazine.com

ABOUT OTA INSIGHT

ABOUT BENCHMARKING ALLIANCE

OTA Insight empowers hoteliers to make smarter revenue and distribution decisions through its market-leading suite of cloud-based business intelligence solutions, including Rate Insight, Parity Insight and Revenue Insight. With live updates, 24/7 support from customer success team, and a highly-intuitive and customisable dashboard, the OTA Insight platform integrates with other industry tools, including hotel property management systems, leading RMS solutions and data benchmarking providers. OTA Insight’s team of international experts are based all over the world and support over 30,000 properties in 140 countries.

Benchmarking Alliance provides the hospitality industry with accurate daily competitor benchmarks on the most important key performance indicators, such as RevPAR, ADR, Occupancy and CRevPS. Their Hotel Trends On the Books service offers a snapshot of how bookings are building up against the market 365 days ahead, allowing hoteliers to make informed decisions based on demand.

www.otainsight.com

www.benchmarkingalliance.com


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STOCKHOLM ON THE BOOKS All indications show that Stockholm will continue to enjoy demand growth. The second half of 2018 shows a relatively

clear development. It may therefore seem surprising that prices have fallen over the past year. In part, this may be due to capacity

growth, but price developments especially towards the end of the year should cause concern.

Source: Benchmark Alliance. OTA report date: 1 June 2018. Based on 10,880 rooms at 57 properties.

OCCUPANCY PER MONTH STOCKHOLM

FUTURE WATCH

PRICE VS. ADR PER MONTH STOCKHOLM

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OSLO ON THE BOOKS Demand in the Norwegian capital is clearly declining, even when focusing exclusively on the second half of 2018 where all

months have less on the books compared to the previous year. It is therefore surprising that price developments during the same

period are as consistent as they are.

Source: Benchmark Alliance. OTA report date: 1 July 2018. Based on 5,934 rooms at 37 properties.

FUTURE WATCH

OCCUPANCY PER MONTH OSLO

PRICE VS. ADR PER MONTH OSLO

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COPENHAGEN ON THE BOOKS Demand development in Copenhagen is stable compared with last year. However, growth seems to be declining and the

lead time is generally shorter with significantly fewer nights on the books in the first half of 2019 than a year ago. This is reflected

in the price development, which is slow. Some optimism can be detected in the market nonetheless.

Source: Benchmark Alliance. OTA report date: 30 June 2018. Based on 3,771 rooms at 26 properties.

OCCUPANCY PER MONTH COPENHAGEN

FUTURE WATCH

PRICE VS. ADR PER MONTH COPENHAGEN

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By Eva Kirstine BrĂźnnich

Designers have become the new curators of a trillion-dollar industry of high-end spa resorts promising the luxury of mindful escape.

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Away Spa by W Hotel in Amsterdam, an urban sanctuary that lets you nurture your soul. Photo: PR

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“When designing a concept, we assess the geographical location, culture and environment.” Anna-Cari Gund, Raison d’Etre

Grand Hôtel Nordic Spa & Fitness in Stockholm offers a Nordic spa concept reflecting affinity to nature and a healthy, sustainable lifestyle. The spa is constructed using stone masonry from Grythyttan and Rauk on Gotland, Sweden. Photo: PR

A new creed of curated spa hotels is emerging, one that embraces age-old traditions reimagined for a modern audience seeking escape from workaholic lives and constant online presence. Worldwide, this booming industry is worth US$ 3.7 trillion annually, according to the Global Wellness Institute. One of the world’s leading spa design companies, Stockholm-based Raison d’Etre has for the past 20 years pioneered this global spa revival. “A hotel spa is no longer a separate unit as it was 20 years ago, but integrated into a larger holistic totality, and spas and their wellness facilities are today often destinations in themselves (…) Wellness has become an all-embracing concept that not only includes fitness but also F&B offerings. Restaurants serving healthy meals add a new dimension to the wellness area, or perhaps there’s a juice bar serving vitamin smoothies,” says Managing Director of Raison d’Etre, Anna-Cari Gund.

CURATED CONCEPTS Raison d’Etre develops its spa concepts for the global market based on traditions from Europe, the Americas and Asia with the aim of offering personalised treatments and locally-rooted therapies. Among their brands are Kempinski The Spa with treatments reflecting the changing seasons rooted in Chinese medicine, and Resense Spa which seeks to revive age-old European spa traditions where water especially is the soothing element. Their Auriga Spa concept is inspired by the full moon rituals of Mexico, whereas their Jiva concept, tailor-made for the Taj Hotels Resorts & Palaces, delves into the heritage of age-old Indian healing techniques. And finally, there is LivNordic – a concept offering a world of Nordic spa experiences with connectedness to nature. The LivNordic brand can be found in Doha, Qatar, and on-

Managing Director of Raison d’Etre, Anna-Cari Gund.

board cruise ships. “When designing a concept, we assess the geographical location, culture and environment. We talk with the owners and investors to get the whole picture. We always suggest products that support both the spa concept and treatment list. We prefer and recommend organic products, and some of the selection must also have a local and authentic connection,” Gund says and adds: “We are currently working on a project in Rome, where we aim to integrate Rome’s history and involve residents and local traditions. That’s absolutely crucial today if you’re to appeal to the local community. When planning our spa in Qatar, we included a hammam even though the spa is inspired by Nordic traditions.” Continued...

