Page 1

Flowers& DECEMBER 2012 $5.50

www.MyTeleflora.com

Love forSale Creative inspirations for best-selling Valentine’s Day designs

How to say “I love you” with flowers? Let us count the ways Pgs 28, 44 Valentine roses, from farm to florist Pg 22


features

DECEMBER 2012

42 22

A Rose’s Journey How roses make their way from farm to florist. By Bruce Wright

28

A Flair for Romance When style and sentiment go so well together, why settle for anything less? Floral design by Lori Novak AIFD, Archibald Flowers, Rancho Cucamonga, California Photography by Ron Derhacopian

44

Love Is Easy Simple yet distinctive designs that say “I love you” in all sorts of ways. Floral design by Bert Ford AIFD, PFCI Photography by Ron Derhacopian

4 DECEMBER 2012

On the Cover Midollino is partially uncoiled, then secured with green aluminum wire to create a decorative armature for this lovely hand-tied bouquet. Bert Ford AIFD, PFCI, also used the wire to reinforce and bind the stems. For more of Bert’s designs, see pages 44-59.


contents 12

Focus on Design A Do-Ahead Accent with Rivercane By Rich Salvaggio AIFD, AAF, PFCI

14

Creative Edge Color Harmonies: Discord By Hitomi Gilliam AIFD

16

Design $avvy Filler Up! By Tim Farrell AIFD, AAF, PFCI

18

18

Fresh Focus

15

Lilies By Bill McKinley AIFD and Bruce Wright

60

Index to Flowers& 2012

63

What’s in Store

64

Wholesaler Connection

65

Where to Buy

67

Advertiser Links

68

Industry Events

13 Flowers& Volume 33, Number 12 (ISSN 0199-4751). Published monthly by Teleflora, 11444 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90064, 800-321-2665, fax 310-966-3610. Subscription rates: U.S., 1 year, $66.00. Canada, 1 year, $90.00 (US currency only); Canadian GST registration number R127851293. Other foreign countries, 1 year, $102.00 (US currency only). Single issues, $5.50 each prepaid. Periodicals postage paid at Los Angeles, Calif., and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Flowers&, PO Box 16029, North Hollywood, CA 91615-9871. Copyright

6 DECEMBER 2012

©

2012 by Teleflora. Printed in U.S.A.


Flowers& Publisher

Rich Salvaggio AIFD, AAF, PFCI rsalvaggio@teleflora.com

Editor

Bruce Wright

Art Director

Tony Fox

National Advertising Director

Peter Lymbertos

Publication Coordinator

Elinor Cohen

Contributing Editor

Bill McKinley

AIFD

U.S. Subscriptions

800-321-2665

Foreign Subscriptions

818-286-3128

Advertising

800-421-4921

On the Internet

www.MyTeleflora.com www.flowersandmagazine.com

ADVISORY BOARD Teleflora Education Specialists Susan Ayala PFCI,

AIFD,

SAO Professional Design, Loma Linda, Calif., Tom Bowling

Fairfield, Ohio, Tim Farrell

Bert Ford

AIFD, PFCI,

Mo., Hitomi Gilliam

AIFD,

AIFD, PFCI,

Kansas City,

AIFD, AAF, PFCI,

Design Circle Events, Fitchburg, Wisc., Alex

Phoenix Flower Shops, Phoenix, Ariz., Vonda LaFever

Niceville, Fla., Joyce Mason-Monheim AIFD, PFCI,

AIFD,

Vancouver, B.C., Canada, Bob Hampton AIFD, PFCI,

AIFD, PFCI, AZMF,

Essexville, Mich., Julie Poeltler

Lone Tree, Iowa, Jerome Raska

AIFD,

Farrell’s Florist, Drexel Hill, Penn.,

Ford Flower Co., Salem, N.H., Jim Ganger

Dallas, Texas, John Hosek

Jackson

AIFD, AAF, PFCI,

AIFD, PFCI,

AIFD, PFCI,

Tucson, Ariz., Darla Pawlak Fountain of Flowers & Gifts,

AIFD, AAF, PFCI, CAFA, MCF,

JR Designs, Detroit, Mich.,

Tom Simmons AIFD, Palm Springs, Calif., Gerard Toh AIFD, Sherman Oaks Florist, Sherman Oaks, Calif., Cindy Tole, Botanica Flowers & Gifts, Greensboro, N.C., Kevin Ylvisaker AIFD, PFCI, Mukwonago,

Wisc.

EDITORIAL COUNCIL Marie Ackerman PFCI,

AIFD, AAF, PFCI,

Teleflora, Oklahoma City, Okla., Tom Butler

Teleflora, Oklahoma City, Okla., Carol J. Caggiano

Jeffersonton, Va., Wilton Hardy

AIFD, AAF, PFCI, FSMD,

Palm Beach, Fla., Rocky Pollitz

AIFD, AAF, PFCI,

AIFD, PFCI,

AAF,

A. Caggiano, Inc.,

JWH Design and Consultant, West

Blue Jay, Calif., Elizabeth Seiji

AIFD,

Edelweiss Flower Boutique, Santa Monica, Calif.

Customer service: For service on your magazine subscription, including change of address, please write to Flowers&, P.O. Box 16029, No. Hollywood, CA 91615-9871, enclosing a recent address label. For faster service, call 818-286-3128; Teleflora members call 800-421-2815.

8 www.flowersandmagazine.com


focus on design Floral design by Rich Salvaggio AIFD, AAF, PFCI

Photography by Ron Derhacopian

For product information, see Where to Buy, page 65.

Rivercane provides a do-ahead accent that’s appealing to both men and women for Valentine’s Day. A natural, inexpensive material, rivercane can take up a lot of space in a design. It marries well with Teleflora’s bamboo tray (as seen here in red, in honor of the holiday) and can be set up well in advance. 1. Fill the liner of the bamboo tray with foam, secure it with anchor tape, and glue short pieces of rivercane to the tray at the front and back of the foam receptacle. 2. For a very long-lasting arrangement with few insertions, add more rivercane plus anthuriums, short-stemmed roses, foxtail fern, variegated hedera leaves, red sea glass, and preserved reindeer moss. b

1

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2

DECEMBER 2012 13


creative edge Floral design by Hitomi Gilliam AIFD

Photography by Philippe Martin-Morice

For product information, see Where to Buy, page 65.

Defined as “lack of agreement or harmony,” discord might seem like a strange choice for the final topic in this year’s series on color harmony. But as anyone knows who observes color trends over time, a combination that looks discordant in one era might later come to be appreciated as pleasing and even trendy. Today we are seeing a trend toward exploration of new harmonies based on formerly “incompatible” color combinations.

Organic pseudo arachnoid A color discordance that occurs naturally may be sought after—and found, especially among orchids and other exotics. The soft hues of white and gold ladyslipper orchirds (Paphiopedilum), shrimp-pink Sedum spectabile, and feathery tentacles of fountain grass all harmonize beautifully. Striped spider orchids (Aranda arachnoides) also fit in the mix—but they introduce unexpected accents of a color that leans to red-violet. This in turn paves the way for the big surprise: hot pink mokaras, which, along with frilly carnations, throw the color scheme off kilter in a challenging, yet not unpleasing way. 14 www.flowersandmagazine.com


Repetition The strength of this design lies in the principle of repetition. A layered coil pattern is evident in the glazed ceramic container by Accent Décor. This pattern is repeated in the form of the yellow shampoo ginger with its layered bracts, and echoed by the wine-colored ti leaves (Cordyline fruticosa) that swirl in layers around the whole design. Blushing gold paphiopedilum and striped aranda orchids harmonize nicely with the ginger and the ti leaves. But scabiosa pods—of a mud color like the vase—introduce a dry, discordant texture. And while the Florigene carnations form an attractive color complement to the yellow ginger, their color is so vivid that they stand out in sharp contrast to everything else. Within this composition, color relationships bridge a very wide gap. They interact with relationships of texture and form to stretch our perception of the beautiful and harmonious in a new direction.

