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SCHOOL OF PLANNING & ARCHITECTURE, AURANGABAD, MAHARASTRA A Thesis Project Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements For the award of the Degree of

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE By TEJASH SINGH B.ARCH/15025/14

Department of Architecture Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Patna Campus Year-2018

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CERTIFICATE This is to certify that the work presented in the report entitled “THESIS REPORT� in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the award of Degree of Bachelor of Architecture of Birla Institute of Technology Patna is an authentic work carried out under my supervision and guidance. To the best of my knowledge, the content of this dissertation report does not form a basis for the award of any previous Degree to anyone else.

(Ar. Ashutosh Kumar) Department of Architecture Birla Institute of Technology, Patna The thesis project as mentioned above is hereby approved as a creditable study of project work and has been presented in a satisfactory manner to warrant its acceptance as prerequisite to the degree for which it has been submitted.

(External Examiner -1)

(External Examiner -2)

Head of the Department of Architecture Birla Institute of Technology, Patna

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

There have been a number of people who have contributed to this Dissertation report, and I would like to thank everyone for their time, effort and help in the making of this dissertation. I would like to thank Ar. AnamikaNandan (HOD Dep’t. Of Architecture, B.I.T Patna) and Ar. Ashutosh Kumar (Thesis Guide) for their guidance in structuring the contents and figuring out the focus area of study.

My senior Ankit Kumar & Nikhil Solanki for his contribution and information over the topic. My friends ChandraMauli, Midhat Fatima, Ishita Bhartiya and all my batch mates for their valuable inputs, helps and their presence. And lastly I’d like to thank my parents for their encouragement and belief in me.

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TABLE OF CONTENT S.NO. 1.

NAME

12 12 13 13 14 14 15 15 15 15 16 16 16 16 17 17 17 17 18

Introduction 1.1 Background 1.2 Need 1.3 Project Description

2.

Site Description 2.1 Location 2.2 Land Type 2.3 Accessibility 2.3.1Access Road 2.4 Dimension 2.5 Climate 2.6 Site Context 2.7 Pros Of Site

3 4 5 6 7 8

Hypothesis Aim Scope of Project Objective Limitation Methodology

1 2

Introduction Selection Criteria

PAGE NO.

CHAPTER-2 CASE STUDY 20 20

INDIAN INSTITUTE OF MANGMENT-A

1

Introduction 1.1. 1.2.

2

History Architect Philosophy

Site Analysis 2.1. Location 2.2. Climate 2.3. Orientation 2.4. Site context

3

Site Zoning 3.1. Functional Zoning and site Planning 3.2. Served and servant spaces 3.3. Built and open spaces

4

Area Program 4.1. Total area coverage 4.2. Design Capacity

5 6 TEJASH SINGH

Material and construction details Analysis of learning spaces BA/15025/14

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6.1. Classroom 6.1.1. Spatial Organization 6.2. Library 6.2.1 Spatial Organization

7

Analysis of residential spaces 7.1. Dormitory 7.1.1. Spatial Organization

8 9

Relationship of learning and Living activates Observation

31 32 33 33 34 34 34 36 37

CEPT, AHEMDABAD 1

Introduction 1.1.Historical background 1.2 Architect View

2

Site Analysis 2.1. Location 2.2 Climate 2.3 Description Of site 2.4 Topography 2.5 Orientation

3

Site Zoning 3.1. Analysis of interrelationship 3.2 Indoor Circulation 3.3 Outdoor Circulation 3.4 Parking and entrance 3.5. Approach 3.6. Planning

4

Area Statement 4.1 Total Area covered 4.2 Ground Floor 4.3. First Floor 4.4. Second Floor

5

Analysis Of learning Spaces 5.1. Studios 5.1.1. Bachelor’s design studios 5.1.2. Master Design studio 5.2. Library

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Analysis Of Informal Spaces 6.1. Entrance 6.2. Basement 6.3. Central Courtyard 6.4. Plaza 6.5. Hussain Doshi Gufa

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Observation CHANDIGADH COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

51

1.

Introduction

52 52 52 52 53 53 53 53 54 54 55 55 56 56 57 58 58 59 59 59 59 59 60 61

1.1 . Architect Philosophy 1.2 . School Philosophy 1.3. Relevance to the case study

2

Site Analysis 2.1. Location 2.2.Site Context 2.3. Climate 2.4. Orientation 2.5. Approach

3. 4 5

Area Statement Planning Analysis Of learning spaces 5.1. Studios 5.2. Lecture Rooms 5.3. Library

6.

Analysis Of Informal Spaces 6.1. Courtyard 6.2. Corridors 6.3. Faculty Room

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Building Character and construction 7.1. Exterior Character 7.2. Internal Character

8.

Observation Comparative Analysis Of case Study CHAPTER-3 UNDERSTANDING THE SITE 1

2 3

4.

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INTRODUCTION 1.1.Location 1.2.Site area & boundaries 1.3.Accessibility SITE CONTEXT NATURAL FACTOR 3.1. Geology 3.2. Soil type 3.3. Soil Characteristic Geomorphology 4.1 Site contour & slope 4.2. Site topography BA/15025/14

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5

6.

7.

8.

9

10

11. 12 13 14

4.3. Drainage 4.4. Seismic Zone HYDROLOGY 5.1 Surface water 5.2. Ground water 5.3. Water Quality VEGITATION 6.1. Site existing condition 6.2. Various species in the region CLIMATE 7.1.Temprature 7.2. Precipitation 7.3. Relative Humidity and cloud coves 7.4. Annual Wind Speed 7.5. Wind speed 7.6. Sun path and solar altitudes 7.7. Climate zone SOCIAL & CULTURAL FACTOR 8.1. Existing land use 8.2.Traffic & transportation 8.3. Density 8.4. Occupation Structure SITE SERVICES 9.1. Electrical Services 9.2. Water Supply HISTORY 10.1 Ellora Caves 10.2. Ajanta Caves 10.3. Daulabad Fort 10.4. Bibi ka maqbara 10.5. Gate of Aurangabad AESTHETIC FACTOR 11.1.Special Feature BY LAW’S CRYTICAL ANALYSIS S.W.O.T ANALYSIS

69 69 70 70 71 71 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 74 75 76 77 77 77 77 78 78 78 79 79 79 79 80 80 80 81 82 83 83 84

CHAPTER-3 STANDARDS AND AREA PROGRAMING

1. 2. 3.

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ARCHITECTURAL STANDARDS AND REQUIREMENT STUDY 1.1.Architectural Standards REQUIREMENT STUDY AREA PROGRAMING

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CHAPTER-5 DESIGN IDEOLOGY

1. 2. 3.

INTRODUCTION 1.1.Concept FORM DEVLOPMENT DESIGN CONSIDERATION 3.1. Site Elements 3.1.1 Circular Walkway 3.1.2. Interactive Spaces 3.1.3 Library 3.1.4 Architectural &Planning Block 3.2. Climate Consideration 3.3 Structural Consideration 3.3.1Architecture and Planning Block façade 3.3.2. Central Library Façade Detail

CHAPTER-6 DESIGN TRANSLATION 1. 2. 3. 4. 5 6 7

SITE PLAN ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING BLOCK CENTRAL LIBRARY MASTER’S BLOCK A&B WORKSHOP ADMIN VIEWS CHAPTER-7 BIBLIOGRAPHY

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LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1Map of Maharashtra Figure 2Praposed site Figure 3Map of Aurangabad Figure 4Dimension of site Figure 5Angular dimension of site Figure 6Temprature of Aurangabad Figure 7Wind direction of Aurangabad Figure 8Basic organisation of building Figure 9Order of movement Figure 10Louis I khan Plaza Figure 11IIM A on map of India Figure 12IIM A on map of ahmedabad Figure 13Wind direction Figure 14Presipitation in Ahmedabad Figure 15Organisation of building along courtyard to catch wind Figure 16Student Movement inside campus Figure 17Site plan of iim Ahemedabad Figure 18Placemet of hostels and classroom and admin Figure 19Location of servant area Figure 20Built and open area Figure 21Arches with exposed brick Figure 22arches Figure 23Buttreses Figure 24arches and circular opening Figure 25Arches Figure 26Arrangement of classroom Figure 27Inside view of classroom Figure 28Arrangement of classroom Figure 29Exterior view of vikrambhai library Figure 30plan of vikrambhai library Figure 31Plan of dome try Figure 32Figure showing orientation of building Figure 33Inside view of hostel Figure 34courtyard between hostel Figure 35digonal arrangment of hostel Figure 36Transion space between hostel and admin Figure 37lobby area joining classroom Figure 38Landscape in-between classroom Figure 39Conceptual sketch by bv doshi Figure 40showing cept at Ahmedabad map Figure 41map showing cept Figure 42Wind direction of Ahmedabad Figure 43Precipitation in Ahmedabad Figure 44Difference in north and south light Figure 45Interrelationship diagram Figure 46Plan showing accessibility in campus Figure 47Plan showing various zones of cept campus Figure 48Sketch showing sketch of studio Figure 49North lighting in studio Figure 50Sitting arrangement inside studio TEJASH SINGH

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B I R L A I N S T I T U T E O F T E C H N O L O G Y , M E S R A | 2018 Figure 51Section of Design studio Figure 52Balcony of studio Figure 53Scale marked on wall of cept Figure 54Provision of north light Figure 55Section of master's studio Figure 56Section of library Figure 57Existance of new library building Figure 58Dramatic effect of light inside library through louvers Figure 59soace between skin and core of building Figure 60View of carols in library Figure 61Exterior view of library Figure 62Entrance of campus Figure 63Basement used as jury area Figure 64Central courtyard of cept campus Figure 65Faculty of design plaza Figure 66View of gufa Figure 67Plan of doshi gufa Figure 68Inside view of doshi gufa Figure 69CCa on map of Chandigadh Figure 70Chandigadh on map of India Figure 71Wind direction of chandigadh Figure 72Precipitation and tempraure Figure 73Plan of cca Figure 74View of studio Figure 75View of classroom Figure 76View of corridor Figure 77Section of campus Figure 78Dimension of site Figure 79Angular direction of site Figure 80Praposed site of spa Aurangabad Figure 81Contour and slope on site Figure 82Vegetation map Figure 83Special feature site Figure 84Column detail Figure 85Orientation of site Figure 86Accecibility on site Figure 87Standard for lecture threaten Figure 88Standards for classroom Figure 89Standards for design studio Figure 90Various activity held inside the campus Figure 91View of master plan of campus Figure 92View showing various interaction spaces Figure 93View shoeing entrance to libarary Figure 94Front view of architecture block Figure 95View showing orientation of site Figure 96detail of column detail Figure 97View of steel bracing Figure 98View of jali Figure 99Joinery detail of wooden bracing on wall Figure 100View of wooden bracing Figure 101Front facade detail

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CHAPTER – 1 INTRODUCTION

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SCHOOL OF PLANNING & ARCHITECTURE, AURANGABAD

1. INTRODUCTION Institution play an important role in providing platform for education. The environment within the institution is the prime generator for quality in education. Architectural education in some ways is vastly different from other kind of education. It lays more stress on learning by doing and discussing rather than studying by books. “As well said architecture should make us feel different otherwise engineering would be enough�- Libeskind , Denial 07/04/2014,interview at The Talks http://the-talks.com/interview/daniellibeskind/. The idea of an institutional education gives us a clear picture of the three dominant entities namely teacher, student and class room. The relationship between them is a student comes to classroom to acquire knowledge from the teacher. But in architecture education, it is difficult to define these words as the place of acquiring knowledge, the source of getting knowledge and the absorber of the knowledge is not fixed. The knowledge can be acquired by looking at things, discussing with people, criticizing and appreciating things. The minute details of a planter or washbasin can be the source of learning to a student, therefore in this case the toilet or the open sit out can be the classroom, from where the student acquired knowledge. Since criticism and appreciation are very closely related to architecture, therefore some people can learn from criticising the mistake and appreciating the creativity from the display of works of the student of a junior class. In this case since the student of the senior class learned something out of the work of junior class, so the student of the junior class here becomes a teacher to the student of the senior class. As someone very rightly said that knowledge is not defined to a particular place and time, it can be acquired from anywhere at any time. The time and changing of colour in a chameleon can be predictable, but it is difficult to say which function of an architectural institution can change in what manner to serve as a platform for interaction, the canteen which is defined as a place for fording or the steps to rise the plinth of the building can convert in to a platform for discussion, when a student of any department or a faculty of the institution start reacting looking at the work kept by the side of a student of other department. Therefore here is a situation where the idea of getting knowledge in a classroom does not work. The built form, the environment, every element is taking part in the teaching-learning process. It thus becomes questionable whether the whole campus should be within the classroom or the classroom should be within the campus.