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Vair Spa at the five-star Borgo Egnazia Hotel in the Italian region of Puglia offers retreat stays with personally customised treatments. Photo: PR

There is also a strong business case to be made on developing spas to offer locally-rooted experiences. With a far greater focus on the bottom line, hotel wellness offerings are now being designed so treatment rooms and fitness studios attract other segments than merely travelling businesspeople and pleasure-seekers. “When it’s off-season for hotels, we offer local residents the chance to enjoy day-spa access and to become members of our fitness spa. It’s about making the product attractive to the local community and about commercial viability,” Gund says.

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TRANSFORMATIVE TREATMENTS Raison d’Etre also develops their spa concepts to embrace a wider range of treatments and therapies than has traditionally been the case at spa resorts.

“We will see a growing va- would have thought luxury horiety of treatments. The classic tels would one day offer not only Swedish massage still accounts a stylish bed to sleep in, but also for 80 percent of all spa treat- life-changing sleep therapy. ments, and that will not change, “Mindfulness is a growing but we will listen more to the cli- trend. Guests require meditaents and will customise the clas- tion rooms, yoga and quiet arsic treatments to individual re- eas. This mindful dimension is quirements. Lavender oil may be something we’ll see far more of used as an anti-stress ointment, in the future. It’s a part of a stress for instance. management apMassage treatproach to allow “Mindfulness is a ments will conyourself the time tinue to be the to get bored and growing trend. basic product, stop staring down Guests require and then you at your phone. meditation rooms, will add someThe spa is a kind yoga and quiet thing extra to of escape. Some areas.” tailor the spa spas will also treatment to bring in psychoAnne-Cari Gund, the customer,” therapists and Raison d’Etre she says. doctors who can A further handle medical emerging trend in the wellness aspects. Medical spas will bemarket is a revival of the classic come more common, and the tradition of the European health same goes for those offering spa. As the products and ser- sleep therapy,” Anna-Cari Gund vice range continuously expands concludes. at spa resorts worldwide, who


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ESPA LIFE AT CORINTHIA Corinthia Hotel London is home to one of the world’s leading spa experiences, ESPA Life at Corinthia, that offers a transformative world of treatments ranging from classic weight-loss programmes to medical treatments previously primarily offered by medical clinics. With its holistic approach, ESPA Life at Corinthia has handpicked a range of leading therapists, including beauticians, osteopaths, specialists in traditional Chinese medicine and lifestyle coaches. “Today’s spa-goers require scientific proof and guaranteed results. Medical spas are becoming more popular,” says Aysun Mut, Spa Director for ESPA Life

at Corinthia, an award-winning four-storey facility featuring 17 treatment rooms, a private spa suite, nail salon, thermal floor with vitality pool, amphitheatre sauna and ice fountain. And should you feel a little peckish, healthy dishes and nutritious drinks are readily available. “Today’s guests seek the newest and best experiences – whether food, wellness, culture or other activities – all combined in one destination. Many luxury hotel brands worldwide have become the providers of spaces that combine these diverse consumer needs into a single lifestyle experience zone,” Mut says.

London’s next-generation spa

Essentially, luxury travel is no longer simply about enjoying five-star luxury service, but about turning off your phone and embracing mindfulness, she emphasises. “It’s about what’s most important in life and getting back to friends and family. In this context, spas have become a real hub for genuine self-care and escapism, and therefore it’s imperative for luxury brands to continue innovating and curating their wellness space and experiences,” she says. “Simply put, sometimes one just needs to get away and spend some quiet time alone.”

ESPA Life at Corinthia is London’s most exclusive and luxurious spa. Photos: PR

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EDITOR’S CHOICE

Our top picks of the world’s leading spa resorts by category.

MEDICAL SPA

YOGA RETREAT

ANTI-AGING SPA

Villa Stéphanie, Baden-Baden, Germany

Ananda in the Himalayas, India

SHA Wellness Clinic, Alicante, Spain

WHY: A recognised medi-spa for life changing diagnostics housed in the 5,000 sq. m. Villa Stéphanie in connection with Brenners Park-Hotel & Spa in the German Black Forest.

WHY: For the perfect Yoga experience you’ll have to go to it’s birthplace, India. When arriving at the Himalayan foothill in a Viceregal Palace, you know that your spirit is in good hands.

WHY: One of the most recognised anti-aging spas in the World. The SHA method includes elements like lifestyle and nutrition condition, together with genetics, our health and well-being.

BEST FOR: Weight Loss, Detox, Holistic and Aesthetic medicine.

BEST FOR:Yoga and meditation, Ayurvedic healing and Stress Management

BEST FOR: Anti-Aging and Rejuvenation, but also Anti-Stress, weight-control and detox

I’LL GO FOR: The seven day Detox and the Bamford Body Signature Treatment

I’LL GO FOR: The 7-night Ananda Yoga Program and perhaps some white water rafting on the Ganges river

I’LL GO FOR: The Anti-Aging Programme in two stages of each seven days while staying in a suite overlooking the Med.