Nature’s way In this design, color values (light and dark) are associated with parched or vibrant textures. It is the tension between these values and textures that occasions a kind of creative discomfort. Delphinium—in a bright, deeply saturated blue—combines with mini callas in a very dark shade of red-violet, which recedes to black in the ceramic container below and the connective tendrils of the stripped, dark red ti leaves. Meanwhile, scabiosa pods and straw bundles like twisted roots introduce a bleached, lightly tinted tan—a faded relative of orange (complement to blue). Thistles, in a scratchy gray-blue, add yet another component that is tantalizingly both in and out of harmony with its surroundings. b DECEMBER 2012 15


design $avvy Floral design by Tim Farrell AIFD, AAF, PFCI Photography by Ron Derhacopian For product information, see Where to Buy, page 65.

Filler up? Know how to sell fillers for additional profit. As you can see by comparing the options presented here, filler flowers can make a big difference to the look and quality “feel” of a design—especially to the classic dozen red roses. And yet, many florists fail to give their customers options. Indeed, many florists fail to calculate the cost of different fillers when they price the roses. True, in some markets, customers who order “a dozen roses arranged” may expect babies’ breath. It’s reasonable, however, to offer the first option shown here, with a combination of salal and plumosus alone, as “standard” filler—at a slightly lower price than you could profitably offer babies’ breath. Then, let the customer know that for just a little more, they can get an upgrade. Bupleurum would be yet another upgrade—your top-tier filler. It’s important to explain the options up front in a way that lets customers know they aren’t being nickeled and dimed—they’re being given a choice. Shown here are ‘Freedom’ roses, all in the same vase—but of course, you can also create more options for customers by changing out vases and rose varieties and by offering other add-ons. Yes, it’s possible to give customers too many choices—but some choice is a good thing, and fillers are a good place to start. b

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fresh focus By Bill McKinley AIFD and Bruce Wright

Your lilies say a lot about what kind of florist you are. Say “lily,” and what comes to mind? Asiatic, Oriental—or one of the many new in-between hybrids? Do you think of an upward-facing bouquet flower, or an outward-facing flower with many large buds and blooms? Do you think in terms of colors or in terms of named varieties? Most important, perhaps, for the way you buy and sell lilies, do you think mainly about price, or mainly about quality—and what does quality mean to you? Over the past several years, the range of lilies has expanded in all directions. Growers in Central and South America have begun to produce lilies at lower cost than lilies from California or Holland—primarily for the mass-merchandiser bouquet market. On the other end of the spectrum, breeders and growers have collaborated to produce hybrids with stunning visual qualities and remarkable performance in the vase, including the new double lilies marketed as Dublet or Roselilies. Premium-quality lilies can be grown anywhere, and come to North America from many places. Still, it’s interesting to note that lilies are among those flowers where American growers still produce a majority of the stems sold in the U.S. In 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, American growers produced 141 million lily stems, versus 68 million that were imported. In the case of many other flowers, of course, the opposite is true: imports far exceed domestically grown roses, carnations, mums, alstroemeria, and other common florist flowers.

Lilies Lilium hybrids Availability year-round Vase life 5 to 10 days (as new buds open) Bunch size 5 or 10 stems

The best bulbs In general, American growers hold a competitive edge with bulb flowers—not just lilies but tulips, iris, and gladiolus. And with bulb flowers, the quality of the cut flower depends on the quality of the bulb it’s grown from. The purchase of high-quality bulbs represents a significant capital investment for the grower. Growers typically purchase lily bulbs twice a year, from bulb suppliers in Holland (in the Northern Hemisphere) or Chile (in the Southern Hemisphere). “The harvesting of the bulbs by the bulb suppliers lasts only about a month,” exNew lily varieties are constantly being developed by breeders and tested by growers. Among those currently being tested by Dramm & Echter (www.drammechter.com) are ‘Invacion’ (top photo) and ‘Red Eyes’. 18 www.flowersandmagazine.com 26 www.flowersand

Name

Flower size

Fragrance

Colors

Asiatic

3 to 3.5 inches

None

White, pink, yellow, orange, lavender, rust, several bi-color combinations

Oriental

4 to 6 inches

Strong

Pink, bi-color, burgundy, white, several combinations

OT (Oriental x Trumpet)

6 to 8 inches

Mild to strong

Yellow, pink, burgundy, several bi-color combinations

LA (Longiflorum x Asiatic)

4 to 6 inches

Subtle or none

Pink, yellow, white, peach, several bi-color combinations


fresh focus plains Juan Carlos Aguilar of California-based grower, shipper and wholesaler Dramm & Echter (www.drammechter.com). So, in order to have lilies to cut all year long, growers have to store some of the bulbs; it will be around six months before they can get a new supply (from another part of the world). “With the Dutch bulbs, you start planting them in January, and the lilies are available for harvest after 20 weeks or so, just after Mother’s Day,” says Janet Louie of Green Valley Floral (www.greenvalleyfloral.com), a premier grower of lilies, gerberas and garden roses. (Some lilies take only about 15 weeks.) The new double lilies (Roselilies) originated in Holland and are not yet established in Chile—which explains why they are available, so far, only during the “Dutch” season, from May through the end of January. “Around Valentine’s Day we get the Chilean bulbs harvested, and fill in with these blooms during the spring,” Janet explains. The cost of lilies varies with size, of course—for a number of reasons. Larger lilies, on stems with more buds and blooms, come from larger, more expensive bulbs. They spend more time in the greenhouse, consuming all the resources that go into maintaining the right growing conditions. But also, they cost a good deal more to ship. “With ‘Casablanca’ lilies, three to five blooms on a stem, you can fit only 60 stems to a box. With smaller ‘Acapulco’ lilies, you can fit twice as many, 120 stems to a box,” says Juan Carlos—halving the cost. One-bloom lilies might fit 250 to a box. Lilies that face up are easier to pack than lilies that face sideways, another factor in the cost of shipping. Lilies are traditionally graded by the number of buds on the stem. The only problem with that is that all the buds may not open. Wholesalers typically look for three to five buds per stem, says Janet. And yet, stems with just two to three buds can offer better value, especially if the flowers are large.

What’s in a name? How can florists help consumers understand that all lilies are not alike? Purchasing and calling lilies by variety name is one way to emphasize quality breeding and provenance. In dealing with bridal customers in particular, however, remember to explain that named 20 www.flowersandmagazine.com 26 www.flowersand

lily varieties may vary in color, owing to variations in growing temperatures, light intensity and even the application of fertilizer. As with dye lots, if your lilies need to match, be sure that you order them all from the same source. More broadly, while it’s a good idea to explain the difference between different types of lilies, industry terms like “Oriental” or “Asiatic” lilies may be confusing to customers, unless they are avid gardeners. Sun Valley Floral Farms (www.thesunvalleygroup.com)

is one grower, famous for its lilies and other bulb flowers, that uses a different terminology. Sun Valley calls its Oriental lilies “Orchid Lilies” and its Asiatics “Love Lilies,” while LA hybrids are called “Royal Lilies” and OT’s, “Sonata Lilies.” “We have branded our lilies for years, and customers return for the branded name,” says Sun Valley’s Ginny Wyche. Getting your shop known as a quality brand is what it’s all about—and lilies are a great place to start. b

care tips lilies

• Purchase lilies with at least two buds showing strong color. When stems are harvested with only green buds, the blossoms will not open well or have proper coloration. Avoid stems with fully open flowers as the blossoms damage easily during transport. • Lilies are ethylene sensitive and should be treated with an ethylene inhibitor. Follow the label instructions. • Remove the bottom one inch of the stem and strip off the lower two-thirds of the foliage. Place in a tepid water and floral food solution and condition at room temperature for several hours or until desired blossom maturity is reached. • Expedite lily blossom opening by using a warm floral food solution and by covering the buds with a clear plastic bag to maintain high humidity. Bright light (not direct sunlight) also seems to hasten the opening process as well as assuring good color in the blossoms. • Store lilies in a 36 degree F cooler with 85% humidity. Removing the anthers carefully will prevent pollen from staining clothes or furniture.

The selection of lilies grown in Ecuador at Esmeralda Farms (www.esmeraldafarms.com) reflects current trends: more of the LA hybrids, with their versatility and designer colors, along with the gorgeous new double lilies. Doubles can be seen on the right side of the selection in the bucket above, including pink and white ‘Roselily Belonica’ and deep pink ‘Double Surprise’. In addition to their ruffled appearance and high petal count, the doubles have no stamens (and thus no staining pollen). They should be cut just a little more open than the standard cut point for singles, as seen in the closeup photo.