1.1 BACKGROUND Architecture education must facilitate the understanding of time and space of an individual. The changes attention will have to be paid to the learning climate in the school. Research in higher education on the social context of school, department and institution and that student learn as much from the context as their interactions and that student learn as much from the context as their interactions with subject knowledge. What and how they learn is strongly influenced by how they perceive and act out their relationship with their teachers and other students. Studio tutors who plan to set up learning situations to encourage student reflections, independent and collaboration will undoubtedly have to refine or develop their own skills and reflect on how they work out in teaching practice. This will require school to create framework and opportunity to support the learning and development of architecture tutors. Architecture education must take in account that it is human endeavour concerned with the physical, social and mental well-being of the student as their intellectual growth.

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Six points that articulate the general plan of architecture education are:      

Creative thoughts Clear thinking Natural ability and learned skills The issues before society Data Collection The careful establishment

MATERIALS

SITE PLANNING

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL

DESIGN PROJECT

CLIENT NEED

DESIGN THEORY

SUSTANABILITY

STRUCTURE

Learning environments in schools of architecture should be realigned to encourage a more collaborative and supportive culture so that student develop student sensitivity to others and a sense of commuting as well as independence of thought.

1.2 NEED The reason for taking up the ‘Architecture College’ is firstly a better understanding of life and environment of architecture student. Secondly the basic scope of designing building using different types of structure to enable student to understand the basic of designing and make them comfortable with the given environment. New colleges have to be established so as to impart the education to the young architect of the upcoming generations so that they can dedicate themselves to create a better living environment of people of India. School of architecture and planning are such institution which keep alive the evident idea of growth and development and equip mankind in creating a better future for themselves and the coming generations. The educations imparted in such institutions not only contribute in development of such individual career but also helps in keeping them abreast with their creative side. To promote such an atmosphere of growth not only of the individual but of the whole nation, more number of self-sufficient institutions are required to be set up which area a clear reflection of what they preach and increased participation can thus be expected from the people.

1.3 PROJECT DESCRIPTION SPA is a premier organisation for architecture and planning education in financial budget of 2018 it was announced to establish a SPA in Aurangabad District of Maharashtra. This School is committed to produce best architect & planners of the nation to take up the challenge of physical and socioenvironmental development of the country. The institute got a piece of land under the BAMU University campus. The basic aims to establishing SPA Aurangabad are –  

To create centre of excellence for imparting quality undergraduate, postgraduate, doctoral and postdoctoral education in Planning and architecture. To create a cadre of high calibre faculty member who will be devoted to teaching, research and consultancy in all disciplines that deal with planning and Architecture.

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

To be socially responsible institution providing research feedback to the government for physical development of human settlements.

The master plan of SPA Aurangabad will be planned on integrated basic comprising of academic, administrative, research and traning,consultancy,library,workshop,canteen,residential,sports,building along with the required infrastructure like water supply, sanitation, expression of electricity, solid waste management, firefighting , etc. to provide a high quality environment for student, academic, administration other staff.

2. SITE DESCRIPTION 2.1 LOCATION - BAMU University Campus, Aurangabad, Maharashtra.

Figure 1Map of Maharashtra

Figure 3Map of Aurangabad

Figure 2Praposed site

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2.1 LAND TYPE - Flat land with no major contours. 2.2 ACCESSIBILITY –   

Through Bus Terminal of Aurangabad its 5.5 km. Through Railway Station of Aurangabad its 8 km. Through Airport of Aurangabad its 10 km.

2.2.1 ACCESS ROADS – Two roads one major and one minor connecting, with width of major road- 13mts & minor road – 6mts. 2.3 DIMENSION-

Figure 4Dimension of site Figure 5Angular dimension of site

The total plot area is 51 acres.

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2.4 CLIMATE - Aurangabad features a semiarid climate.

Figure 7Wind direction of Aurangabad

Figure 6Temprature of Aurangabad

Annual mean temperatures in Aurangabad range from 17 to 33 °C, with the most comfortable time to visit in the winter –October to February. -Most of the rainfall occurs in the monsoon season from June to September. Average annual rainfall is 710 mm.

2.5 Site Context – The site comes under BAMU university which is already a educational area which has various privilege for building and institutional campus. Aurangabad is rich in Architectural history with many ancient monuments structures. Growing need for new development in rapid developing state there is need for such institute in region.

2.6 Pros of the site Located in the institutional area, giving a calm and silent environment to study.  The area is quite green, environment friendly and less polluted.  The site has a nearby water body.

3. HYPOTHESIS OF THE PROJECT My hypothesis roam around the making architecture for architect and learning out of the class. How can a physical attribute contribute to creation of environment of learning, Development of typology.

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4. AIM To analyse and understand the essential architectural design qualities of spaces in a college of architecture and to design college of architecture.

5. SCOPE OF THE PROJECT Landscaping and site planning is the main one aspect which makes a boring college into a living being, so landscaping is one the major scope of work which can be exhibited through Site plan and landscape details. Designing interactive classroom and studios is one of the main aspects of college, so it can be exhibited through the integrated designs and plan. Space integration is also a major scope of work and can create a dead space into a living space which can be presented through circulation and movement pattern. Natural Lighting and open space is also one of the major design aspect and scope of the project. These scopes of work can identifies the limitation of work.

6. OBJECTIVES        

Creation of an inspiring environment conducive to architecture. The need for synthesizing knowledge and technology dealing with built environment. To understand spaces through case studies and data analysis. Responsiveness to environment and local climate. Effective use of available resources. Extent of innovation incorporated to minimal use of conventional source of energy. To make energy efficient, eco-friendly and a barrier free environment. To carefully design spaces so as to bring about interaction among the student and teachers and make the building an ideal place for education.

7. LIMITATIONS    

Design will be done according to the site, requirement and functions. Carefully incorporating the climatic considerations as area is prone to drought. The institute should be so as like reflecting the culture of the architecture. The design should be a careful fusion with the surrounding university campus.

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8. METHODOLOGY

OBJECTIVE

HOW TO ACHIEVE IT

TOOLS

To study the architectural and Literature and document study Internet, Secondary design aspects of the college. of college, about their design data and Literature aspects. Study. To study the students Observation of student’s life experience in the college. in college.

Case study, Questionnaires and Observations.

To study the design Literature study requirements Case study and requirements in college in college with architectural Literature study of especially in architectural needs. architectural college college. and studios. To study the techniques and Analysis of different Case study of open impacts of spaces in college. techniques and their impact of and closed spaces in open and enclosed spaces. college campus.

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CHAPTER-2 CASE STUDY

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INTRODUCTION Whether you’re looking at houses, shopping centers, factories or skyscrapers, chances are an architect was involved in creating the designs. If you’re looking for a college major that will allow you to mix subjects like math and business while also praising your keen design eye, you might want to consider taking on a major in architecture. What is an architecture? Architecture is a mix of art, science, math and business so it requires you to have a robust background in a variety of subjects. It also requires a five-year course of study rather than the standard four years for an undergraduate degree. College of architecture: It provide course for Bachelor in architecture to students, with learning through formal syllabus and informal activities and interaction. A architecture collge building should provide opportunity for students for various types of learning. Where students observe and gain knowledge practically. For this we should create space for interaction at different levels:Student – student interaction Student – villagers interaction Citizens – student – delegates’ interaction Thus there arises a need for a school where the students can discover, integrate, articulate and apply knowledge.

SELECTION CRITERIA The thesis project revolves around the aim of the architecture college that can enhance the visual learning through implementation of architectural elements in the design. Louis Kahn’s designs are characterized by powerful, massive forms; IIMA building is no exception. He used simple, platonic forms and compositions to great effect, giving the 66 acre campus (now known as the heritage campus as another campus was later built across the road) a rare quality. The integration of spaces and making segregation between served and servant places and making various interactional spaces and use of structural and geometrical pattern through the campus. CEPT university one of the best planning and building construction techniques used in it that visually contribute learning among students through its façade, building infrastructure. Moreover the CEPT have very interesting interacting spaces that allows students to take part in various community and other interactions. It has been also good example of using building envelope so as to reduce heat gain through its building orientation. These ideas will help this thesis project to learn these techniques and should be taken in consideration. Chandigarh college of architecture is a well-known name in the field of architectural education, conceived and designed by the master architect Le-Corbusier himself in 1962.The school is known for its academic excellence and has set many examples in the field of architecture education located in ‘city beautiful’, the school is known for producing architect who are competent and enthusiastic in the professional field.

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INDIAN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT AHMEDABAD (IIMA) 1. INTRODUCTION Led by space scientist Dr. Vikram Sarabhai and an eminent industrialist and philanthropist Shri Kasturbhai Lalbhai, and proactively supported by the then Chief Minister of Gujarat, Dr. Jivraj Mehta, and a group of enlightened individuals set up IIMA in 1961. This group ably wove together a coalition of five actors - the governments at the centre and the state, local industrialists, the Ford Foundation and the Harvard Business School, to establish the foundations of the Institute. A rising centre of education, information technological and scientifical industry, Ahmedabad remains cultural and commercial heart off Gujrat and much of western India. Courses of study-The focus is upon Business administration, or finance, economics another aspects of the specialized curriculum of business management. Description of the campus-The entire campus comprises of school building, student housing, and artificial lake (not built yet) and management development centre the institute undertake the post graduate program and fellow programs in mangment.Beside these there are many part time courses in the field of management. It accommodates student capacity of 500, with initial hostel facilities for 200 and staff housing for 30 expendable to 60.Plans for establishing these institution were intendent in 1961. Objective-To improve the decision making skills and administrative competence of practicing mangeers.to assist organisation in solving their management problem by providing consultancy services. Nature of Campus-The master plan of campus is divided in two parts: 

The institutional complex with library, administration faculty blocks, school building dome try. The Residential area for faculty and clerical staff.