FAVOURITE FEATURE: All wifi connection in your suite can be

FAVOURITE FEATURE: The Hopi Ear Candling

FAVOURITE FEATURE: If a suite doesn’t do it, book their Penthouse Residence featuring a private Hammam, a cinema and your own private wellness room.

switched off by the push of a button

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The Beaumont Spa & Gymnasium provides an oasis of tranquillity and revitalisation set in marble Art Deco surroundings. Photo: PR


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The Scandinavian hospitality industry faces increased labour shortage, which poses unique challenges when seeking to hire the right candidates and retain corporate talent. By Eva Kirstine BrĂźnnich

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Photo: Peter-Emil Witt

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Labour shortage is a chal- half of those responding reportlenge for many business sec- ed having encountered such diftors throughout ficulties over Scandinavia, not the past year, “We need to get least the hospiand they also better at attracting tality industry. expect labour young people to the A business surshortages to industry and at devey conducted intensify in the by the Danish veloping staff skills” years ahead. A industry organtotal of 25 perJonas Siljhammar, CEO Visita isation HORcent of the surESTA in Februveyed compaary demonstrates widespread nies have experienced problems recruitment challenges. About recruiting not just trade profes-

TALENT SPOTTING With greater opportunities for job-seekers, the hospitality industry throughout the region is losing out. Not least due to a perceived lack of career opportunities among prospective candidates. There are no academic programmes at Scandinavian universities offering bachelor or master degrees particularly aimed at the hotel sector, which leads bright young students to opt for other more promising careers. Faced with stark competition, major hospitality players in the region have started to develop their own training programmes and recruitment tools to attract and retain talent. “Attracting bright minds is a challenge, and as demand increases, some of those hired will have more limited qualifications. The kind of talents who make good general managers, restaurant managers or star chefs can be hard to come by,” says Allan Agerholm, CEO of BC Hospital-

August 2018

sionals but also managerial staff. This also applies in Sweden, says CEO of the Swedish hotel and tourism association Visita, Jonas Siljhammar: “We face the same picture. We need to get better at attracting young people to the industry and at developing staff skills. At the same time, we are experiencing an employee drain, which necessitates efforts to retain those who enter our industry.”

ity Group, one of Copenhagen’s leading hospitality providers. “That’s why we have established an academy where we provide skills development for our colleagues, preparing them for advancement within our organisation,” he adds. Scandinavia’s largest operator headquartered in Stockholm, Scandic Hotels has addressed the challenges of recruiting the right management candidates by developing an internal training programme. According to Head of HR at Scandic, Lena Bjurner, it’s about developing and retaining the talents that are already in the company. “The industry is growing fast and there are many different professional groups at our hotels. Attracting talent has become a more difficult market. We are privileged to have attracted lot of people with the right passion and attitude whose talents we can develop at our Scandic Business School. We offer training and educational programmes aimed at those who are already in managerial positions and want

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to develop their competencies as well as those who have the potential to become leaders or specialists within a particular field,” she says. Scandic was recently ranked by Great Places to Work as Europe’s third-best workplace in the multinational corporation category. Scandic has also previously been hailed as Best Workplace in Denmark, Sweden and Finland. And according to Lena Bjurner, this makes Scandic attractive to prospective candidates. “At Scandic, we have employees from 120 nations, and each individual with his or her unique personality help create our work culture. We are like a family. We care about each other and bring out the best in each other. We believe in our employees and that gives us a positive reputation. And we are being rewarded with a large increase in the number of applications.” This focus on employee attitude rather than skills is shared by another of Scandinavia’s leading

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hotel operators, Nordic Choice challenge with many smaller hoHotels, which is headquartered tel and restaurant companies,” in Oslo. According to HR Man- he says. “The hospitality indusager Hanne Corneliussen, the try in Sweden is currently conchallenge lies in spotting talents solidating itself and companies early. are getting bigger and bigger. “The talent in our industry is That’s why we need to be better very diverse. We have employees at communicating to prospective from all over the world, and we’re employees that these jobs are for not preoccupied with any gaps in life.” applicant CVs, but with personalAnd it’s also important to keep ity. We have sevin mind that skills eral examples of requirements will “We’re not employees who change over the preoccupied with arrived without coming five to any gaps in formal qualificaten years, he emtions, but who applicant CVs, but phasises. have achieved “Competence with personality.” managerial posirequirements will tions,” she says. be transformed Hanne Corneliussen, HR Manager, According to as a result of inNordic Choice Hotel Visita CEO Jonas novation, digiSiljhammar, the tisation and the hospitality industry is faced with automation of a number of worka major marketing exercise in at- flows. Some jobs will be replaced tracting labour. by others. To which degree is “The industry is very good at hard to say yet. But the nature of marketing itself towards custom- jobs will change,” he concludes. ers, but it also needs to market itself as an employer. There is a

At Scandic Copenhagen, restaurant supervisor Antonio Ricciardi briefs the kitchen staff and waiters about the menu the day. Photo: Peter-Emil Witt

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If you hire a general manager at a salary of DKK 1 million per year, the secondary cost will arise from the one year it takes before a new general manager becomes fully operational, according to Mette Arnold, partner TN Manpower & Training.

WHEN EXECUTIVE RECRUITMENT GOES WRONG

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If a company employs a member of the management team who falls short of expectations, this exercise will – as a rule – end up costing the company the equivalent of an annual salary, points out Mette Ravn Arnold, a partner in TN Manpower & Training. “If you hire a general manager at a salary of DKK 1 million per year, the secondary cost will arise from the one year it takes before a new general manager becomes fully operational. But it’s not just about money, there are also human consequences. Inadequate managerial skills are the most frequent cause of changes in the management team,” she says. For Scandic Hotels, the recruitment process – both internally and externally – has become extremely important, says Head of HR, Lena Bjurner. “We go to great lengths when recruiting. It’s important that our Continued...