A ROSE’S JOURNEY How roses make their way from farm to florist. By Bruce Wright

At Valentine’s Day or at any time of year, roses typically travel a long way before they reach your shop. What happens to them along the way makes a big difference to how they open up and how long they last—both in your shop and in your customer’s home. The journey varies quite a bit, depending on such factors as where the roses are grown and whether they are delivered first to a wholesaler (the traditional, and still the most common chain of distribution) or shipped directly from the farm to a retail shop. Here is one example of the journey—with notes about alternative routes and best practices. The information in this story comes from a variety of sources including Royal Flowers (www.royalflowersecuador.com). Royal is one of a handful of rose suppliers who control quality by maintaining direct control over the rose’s journey, from the farms in Ecuador to when the flowers are delivered to a trucking company in Miami. 22 www.flowersandmagazine.com

DAY 1: Roses grown in Colombia or Ecuador are cut in the grower’s greenhouses and quickly transported via hanging trolleys to the grower’s facility for grading and bunching. At Royal Flowers, the roses are in water during this entire process, except when they are bunched, says Rex Thompson, director of sales and marketing. “Then they are put into hydrating solution and hydrated in cold rooms overnight. This is very important to strengthen and prepare them for transport. They don’t get put into boxes until they’re prepared and conditioned to make that flight.” DAY 2: The bunches are taken out of the solution, the bottoms of the stems are dried off, and the roses are packed into boxes and delivered to a cargo agency on Day 2. The

cargo agency does everything necessary to prepare the roses for delivery to the airlines. That process involves such things as setting up waybills, getting the flowers pre-inspected, barcoding and precooling the boxes, consolidating the shipments, and maintaining them in temperature-controlled facilities near the airport. At Royal Flowers, the cargo agency is a division of Royal; other growers may use independent cargo companies to handle the logistics of shipping flowers by air.

Before roses are loaded onto a plane to Miami, it’s essential that they be hydrated and conditioned. At Royal Flowers, that means one hour for each 10 centimeters of the rose stem length, for a total of six to eight hours at 33-35 degrees F.


A ROSE’S JOURNEY The situation is a little different in Colombia, where cargo companies also operate, but without performing all of the same functions; typically, the growers deliver right to the airlines. Also, Colombian roses may fly out that same day; owing to airport restrictions in Quito, Ecuadorian roses, delivered to a cargo agency in the afternoon, must wait until the following morning for a flight. Once the flowers arrive in Miami, the same cargo company might be responsible for receiving the flowers, getting them cleared through customs, paying taxes, breaking down the consolidated shipments, and precooling the boxes again before delivering them to a trucking company. Or, these functions might be handled by a broker, distributor, or importer. At Royal, they are all handled by divisions of the same company.

DAY 3: The roses take a four-hour flight to Miami and arrive in the afternoon. (The flight from Colombia is a little shorter than from Ecuador, but not by much—perhaps three and a half hours.) In Miami the roses need to be inspected for pests by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and cleared by the customs bureau. Consolidated shipments need to be sorted into separate shipments for different consignees. In flight, the temperature in the hold of a cargo plane carrying roses is controlled, but not perfectly. When they are loaded onto a plane, boxes of roses should have been “pre24 www.flowersandmagazine.com

cooled,” using a system that forces chilled air through holes in the boxes, to a maximum of about 38 degrees F. By the time the plane lands, and certainly by the time the boxes clear customs and inspections, their internal temperature will likely have risen to perhaps 48 or 50 degrees F. A good distributor, importer or cargo company will check the temperature of the boxes and precool them once again before delivering them to a trucking company. The whole process—inspections, customs, sorting, and precooling—takes at least another day.

Breeding makes a big difference to how well a cut rose can withstand the stresses of shipping. At top left, Maria Elena Guerrero, who heads up the Esmeralda Breeding & Biotechnology program at Esmeralda Farms in Ecuador, proudly shows ‘Show Time Checkmate’, a new variety for which Esmeralda won the Platinum award for Best Breeder in New Varieties of Roses at the FlorEcuador Agriflor exposition this past October. ‘Checkmate’ is seen here in a testing greenhouse, not a production greenhouse; a rose cut for shipping would of course not be allowed to open this widely on the plant. Below left, the harvesting of roses starts early in the morning at El Redil in Colombia and at similar farms in both Colombia and Ecuador. Typically, it take from 30 minutes to an hour from picking to processing, from harvest to packing room. At most flower farms, roses travel quickly from greenhouses to processing facilities via a trolley system like the one seen below at Esmeralda Farms in Ecuador, where the roses are held in water during the trip.

DAY 4: Most roses make their way from Miami to a floral wholesaler by truck. In a sense, this is when responsibility for the shipment passes to the wholesaler, because the wholesaler hires the trucking company. “If you buy from a quality wholesaler, that wholesaler will hire a reputable trucking company,” says Rex. One of the best known is Armellini Express Lines. Flowers& asked Williee Armellini, a family member familiar with the operation, “What misconceptions do you commonly encounter about what happens when flowers go by truck?” “It goes a lot faster than most people

think,” says Williee. When roses or other flowers are delivered by the cargo agency to the Armellini facility, they’re scanned in, and an entire truck—typically, 48 feet long—is packed, box by box, in as little as an hour. “There are two drivers in every truck, so they can switch off and keep driving until all the flowers are delivered,” Williee reports. Leaving Miami, the truck will likely stop in northern Florida to pick up some of the cut foliage that is grown there. Then it continues on up the highway to cities along the East Coast, or heads inland to points west, stopping only long enough to unload boxes of flowers that


A ROSE’S JOURNEY have been strategically packed to make the unloading process as efficient as possible. What makes the difference between a topnotch, dedicated floral trucking company and another is, of course, first of all refrigeration. At Armellini, monitors keep a record of truck temperatures: “We do that so if someone says their flowers arrived hot, we can check on it,” Williee explains. “The truck really can’t

nificant delays. It’s not uncommon for roses to spend 12 days in transit—and at holiday times, much longer. The delays, of course, affect some customers more than others. Those who have preordered and have good relationships with suppliers fare better. The remarkable thing is how resilient most varieties of cut roses are, providing they have been grown and processed with proper care so that they’re protected from disease and infection, and—most critically—kept con-

precool. So if you put them in there at 40 degrees, they’ll be delivered 40 degrees. If you put them in there at 60 degrees, they might come down to 50”—but meanwhile, they’ll also warm the truck interior just a little, which is why Armellini samples the temperature of the flower boxes it receives, and will reject boxes that are too hot. DAYS 5 AND 6: Depending on the destination city, flowers trucked from Miami will arrive at the wholesaler usually within one or two days. Of course, it may take another day or more for the flowers to be sold to a retailer—unless they are presold and arrive in boxes ready to be passed along quickly to the retailer without additional handling or processing. Seven days, then, is typical for this chain of distribution. Various circumstances can lengthen that time, including “rotation,” when flowers are held back—by a Miami importer, say, who has purchased them on speculation—until they are sold. At holiday times, like Valentine’s Day, the sheer volume of demand puts stresses on the system that are likely to cause sig26 www.flowersandmagazine.com

sistently cool, with an average temperature lower than 40 degrees F. Under these conditions, cut flowers that have been through the distribution process outlined above will emerge from their boxes—well, as fresh as a rose.