1.1. HISTORY IIM Ahmedabad was established on 11 December 1961 with the active support of the Government of India, the Government of Gujarat, Harvard Business School, and prominent members of Indian industry. The physicist Vikram Sarabhai and businessman Kasturbhai Lal bhai, both natives of Ahmedabad, played pivotal roles in setting up the institute. The institute's Kasturbhai Lal bhai Management Development Centre and a Kasturbhai Lal bhai Chair in Entrepreneurship are named in his honour. The management educator Ravi J. Matthai and several other Ahmedabad-based industrialists also played a major role in its creation. 1.2. ARCHITECT’S PHILOSOPHY For Lois I khan, an institution was a centre activities of men and a realm within which talents inside the people may be developed and exercised. Louis I khan’s believe in “men and institution” was one subsequent idea which profoundly influenced IIM (Le Corbusier & Louis I khan)

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Khan had in his mind – “a realm of space may be connected by ways of walking and wondering is protected kind of walking (which) you consider a high spaces together with low spaces and spaces where people can sort to find the places where they do what they want to do”.

Figure 9Order of movement

Figure 8Basic organisation of building

Figure 10Louis I khan Plaza

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2. SITE ANYLYSIS 2.1. Location The site is located on the outskirts of university area of Ahmedabad. The site ages are bound by roads on 3 sides and large maiden on North-west edge. Latitude-23.0317° N Longitude-72.5345° E

Figure 11IIM A on map of India

Figure 12IIM A on map of ahmedabad

2.2. Climate The climate of Ahmedabad is very harsh:-summer are extremely hot while the winters are very cold dough short .It has a moderate rainfall and prevailing wind direction is generally south-west. Ahmedabad has a hot, semi-arid climate with marginally less rain than required for a tropical savanna climate. There are three main seasons: summer, monsoon and winter. Aside from the monsoon season, the climate is extremely dry. The weather is hot from March to June; the average summer maximum is 43 °C (109 °F), and the average minimum is 24 °C (75 °F). From November to February, the average maximum temperature is 30 °C (86 °F). The southwest monsoon brings a humid climate from mid-June to mid-September. The average annual rainfall is about 800 millimetres (31 in).

Figure 14Presipitation in Ahmedabad

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Figure 13Wind direction

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2.3. Orientation The three elements the school, dometries and faculty of residences-was group to take advantage of the available winds, to provide as much unentrapped breeze through the building as possible the academic block was places at the central part of site-towards the north west edge the housing areas take up the rear portion of the site and are also approached from minor road and lanes. While designing for the institute Khan referred to the examples of ‘Royal Fort’ and ‘Palace at Lahore’ the ‘Red fort at Delhi’ and the palaces of ‘Fatehpur Sikri’ in which court was used for Figure 15Organisation of building along courtyard to catch wind ventilation. Khan talked of school building as a “building within a building-one open to the sun the other to living”. He also used the terms “shade, closeness, building hugging building” for the institute. “So the system is fundamental to that of porches the exterior is given to the sun, and the interior is where you live work and study”. The above concept has influenced the basic location of the activity on site .The academic block was placed in the central part of the site toward the North West edge. The housing area are in the rear portion of the site and approach from minor road and lanes.

2.4. Site Context The land allocated for IIM-A was situated on the western side of the river which was a developing part of new Ahmedabad in 1962.The site was situated near the village of ‘Bastrapur’ and was adjoining to the developing academic institution of Ahemdabad.About 66 acers of flat pasture land which belong to ‘Kasturbhai lal Bhai’ was allotted for to the construction of the building of IIM-A (the academic blog plus the housing ) faculty ,staff and servants)).Today it is surrounded by Gujrat university campus. The Ahmedabad textile and industrial research association (ATIRA),the physical research laboratories(PRL, the Ahmedabad municipal association (AMA),and smaller residences and commercial centers.Also India spaces research organization (ISRO)and Nehru foundation Campuses are located in its gradual context.

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3. SITE ZONING 3.1. Functional zoning and site planning. The organization of the complex is govern by the nature of activity. The more public activity like administration, faculty office and to some extent library. Have been places towards the outer side with direct public approaches, while the classrooms being private nature, from the inner wing and behind classrooms come dometry for student. The classroom are related to the dometries as a church to a monestry.It is built at the edge of educational complex, so as to maintain connection outside. Separate access is provided for institutional complex and residential area. The main complex is a rectangle with the teaching wing on the southern side, faculty cabins and faculty administration office to the north Figure 16Student Movement inside campus and library to the east. In the heart of this complex is open plaza. The main complex is an organization of courts, light wells and services related to main function the student dometry are located very close to the main complex. The campus has been planned according to the above requirements in mind.

Figure 17Site plan of iim Ahemedabad

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The three building-the administration block and the faculty the classroom block and the library define the edges of the vast plaza.

Figure 18Placemet of hostels and classroom and admin

3.2. Served and Servant Spaces. According to kan served spaces include areas which include the human activity a servant spaces include the spaces for mechanical devices, toilet and other services. He also says that service, servant spaces just can’t not be neglected or placed between partitions. They should form their own identity and form the structure itself.Servent spaces are merged very nicely to the served spaces. The servant block of the classroom are includes the services, vertical circulation and the meeting porch. Thus it is not only the service area but the gathering area. Figure 19Location of servant area

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3.3. Built and Open Spaces There is linear arrangement of classroom and administrational with the library parallel to both and the dometries are arranged diagonally. A strong sense of geometry in individual units and its connection in the built vs open plan.

Figure 20Built and open area

4. AREA PROGRAM

4.1. Total Area Coverage    

Old Campus + New Campus. Site area = 39.57 HA. Total Built Up Area = 13.1 HA. F.A.R = 0.34 S.NO.

NAME

AREA(sq.m)

1. 2. 3.

Site Area/Student Site Area/Residential B.U.A/Residential

424 223 117

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S.NO. 1

2.

4.

5 6

7

8

SPACE Classroom Old Campus New Campus Toilet(Per Floor Male+ Female) Faculty Block Faculty Cabin Faculty Library Toilet(Per Floor Male+ Female)x4 Dormitory Type -I Blocks Rooms Toilet(Per Unit) Type - II Blocks Rooms Toilet(Per Unit) Library Toilet Administration Block Area Post graduate Program Office Fellowship program in management(FPM) Electrical Office Security office Admission Office Drawing Office Dispatch Office Housekeeping office Audio Visual Office Estate Supervisor’s office Alumni Office Placement Office Dining Block Dining area for students Kitchen area for Student Dining area for Staff Kitchen area for Staff Residence Staff House Type-I Staff House Type-II Staff House Type-III Faculty Quarter Transit Quarters Married Student Quarter

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NO. of UNIT’s

AREA(sq.m)

6 18 4

132 2697 100

90 1 8

2940 624 240

15 600 60

19710 12200 3375

3 120 24 1 2

4225 2775 352 2671 98

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

4128 75 75 75 75 75 15 15 75 75 50 75 75

1 1 1 1

411.5 142.3 411.5 142.3

12 8 4 58 20 4

2430 13572 678 13366 3393 1074

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4.2. Design Capacity

S.NO.

1.

2 3

4 5 6

7

SPACES

Total area(sq.m)

No. of people

Area per person(sq.m)

132 2697 2940

360 500 90

2.2 5.3 16.4

19710 4225 4170 2671

600 120 73 600

32.8 35.2 6.75 4.4

411.5 411.5 282.4

300 300 50

4.5 4.5 2.2

84 66 230

-

42.6 16.6 57.6

Classroom Old Campus New Campus Faculty Block Dormitory Type -I Type - II Administration Library Dining Block Dining area for students Dining area for Staff Kitchen Staff Residence Staff type – I(Per Unit ) Staff type – II(Per Unit) Faculty Quarter(Per Unit)

5. MATERIAL AND CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

For the campus of IIM Ahmedabad, Khan used exposed brick and concrete as a construction material. This theme of brick technology. In its load bearing walls and brick arches spanning spaces from walls above, gave the campus a certain rhythm. It is through the complex that khan made the various building answerable to each other even through the scale of the house, the school and the dormitory was different. The circular openings in the walls was a result of an understanding of the order of construction. Figure 21Arches with exposed brick

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Figure 22arches

Figure 23Buttreses

Cells double height halls or porches.

Cells Only

Cells single height porches or halls. Figure 25Arches Figure 24arches and circular opening

I made these large opening because there are earthquake conditions, and actually the arch below is just important as the arch above. You have a gravity force, but you have a (seismic force the opposite ways, requiring) the reversed arch.�(MCC Carter 250).

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The exterior mansion walls are in fact sun screens which cuts the glare that comes through these circular openings. The main building of the campus are organized around a large rectangular plaza. Repetitive forms are placed on either side of the long axis of the plaza and the library is placed at the termination of this axis. He made a strict distinction between community spaces and private spaces. The size of the opening and corridors that surrounds the plaza are chosen to express the size of the institution. Thus khan’s initial response to India was climate and it was this that led him to use of large voids in solid masonry construction.

6. ANALYSIS OF LEARNING SPACES

6.1. Classroom The idea for ‘seminar classroom ‘comes from the Harvard Business School. The emphasis on learning through participation and discussion demanded a classroom that created a suitable environment. The classroom are designed “case” method that is the student are given particular situation and are required to explain other how they would solve the problem. Therefore classroom needs more spaces for discussion. Louis Khan Created and made it as a series of semi-circular steps-orienting students towards each other as well as the teacher. This created a sense of group participating together, instead of standard lecture room. The method of instruction were developed aiming at an all-round development of the student and to actively involve him in the academic processes, so that learning becomes a part of thinking apparatus of the students.

Figure 26Arrangement of classroom

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Figure 27Inside view of classroom

6.1.1. Spatial Organisation The classroom block consists of six units held together by a single double height corridor space. The corridor to the classroom acts as a place of informal discussion between students and faculty, students and students. This also becomes the entry exit lobby to the classroom. Within the classroom itself, the space is broken into sub-spaces by creating alcove like spaces near the entrance points and a distinct place for a teacher. Light was taken indirectly by triangular light wells on either sides of the room, so that there are no direct visual connection to the outside-creating an extremely

Strong sense of and ‘inside’-an inner center.Towards the plaza, the individual classrooms are concealed by the continuous façade of the corridor-in order to maintain the institutional scale of the plaza. But towards the dormitory each units of classroom blocks is expressed as a separate mass, linked by semi-open balcony like spaces.

Fig-21 Plan of Classroom.

Figure 28Arrangement of classroom

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6.2. Library The library, the classroom and seminar room and the dormitories form the core function of the institution as expressed in the organization. The faculty cabins and the residences form the peripheral area. The core areas represent the living centre for the institution. Life in the institution revolves around these areas. The library is a place individual with his book and his workplace and the light plays an important role in the library. The library becomes the centre of the institution. From here it radiates relationships to the collective realms of the Figure 29Exterior view of vikrambhai library institution. It directly addresses the entrance court and the student entry.