managers inspire, build trust, cooperate and are capable of empowering our employees. We compile personal profiles and conduct tests in the recruitment process to ensure that the candidate embraces a Scandinavian value of hiring people for their attitude and then offering skills training,” says Lena Bjurner. Nordic Choice Hotels has adopted a similar approach, explains HR Manager Hanne Corneliussen. Thorough preparation prior to a job interview is absolutely crucial, she emphasises. “We continuously strive to enhance the skills of all recruiting managers at Nordic Choice Hotels. The training is both online and off-line, and we have clear guidelines and policies for recruitment and onboarding,” she says. But erroneous recruitment still happens, she acknowledges. “Those who hire and those

How do you avoid the setback of recruitment mismatch? who get employed are people. Sometimes the match isn’t quite right, but that doesn’t mean that the person hired isn’t right for a different job in the company. Sometimes you need to reassess,” says Hanne Corneliussen, and adds: “There are costs involved in recruiting, hiring and onboarding, and recruitment will become especially costly should the same job vacancy need to be repeatedly filled within a short period of time. But although the costs in terms of time and money can be considerable, great personal costs can also be involved if an employee experiences a feeling of failure. We as employers have a great responsibility to quality check the information we receive during the recruitment process, so that we choose the right candidate, ensuring we are the right choice for the candidate, too.”


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August 2018

IN SEARCH OF NEW TALENT

Has the time come to widen the circles of industry recruitment? The industry is booming and so is employment. This requires the industry to start looking beyond its professional ranks, says Mette Ravn Arnold, partner in TN Manpower & Training. “There is a lack of openness towards non-industry professionals, which leads to narrow recruitment from the same talent pools. This applies to the managerial level as well as the level below. The hospitality industry entertains a narrative of uniqueness, which leads us to make special demands on our employees. It’s a closed club, not least within revenue management.” According to Mette Ravn Arnold, the industry should look more at natural traits than professional training in relation to

service. “One could look more at personal competencies than traditional CVs and work-related experiences, such as with PMS systems. Today, many employers look at the professional quality of an applicant’s previous positions. In the future, it will become necessary to adopt a broader perspective,” she says, adding: “Other players within the service industry, such as ISS and Deloitte, have begun showing interest in people from the hotel industry. Perhaps we should look around to see if we could use people from other service industries, too.” However, according to Allan Agerholm, CEO of BC Hospitality Group, industry knowledge is es-

pecially important when it comes to positions such as general manager or restaurant manager, while such knowledge is less relevant when it comes to marketing positions, for example. “We don’t attract many people from other industries. To manage a hotel or restaurant requires knowing what you are doing. Theoretical training isn’t enough on its own. You need to know something about the trade. However, within specialised areas such as sales and marketing this is less important. Many people nurture a dream of opening a hotel, but it soon turns out that they have difficulty delivering when it comes to operational management,” he concludes.

Focusing on employee attitude rather than skills is essential to Nordic Choice Hotels. Here the reception Hotel At Six, Stockholm. Photo: PR

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EXPERT TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL RECRUITMENT WHEN SCREENING APPLICATIONS AND CVS, TRY TO AVOID INTERPRETING THEIR MOTIVES.

Spending 10 minutes longer on the phone with a candidate will ensure you won’t make the mistake of declining a promising talent.

ALWAYS SCREEN THE CV FIRST.

Save the application for after. The CV offers a factual track record, while the application is an exercise in dreams, visions and ambitions. You can easily get distracted from a candidate’s true qualifications.

ASK FOR FACTS AND EXPERIENCES:

“What did you do,” “How did you do that?” It’s easy for a candidate to dream up future scenarios, but more difficult to rewrite the past. Listen carefully to the answers.

REMEMBER THE 80/20 RULE.

You should be talking 20 percent of the time and the candidate 80 percent of the time during an interview. Listen to what the candidate has to say – don’t listen to yourself talking.

FACILITATE THE DISCUSSION BY ASKING CANDIDATES TO PREPARE TASKS BEFOREHAND BASED ON SPECIFIC CASES.

Also employ cognitive skills tests and compile personal profiles. Make sure to benefit from the feedback session where the candidate will explain how he or she reached their conclusions. These tools offer a shortcut and help us pinpoint what is relevant.

August 2018

By Mette Ravn Arnold, partner TN Manpower & Training Photo: Thomas Andersen

KEEP IN MIND THAT THE CANDIDATE HAS SPENT ALL HIS OR HER LIFE BECOMING THE PERSON THEY ARE.

That’s difficult to change. Consider how difficult it may be to teach a candidate about a given internal administrative system or certain market knowledge.

BE SURE TO ENGAGE WITH THE RIGHT PERSONALITY WITH THE RIGHT ATTITUDE AND CHEMISTRY.

We navigate in a work culture where individual responsibility, ownership and good decision-making are keys to success. If the candidate is bright, he or she will quickly learn the basic facts.

QUANTIFY.

When evaluating candidates, grade them from 0 – 10 (or whichever scale you prefer). Preferably on several parameters relevant for this position. Be sure to involve several people in the process and to evaluate immediately after each interview.

DIG DEEPER INTO WHAT THE CANDIDATE IS TALKING ABOUT.

“What”, “How” and “Why” are good words to start a sentence with. They will generate interesting answers. And if you want to know more, keep digging.

GIVE SCOPE TO INTUITION.

If you draw on your own experiences – also the subliminal ones – and trust your gut feeling you will often be right. When in doubt, simply hold back!