Faster versus colder There are, of course, other distribution channels available today. Twenty-four-hour shipping is possible—and expensive. FedEx also offers an option that combines cargo air to Miami, chilled delivery trucks to Memphis, express air to a retailer’s city and delivery vans for a total of three days from farm to retail shop. This accomplishes fast delivery but with some compromise of the cold chain. When roses and other flowers are shipped from California, they can travel via refriger-

At Royal Flowers in Ecuador, grading of roses (below top) means checking stem length, head size and cut stage. After grading, roses are bunched prior to conditioning and precooling. Boxes of roses are typically barcoded so they can be tracked throughout their journey. Holes in the sides of the boxes allow for “precooling” with forced air to insure a low temperature inside the box at various stages of their journey. ated truck all the way, a process that can take anywhere from one to four days. From a coldchain point of view, this method of distribution is in many ways the ideal—depending, as always, on growers, shippers, and wholesalers following best practices. It also offers the possibility of shipping flowers in a holding solution or some other kind of wet pack, so they remain hydrated all along the way. Studies have been made comparing these different modes of transport without swaying all buyers to one system or another. All of the options offer a fundamental tradeoff: the faster the transit time, the more likely it is to involve more time on a plane, where the temperature cannot be as well controlled as it is on trucks. The value of speed can be overestimated. Remember that a chilled rose is hibernating. Its metabolism has been slowed down, so that, essentially, time and the aging process slow down likewise. When the “cold chain” is broken, the rose becomes vulnerable to the potential negative effects of ethylene and of disease, especially botrytis, that may be lurking inside its petals. In the end, the success of the rose’s journey depends not only on the route taken, but on the conscientious care taken by its custodians along the way. What’s a retailer to do? The best advice is the perennial advice: One, buy from trusted suppliers who have, in turn, trusted partners all along the chain of distribution, so you know that no matter how long their journey, your roses have been well cared for every inch of the way. Two, order ahead. “Don’t underestimate the difference it makes when you give your wholesaler the order in advance,” advises Rex at Royal Flowers. After all, careful planning on the part of all partners in the chain is what makes the chain work—and when it works, it works very well indeed. b


For information about advertising

Flowers&

in call Peter Lymbertos at 800-421-4921

DECEMBER 2012 27


A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE

When style and sentiment go so well together, why settle for anything less? Floral design by Lori Novak AIFD, Archibald Flowers, Rancho Cucamonga, California

For product information,

â–ź

Photography by Ron Derhacopian

see Where to Buy, page 65.

PINK IS THE NEW RED At right, two different kinds of light-pink roses, grouped on opposite sides of this very feminine bouquet, form a well-balanced contrast: smooth petals on the left, ruffled ones on the right. Cymbidiums and dahlias in a deeper pink enrich the color scheme. All of the flower stems, including light green hydrangea and trailing ivy, are arranged in a curly willow grid inside the footed art-glass vase, studded with pearls and mirror mosaic tiles.

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DECEMBER 2012 29


JANUARY 2012 30 www.flowersandmagazine.com


A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE

GREEN TRICKS At left, bundled blades of steel grass are looped over the top of a handtied bouquet, weighted with faux rubies and held in place with pearlheaded pins. The stems, meanwhile, are neatly wrapped in aspidistra leaves—a look that’s popular with customers at Archibald Flowers. the rubies sparkle against a background of roses in a light peachy-pink, while the entire bouquet is outlined in deep purple callas, ‘Sumatra’ lilies, and lavender tulips.

CLASSIC COLORS

SUBHEAD

xxxxx

xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x v xxxxx xxxx xxx x x xxxx xx x xxxxx

Red and green can serve just as well for Valentine’s Day as for Christmas—especially when they’re combined in the stunning blooms of green-heart ranunculus, a variety that holds up well and brings a garden feel to a design pairing red and light green roses with brunia, scented geranium leaves, galax and sword fern. AUGUST2012 2010 31 31 DECEMBER


A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE

32 www.flowersandmagazine.com


LET’S GET HORIZONTAL Like a sensational sunset, this crescent-shaped bouquet weaves subtle shades of salmon, pink and orange with white and light green around an armature of curly willow, held together with decorative flat wire. The armature is fashioned with a vertical stem and two arms. Lori used callas and snowberries to bring color to the arms of the crescent, but any number of other materials could also work. DECEMBER 2012 33


A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE

OFF CENTER A ruffle of light pink sedum and a long loop of bear grass are the surprisingly simple enhancements that provide visual balance for the star attractions of this bouquet: a cymbidium spray, ‘Black Baccara’ roses, and a vintage-style teardrop vase. Lori placed the orchids first, then the sedum, then the roses and foliage; the narrow opening of the vase helps to control the stems.

TALL, DARK, AND HANDSOME A bundle of equisetum, wrapped in black decorative wire and studded with faux rubies, adds height, value and flair to a bouquet of dark purple dahlias and callas, ‘Freedom’ roses, cymbidium orchids, ‘Green Trick’ dianthus, and hypericum berries. Scabiosa pods are tucked in for contrasting texture, all in a black glass cylinder vase. 34 www.flowersandmagazine.com


DECEMBER 2012 35


A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE

SWEET AND LOW

A low arrangement is in many cases easier for the recipient to place and appreciate, as well as longer lasting than a tall one. Here, a Lomey Wire Collar serves as a decorative design grid for a luscious bouquet of hydrangea, lilies, tulips, and dahlias, with fuzzy lamb’s ear foliage in a white glass cylinder. 36 www.flowersandmagazine.com


FLOWING LINES

Lily grass and mini calla blooms create a windswept motion from right to left, flowing over clusters of roses in contrasting shades of red (‘Freedom’ and ‘Black Baccara’). Scabiosa pods, pink cymbidiums, pink-tinted sedum, and beaded wire all participate in an exquisitely shaded and coordinated color scheme. DECEMBER 2012 37


HEADLINE RIGHT HERE

ONE OF A KIND Why not combine the traditional red roses with something really different? A stunning rosette vase provides a solid base for a design with dynamic lines and intriguing textures, including a tall branch of vivid pyracantha berries, a lightly fanned cluster of sarracenia lilies, callas, pincushion proteas, hypericum, and a graceful pair of aspidistra leaves.

PURE ELEGANCE Nothing says “serenity� like green and white. Strands of variegated ivy pulled across the top of this bouquet create movement and harmonize with the white flowers and vase. The orchids, clipped from the bottom of a tall cymbidium spray, are in water tubes. 38 www.flowersandmagazine.com


A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE

AUGUST2012 2010 39 DECEMBER


A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE

TABLE FOR TWO Work with a local restaurant manager and you could find yourself supplying flowers for couples dining à deux—with bud vases to take home, and a mini heart, filled with red and pink spray roses, as the ultimate centerpiece. A few green buds among the spray roses add texture to this nineinch heart, fashioned in an Oasis foam form with a base of hard green plastic, here disguised with strands of ivy. JANUARY 2012 40 www.flowersandmagazine.com


AUGUST2012 2010 41 DECEMBER


A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE

A TOUCH OF BLUE

Peacock feathers and blue thistle add jewel-like accents to a bouquet in the classic, popular green and purple color scheme. Green Fuji mums and hypericum bring up the color in the art-glass vase, while the feathers pick up its intriguing pattern. Like many of Lori’s bouquets, this one is made with curly willow inside the vase to support and secure the stems. b

42 www.flowersandmagazine.com


DECEMBER 2012 43


Simple yet distinctive designs that say “I love you” in all sorts of ways.

LOVE IS EASY Photography by Ron Derhacopian

For product information,

www.flowersandmagazine.com 44 JANUARY 2012

Floral design by Bert Ford AIFD, PFCI

see Where to Buy, page 65.


ALL CLEAR

Terrariums are

easy to fill; in certain markets, they’re also trendy (especially when the containers, like these, are made with recycled glass). The reusable containers add considerable value; customers can be encouraged to bring them back to be refilled with plants. Fresh flowers can be arranged in a small Iglu caged foam holder, or simply in a chunk of wet foam, and lowered into the container. If the flowers and foliage fill the interior space, they will be stable enough for delivery. Or, swirl a few mini callas inside the low container and just add water (mixed with flower food, of course). At Bert’s shop, they deliver the terrariums with a note that suggests, “If condensation builds up inside, simply remove the cover until the glass clears.”

DECEMBER 2012 45


LOVE IS EASY

SERENE SHELTER While this design requires a little more labor, all of it except the last step—adding the white roses—can be done up to a week in advance. Bert added wet floral foam to the white ceramic bowl and over it a grid of clear anchor tape. Then he fashioned a sheltering arch out of midollino, first adding a series of midollino loops to the foam, then the cross-pieces, secured with snippets of UGlu. He added the foliage and carnations, covered the rest of the foam with moss, and inserted the roses last.

46 JANUARY 2012 www.flowersandmagazine.com


THE TOTAL EXPERIENCE Chocolates, candles, and a forest of a dozen roses: this colorful, geometrically styled presentation inspires a moment of joy and excitement that is prolonged as the chocolates are consumed and the candles lit, in a reverie of pink. Bert inserted the midollino in small bunches and allowed the bunches to fan out a little around the roses. The arrangement looks beautiful without the box, but the box can also be replaced in the design each time a chocolate (or two) is removed.