6.2.1. Spatial Organization The basic spatial of the library is of two separate blocks-each housing separate activities linked by stairwell. The front block is the public area. The rear block is taken up by stack area. The rear block is taken up by stack areas and reading rooms. The stair well is an important elements in the block and acts as a both linkage element and a separator between the two constituent blocks of the library. The library can be perceived as a sequence of layer of spaces-creating a gradual transition from the open plaza to the inner most part of the library. The first layer consists of the terrace overlooking the plaza. From here one reaches the second layer- Figure 30plan of vikrambhai library the entrance to the library flanked on two sides by lightwells.The third layer is the large public reading area – a double height volume. Next comes the stairwell and finally comes the slack areas and reading rooms. This layering of activities represents a hierarchy of public to private spaces at the same time reflects khan’s approach to the harsh sun of the city-creating a gradual transition between the inside and outside.

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7. ANALYSIS OF RESIDENTIAL SPACES. 7.1. Dormitory The main concept of the campus begins with the planning of the dormitory blocks which were to housed 300 student’s. “The group of 15 dormitory blocks was connected like a string of beads placed one behind another”.(LOUIS I KHA & LE CORBUISER) The dormitory becomes the extension of work space. It is concerned around the idea that seminars are the integral part of the way of life of students. The living areas are disposes into two levels one closer to school on a raised plinths which is intimate and internal and the other at the edges, large and outward oriented. The lower dormitories contains clubs house in them. The upper dormitories have streets running throughout them Figure 31Plan of dome try

Figure 33Inside view of hostel Figure 32Figure showing orientation of building

.

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7.1.1. Spatial Organization at Unit Level The unit plan of dormitory consists of      

Entry to the dormitory Common lobby Staircase-Vertical circulation Cell Balcony Services spaces-pantry, toilet

The plan of each dormitory consists rectangular rooms opening into a triangular porch facing a square and that square function as a service area. The cells open out into garden by means of balcony which also acts as shade during day time. They provide option to complete closure or opening as relevant for day and night, summer and winter. The entrance to stairway is in the triangular porch. The portion of each dormitory house becomes a transitional space where living and learning meet. The single dormitory block consists of the student three at each. Each floor of a single under floor accommodates a community of ten student in the common room is also served by pantry entrance of service spaces.

Figure 34courtyard between hostel

The orientation of each room and the north blocks in the direction of the prevailing wind of summer season. The cells opens on the garden courts through the depth of the edges. They provide options of complete summer and winter. The gaps between the structures renders the block porous for passage of breeze. These aspects have been a consideration in the generation of the dormitory block.

Figure 35digonal arrangment of hostel

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The dormitory buildings are among the most masterly done pure geometric forms. Each dormitory is a cubic block, three storey and has two wings of individual rooms set at right angles, separated by vertical slot, forming an L-shaped on the west and south that creates shadowed common spaces for informal meeting. The upper levels house the cells and the ground opens to the opportunities of porches or covered walkways, single or double height .The tower-like services blocks is placed on the north east corner of each dormitory ,its corners opened with narrow slots, so that it facades appear to stand free of one another. A diagonal wall, pierced by large circular openings and joined at its midpoint to the services tower, forms the outer edge of the triangular common room, with semicircular staircase at its centre. The three floors of bedrooms are placed overran open ground floor, formed by the massive semi-circular arches and battered buttresses supporting the bedroom wall above. The planar wall is buttressed in one direction, and braced by concrete floors in the other walls, lateral formations of these is the basis of the dormitory construction. The cell unit generates the base dimension of the block. The walls are made of solid brick masonry and floors of concrete. The stairs out of concrete, illustrates its co-existence with the brick wall on which its landing has its bearing.

Figure 36Transion space between hostel and admin

The basic unit of dormitory wall expresses an integral coexistence between appropriate structural forms, made out of brick and concrete.

8. RELATIONSHIP OF LEARNING AND LIVING ACTIVITIES As discussed in the previous chapter there are three ways by which on gains knowledge:

Learning from the teacher-it is formal discussion within the classroom with the teacher. Learning by himself, on his own (library)-it can take books, references, magazines, etc . . . . It is a space where students, faculties from where information, knowledge can be updated. Learning by interacting with his fellow students and teachers (informal discussion)-it is a learning activity that happens outside the classroom. It can Figure 37lobby area joining classroom be a in between space where discussion between student and student, teacher and student happens. It can be a place between living and learning.

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The organization of transition spaces is governed by the institution of learning containing formal and informal parts. The transition spaces of living and learning activates reflect the institutional character. The diagonal steps that lead to the entrance of the block sate the important by breaking away the geometrical character. The learning activates like classroom and library are connected by long corridors which overlooks to Louis I Khan plaza as shown in the image below Organized along rigid axis with double Figure 38Landscape in-between classroom volume, the corridors are extremely formal, through broken intermediate spaces as shown in the figure.

9. OBSERVATION. Hierarchy of different functions and spaces. The scale and massing gives a monumental feeling of spaces. Classroom corridors and courts are most active spaces. Louis I Khan plaza is most interesting space .Louis Khan Plaza is most interesting space due to its scale and gradually, used the gathering and convocations. ‘Passage in front of library is used as a viewing space for plaza. Canteen and auditorium are not well integrated in to design being a later addition. Nature is lacking in design, given peripheral place.

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CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING AND TECHNOLOGY, AHMEDABAD 1. INTRODUCTION The founders of the School of Architecture had a most daring and unusual perception of their task. They emphasized learning rather than teaching, and saw the place of learning as one where there were no boundaries, no hierarchies and a complete atmosphere of free and unhampered inquiry. Naturally, they thought of a campus that demonstrated and facilitated that outlook. This exhibition documents a dual movement: a search and for a model of education, and the simultaneous search for an architecture appropriate to the idea of learning. It is rare that there is such a close relation between programmatic development and architectural evolution. CEPT is fortunate to have been such a process [where] the same minds think of the quality of an institution and its architectural form. In the 50 years between 1962 and 2012, the School of Architecture grew into CEPT University, and its founders, many faculty members and students played an active role in designing and making the campus. All this was done under the direction of Balkrishna V. Doshi, founding member, first Director, Dean Emeritus as well as Architecture of the Campus Planning, under the banner of his architectural practice known at various times as Vastu Shilpa, Stein Doshi Bhalla Architects and Sangath.

1.1.Historical Background The school of Architecture sponsored by Ahmedabad Education Society (AES) and was establishment in 1962 on the land of AES in the neighbourhood of Gujrat University. A decade after that the school of Planning was also established on the same campus. Later in 1982, school of building Science and technology was accommodated and in 1991 school of interior design was established. Sister institutions like visual art centre, kanorial centre for arts are also incorporated within the campus. A study cell was also established within the campus which deals in studies and consultancy of ruler and urban planning and professional there upon.

1.2.Architect View School was designed by Ar.B.V Doshi who had the following underline principal in his mind to interrupt ‘SCHOOL’ as an open space. A feeling of ‘NO RESTRICTION’ to the exchange of idea. ‘CLASSROOM SENSE’ must be all over, outside as well as inside the building. Emphasising ‘an open flexible space’ with hardly any doors. ‘Exposed local materials ‘for minimum cost, easy expansion and maintains. ‘North Light’ in the studios to trap maximum glaze free natural light. Doshi tried to activate the spaces between with variety of spaces and ‘interlocking platform.

Figure 39Conceptual sketch by bv doshi

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2. SITE ANALYSIS 2.1.Location The campus is located of 5 acers of land in academic atmosphere within the vicinity of prime educational institutions in the Navaranganpura area of the historic city of Ahmedabad.

Figure 41map showing cept

Figure 40showing cept at Ahmedabad map

2.2.Climate The climate of Ahmedabad is very harsh:-summer are extremely hot while the winters are very cold dough short .It has a moderate rainfall and prevailing wind direction is generally south-west. Ahmedabad has a hot, semi-arid climate with marginally less rain than required for a tropical savanna climate. There are three main seasons: summer, monsoon and winter. Aside from the monsoon season, the climate is extremely dry. The weather is hot from March to June; the average summer maximum is 43 °C (109 °F), and the average minimum is 24 °C (75 °F). From November to February, the average maximum temperature is 30 °C (86 °F). The southwest monsoon brings a humid climate from mid-June to mid-September. The average annual rainfall is about 800 millimetres (31 in).

Figure 42Wind direction of Ahmedabad

Figure 43Precipitation in Ahmedabad

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2.3.Description Of Site Overall extent-about 19.5 acres, measuring about 300 mts north south and about 150 meters east and west in the roughly rectangular with extension on the eastern side at northern and southern ends-for bicycle parking and on the southern side (Hussain-Doshi Gufa) Bordered by wide arterial road on western side smaller public approach road on northern side. Cricket field at eastern side internal access road on the southern. Accessed from main access from northern side to entrance on the southern side to entrance on the southern side. 2.4.Topography The general slope is towards the north western corner. The northern side is undulated with dips and ‘moulds’ endings in a deep dispersion at the northern western corner. The northern edge drop down from the road level and rises in the parts to form the mound with ‘ravines’ in-between plains in a low flat basin from which it rises again to a more extensive plain which has one further low mounds rising along a portion of the eastern edge. 2.5.Orientation A look of the sun path diagram for the northern hemisphere would show that insulation is constant in the North and south. South being subject to direct radiation through the day while north receives sky reflection different light. The east and west side are exposed to radiation during the former and later part of the day respectively. The parallel walls, forming as they do, an open tube of space, are predominately aligned North south, Figure 44Difference in north and south light effectively closing off the east and west sides. While north, being the side providing the most favourable lightning condition for nearly all activates in general, is ‘welcome’, South characterised by constant insolation is preferably shaded from welcome as a source of warm, shallowly angled radiation radiation during the chilly days of winter. Such characterisation is reflected in the gesture made/stances taken by the building. The North side is heightened to allow more North light in while the south side is kept low t shield from the harsh direct radiation .This results in a configuration with ‘double height North side and a ‘single height ‘south side. Such differentiation of height in section leads to polarisation of the combined volume, emphasising the direct ally set out by the parallel walls in plan.

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3. SITE ZONING 3.1.Analysis of Interrelationship Faculty rooms have been placed quit far from studio leading to lack of proper interaction between the faculty and the student. Lack of spatial hierarchy and interconnection upon different infrastructure facility. All the main infrastructure facility are loosely placed at various places in the campus thus it lacks order in their inter relationship and inter connection. Lack for toilet for the student is yet another point to be notices also the position of toilet is such that a student from extreme end studio need to pass through a studio to reach the toilet.