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Old industrial buildings are finding new leases of life as converted hotels. Operators are not only cutting costs with low-investment opportunities they are also embracing new ways to reimagine the hotel experience. By Eva Kirstine BrĂźnnich Photo Press

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Tree Hotel is a hideaway in the treetops of northern Sweden. Photo:PR

August 2018


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August 2018

CityHub hotels let you stay in a hub of compact units that each contain a king-size bed and a docking station for your phone, tablet and computer. Photo:PR

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otel conversions have historically been marked by standardised requirements from operators for the bearing of a construction, the width and depth of the building and minimum room space and window size, among other things. But the hotel market has become increasingly open to inventive change as market players are now emerging who see opportunity and profitability where others saw limitations. Today, operators are seeing possibility in a wide range of buildings of very diverse original usage – and even buildings as small as 1,500 - 2,000 m2 as long as the location is right.

A DUTCH SUCCESS

media following. In April this year, CityHub expanded to Rotterdam, while there are plans for more hotels throughout Europe. The Dutch CityHub chain “The most important starting launched its first hotel in 2015. point for us is a building that is In just six months, a dilapidated centrally located. Once we have industrial space in central Am- found our spot we are very flexsterdam was ible. Other hotels transformed into “The most import- look for buildings a hotel with 50 that live up to ant starting point private sleeping specific requirefor us is a building ments for the units organised that is centrally as an internal number and size hub surrounded located” of rooms. We, on by shared hangthe other hand, Martial Robardet, Director out space. Citycan easily get Development Hub Amsterdam something good & Investments, CityHub has experienced out of a building constant growth that is either very since its launch and enjoys oc- narrow or deep, for instance. We cupancy rates exceeding 98 per- don’t need windows or natural cent as well as an amazing social daylight, we simply look at opContinued...

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portunity,” says Martial Robardet, allowing us to offer low rates. This Director Development & Invest- means that a variety of industrial ment at CityHub. buildings may be relevant to us. CityHub Amsterdam not only We have a room layout that alrepresents a new approach to ho- lows us to convert the building tel conversion; it also represents without major investments within an entirely new conceptual ap- a short period of time. We just proach to hotel have to install design somebathrooms “In cities, hotels are where between because evtoday places that hostel and hotel. erything is The clientele is c e n t r a l i s e d invite locals as well as young, internain the hubs,” guests to drop in.” tional, digital says Robarsavvy and see det. Morten Fougt, Business and Project Manager, themselves as Their flexiAI Architects & Engineers part of a creative ble approach community. So, to hotel dethe CityHub concept is simple: sign offers advantages when it cool, affordable, centrally located comes to sourcing properties in and with digital solutions for ev- markets where supply is limited. erything. While hotel conversions are often “Nobody expected that a for- a daunting task, a concept such mer storage facility could become as CityHub sees opportunity ratha hotel like the one in Amster- er than limitation. dam. With these types of build“Often there are far more opings, the rent is lower than in a portunities in moving into an intraditional hotel building. We can dustrial building with high ceilings also double the number of rooms and large open spaces compared compared with traditional hotels, to traditional office buildings with CityHub hotels offer ample common areas for socialising and community activities. Photo:PR

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August 2018

long narrow hallways. That allows us to place the rooms wherever we want and make the most of the space. At the same time, the supply of industrial buildings is great since they are not in demand for hotel operations. We can move into everything from office space and warehouses to old factories,” Martial Robardet concludes.

INVITING SPACES Modern travellers are increasingly seeking hotels that ooze with charm and localhood. One of Scandinavia’s leading architectural and engineering studios specialised in hotel conversion, Copenhagen-based AI Architechts & Engineers has set new standards for repurposed luxury hotels, having overseen the transformation of a number of landmark buildings into new luxury hospitality experiences. “In cities, hotels are today


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places that invite locals as well as guests to drop in. Traditionally, hotel guests spent their time out in town. Now, hotels have become part of the city and organise events and concerts and more. This is why the building must also be inviting in its design. For example, by offering a greater sense of flow between the rooms or by opening glass façades towards the street to show that the restaurant is open to all,” says Business and Project Manager, Morten Fougt, who with 25 years of experience with the company has helped shape and develop their approach to architectural conversion. Among their Copenhagen projects is Hotel Skt. Petri, a heritage-listed Modernist building that was formerly a department store. Recently opened, Nobis Hotel Copenhagen was previously the home of the Danish Royal Academy of Music. Both these projects offer street-level dining options with an appeal to passers-by as well as staying guests. Currently, AI is repurposing Copenhagen’s imposing Neo-baroque central post office to become a 380-room flagship of Nordic Choice Hotels. One of AI’s noted recent Copenhagen projects is Hotel Sanders, which is technically speaking not a conversion (most of the building was already a hotel). Nestled behind the old Royal Danish Theatre, Hotel Sanders has been transformed into the kind of laidback hideaway even locals seek in a buzzing city increasingly geared for fast-moving stays.

Hotel Herman K in Copenhagen is an example of an unusual conversion, having previously served as a transformer station for the city’s power grid. Photo:PR

Continued...