AUGUST2012 2010 47 DECEMBER


LOVE IS EASY

48 www.flowersandmagazine.com


THE WAVE A wide, wired net ribbon (shown here in a color called “Addiction Pink�) serves as a grid that supports rose stems at the same time that it adds a colorful curve to the design, based in a low white ceramic rectangle. Bert used a double thickness of the ribbon to fashion the shape he wanted, then secured it simply by inserting the stems through it, starting on the left.

SIMPLE ELEGANCE A magnificent stem of pink cymbidiums requires very little in the way of enhancement: bind it with curly willow and lily grass at the base and nestle it in river rocks in a tall glass cylinder. If the cylinder is properly proportioned to the orchid stem, the orchids fill the vase in such a way that no other mechanic is needed. A band of ribbon reinforces the color. DECEMBER 2012 49


LOVE IS EASY

NUTS ABOUT YOU After admiring the playful, clever composition as a whole, the recipient can simply lift up the inner, Mini Bunch vase, removing it from the outer Celebrity Vase, and enjoy the gerberas on their own while snacking on healthy, roasted WonderfulŽ brand pistachios. To make this design, however, it’s easier to combine the vases first, add the pistachios, and finally the flowers and ribbon.

50 www.flowersandmagazine.com


MEGA DOZEN Green Mega Beaded Wire, draped not only over the top of the bouquet but inside and outside the clear glass vase, makes a beautiful enhancement to a hand-tied bouquet of a dozen yellow roses, collared with baby’s breath. Of course, you could do the same thing with red or pink roses and any harmonizing color of Mega Beads.

DECEMBER 2012 51


LOVE IS EASY

52 JANUARY 2012 www.flowersandmagazine.com


BUNCHES OF LOVE Three bunches of double tulips are bound to make an impression—but the impact is amplified by wrapping bunches of five in fatsia leaves and layering them for an effect of depth, with more fatsia leaves fanned out behind them, in a silvery metal container that serves as a keepsake gift.

BLUE FOR YOU Iris might not be a conventional Valentine’s Day flower—but a heart made of green aluminum wire, wrapped with bullion and beaded wire, sends the message home. Bert first filled the clear glass rectangle with equisetum, then added a dozen iris stems in between. At the lower end of the heart, aluminum wire extends from it and is inserted into the top of a cut equisetum stem. AUGUST2012 2010 53 DECEMBER


LOVE IS EASY HEADLINE

RIGHT HERE LONG-LASTING LOVE This gift has it all: roses, chocolates, and a phalaenopsis orchid plant that will still be blooming when the roses (and the chocolates) are gone. Bert placed the plant inside the six-inch white cube and wedged slices of wet floral foam around it to add the pink roses and ming.

54 www.flowersandmagazine.com


LUSH AND LOVELY What could be simpler, or more stunning, than full heads of hydrangea in a range of colors, with immature green hydrangea interspersed among them for contrast? These are arranged in a grid of clear anchor tape. To send the Valentine message home, Bert added hearts made of purple aluminum wire, with long wire stems so they can be secured either to the vase (by wrapping the stems around the rim) or to the hydrangea stems.

AUGUST2012 2010 55 DECEMBER


LOVE IS EASY

FOR MY SWEETIE Stackable pillar vases from Syndicate Sales make a handy container for a trio of treats: jelly beans chosen for colors that complement the flowers on top, arranged in foam in a clear plastic liner. The vases are tied together with pink ribbon and secured with UGlu.

FLOATING ON AIR Orange mitsumata—substantial in appearance but lightweight—appears to float just below the heads of the roses in this design, reinforcing their bright color and actually securing their placement. Bert first wrapped green metallic wire around the tops of the rose stems in four places, then used the same wire to tie the mitsumata in place. He removed some, though not all, of the foliage from the rose stems to emphasize the floating effect. A copper-colored plastic tray covered with thick pool moss makes an effective base. 56 JANUARY 2012 www.flowersandmagazine.com


AUGUST2012 2010 57 DECEMBER


LOVE IS EASY

HEART TO HEART

A heart shape

made with short-stemmed carnations, framed with ming foliage, can be designed in foam up to ten days in advance of the holiday, then outlined with mini callas and bear grass closer to the day. The callas are pinned in place with pink Diamante pins; the outside of the bamboo square is banded with ribbon to reinforce the color of the carnations.

58 JANUARY 2012 www.flowersandmagazine.com


DAISY DO

A cheerful gather-

ing of multicolored gerberas—a trendy favorite with customers, especially the younger generation—is even more appealing with the playful addition of spiraled aluminum wire wrapped around the stems. To spiral the wire, simply wrap it tightly around a pen or pencil first, then pull it out and insert the gerbera stems through it. It adds color and decorative value, helps to support the stems and, within limits, allows you to manipulate each stem so the gerbera blooms face the way you want. Bear grass and a polka-dot ribbon add the finishing touches. b

DECEMBER 2012 59


flowers& index 2012 Best Sellers Celebrate Spring with Flowering Bulbs .................... Mar, p. 16 A Leaf-Wrapped, Containerless Design ................................. Mar, p. 18 A Lily Grass Design Grid ......... Oct, p. 15

Creative Edge Color Harmonies: Monochromatic......................Jan, p. 10 Complementary ..................... Feb, p. 10 Split Complementary ............. Mar, p. 10 Warm Analogous ................... Apr, p. 10 Cool Analogous .................... May, p. 12 Color of the Year: Tangerine Tango ....................Jun, p. 12 Triadic ...................................Jul, p. 12 Tetradic................................ Aug, p. 10

Ton sur Ton ...........................Sep, p. 10 Polychromatic ....................... Oct, p. 12 Achromatic ........................... Nov, p. 12 Discord .................................Dec, p. 14

Efficient Designing in Multiples ............................... Apr, p. 16

Spring a la Mode: Fashion Hues and Simple Stylings ...................... Feb, p. 26

Profitable Recipe Design ........ May, p. 25

The Joy of Easter: Gifts and Décor to Celebrate Rebirth .................... Feb, p. 42

Pricing It Right .......................Jun, p. 24

Design Contest

To Green or Not to Green? ........Jul, p. 16 Do-Ahead Designing ............. Aug, p. 23

The Theme ............................Jan, p. 24 (and Feb, p. 24 and Mar, p. 24)

The Difference Hydration Makes ..................................Sep, p. 14

The Ten Finalists ................... Aug, p. 17

Recycling Old Containers ........ Oct, p. 14

The Winners ......................... Nov, p. 41

Market-Bunch Designing ........ Nov, p. 14 Filler Up! ...............................Dec, p. 16

Design $avvy Use Space to Add Value ..........Jan, p. 14

Floral Design Features

Who’s Counting? Are You? ...... Feb, p. 14

Design Directions 2012: Today’s Style Trends Are All About Your Own Creativity ................Jan, p. 26

Save Labor with Fewer Insertions ............................. Mar, p. 14

60 www.flowersandmagazine.com

Giving at the Office: Sensational ThankYou’s for Secretaries ............... Feb, p. 48 Hue’s Your Mama: Color-Themed Designs for All Kinds of Moms ....Mar, p. 26 Prom Fantasies: You Can Make Their Dreams Come True ............... Mar, p. 36 Beauty Unveiled: Bouquets That Stand Up to the Spotlight .................. Apr, p. 26 Celebration Tables: Classic Reception Décor with a Creative Twist ..... Apr, p. 40 The Next Big Thing: Trend-Setting Varieties in Designs ............... May, p. 26 Selling Up Everyday: Add-ons and Upgrades for Higher Profits .........Jun, p. 26


Selling Up Parties: Party Work with

Creative Enhancements...........Jun, p. 40 Styles for the Season: Creative Cues for

Holiday Display ......................Jul, p. 22 Summer Sales Boosters: Ideas to Bring

Customers into the Shop ..........Jul, p. 42 Home Couture: Style-Savvy Decor Using

Permanent Materials.............. Aug, p. 24 Fall Variations: Fresh-Flower Designs

LLY.COM

with a Creative Twist.............. Aug, p. 42 European Style, Step by Step: First in a

Series from Bloomtube............ Sep, p. 20 Something Special: Techniques for

Fresh & Fragrant Greens year around. In the Language of Flowers, Holly symbolizes - Domestic Happiness and an expression of unconditional love

Standout Bridal Bouquets ........ Sep, p. 26

Pine Hope Fir Time -

-

503-397-3547

Beyond the Centerpiece: Wedding

Reception Design .................. Sep, p. 40 Lasting Memories: Keepsake Sympathy

Gifts for the Home .................. Oct, p. 16 Meaningful Tributes: Distinctive Designs

Florist's Best Friend-

for the Service........................ Oct, p. 32

Floral Delivery Trays

Themes Like Christmas: Four Classic

EASY LOAD

Holiday Looks ...................... Nov, p. 16

NO SPILL

LIGHT WEIGHT

How to Make Hand-Tied Bouquets: New

Book Excerpt ........................ Nov, p. 46 A Euro-Style Holiday Wreath: Step-by-

Step from Bloomtube ............. Nov, p. 60 A Flair for Romance: Style and Sentiment

Go Together.......................... Dec, p. 28 Love Is Easy: Simple Yet Distinctive

Valentine Designs .................. Dec, p. 44

Floral Delivery Tray or Floral Carrier!