Figure 45Interrelationship diagram

3.2.Indoor Circulation The circulation within the building is very complicated with lots of level changes and staircases at different level. The internal staircase lacks natural light in many places spiral. Stairs are used are widely uncomfortable for daily use. The corridors are less and short length. All the places within are visually interconnected. 3.3.Outdoor Circulation The circulation with in this the campus is pedestrians. The vehicular access is restricted along the periphery of the campus. There are lot of trees within the enclosed spaces from where all the building are accessed which provide ample shade and comfort. 3.4.Parking & Entrance Parking Facility has been provided adjacent to the entry by the provision of an open space. Two wheeler parking is also provided near the Doshi Gufa. The entry to School of architecture is through a split staircase which leads to the second level of the building. 3.5.Approach Informal approach to the school from the main road, school building is set back around 100 from the main traffic road.to get claim quite atmosphere within the centre. To promote better interaction, pedestrian access have been given from all around the site. Doshi wished the public to wonder and it was the sense of invention that lead him to solution of interlocking. Wide stepped shade walk ways and platform at the entrance serves as interlocking common spaces for in formal gathering exhibition of arts. The narrow roots running from north side can be compared to the tight alleyways leading into an old Ahmadabad ‘pol’ or urban quarter, after a constricted entrance the space expands into a precinct equivalent of an old city square or ‘chowk’ the courtyard. TEJASH SINGH

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Figure 46Plan showing accessibility in campus

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Figure 47Plan showing various zones of cept campus

The staircase entrance to the studio block is very interesting and inventing. The space bond by straight and angled parapet with access to the upper and lower level. The parking area is an un paved area with no designated space for car and two wheeler parking to the space is enough for parking. All other area is connected through pedestrian walkways or payment usual of brick tiles.

3.6.Planning The complex consist of two main wings. The main wing on the north side has the studio and lecture room for all the three schools architecture, planning and science & technology with their own service facility. In the other wing the ground floor is the administration, office of the dean, director and faculty rooms there is library on the ground floor and below it is the auditorium the building has steeped section with facilitates area movement. Deep apparatus proved on the south side shade the interior from the glare and heat. Funnel spaced entrance on the south faces designed to direct the breeze through the building all these building from the central court. There is canteen on the North

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West facing the court. There are two main lawn, in front of the main wing & rear side of the administration.

4. AREA STATEMENT     

Site Area – 5 acres Covered area (arch area) – 1.22 acres Student intake – 40 No. of student in architecture – 200 No. of teaching staff – 15

4.1.Total area covered Name

Number

Area(sq.m)

Area/student(sq.m)

Studios Lecture halls Toilet Administration Library Computer Room Circulation

7 4 G+B 1 2 H+V

858.6 648 234 324 198.72 216.03 2473.35

21.4 16.2 5.4 -

4.2.Ground Floor Name

Number

Area/student(sq.m)

Studios Toilet Semi Open Spaces Office Area Auditorium Circulation Total area

1 1 1 1 1 H+V -

226.8 94.5 263.25 263.25 324 1703 2874.8

4.3.First Floor

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Name

Number

Area/student(sq.m)

Studios Lecture halls Library Computer Room Faculty Cabins Administration Circulation Toilet Total area

3 3 1 1 16 H+V -

315 486 198.72 89.28 53.46 324 448.65 94.5 2010.51

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4.4.Second Floor

Name

Number

Area/student(sq.m)

Studios Lecture halls Computer Room Circulation Toilet Total area

3 1 1 H+V 1

315.9 321.7 162 257.3 45 1101.9

5. ANALYSIS OF LEARNING SPACES 5.1.Studios 5.1.1. Bachelor’s Design Studios. 

    

Oriented North South, are spacious double height volumes, soliciting north light and pleasured south breeze. The opening on the south wall are received enough with the balcony so as to cut south sun and make room for ventilation. These balcony although small, makes good relaxing space for student and the direct linkage with outside. Studios over look studios below, one knows what happening in other studios, also during night the image can be seen Figure 48Sketch showing sketch of studio on north light plans. Circulation through studio which although interaction but quite disturbing. The duplex studio does not offer the lower studio any visual connection with outside. A horizontal scale both feet and meter are marked on the concrete band, in each studio, so that student can have an idea physical measurements. Studios are so planed so that drafting is done under double height area and lecture, discussion under single height area. Moveable furniture’s drafting tables, plans (use to display and as partitions) arranged as per personal preferences.

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

No casual sitting space for discussion and relaxing inside the studio.

Figure 54Provision of north light Figure 51Section of Design studio

Figure 52Balcony of studio

Figure 53Scale marked on wall of cept

5.1.2. Master’s Design Studios

Figure 50Sitting arrangement inside studio

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Figure 49North lighting in studio

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A studio space for the Masters in Planning program on campus was proposed in an area haphazardly subdivided as consultancy offices, with an underutilised scope for light and ventilation from the existing architectural conditions. As a foremost and necessary act of decluttering, all the existing subdivisions are rejected and the north-south facades are opened up with views respectively to the lawns and adjacent thoroughfare. The system for openings, thoughtfully employed, is that of lightweight and easy-to-maintain aluminium sections in combination with fixed glass and louvers to ease connectivity, ventilation, light and also to include the future possibility of replication in other locations around the existing buildings on campus. In terms of space organisation for the studio, the course module needed five clusters housing 20 students each, with a space for teaching, discussions and working space for students. Echoing the existing geometry, the four larger modules are bunched together symmetrically with the central aisle leading to the research module at the eastern end. Within each teaching cluster is organised a teaching board that also acts as a space divider, a large discussion table in the central space and individual work desks on the periphery with wall mounted pin-up boards. The suspended lighting system is simply worked out following the geometry and

layout of each cluster.

Figure 55Section of master's studio

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5.2.Library. The act going to read is one reflection and its one you connect to artefact of the book. In research the best library are one which created very interesting spaces the spaces who were calm. 

    

  

The location of the library building location is very parietal it’s kind of building through which we can walk through and use as a short cut. The building has a free design as it can be accessed through all side of the building. In the design of the library building there is wide and broad spectrum of spaces. The unique building has 12 interactive spaces spanning 6 levels. It also has 3 'skins' that are nestled into each other - the outer skin, the middle glass layer and the central core. Which helps in modulating the temperature and humidity. The height of the book stack is 2.4 m height it allow creation of smaller rooms and mezzanine for private room and intimacy. On the upper levels there are 2 floors one at +4m and another at +8 meters. These are the levels where building engage itself with nature, on the upper level there is verandas space under the library which allow creation of spaces which allow student to work into the small group. At the -4 level there are large Carrols (boxes) which have a private space for group of students. At the -8 level it’s very quiet as there is no connection to the outside and we have large table surrounded by stacks of books with services. The one more prominent feature of the building was the structural elements where all integrated in the book core stack which create a sense of confusion as we are so low with level but none of the structural elements are visible. The design element was the skin of the building as the skin of the building was left independent so as to respond to the climatic condition. The lover are self-configurator’s and comes with different setting to configure light and wind inside the building Students here have the choice to study in small groups and engage with the environment on the upper levels or read in quietude in the underground portals.

Figure 57Existence of new library building

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Figure 56Section of library

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Figure 60View of carols in library

Figure 61Exterior view of library

Figure 59soace between skin and core of building

Figure 58Dramatic effect of light inside library through louvers

6. ANALYSIS OF INFORMAL SPACES. 6.1. Entrance 

 

The entry to the complex is through a long axis which ends up in a facing a blank wall. One is forced to turn, go down a flight of brick paved steps rising up ever so slowly towards the framed entrance to the library. On the right side ids the double stored studio block perpendicular to the axis of the library. The main administrative block is approached by an informal and indirect approach thus emphasis the change in direct approach thus emphasizing the Figure 62Entrance of campus change in direction and the informal nature of the campus. The small structure of the wood workshop and the T.V room, which helps in containing spaces. The building forms are arranged around a courtyard which can be accessed from all the side with open spaces flowing into each other through well designed transition spaces.

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 

The entry to the individual building provide from the common court around which the building are arranged. Vehicles are restricted to the parking space provided at the periphery while the campus is pedestrianized.

6.2.Basement The basement and the central courtyard are the most likely multipurpose spaces. The building is raised up from ground. But here the spaces underneath is active and multi-functional, designed for sun protection and exposure to breeze. In form a link between raised lawn of the north with sinking activity of the south. The basement is used for occasional theory classes/discussion, exhibitions, competitions, cultural program, indoor games. Decorated with the painting the space gives a very intellectual and artistic ambience. Figure 63Basement used as jury area

6.3.Central Courtyard The Courtyard is an area of great interaction because all the entrance of blocks open to it .It houses the canteen spill over , volleyball and basketball courts , temporary workshops and students council room structure an open air theatre and physical experimental space of students. Informal seating is provided all around the court like under trees and other temporary structure for user social interaction as well as relaxed intellectual discussion. The atmosphere in the Courtyard is quite lively. An open air theatre, is such planned that it forms a place not only for performance but also for discussions. Figure 64Central courtyard of cept campus Since a single canteen is provided, which is to be used by students of architecture, planning, landscaping, art, interior, it forms the core of institute for interaction and exchange of ideas.

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6.4.Plaza The plaza in the block is one of the most active places in the campus. It is double heighted and has two parallel walls on which art installation are done. This can be considered as an inspiration from Le Corbusier’s free Floor plan.

Figure 65Faculty of design plaza

6.5.Hussain Doshi Gufa To enhance the cave like feeling of gallery, the contours of the site were retained, rather than being leveled. The gently undulating surface of the earth can still be perceived beneath the thin concrete floor slab poured over it.It’s a common gathering space and art exhibitions are held in the complex and within a newly constructed art gallery within the Gufa complex.

Figure 67Plan of doshi gufa

Figure 66View of gufa

Figure 68Inside view of doshi gufa

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7.

OBSERVATION

The building has simple horizontal lines and merges well with the site. Architectural elements are well expressive of their functions. Entry is very inconspicuous and a few garden steps lead to the lowest level. T visual linkage between different studios is well achieved by staggering the block. Studios on the same floor are well linked and create a lot of interactions. The concept of barrior free teaching learning process is well achieved by creating study environment in the court, outside the building through landscaping. The Courtyard promises freedom of movement and is very well linked up with the rest of the building. The building are well oriented to allow light and ventilation. The overall planning of the campus is based on central courtyard with built masses on three sides and thick green belt on fourth side which gives the desired protection from the hazards of the university main road. The courtyard and the basement circulation has been designed as open and on a very large scale whereas the circulation inside the building is very restricted one as available area has been used for maximum utilization of space and compactness of design The basement has been designed as multifunctional space. It is a very active space of the campus as one side of it are the rising contours that protect it from the road there by helping it create its own environment and on the other side are the combination of steps leading to another active space of the campus i.e. the central courtyard. Theory classes of architecture students are held in this space .The flexible furniture helps in several, seating congestion and attract students from other areas. Climatic comforts have achieved by shade but lack of audio and visual privacy makes this space a bit “unfit for the stated use. The audience sits on the steps and creates an environment of free interaction. The circular Kota stone raised floor and moreover the variation in flooring materials makes the space symbolic of cultural dance area. Festivals space becomes the most active one during the festivals and as it symbolizes invitation and informality various other activities such as exhibition, workshop, jam-sessions, quiz etc. demand the use of this space. The space undemanding forms an image of a lobby which is very disturbing considering its other uses. The design studios are designed in a manner of factory with north-south axis for the studios as each studio receives sufficient natural light from the north and breeze penetration is facilitated from the south side. The duplex section of the studio has been designed for easy communication between two studios and the surrounding space but he same time are at some time audio – visual disturbing too.