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August 2018

OUT OF THE BOX

Unique locations that offer unusual experiences

TREETOP LIVING Treehotel is located in Harads in northern Sweden. A local couple set out to create a hotel in the Swedish treetops, saying: “We live here, we love our village, we wanted to earn a living and we looked at what we could do with what we have here.” The individual rooms at the sustainable hotel have inspiring names. The Bird’s Nest resembles a great prehistoric bird’s nest, while The UFO provides guests with a setting reminiscent of Star Wars. Today, the hotel has eight rooms and the demand shows the concept enjoys great appeal. www.treehotel.se

AMONG SHARKS AND DOLPHINS Hotel Atlantis at The Palm in Dubai, UAE, is located on a manmade island and their slogan is “Check into another world”. And that’s just what you do when booking one of their Underwater Suites, where the floor-to-ceiling windows offer submerged views of the Ambassador Lagoon and its 65,000 marine animals. You can also get close to dolphins and learn to swim with sharks at the hotel’s diving school. www.atlantisthepalm.com

POP UP HOTEL WITH 85 ROOMS

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If you’re looking for a room with an industrial look, Room45 is the solution. The concept lets you establish an 85-room hotel in record time in your backyard or on the beach (if you can get permission). Perfect for festivals, sporting events or any other events. The team behind the concept got the idea from often having lacked access to extra accommodation during different events, and the rooms are therefore converted containers that accommodate up to three people and have all the facilities you usually associate with a hotel. They can be erected and dismantled in just a week. www.room45.com


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By Eva Kirstine Brünnich

– IN AN AGE OF INDIVIDUALITY While some leading hotels hire big-name fashion designers, others turn to specialised companies to craft their sartorial identity. But in an age of individuality, do we still need standardised apparel? We’ve explored the answer with one of New York’s leading hotel uniform designers, Kim Nguyen. 60

The lobby at Four Seasons Hotel New York. Photo: Christian Horan

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August 2018

Kim Nguyen, founder of Kimmie Kakes uniforms design company. PR Photo

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he hotel uniform is as old as the very concept of the hotel. As the modest hospitality of medieval wayside inns gave way to the exclusive service of the golden age of Victorian travel, hotel personnel took on many of the classic roles and duties of domestic servants, which is why early hotel uniforms would often copy the formal attire of well-heeled households. And while some boutique hotels are leading the way to embrace more individualised workwear, many leading hotels worldwide are seeking an image-defining return to sartorial style. That was the case when the Rosewood London Hotel commissioned home-grown designer Nicholas Oakwell to develop vintage-inspired couture uniforms and when the Park Hyatt New York asked New Jersey-born Narciso Rodriguez to add minimalist elegance to their staff wardrobe. But while some leading hotels turn to the great fashion houses to define a sartorial identity, others opt for companies specialised in statement uniform design. One such company is Kimmie Kakes. Based in New York City and founded by Kim Nguyen, Kimmie Kakes has clad hotel staff at such storied establishments as Four Seasons, W, The Nomad and Eleven Madison Park. Kim Nguyen’s passion for uniform design began when working as a cocktail waitress at the Royalton Hotel in New York City in the 1970s. At the time, she was interning with a fashion designer, who one day asked her to help with designing a cocktail bar waitress dress. Since then, Nguyen has worked with top restaurateurs and hoteliers to create employee apparel as image-defining as the hotel interior design itself.

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Kim Nguyen’s design for receptionist attire for Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown. Photo: Kimmie Kakes

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As with the entire staff wardrobe at Rosewood Hotel in London, the uniforms for The Holborn Dining Room are designed by Nicholas Oakwell. British fabrics are used whenever possible, including Scottish tartan. Photo:PR

Why do you think uniforms are still important? “It gives the hospitality world a finishing touch. Uniforms complement the designs of restaurants and hotels and tie everything together. If you have a great uniform that fits well and the fabric feels good, employees feel great when they put it on. Their whole attitudes change.”

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What defines a good uniform? “Good, fitting and comfortable. A great uniform isn’t trendy, it’s timeless. Chic, tailored and classic styles that will last. Adding prominent accessories with a splash of colour always helps. If you do classic clothes and add edgier, trendier accessories, it’s a lot easier to make changes for 100 people than if you replace the whole uniform.”

August 2018

Shangri-La Hotel Toronto lobby lounge uniforms are designed by Canadian designer Sunny Fong. The graphic print draws inspiration from a Ming vase. Photo:PR

How do you start the creative What is the most challenging process of designing a uniform? aspect of your work? “I do a lot of research on the “Having to deal with multineighbourhood and neighbour- ple decision makers. They don’t ing hotels, the architecture, the always have the same style interior design, the exterior de- so  I have to find the balance to sign, the colour scheme of the please all without losing the infurniture, the walls, flooring, tile, tegrity of the uniforms. There’s a wood, all of that. I balance with creeven research the ative and opera“A great uniform era that the buildtions personnel isn’t trendy, it’s ing is from – say, and it’s always if it has Art Deco good to have timeless. flourishes on the both agree.” Kim Nguyen, exterior but the founder of Kimmie Kakes interior is modern What would and sleek. Clients usually send us design renderings of their restaurants or hotels. Once we see those designs, we put mood boards together and present a few different options for clients to choose from.”

the uniforms look like if you had your own hotel? “Relaxed, casual, comfy. No ties! My hotel will most likely be near the ocean. I dream of having more flowy resort wear for the staff at my future hotel.”