Floral Industry Features Colombia-Myths & Reality:

Big Changes in the Land of Flowers

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

One carrier holds an average of 20 to 30 arrangements.

Light-weight, h igh imp act plastic. Size 48"

Carrier is adjustable to any size (removing or adding blocks as needed).

Large, flat surface, available by

Jan, p. 52

-

x 48". 33

Ibs. Pins included.

moving pins to storage at sides. to deliver. No tip-overs or broken ends-saves load and unload time. No special places; load

in

the order you wish

SEMINOLE

Down on the Farm: Get the Biggest Boost

3710 Sipes Ave, Sanford, FL 32773

from "Buy Local" ....................Jan, p. 58 PATENTED

1-800-638-3378. Fax 407-322-6668 outside u.s.A. 407-321-4310 30 Day Mfg. Satisfaction Guarantee! www.seminoleds.com

DECEMBER 2012 61


flowers& index 2012 Blooms and Bunnies on the Rise: Balloon Designs for Spring ...... Feb, p. 56 Show and Tell for Teens: Grab Your Slice of the Prom Pie ..................... Mar, p. 54 Market Report—Fresh-Flower Trends: What Customers Want ........... May, p. 48 A Closer Look: Art Photography Helps Us See Flowers in a New Way ............................ May, p. 52 Vase Life Redefined: Top Suppliers’ Fashion-Forward Containers........................... May, p. 54

Focus on Design

Fresh Focus

In Step with Color Trends ........Jan, p. 12

Clematis ...............................Jan, p. 18

A Double Container for Secretaries ........................ Feb, p. 12

Anemones ............................. Feb, p. 59

A Trio of Silver Cube Designs ............................... Mar, p. 12

Peonies ................................ Apr, p. 18

An Elegant Effect with Gel Beads ...................... Apr, p. 14

Spray Roses ..........................Jun, p. 14

A Vase Treatment with Hala Foliage ......................... May, p. 16

Cattleya Orchids.................... Mar, p. 20

Stock ................................... May, p. 57

Carnations .............................Jul, p. 58 Eryngium ............................. Aug, p. 66 Amaranthus...........................Sep, p. 16

World Peace Through Flowers: World Flower Council’s Noble Dream ................................. May, p. 56

A Design Grid with Rubber Bands........................Jun, p. 10 Framed Holiday Art..................Jul, p. 14

Amaryllis.............................. Nov, p. 52

Autumn Leaf Accents ............. Aug, p. 12

Lilies ....................................Dec, p. 18

Partners in Freshness: Two Care and Handling Leaders Join Forces ..................................Jun, p. 22

An Archway for the Escort Table ..........................Sep, p. 12

The Clear Alternative: Floral Containers Made from Recycled Glass....................................Jun, p. 52 The 2012-2013 Flowers& Buyers’ Guide: Source Book ...............Jun, p. 61 The Best of the Bunch: How Pocket Full of Posies Wins at Weddings ..............................Jul, p. 18 How to Succeed in Business: America’s Biggest Chain of Flower Shops .................................. Aug, p. 55 The Making of a Silk Flower: A Visit to a Factory in China.... Aug, p. 59 Some Like It Hot: Highlights from AIFD’s National Symposium ...........................Sep, p. 54 Your Gift-Basket Questions Answered: Tips from Shred to Shrink ........ Oct, p. 51 A Rose’s Journey: How Roses Make Their Way from Farm to Florist ................Dec, p. 22

62 www.flowersandmagazine.com

Chrysanthemums ................... Oct, p. 58

Votives on a Vertical Wreath .... Oct, p. 10

Shop Profiles

A Tiered Holiday Design ......... Nov, p. 10

Alamo Plants and Petals, San Antonio, TX ..................... Feb, p. 16

A Do-Ahead Accent with Rivercane ..............................Dec, p. 12

Floral Elegance, North Grafton, MA ................. May, p. 18 Julia’s Flowers and Gifts, Wilmington, NC ..................... Oct, p. 53 Silver Springs Floral & Gift, Albuquerque, NM .................. Nov, p. 54

The Buzz Back in the Big Apple; Online Shopping for Florists; An Extraordinary Life............... Feb, p. 64 Fun with Duct Tape; Memorial Day Giveaways; A Pressing Matter .................................. Mar, p. 58 Learn from Bloomtube; Judith Blacklock Book; You Be the Judge......... Aug, p. 16


what’s in store

STRINGS ATTACHED The Heartstrings Bouquet by Teleflora offers three gifts in one: beautiful flowers, a keepsake vase in lustrous red ceramic, and a necklace featuring a silver-plated heart pendant that sparkles with a one-caratsized Swarovski® Elements crystal. Call 800-333-0205 or visit www.myteleflora.com.

DAYDREAMING OF YOU Adorable doodles called Heart Scribbles are featured on Valentine balloons from Betallic for 2013, including latex balloons in red or fuchsia and a heart-shaped, 18-inch, holographic foil balloon in white, red and fuchsia. Call 314-991-1943 or visit www.betallic.com.

LOOKING SHARP The Flux Flower Power Stem Trimmer is designed to maximize cut-flower vase life by cutting the stem at just the right angle for optimum absorption of water and nutrients. Blades last for over 1,000 stems for roses and similar flowers. Available in three colors. Call Alice Parsons at 770-578-0918 or visit www.questa4hgo.com.

GO WILD Heart-shaped boxes filled with Grand Truffles come in a striking blackand-white zebra pattern—or in tawny leopard spots. These are just two of the eye-catching options from premium chocolatier Sweet Shop USA. Call 800-222-2269 or visit www.sweetshopusa.com.

DECEMBER 2012 63


STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION (Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685)

wholesaler connection The following leading wholesale florists are distributors of Flowers& magazine.

ARIZONA

KANSAS

SOUTH DAKOTA

PHOENIX Conroy Wholesale Florist The Roy Houff Company

WICHITA Valley Floral Company

SIOUX FALLS North American Wholesale Florist, Inc.

CALIFORNIA FRESNO Designer Flower Center INGLEWOOD American Magazines & Books OAKLAND Piazza International Floral SACRAMENTO Flora Fresh SAN BERNARDINO Inland Wholesale Flowers SAN DIEGO San Diego Florist Supplies SANTA ANA A to Z Wholesale Floral SANTA ROSA Sequoia Floral International

FLORIDA

KENTUCKY LOUISVILLE The Roy Houff Company

LOUISIANA BATON ROUGE Louisiana Wholesale Florists LAFAYETTE Louisiana Wholesale Florists

MICHIGAN

UTAH

WARREN Nordlie, Inc.

MINNESOTA MINNEAPOLIS Koehler and Dramm ROSEVILLE North American Wholesale Florist, Inc.