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CHANDIGADH COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

1. INTRODUCTION The Chandigarh College of Architecture was established as part of the ‘Chandigarh Project’– the most significant and daring experiment in architecture and urban planning of the 20th century. As such, the driving force and mission of the college is also to fulfil the same ethos. Located in the Educational Zone of the city, the Chandigarh College of Architecture (CCA) was established on 7th August 1961 at the behest of Le Corbusier. The College is housed in a sprawling campus of 9.5 acres and has separate hostels for boys and girls. It offers a Bachelor of Architecture program of five years duration with an annual intake of 40. The college is affiliated to Panjab University, Chandigarh and its B.Arch. course is approved by the Council of Architecture, India. CCA is a premier institution having highly qualified Architect-educators most of whom are having post-graduate qualifications. To make its mark at the national as well as international level, the college uses ‘the Chandigarh Experiment’ as an open text book for its teaching philosophy and methodology. It draws heavily upon from the work done by the great master architect-planner and his associates. As the growth of the city is an on-going process, the college uses every opportunity to take up real / live situations in the city to undertake studies, analyse them and use conclusions drawn from such ‘live’ case studies of architecture and urban planning.

1.1.Architect Philosophy Concept can be understood from the design of main building. The use of north light concrete roof with an open lawn as a central courtyard and minimal openings on the west wall indicates the climate as a reason behind the design Long. Corridors with squarish built form gives resemblance to the Character of Chandigarh city.

1.2.School Philosophy. CCA aims at developing its unique inherent potential and location and to inspire, support, sustain and continue academic programs whereas professionals-trained in the tradition of modernism ushered in by the incomparable master- could extend the frontiers of creativity in the pursuit of serving the family of man-efficiently, comprehensively and beautifully. The Chandigarh college of architecture (CCA) was established on 7th August 1961 and was up as a part of the great ‘Chandigarh experiment’ to impart education in architecture.

1.3.Relevance Of case study. Chandigarh college of architecture is a well-known name in the field of architectural education, conceived and designed by the master architect Le-Corbusier himself in 1962.The school is known for its TEJASH SINGH

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academic excellence and has set many examples in the field of architecture education located in ‘city beautiful’, the school is known for producing architect who are competent and enthusiastic in the professional field. 2.

SITE ANYLYSIS

2.1.Location The campus is located over 8 acres of land in an academic atmosphere and forms a part of Punjab engineering college campus in sector 12,Chandigadh.Tgrough the college stands alone as a school of architecture its near to capital complex and easily accessible.

Figure 69CCa on map of Chandigadh

Figure 70Chandigadh on map of India

2.2.Site Context The college is situated on vidhya path sector-12D Chandigarh, INDIA.  The campus is housed at the Punjab Engineering College Campus, Sector 12 in Chandigarh.  CCA is widely spread in 5-acre (20,000 m2) campus with its own cricket ground, basketball court, volleyball court and a gym.  The boy’s hostel is located 250 yards (230 m) at the back and the girl’s hostel is located in adjacent sector-11. 2.3.Climate

Chandigarh has a humid subtropical climate characterised by a seasonal rhythm: very hot summers, mild winters, unreliable rainfall and great variation in temperature (−1 °C to 46 °C OR 30.2 °F to 114 °F). The average annual rainfall is 1110.7 mm. The city also receives occasional winter rains from the Western Disturbance originating over the Mediterranean Sea. The western disturbances usually bring rain predominantly from mid-December till end of April which can be heavier sometimes with strong winds and hails if the weather turns colder (during March–April months) which usually proves disastrous to the crops. Cold winds usually tend to come from the north

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near Shimla, capital of Himachal Pradesh and from the state of Jammu and Kashmir, both of which receive their share of snowfall during wintertime.

Figure 71Wind direction of chandigadh

Figure 72Precipitation and tempraure

2.4.Orientation The site is 3.5 acres in area. The college building has been located corner to have space for play fields. The Built form is tilled so as to get south orientation (help capture prevailing winds.)   

East west –opening (narrow to reduce radiation). North side – Unique roof form to capture north light. South side- Hallow concrete blocks for both light and air. Fig- Wind direction according to site.

2.5.Approach The approach to the college I through V3, Vaidya path. The site have 2 entrances. One major entrance towards the south east. This entrance is used for both the pedestrian and the vehicular entrance. The other entrance is towards the north east .This entrance is used by the student coming from hostels.

Fig- Map showing vehicular movement..

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3. AREA STATEMENT  Total Area – 3.5 acres 

Covered Area – 1.05 acres

S.NO

Spaces

1. 2 3 4 5 6 7

Circulation(horizontal + vertical) Library Faculty Room Admin/accounts Canteen Toilet Student Area

S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Area (sq.ft) 7337.39 4150 4427.93 3748 3555.81 1795.89 20468.06

Spaces Studios Lecture Halls Multipurpose hall Labs Computer Room Photography Cum Dark Room Art Room Toilet

Number Total

Area (sq.ft)

Area/student(sq.ft)

5 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 g +1 b

12579.5 1349.83 1432.6 2146.75 857 391.57 1206.46 936

61.8 9.75 7.16 53.6 21.4 9.70 30.10 -

4. PLANNING The planning is introverted in nature. The studios and classroom have been grouped together around a rectangular courtyard. There are doubly loaded corridors orienting on two ends of the building, which lead from the entrance to the studios and classrooms. The facilities like library, museum, common room, dark room, administration and faculty room are on the both side of the corridors. These corridors are poorly connected to the courtyard d through four small openings. The design studios are on the northern side of the building’s entrance hall is long and rectangular in shape .As such there is no order

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Fig-Connectivity of different sections..

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or hierarchy of spaces, the building and the layout seems uninteresting in terms of functionality.

Figure 73Plan of cca

5. ANALYSIS OF LEARNING SPACES.

5.1.Studios

     

The functioning of studios is not quite gladdening although diffused light is in abundance. Studio spaces are too hot in summer and too cold in winter, with no direct access to open spaces. There is flexibility in the arrangement of workstation. True nature surrounds the building but one studios look towards the greenery. Corridors are widened in studio areas. Studios seem to be merely stacked on to a circulation corridor without any real thought given to the relationship of studios.

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Studios spaces intercepted by columns in between.

Figure 74View of studio

5.2.Lecture Rooms

 

Tired fixed seating. Treated with thermos frieze panels on the rear wall and glass wool and jute lining on side walls. In case of two adjacent lecture rooms double glazed glass panels are fixed on the top of part ion walls, which allows north light and cut off disturbances.

Figure 75View of classroom

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5.3.Library

    

Newly constructed this is centrally air conditioned, with clearly demarcated spaces for periodicals, reference, general reading and issue/return counter. It is dived into these levels ground, mezzanine and basement Diffused north lighting in reading areas. Cut out in slabs so that the librarian can have full control over the library. A.C plant room is given an access from the reference section.

Fig- Views of the Library.

6.

Fig- Section of library.

ANALYSIS OF INFORMAL SPACES.

6.1.Courtyard

 

The basic aim of the courtyard planning is for the purpose of light and ventilation and a platform interaction among the various functions lined around it The courtyard is rectangular in plan and well used in winter. It is a short cut passage way to library. The courtyard is bounded by exposed brick walls ion there three sides, the fourth side is bounded by glazed wall. Stage on the north of the court is used for cultural programs. Fig- View of the courtyard.

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6.2.Corridors

  

There are four corridors running all along the court. The corridors are 5’-0” in width and doubly loaded except at on place The two corridors running from south to north are bounded by various activates likes lectures, theatres, auditorium, stores etc. The corridors are the main circulation arteries and induces interaction among the teachers and students.

Figure 76View of corridor

6.3.Faculty Rooms In spite of the uninteresting nature of the studios one aspect which is quite remarkable is the varying nature of relationship generated by the location of faculty rooms. At some places faculty rooms have been placed conveniently closed to the studios whereas at some places, they are at a distance. This is bound to generate mixed sort of reactions of student towards faculty as it seems to be faculty member practically all over the building although the faculty member complain of physical conectictivity.

7.

BUILDING CHARACTER & CONSTRUCTION

7.1.Exterior Character

 

The building is quite un-noticeable from the main approach road, seems to merge with ground. It has a horizontal skyline with concrete jails dominating the front façade, an astatically sound composition is produced by the shadows on the precast grills.

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A geodesic dome erected by the student in front of the college is the focal point from the approach road, but as one enters into the main gate, the bright and brilliantly painted, mural inscribed in the porch is the dominating and inviting entrance. Rain water is drained out though projecting gargoyle- a simple and clear play pf forms.

7.2.Interior Character

   

The entrance lobby is quite intrusting with free standing brick piers having display of student’s works and a wall of glass panelled concrete grills. The concrete grills also cast interesting shadow patterns. On the left side of the lobby is the reception and on the right side is the auditorium Overlooking the lobby is the courtyard, which acts as a platform for interaction among the students. The corridors are enclosed, doubly loaded, and are narrow in proportion to their volume. Before the studios, the corridors open a bit wider to accommodate student.

Figure 77Section of campus

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OBSERVATION The building sits on a angle of about 45 degree to the geometry of the site in order to take in ample amount of north light. The 8-13 acres piece of flat land is situated in campus of Punjab University. The plot is surrounded by road along the four sides. Brick facades on the three sides surround the open space. The space plays suitable role in retaining students in their free hours. The cement platform of canteen raised earthen land and tree give variety of play to the landscape. Dotted with shading tree and student made sitting furniture add to the intimacy and utility of the space. The space requirement as it stands at present seems more or less adequate but as future provision has been proposed the internal circulation may pose congestion problem also in certain areas like library etc. is bound to occur which may result in deteriorating the environment. Architect’s philosophy has been very successfully transformed in to build form to create desire environment and the impulses. However at places philosophy has overruled functions like circulation through studios. The low height volume with approx. 10’ roof houses some of spaces divided by non-load bearing wall. The architectural system provides provision suitable scheme with above three components sop that the system is selves solves many problems i.e. lighting flexibility provision of future expansion and strong open spaces with its facades. The provision of natural lighting by the section of roofs minimizes the window areas on the facades. The movement along the movement along the elongated vestibule not only provides an impressive entry but the perforations on the walls also render an active dialogue with outer and inner spaces. The numerous wall with in the vestibule support the slab; provide access to other corridor and place for notice boards. The lecture halls have high degree of habitability. The functional aspects include right amount of ambience, stepped sitting, suitable built in furniture and minimum nominal disturbance. More over the half fit nicely in the given architectural system. Lecture halls provide with steps render an easy and proper sitting position while taking lectures. Provision of one- door and slit widows at the back accounts for a very disciplined and destruction free environment. CCA has large and voluminous studio with pleasant amount of ambience. The studio is large enough to accommodate lecture chairs, drawing boards stands and individual lockers.