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DIGITAL

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Heiligenhafen was a small German seaside town in decline when a major tourism masterplan was enacted. Sixteen years later, the Baltic Sea coastal resort has become a tourism success. By Eva Kirstine BrĂźnnich

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August 2018

Beach Motel Heiligenhafen is located on a headland between the beach promenade, marina and the Binnensee lake in Heiligenhafen. Photo: PR

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isitors relax in the roofed beach chairs. Skaters race along the scenic wooden pier. Holidaymakers queue at the bakery shop for coffees and fresh bread for their seaside picnics. There isn’t a table to be had at the cafés that line the beach promenade and there’s also hardly a vacant room to be found in the city’s hotels, holiday homes or apartments. Heiligenhafen, a small northern German city by the Baltic Sea, bustles with seaside activity. But tourism hasn’t always been booming. A fishing town in decline in the 1990s with just 9,000 inhabitants, local tourism was limited to German visitors who would return to the same holiday apartments year after year. There were no hotels and no tourists between October and April. “We lacked year-round tourism, which would have been a good source of income for the city. And then we lacked hotels and relevant facilities that could attract guests also outside the

summer season. So, we adopt- 2002. The first step was aimed ed a masterplan primarily aimed at improving the infrastructure at developing the infrastructure and included the refurbishment and creating new apartments, of the city’s crumbling beach cabins and hotels with modern promenade. The €30 million facilities demanded by tour- infrastructure price tag was ists,” says jointly funded Manfred by the state of Wo h n r a d e , Schleswig-Hol“We only received directorofHeifunding because we stein and the ligenhafener had prepared a clear E u r o p e a n VerkehrsbeUnion, explains masterplan and could W o h n r a d e . triebe GmbH promise that private And (HVB), an inpublic dependent funding was investment would subsidiary follow, which was also indeed a deciof Heiligensive factor for the case” hafen Municthe success of ipality, Ostthe project. Manfred Wohnrade, director holstein. “We only of Heiligenhafener Verkehrsbetriebe GmbH In addireceived fundtion to seting because ting the parameters for hotel we had prepared a clear masprojects, the masterplan also terplan and could promise that included plans for a beach private investment would folmaintenance programme and low, which was also the case,” the operation of the marina and he says. fishing port as well as event deAnother source of funding is velopment for tourists. from tourists who pay a tourism The plan for the new Hei- tax of €3 per night they spend in ligenhafen was developed at the city, which offers 8,200 beds. Manfred Wohnrade’s small marina office and was revealed in Continued...

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NEW ACCOMMODATION After eight years, the next phase of the project was enacted in 2010, and in 2012 the city’s new landmark attraction was completed – the tri-sectioned 435-metre pier, Erlebnis-Seebrücke Heiligenhafen, which offers seafront sundecks and a glass-covered lounge. The state of Schleswig-Holstein financed 70 percent of the €5 million cost. Further activities followed in 2016 with the opening of 91 holiday homes and apartments in addition to the three-star Bretterbude Heiligenhafen Hotel and the four-star lifestyle hotel Beach Motel. But was it easy for you to find operators for such a new project? “No,” says Manfred Wohnrade with a big smile. “We

started contacting 100 potential hotel investors and operators. We wrote to all of them. Eleven found the project interesting, but we ended up with only one potential partner. Today, the Beach Motel and Bretterbude Heiligenhafen Hotel are operated by the Hamburg-based hospitality company Heimathafen Hotels. They have a huge network that helps to attract more guests. Now new potential partners are approaching us,” he adds. Today, tourists come to Heiligenhafen all year round, and the project has created 200 fulltime jobs. There were 500,000 bed nights in 2014 and the number had risen to 800,000 in 2017. More than 1 million bed nights are expected by 2025 – or even earlier, Wohnrade adds. The visitors are still 90 percent Germans, but Scandinavian, Swiss and French travellers are also

August 2018

making their way to the town. Heiligenhafen still lacks a five-star hotel, but the masterplan has been devised to cater to a wide group, Wohnrade emphasises. “Guests require a wide choice and we would like to attract all types of guests. Many families with children stay in the apartments where they prepare their own meals. But we would also be interested in attracting guests wanting to dine out, stay in a nice hotel and visit the spa when the weather isn’t so fair.” The next step is to create more opportunities for winter guests, which will include a new state-of-the-art spa resort with hotel rooms and holiday apartments that will also attract locals. The project is to be completed within three years. The beach area also lacks parking space and apartments for the many new employees.

Das Strand Resort Heiligenhafen is located by a 4km beach front and consists of holiday apartments and cottages of different sizes, offering views to either the lake or sea. Photo: PR

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REACHING TRAVELLERS

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mid-week days, for example. Only during high season are full-week rentals required,” she says. At Beach Motel, they are busy checking in their guests, who are welcomed everywhere

August 2018

ilies, couples or book-reading singles alike. The occupancy rate is over 95 percent on a sunny day like It’s one thing to keep buildtoday, says General Manager Aling new hotels and finding the exandra Rojas. Beach Motel has right operators. But how do you 115 rooms and 62 apartments. attract guests? A total of 98 perYou need to cent of guests are partner with the German and the right people, acconcept is simple. cording to JessiWhen booking ca Wenzel, who a room, all other heads the new services – breakMarina Strand fast, spa or masResort, a beach sage – are add-on development conchoices. sisting of 28 holi“We have day homes and 15 guests all year apartments, all of round, although which offer views the occupancy to the sea, lake or rate drops to 60 marina. percent between “To succeed, November and we need to go new February. During ways. We have that period, we been successful in host weddings joining OTAs such every weekend as booking.com, not only for lowhich has given cals but for visius many guests. tors from places You have to draw such as Hamburg. on players with Throughout the existing networks autumn, we offer and a wide reach,” incentive stays, Wenzel says while and in winter there walking me to are Christmas parBeach Motel, the ties,” she says. The Ocean Suite Samova at Beach Motel Heiligenhafen reflects city’s newest hotel the theme of ‘Tea and Water’. The tea is offered in association with To satisfy the Samova. Photo: PR inspired by the style needs of different of the Hamptons on guests, Beach MoLong Island, New York. – in the reception and on wel- tel has also introduced themed “And when it comes to hol- come notes in the rooms – with suites. Their Ocean Suite Mini iday homes, flexibility is im- the Frisian greeting mòjn. Staff includes a Morris Mini car rentportant so guests can arrive address guests by their first al. The Ocean Suite Samovar when it suits them and not only name, which is somewhat un- includes a samovar for avid tea have Saturday as a changeover common in Germany. And here, drinkers. And finally, there is the day, which has been customary. soft seating and comfortable Ocean Suite ‘Jever’, which inMany guests appreciate being corners offer a laidback and cludes beer on tap in the suite able to come for two or three welcoming ambiance for fam- for thirsty souls.