GEORGIA

CAMPBELL HALL Henry C. Alders

HONOLULU Flora-Dec Sales

ILLINOIS CHICAGO Bill Doran Company The Roy Houff Company NORMAL The Roy Houff Company PEORIA HEIGHTS Bill Doran Company WHEELING The Roy Houff Company

TEXAS

BOSTON Jacobson Floral Supply

MASSACHUSETTS

MISSOURI

HAWAII

NASHVILLE The Roy Houff Company DALLAS American Agroproducts, Inc. HOUSTON Pikes Peak of Texas Southern Floral Company LUBBOCK Lubbock Wholesale Florist

PENSACOLA Hall’s Pensacola Wholesale Oscar G. Carlstedt Company OMEGA Hornbuckle Wholesale Florist

TENNESSEE

ST LOUIS LaSalle Wholesale Florist

NEW YORK

OHIO BEREA Pioneer Wholesale Company DAYTON Nordlie, Inc. NORTH CANTON Canton Wholesale Floral PARMA Cleveland Plant & Flower Company

PENNSYLVANIA PITTSBURGH Keystone Ribbon & Floral Pittsburgh Cut Flower Company

64 www.flowersandmagazine.com

SALT LAKE CITY Ensign Wholesale Floral

VIRGINIA NORFOLK The Roy Houff Company RICHMOND The Roy Houff Company

WASHINGTON TACOMA Washington Floral Service

CANADA BURNABY, BC Signature Floral Supply (division of Kirby Floral Inc.)

MALAYSIA SELANGOR Worldwide Floral Services

SINGAPORE Worldwide Floral Services

Publication Title: Flowers& Magazine Publication Number: 0199-4751 Filing Date: September 21, 2012 Issue Frequency: Monthly No. of Issues Published Annually: 12 Annual Subscription Price: $66.00 Complete Mailing Address of Publication: 11444 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90064-1544 Contact Person: Elinor Cohen Publisher: Rich Salvaggio Editor: Bruce Wright Owner: Teleflora, 11444 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90064-1544 Issue Date for Circulation Data: September 2012

Extent of Circulation a. Total No. Copies (net press run) b. Paid and/or Requested Circulation 1) Outside-County Mail Subscription, Stated on Form 3541 2) Paid In-County Subscriptions (Include advertiser’s proof and exchange copies) 3) Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales (not mailed) 4) Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS c. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation d. Free Distribution outside the Mail 1) Outside-County as stated on Form 3541 2) In-County 3) Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS 4) Free Distribution outside the Mail (Carriers or other means) e. Total Free Distribution f. Total Distribution g. Copies Not Distributed h. Total i. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation I certify that the statements made above are correct and complete.

Avg. Previous 12 Months 12,360

Single Issue Nearest Filing Date 11,638

7,295

6,874

0

0

1,068

941

12

12

8,375

7,827

240 0

207 0

200

202

3,160 3,600 11,975 385 12,360

3,027 3,436 11,263 375 11,638

70%

70%


where to buy For more information on merchandise featured in Flowers&, contact the supplier directly. Direct links to most suppliers can be found on the Flowers& website, www.flowersandmagazine.com. Use the links under “Advertisers in this Issue” or the link to our searchable, online Buyers’ Guide at the top of the Flowers& home page.

FOCUS ON DESIGN, pages 12-13

Red bamboo tray, Teleflora. Red Deco Glass, Accent Décor.

CREATIVE EDGE, pages 14-15

Artsi Vase, Accent Décor.

DESIGN $AVVY, page 16 Couture Vase, Teleflora.

A FLAIR FOR ROMANCE, pages 28-42

PINK IS THE NEW RED, page 29 Footed art glass vase with mirrored mosaic and pearls, Diamond Star.

FLOWING LINES, page 37 Red ceramic rectangle, Floral Supply Syndicate. ONE OF A KIND, page 38 Green ceramic flowered vase, IHI India Handicrafts Inc.

Celebrity Vase (outer vase), Syndicate Sales.

HEART TO HEART, page 58 Bamboo square, Teleflora.

MEGA DOZEN, page 51 Mega Beaded Wire, SmithersOasis. Classic Urn glass vase, Syndicate Sales.

DAISY DO, page 59 9-inch thick glass vase (from Trio Bouquet Vase Assortment), Syndicate Sales. Pink polka-dot ribbon, Lion Ribbon.

PURE ELEGANCE, page 39 White ceramic flowered vase, IHI India Handicrafts Inc.

Accent Décor. TABLE FOR TWO, pages 40-41 Vintage Bottle Collection, Syndicate Sales. Oasis Floral Foam Maxlife Mini Heart, Smithers-Oasis.

Call 800-385-5114 or visit www.accentdecor.com.

Container Source. Call 800-499-6128 or visit www.containersource.com.

A TOUCH OF BLUE, page 42 Patterned art glass vase, Diamond Star.

Diamond Star. Call 888-866-8368 or visit www.diamondstarglass.com.

Floral Supply Syndicate.

LOVE IS EASY, pages 44-59

ALL CLEAR, pages 44-45 Garcia Group® Glass Terrariums in the G3™ line, Pete Garcia Company.

GREEN TRICKS, page 30 Flared glass vase, Diamond Star. Red diamonds, Accent Décor. CLASSIC COLORS, page 31 Red ceramic rectangle, Floral Supply Syndicate. LET’S GET HORIZONTAL, pages 32-33 Flared, textured glass cylinder, Diamond Star. OFF CENTER, page 34 Brown ceramic flowered teardrop vase, IHI India Handicrafts Inc.

SERENE SHELTER, page 46 Midollino and UGlu, SmithersOasis. THE TOTAL EXPERIENCE, page 47 Heart-shaped box of chocolates with ribbon and butterfly (Milk and Dark Fudge Love), Sweet Shop USA. Square Tapered Tray, Container Source. Midollino and beaded wire, Smithers-Oasis.

BUNCHES OF LOVE, page 52 Element Vase, Accent Décor. BLUE FOR YOU, page 53 Decorative wire, Smithers-Oasis.

IHI India Handicrafts, Inc. Call 800-524-6766 or visit www.ihionline.com.

Lion Ribbon. LONG-LASTING LOVE, page 54 White ceramic Urban Square, Accent Décor. 3-ounce lavender heart, Sweet Shop USA. LUSH AND LOVELY, page 55 Serenity Vase, Syndicate Sales. FOR MY SWEETIE, page 56 4¾-inch Pillar Vase, Syndicate Sales.

Call 800-551-LION or visit www.lionribbon.com.

Pete Garcia Company. Products are available through the company’s Floramart showroom in Atlanta. Retail florists can make an appointment to visit the showroom through their local wholesaler. Call Floramart at 800-241-3733 or visit www.floramart.com.

Smithers-Oasis. Call 800-321-8286 or visit www.oasisfloral.com.

SuperMoss. Call 800-677-5777 or visit www.supermoss.com.

THE WAVE, page 48 Wired wide net ribbon in Addiction Pink (#790845), Lion Ribbon. White ceramic Urban Planter, Accent Décor.

TALL, DARK, AND HANDSOME, page 35 Black glass cylinder, Floral Supply SIMPLE ELEGANCE, page 49 Tall glass cylinder, Accent Décor. Syndicate. Red diamonds, Accent Décor. NUTS ABOUT YOU, page 50 Wired Pristine red ribbon, Lion SWEET AND LOW, page 36 White glass cylinder, Floral Supply Ribbon. Mini Bunch Vase, Teleflora. Syndicate.

Call 800-347-9994 or visit www.fss.com.

Sweet Shop USA. Call 800-222-2269 or visit www.sweetshopusa.com.

Syndicate Sales. Call 800-428-0515 or visit www.syndicatesales.com.

FLOATING ON AIR, page 57 Essentials Rectangle Bowl in Copper, Smithers-Oasis. Pool moss, SuperMoss. Mitsumata, Accent Décor.

Teleflora. Call 800-333-0205 or visit www.myteleflora.com.