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COMPARITIVE ANALYSIS OF CASE STUDIES TOPIC Relevance to topic

CEPT,AHMEDABAD

CCA,CHANDIGARH

CONCLUSION

The primer institute imparting education in the field of the art and architecture with the appropriate work atmosphere created through architectural spaces. Ahmedabad Semi-formal Planning

The school provides education in architecture

-

Chandigarh Formal Planning

Site Zoning

Building evolved around a central open space with smaller courtyards

Building evolved around a central open space

Parking

Vehicular segregation at the main entrance in north and south pedestrian campus

Vehicular parking inside outside campus is provided

Entrance

Paved pathways shaded by trees with lawn on both side .No direct entry Secured entrance

No such pathways leading to main entrance

Open Spaces

Planed formal courts

Light & Ventilation

North-south orientation of building with large opening permitting ample of sunlight inside

Planned formal central courts with informal spaces for sitting ad gathering North south orientation of building with large opening permitting ample of sunlight inside

Planning can be formal & semi-formal. Building evolved around a central open space with smaller courtyards Vehicular parking can be either inside or outside of the campus premises. Formal entrance with landscaping to merge with the surrounding .Secured entrance. Open spaces could pleasure for gathering &studies in campus premises. Bigger opening along the north-south the north south axis are functional in allowing natural light in the interior spaces & for cross ventilation.

Building Services

Located inadequate on the passage as leakage is taking place in the areas a below

Administrative Area

Separate administrative block

Lobby

Lobby is interpreted in the form of double heighted amphitheatres or courtyards

Location Site Planning

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Building services are maintained properly in all over the building blocks Office and administrative areas are connected with and within the academic blocks Lobby interpret ate in the form of long passage

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Separate administrative block proves functional

Provision of lobby as a separate space is not necessary. It can be in the form of open courts.

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Library

Central library building with well integrated spaces.

Library with ample natural light coming inside

Classrooms

Open classroom with visual contact between two classrooms

Classrooms don’t have visual contact and they are beside ach other

Staff Room

Provided in the central administrative block

Stair case & circulation core

Articulated cantilevered open staircase but inadequate sunlight

Staff rooms are provided in the academic quadrangle to easily reach to the classrooms No staircase provided

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Library to be designed efficiently to encourage selflearning. Classroom to be designed in accordance with the open spaces to allow visual as well as physical interaction Staff rooms to be provided in the administrative building but near to classes. Staircase to be made interesting and well-lit to make circulation lively in the building.

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CHAPTER – 3 UNDERSTANDING THE SITE

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1. INTRODUCTION

1.1.

Location

The site is in the North-West part of Aurangabad city in Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar University. The site is located from the city and is in area sound for educational purpose. The University surrounded with hills from West to North with slope towards South –East direction

1.2.

Site area & boundaries –

The proposed site is West side to the main building of BAMU, the total site area which is allotted by the Govt. of Maharashtra is 35.26 acres .The site is surrounded by one major at north and one minor road at west side of the plot. The South west edge of the site touches with sangita colony. The proposed site is polygonal in shape and have curvy edges at the north end of the site.

Figure 78Dimension of site Figure 79Angular direction of site

1.3.   

Accessibility Bus Stand- Dr .Babasaheb Ambedkar University is at the distance of 2.3 Km with travel distance of 10 mins from Central Bus Stand of Aurangabad. Railway Station – University is at 5.7 km with travel distance of 15 min from Aurangabad railway Station. Airport – University is at 12km with travel distance of 30 min from Aurangabad domestic Airport.

2. SITE CONTEXT The site is located on the west side in university campus on footsteps of Gagobaba Tekdi.Other institutional building nearby is National Institute of Electronics on South side and on opposite side if site, while Department of management Science, Department of Physics on east side, Department of Chemical technology and workshop on the North side. TEJASH SINGH

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The site is located to two major Historical monuments that are Bibi ka Maqbara and Soneri Mahal which follow Architectural feature of Mughal Architecture. A large open space is surrounding Bibi ka Maqbara and the University is separated with this historical site with belt of residential area from North to South site. Also, there are other vacant land reserved for other colleges as the BAMU is spread in area of 750 acres.

Figure 80Praposed site of spa Aurangabad

3. NATURAL FACTOR

3.1.

GEOLOGY

The granite rocks have given rise to red as well as black cotton soils. Major part of the city has deep black soil derived from the trap rock. A mixture laterite and black soil is encountered in the eastern parts together with sandy soil along river banks. Most of the hill tops are bare or covered with coarse gravel while low-lying area accumulates clay and loam. The massive basalt is a dark to black rock having very small to medium grained texture. The sculpture has very carefully avoided the massive trap flows while carrying the caves at Aurangabad. Minerals of economic importance are not reported in the city. 3.2.

SOIL TYPE –

Compact coarse sand to 10’-12” and rocky land below coarse sand is the middle of the site and compact coarse sand to 3’-4” rocky land below coarse sand is in east side of the site and at the border of North west side.

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Fig- Figure showing various patches of soil

3.3.

Fig- Pin drop showing site laying in type of soil

Soil characteristic

Most of the region is covered with deep black cotton soil derived from the Deccan trap volcanic rock. However, the soils vary greatly in texture and depth. The deep black soils are found along the river banks of Godavari, Manjara, Purna, Dudhana and Penganga and their tributaries and the soil is capable of retaining moisture. The soils are, however, course, shallows and relatively poor, along the hill slopes and at the foots of the hills. The major portion of the region is covered by medium black soil. The medium and deep soil in the region is rich in plant nutrients

4. GEOMORPHOLOGY – The district comprises of varied topographic features and landscapes consisting of high hills and plains and low lying hills. Most of the hill ranges are located in the northern part of the district. The hills near Verul in Khuldabad taluka are part of these ranges which extend to Chawaka ranges and Aurangabad hills. The Satmala range encompasses several hills overlooking the Tapi valley. From west to east they are Antur (826 m amsl), Satonda (552 m amsl), Abasgand (671 m amsl) and Ajantha (578 m amsl). The Satmala hill (493 m amsl) from which name of the range is derived, is situated north to Kannad town. The district is a part of the Deccan Plateau. In general, the slopes in the district are towards south and southeast. The average elevation of the district is in the order of 500 m amsl. Within it there are flat topped hill ranges extending over wide area and also hills separated by broad valleys. Major part of the district falls in Godavari basin with a small area in north eastern parts falling Tapi Basin. The major river in the district is the Godavari with its tributaries namely; Purna, Dudhna and Shivna rivers. The other important tributaries are Sukna, Khelna, Kham, Gulathi, Shivbhadra and Girija rivers. Depending on the drainage and geomorphology, the district has been divided into 52 watersheds.

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4.1.

Site contour & slope –

The proposed site has a topography with maximum elevation of 579 metres and lowest of 567 metres. The site has a hill in north direction. And the site plays in the valley region with sloppy ground running towards the south west direction of the site.

Fig- Site geological contour

Figure 81Contour and slope on site

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SITE TOPOGRAPHY –

4.2.

The longitudinal and the latitudinal sectional profiles show that the site has a slope topography in the direction of North-East with a maximum slope of 4.5% to -2.3% and 8.1% to -1.9% of average slope.

4.3.

DRAINAGE

Fig- Showing the drainage pattern of city

Fig- Showing the drainage direction of site

The nearest water treatment plant is the Kham river point where the sewage of BAMU campus and nearby residential area flows through is drained out. The proposed site has a slope of 1.5% to -1.2% in the South-West direction which can be used for all drainage purpose related to the project.

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4.4.

SEISMIC ZONE –

The proposed site of Aurangabad which comes under the seismic zone 2 is under minimum intensity seismic risk with zone factor of 0.10, maximum horizontal acceleration experienced by structure in this zone is 10% of gravitational acceleration.

Fig- Showing the seismic zones of India 5. HYDROLOGY – The major part (95%) of the district constitutes a sequence of basaltic lava flows (Deccan Trap) while alluvium occupies a small portion. There are two distinct hydrogeological units in the district i.e. fissured formations (different units of basaltic lava flows) and porous formations (isolated patches of alluvial deposits). The occurrence and movement of ground water is controlled by variation in water bearing properties of these formations. 5.1.

Surface water –

The proposed site has seasonal water tribunal resource on the site, it is situated on the Satmala range near the Kham River but the river is only seasonal most of the period of the year it’s in dried up situation. The major requirement of the water is fulfilled by the government dug well.

Fig- Various surface water sources in city TEJASH SINGH

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Ground water –

5.2.

The Depth to water level recorded Khuldabad taluka OF Aurangabad District pre monsoon ranges from 2 m to 5 m metres below ground level (mbgl) , and in post mansoon rainfall it is 5 m to 10 m. During premonsoon period, rise in water levels has been recorded was in ranges between 0.08 and 0.79 m/year. Fall in water levels has been observed was ranges between 0.03 and 2.48 m/year.

Fig- Post monsoon depth of water

Fig- Pre monsoon depth of water

5.3.

Water Quality

The concentrations of all the parameters except nitrate in most of the samples are the within maximum permissible limit of the BIS standards Overall, it can be concluded that the ground water quality in the wells monitored in the district is affected because of high NO3 concentrations.

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6. VEGETATION

6.1.

SITE EXSISTING CONDITION –

The existing condition of the site is shown in the figure, the site has a dense vegetation on the northern side of the site and barren land on the south-eastern side of the site, vegetation of bushes (Aerva javanica) at North West side of the site, and heavy vegetation of trees of neem at the northern side of the site.

Figure 82Vegetation map

6.2.

Various Species in the region

Ramling Wildlife Sanctuary and the adjoining region comprises hills and hillocks which support rich tropical dry deciduous and scrub vegetation. During our floristic explorations, thirteen taxa of flowering plants were recorded which are new to the Marathwada region.

Azadirachta indica(neem) TEJASH SINGH

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Dyssodia tenuifolia

Aerva javanica

Acacia planifrons

7. CLIMATE Annual mean temperature in Aurangabad range from 17 degrees C to 33 degrees C with the most comfortable time to visit in the winter- October to February. The highest maximum ever was recorded was 46 degree C and the climate is Hot and Dry with Semi-arid climate.

7.1.

Temperature –

The maximum temperature of Aurangabad ranges from 32* C to 41* c with peak temperature of 41* C, while the minimum temperature ranges 18* C to 29* C with peak temperature 29* C. The average temperature ranges from 28* C to 36* C with peak temperature 28* C.

7.2.

Precipitation-

The precipitation is observed month of June, July, August, September and October with maximum precipitation of 31cms in month of September.

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7.3.

Relative Humidity and Cloud Coves-

The humidity is maximum 79 % in month of September and maximum cloud cover is 65% in month of July.

7.4.

Annual Wind Speed

The maximum wind speed is measured in months of May, June and July with speed 15.9 mph, 16.3mph and 16.6 mph respectively and ranges between 7.4 mph and 16.6 mph. While the average wind speed is at its maxima in month of June and July with speed of 12.8 mph and ranges between 5.1 mph and 12.8 mph.

7.5.