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August 2018

THE PERFECT PLAN

A clear tourism masterplan made Heiligenhafen a winner When Jens Sroka was presented with the Heiligenhafen tourism masterplan in 2007, it was a city starting almost from scratch. But the plan offered a very clear vision for how the city would develop over the next 15 years. As the owner and CEO of the German hotel chain Heimathafen Hotels, Sroka is an experienced operator specialising in seaside hotels. “I had never seen a city with such a clear plan, and I was im-

Jens Sroka, CEO Heimathafen Hotels Photo: PR

pressed by the detail: ‘This is what we have, this is what we want.’ The two hotels they want-

ed to open were to be placed very reasonable for land offering either side of the pier and both sea views and a superb location,” with a view to the sea and lake. he says. A very central and Out of the tosuperb location tal investment cost “I had never with both harbour of €49 million, Heiseen a city with mathafen Hotels fiand marina within such a clear walking distance,” nanced 20 percent. he says. plan, and I was Banks funded 70 perJens Sroka alcent and the remainimpressed by ready operates ing 10 percent was the detail.” three hotels by the funded by the state North Sea coast of Schleswig-HolJens Sroka, and has twelve stein and various EuOwner and CEO Heilmathafen Hotels years of industry ropean Union funds experience. He aimed at supporting saw this as an attractive opportu- job creation. Room rates start at nity to expand to the Baltic Sea. €85 at the four-star Beach Motel, Equally crucial factors were price €39 for the three-star Bretterand funding, he points out. The bude Heiligenhafen Hotel. price was very reasonable, and “Today, people are looking the seller was Heiligenhafen Mu- for something more than a hotel. nicipality. They want access to restaurants, “We paid €900,000 for the shopping, etc. And our key sellbiggest plot of 42,000m2 and ing point is that with us you get €500,000 for the other. That is value for money. It’s something

ROOM NIGHTS

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Heiligenhafen is located on the peninsula of Wagria by the Baltic Sea in East Holstein approx. 70km from the city of Lübeck.

The number of room nights in Heiligenhafen during the period of 2014 – 2017 has almost doubled. Heiligenhafener Verkehrsbetriebe GmbH & Co

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people tell friends and acquaintances about and they return,” he says. Since the opening of the hotel, the number of visitors has skyrocketed due to a combination of choosing the right tour operator and a strong presence on social media. “That means that if a group cancels, we can fill the rooms in

two hours by posting them on Facebook. We are very active and have a staff member dedicated to posting content on Facebook and Instagram. We are dedicated to search engine optimisation, which means we are top of the Google search list every time,” he says. This has resulted in 70 percent of all bookings being made

August 2018

through the hotel website, although the hotels can also be found on booking.com. But prices are always lower on the hotel website,” Sroka points out.

HEILIGENHAFEN’S FIVE STEPS TO SUCCESS

The five steps to tourism success according to Manfred Wohnrade, Heiligenhafener Verkehrsbetriebe.

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MASTERPLAN

Develop a detailed masterplan that also maps out the opportunities for all stakeholders.

INFRASTRUCTURE

Make sure that the infrastructure is in place and make sure there is a sense of uniqueness.

INVOLVEMENT

Involve all relevant public authorities and stakeholders as early as possible and ensure they contribute to basic investment such as infrastructure.

PRIVATE INVESTMENT

Ensuring private investment is crucial to the success of the masterplan, so make sure this gets high priority from all involved. If business cannot see the opportunities of investing, the masterplan will fall apart.

ONGOING DEVELOPMENT

Ensure that there is an ongoing development of the area and that the diversity of the facilities is continuously developed to ensure growth for the benefit of all.


HAY.DK


Modular by design VOLA commitment to sculptural modularity is epitomised by the T39 Towel Rail. The system features minimalist cantilevered bars which can be configured in any quantity and spaced to suit any bathroom design. T39 is the perfect accompaniment to VOLA award-winning range.

VOLA Showroom Pakhus 48 Klubinsvej 22 DK-2150 Nordhavn Tel.: +45 7022 4570

VOLA A/S Lunavej 2 DK-8700 Horsens Tel.: +45 7023 5500 sales@vola.dk www.vola.com

Profile for Telling & Nesager

GUEST MAGAZINE - TRACKING THE BELMOND FEELING  

GUEST magazine – a quarterly periodical aimed at the makers and shakers of the Scandinavian hospitality industry. By www.tellingnesager.com

GUEST MAGAZINE - TRACKING THE BELMOND FEELING  

GUEST magazine – a quarterly periodical aimed at the makers and shakers of the Scandinavian hospitality industry. By www.tellingnesager.com

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