DECEMBER 2012 65


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EQUIPMENT

2009 Bush Refrigeration 10 door flower vending machine Perfect working and looking condition Just serviced right before we stopped use Currently in dry air-conditioned storage Why buy a new one for $16,000; when you can buy this one for $7,500 OBO Ph: 386-253-7946 Mon-Saturday Email: ffdab@earthlink.net *Guaranteed works perfect*

DBC WHOLESALE

                     NEW CLOSEOUTS ADDED WEEKLY

410-734-7800

EQUIPMENT

The #1 Selling

Flower Stem Cleaning Machine

barrinc.com

920-231-1711 •

info@barrinc.com

SCHOOLS

Benz School of Floral Design Learn by Doing! Weddings, corsages, sympathy tributes, party decorations, plant and flower care, shop management, arrangements for all occasions

For a class schedule: BENZ SCHOOL PO Box 9909 College Station, TX 77842 979.845.3841 aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/benz

Creative Floral Design School of New Orleans • 80-hour course - 2 weeks • 65 of 80 hour are hands-on • School is 25 years old • Complete course in Floral Design & Shop Management • Over 3,000 students from across US successfully trained • Approved and licensed by Louisiana Dept. of Education Jeanne Gegenheimer Safley, AAF, Director Call or write for brochure & Class Schedule

Established 1962

WHIZ STRIP 661-702-1977 www.whizstrip.com

66 www.flowersandmagazine.com

714 Lafayette Street • Gretna, Louisiana 70053

800-423-6338 • 504-366-7676 www.floral-designschool.com


SCHOOLS

advertising links For easy access to many of our advertisers’ websites, go to www.flowersandmagazine.com and click on the Advertisers link.

BURTON + BURTON ................................................................................................ 3 800-241-2094 www.burtonandburton.com DALLAS MARKET CENTER ....................................................................................... 1 800-DAL-MKTS www.dallasmarketcenter.com DRAMM & ECHTER............................................................................................... 27 800-854-7021 www.drammechter.com ESMERALDA FARMS .................................................................INSIDE FRONT COVER 800-888-8994 www.esmeraldafarms.com FLORAL DELIVER EASE ......................................................................................... 27 877-740-3273 www.floraldeliverease.com

      

4800 Dahlia, Denver CO 80216 800-858-9854; 303-388-7377 Classroom or Home Study Courses Visit our website for more info

www.floralschools.com

HORTICA INSURANCE AND EMPLOYEE BENEFITS ..................................................... 9 800-851-7740 www.hortica-insurance.com JETRAM, INC. ...................................................................................................... 43 800-551-2626 www.jetraminc.com MAC TECHNOLOGIES DEVELOPMENT CORP. ..................................................... 2, 17 888-280-3509 www.arrivealiveproducts.com

approved by Co. Dept. of Higher Ed.

South Florida School of Floral Design 1612 S. Dixie Hwy • Lake Worth, Florida 33460-5856

1-800-585-9491 www.floralinstruction.com E-mail: floridaconnect@live.com

OREGON HOLLY .................................................................................................... 61 503-397-3547 www.oregonholly.com PETE GARCIA COMPANY ....................................................................................... 11 800-241-3733 www.floramart.com ROYAL FLOWERS ....................................................................... INSIDE BACK COVER 800-977-4483 www.royalflowersecuador.com

Licensed by the Commission for Independent Education, License #403

SEMINOLE ........................................................................................................... 61 800-638-3378 www.seminoleds.com

WEDDINGS

SMITHERS-OASIS ................................................................................................... 5 800-321-8286 www.oasisfloral.com THE SUN VALLEY GROUP ...................................................................................... 23 800-747-0396 www.tsvg.com SWEET SHOP USA.................................................................................................. 8 800-222-2269 www.sweetshopusa.com SYNDICATE SALES ................................................................................BACK COVER 800-428-0515 www.syndicatesales.com TEAMFLORAL ....................................................................................................... 25 800-342-2251 www.teamfloral.com TECNIFLORA ........................................................................................................ 21 800-461-4825 www.tecniflora.com John Toomey Co

(800) 421-0052

Wedding Aisle Runners Rentals & Sales

UPS Shipments

White Cotton Runners

TELEFLORA ................................................................................................... 10, 19 800-421-2815 www.myteleflora.com TEXAS STATE FLORISTS ASSOCIATION ................................................................... 43 800-375-0361 www.tsfa.org VASE VALET ......................................................................................................... 43 316-747-2579 www.vasevalet.com VITAMIN INSTITUTE ................................................................................................ 7 800-441-VITA www.superthrive.com

DECEMBER 2012 67


industry events For the most recent additions to Teleflora Unit Programs, go to www.MyTeleflora.com and click on Design Education to access the Floral Event Calendar in the Unit Program section.

National and International

Central Region

January 9-16, 2013, Atlanta, GA

March 1-3, 2013, Grand Rapids, MI

Atlanta International Gift & Home Furnishings Market, Americasmart. Call 800-ATL-MART or visit www.americasmart.com.

Great Lakes Floral Expo, Amway Grand Hotel, DeVos Place. Call the Michigan Floral Association at 517-575-0110 or visit www.greatlakesfloralexpo.com.

January 16-22, 2013, Dallas, TX Holiday and Home Expo, Dallas Market Center. Call 800-DAL-MKTS or visit www.dallasmarketcenter.com.

January 17-22, 2013, Chicago, IL Chicago Market, Merchandise Mart Plaza. Call 312-527-7561 or visit www.shopchicagomarket.com.

March 22-24, 2013, Green Bay, WI Wisconsin/Upper Michigan Florist Association, Annual Convention, Radisson Hotel & Conference Center. Call 414-755-6290 or visit www.wumfa.org.

Northeast Region

January 25-28, 2013, Los Angeles, CA

March 8-10, 2013, Groton, CT

California Gift Show, Los Angeles Convention Center. Call 678-285-3976 or visit www.californiagiftshow.com.

Northeast Floral Expo, Mystic Marriott Hotel. Call the Connecticut Florists Association at 800-352-6946 or visit www.northeastfloralexpo.com.

January 26-30, 2013, New York, NY New York International Gift Fair, Javits Center - Piers 92 & 94. Call 800-272-SHOW or visit www.nyigf.com.

South Central Region

March 11-12, 2013, Washington, DC SAF Congressional Action Days, Capitol Hill. Call Laura Weaver at the Society of American Florists, 800-336-4743, or visit www.safnow.org.

Arkansas Florists Association, Flower and Garden Show, “Home Grown Goodness,” State House Convention Center. Call Bill Plummer at 501-208-2882 or visit www.arflorists.org.

June 19-25, 2013, Dallas, TX

June 1-2, 2013, Lafayette, LA

Holiday and Home Expo, Dallas Market Center. Call 800-DAL-MKTS or visit www.dallasmarketcenter.com.

Louisiana State Florists’ Association, “Weddings, Parties & Proms! Oh, My!,” Holiday Inn Lafayette. Call 318-255-2671 or visit www.lsfaonline.com.

February 22-24, 2013, Little Rock, AR

June 28-July 2, 2013, Las Vegas, NV AIFD (American Institute of Floral Designers) National Symposium, Paris Hotel. Call 410-752-3318 or visit www.aifd.org.

July 12-14, 2013, Mesquite, TX Texas State Florists’ Association, Annual Convention. Call Dianna Nordman at 512-834-0361 or visit www.tsfa.org.

July 10-17, 2013, Atlanta, GA Atlanta International Gift & Home Furnishings Market, Americasmart. Call 800-ATL-MART or visit www.americasmart.com.

Southeast Region

July 13-16, 2013, Columbus, OH OFA Short Course, Greater Columbus Convention Center. Call 614-487-1117 or visit www.ofa.org.

Florida State Florist Association, MidSeason Convention, Paramount Plaza Hotel. Call 866-900-FSFA or visit www.floridastatefloristsassociation.com.

July 17-20, 2013, Santa Barbara, CA

April 11, 2013, Carolina, Puerto Rico

California Association of Flower Growers and Shippers (Norcal), Fun ’N Sun Weekend, Fess Parker’s Double Tree Resort. Call 831-479-4912 or visit www.cafgs.org.

July 18-23, 2013, Chicago, IL Chicago Market, Merchandise Mart Plaza. Call 312-527-7561 or visit www.shopchicagomarket.com.

68 www.flowersandmagazine.com

Coming next month:

January 18-20, 2013, Gainesville, FL

AIFD Southern Conference: Explore Beyond the Shore, Verdanza Hotel. Call 410-752-3318 or visit www.aifd.org.

Western Region

• Our annual Special Trends Issue is sizzling with fashion-forward colors, products, and design ideas! • Also featured: European design howto’s, internet marketing tips, and more.

It’s all coming in the January issue of

Flowers&

July 17-20, 2013, Santa Barbara, CA California Association of Flower Growers and Shippers (Norcal), Fun ‘N Sun Weekend, Fess Parker’s Double Tree Resort. Call 831-479-4912 or visit www.cafgs.org.

Don’t miss it!


Flowers& - December 2012  
Flowers& - December 2012