WIND DIRECTION

MAY

JANUARY

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NOVEMBER

AUGUST

The above figure shows the wind flow in site throughout the year at periodic month. Sr. No. 1 2 3 4

Month January May August November

Morning E/calm W/NW W/SW E/SE

Evening W/SW W/NW W/NW NE/W

Wind Speed(Km/hr) 7.4 15.93 16.25 7.4

The table below shows the flow direction and speed in Aurangabad at periodic time of a year.

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7.6.

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Sunpath and solar altitudes

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7.7.

Climatic zone –

8. SOCIAL & CULTURAL FACTORS

8.1.

Existing landuse

In the year 2006, the agriculture area is 24.449 Sq.Km, simultaneously there is barren Land 21.74 Sq.Km The barren Land has increased due to various reasons, one of them is, increase in industrialization after 1982 as Aurangabad council converted into Aurangabad Municipal Corporation, consequently settlement area also increased.

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8.2.

Traffic & transport –

The proposed site at the junction of road going towards SAI sports authority and pedagogy department, which is less traffic zone. The site is situated inside the BAMU University campus and have less affection due to outside traffic.

8.3.

Density

Aurangabad is one of district of Maharashtra in India. There are 9 Talukas, 1,356 villages and 16 towns in Aurangabad district. As per the Census India 2011, Aurangabad district has 7, 51,915 households, population of 37, 01,282 of which 19, 24,469 are males and 17, 76,813 are females. The population of children between age 0-6 is 5, 32,659 which is 14.39% of total population. The sex-ratio of Aurangabad district is around 923 compared to 929 which is average of Maharashtra state. The literacy rate of Aurangabad district is 67.65% out of which 74.35% males are literate and 60.38% females are literate. The total area of Aurangabad is 9,821.54 sq.km with population density of 212 per sq.km. Out of total population, 56.23% of population lives in urban area and 43.77% lives in rural area. There are 14.57% Scheduled Caste (SC) and 3.87% Scheduled Tribe (ST) of total population in Aurangabad

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8.4.

Occupational structure –

The study of occupational structure of town the current study shows, the workers are engaged in cultivation, agricultural labour, households, industry and other works. Total population of Aurangabad city is 2,98,937. Out of this, 79,917 people recognized as working force. That means, work participation rate of Aurangabad city is 26.73 percent. Out of total workers, about 1285 workers were identified as cultivators, 1762 as agricultural labours. Most of the workers were found in other workers category. Marginal workers were 2701 having the share of 0.90% to total population of the city. Non-workers population was found 219020 which shares 73.27% to total population. It clearly shows that, non-working population in the Aurangabad city is very large. Because, people from all over the Marathwada region migrating to Aurangabad especially for educational and residential purpose. This leads to increase the non-working population in the city.

9. SITE SERVICES:

9.1.

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Electrical services:

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9.2.

WATER SUPPLY:-

10. HISTORY:Aurangabad city is rich in historical monuments as it has very vast historical background it has heritage sites of Ellora and Ajanta caves, Mughal buildings like Bibi ka Maqbara, Tomb of Aurangzeb at Khultabad, Fortification wall and gates, Deogiri fort at Daulatabad, etc. Aurangabad city is the large tourism hub in Maharashtra state. This gives Aurangabad city a distinct Architectural feature.

10.1. Ellora Caves Located on the North-West side of Aurangabad near Khultabad at 39 km from Aurangabad, it is a World Heritage site by UNESCO featuring Buddhist, Hindu and Jain monuments from 600-1000 CE period. The main attraction here is the Kailash temple carved out from a single mountain.

10.2. Ajanta Caves: Located in the North of Aurangabad district in Sillod district at 99km from Aurangabad, this is also a World Heritage Site by UNESCO have 29 rock cut Buddhist cave monument date from 2nd Century to about 480 or 650 CE. The paintings of Ajanta is world famous.

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10.3. Daulatabad Fort This fort is also known as Devagiri and was constructed in 14th Century and is about 16 km of North-West of Aurangabad City, this historical fort was built by first Yadava king Bhillama V, in 1327 famously remained the capital under Tughlaq dynasty and was constantly known to shift the capital from Delhi to Daulatabad and Daulatabad to Delhi, this is one of the unconquered fort in India and is famous for its unbreakable security and maze to distract enemies to enter the fort

10.4. Bibi ka Maqbara It is in Aurangabad in North-West side. It is commissioned by Aurangzeb sixth Mughal emperor in the memory of his first wife Dilras Banu Begum, it is similar to that of Taj Mahal in Agra the mausoleum of Aurangzeb’s Mother Mumtaz Mahal. it is also name as Dakkhani Taj.

10.5. Gates of Aurangabad One of the things that made Aurangabad stand out from several other medieval cities in India was its 52 “Gates”, each of which had a local history or had individual linked with it, due to which Aurangabad is known as “City of Gates” Out of these 52 gates only four and nine gates have survived .The name of these gates is Badkal Gate, Delhi Gate, Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Roshan Gate.

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11.1.ASTHETIC FACTOR

1. View of hills

3. Backside view of education department TEJASH SINGH

2. View of Gorababa hills

4. View of Sangita colony

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11.2. SPECIAL FEATURES

The site is polygonal in shape with two artisan road covering it from two side in the north and wet direction of the site. The site at junction point to the SAI Sports centre and Paramedic department.

Figure 83Special feature site

12.

BY LAW’S

Front set back -9 mts . Rear set back 4.5 mts . Side setback-4.5 mts . Maximum ground coverage – 33% Maximum permissible height – 15 mts . Floor area ratio – 1.1 Built up area – 46538.38 sq.mts . Total site area – 206389.61 sq.mts . Ground coverage – 46741 sq.mts . Total area for parking – for every 100 sq.mt built up area there should be 12 sq.mts parking area.

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13. CRITICAL ANALYSIS

13.1.Foundation The recommended safe soil bearing capacity is 500 kN/m2. (Refer Geotechnical Report). The footings for columns and shear walls will be sized based on this soil bearing capacity. The type of foundation shall be open (isolated or combined) footings. The depth of foundation shall be up to hard strata or 1.5m from natural ground level, whichever is more. All footings shall be located below the grade slab at the lower ground level. For adjacent footings at different levels, clear horizontal distance between the footings shall be at least twice the difference between the bottoms of footings. If required, plumb concrete shall be used to raise the level of lower footing. The location of the tie beams between the footings and the lower basement slab shall be determined as per the following: Tie beam shall be provided if the distance between top of footing and bottom of raft (unsupported length of column) is more than 5.0m. The soil type proposed to be used in analysis as per Table 1 of IS 1893 (Part 1): 2002 is Type II Medium Soils. Figure 84Column detail

13.2.Built Foam & Orientation

Aurangabad region come under a Hot and Dry region and temprature fall is less in seson of winter as the lowest temprature is 17 degree.Their is requirment of less contact to direct sun in the region as the region experience a extreme summer and is affected by seviour drought situation.The sun path follow the rout from west to east via south.The wind direction of the prevaling wind in region for the maximum time remains towards South west. The design considration of the building requires then orientation of the building in irection of North west as it will obstruct the direct sun exposer in afternoon time,and use of lovers will help to cath the prevaling wind on the site. Figure 85Orientation of site

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13.3.ACCESIBILITY

The basic reson for providing access from the discripitive position of the site is to facilitate the orientation of the building which is the basic design consideration. The plus point for the access from the point as the point have less prone to vehicular traffic and benificial for movment of the traffic. The service entry point road is having least amount of traffic movment and will allow segregation of circulation within the premises.

Figure 86Accecibility on site

14. SWOT ANALYSIS

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CHAPTER – 3 STANDARDS AND AREA PROGRAMMING

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1. ARCHITECTURAL STANDARDS AND REQUIREMENT STUDY

1.1 ARCHITECTURAL STANDARDS To design a certain building we need to follow the minimum standards. Mentioned below are some standards required for architecture are lecture theatre, studios and class room.

Figure 87Standard for lecture threaten

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Figure 88Standards for classroom

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Figure 89Standards for design studio

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2. REQUIREMENT STUDY The institute consists of basic spaces like administration, gathering spaces like plaza, garden, working spaces in form of studios, workshops, classrooms, research labs, construction yards, etc. and residential areas like hostel and dining hall, with recreational areas like sport’s complex and auditorium and refreshment area like canteen and student area.

2.1. ADMINISTRATION AREA:

Administration area must have common facilities which is shared by all office staff and principal and non-teaching staff. It should be accessible to all the workers of administration area and visitors can access the reception area directly. All data of institution should be available here and it will be enclosed to administration head office.

Cashier space and locker should be isolated and not accessible to all accept the office worker.

2.2. STUDIO AND CLASSROOM. 

Different type of studios for different departments.

The studio must have enough working space, storage area, display area and area for interaction.

The studio must have intake of fresh air and north light.

Studio size may vary according to number of user and department.

2.3.LIBRARY

     

Reading area which is permanently lit with the daylight. Reference area should be accessible to librarian and under his/her supervision students and faculty should refer the data. Cloak room should be outside the library. Storage and Achieves shall be accessible to librarian only and for student and faculty in special case. Audio/visual information area should be provided separately. Digital library should be placed separately.

2.4.COMPUTER LAB.

 

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100 students can access the lab at a time. The lab should be air conditioned as the server room needs to be cool all the time.

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Software and hardware storage should be accessible to lab in-charge and it should be places near his/her cabin. 2.5. EXHIBITION AND JURY AREA

     

There should be two type of exhibition one permanent and temporary exhibition. Permanent exhibition should display the work of previous academic year. It might be a room or a large space. Exhibition area should be easily accessible to the visitors. Temporary exhibition area should be place near workshop and studio. The common jury area should be provided near to studios so that during jury it will be easily accessible to all.

2.6. WORKSHOP.

  

Workshop space shall be placed near the studios. Requirement of space may change according to nature of workshop. Storage space should be more.

2.7.AUDITORIUM.

  

Minimum 1000 seat capacity. It will have all required space in auditorium criteria. Entrance shall be semi-covered space with appropriate volume so when they gather, the space does not seem congested.

2.8.SPORT COMPLEX

 

Provision of indoor games and gymnasium. Long span structure to accommodate more courts of sports.

2.9.CANTEEN

   

It shall be common gathering space. It shall be a common gathering space. It shall have open and semi-open space. It shall also be connected with sport

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AREA PROGRAMING

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CHAPTER-5 DESIGN IDEOLOGY

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1.

INTRODUCTION

Institution play an important role in providing platform for education. The environment within the institution is the prime generator for quality in education. Architectural education in some ways is vastly different from other kind of education. It lays more stress on learning by doing and discussing rather than studying by books. “As well said architecture should make us feel different otherwise engineering would be enough”- Libeskind , Denial 07/04/2014,interview at The Talks http://the-talks.com/interview/daniellibeskind/. The knowledge held inside cluster of spaces with easy reach to all facilities can be achieved inside a circle of surrounding various formal and informal spaces.

1.1. CONCEPT

GYAANA CHAKRA -THE CIRCLE OF KNOWLEDGE

“Cluster in a modern version of cloistered university town with all facilities within easy reach”

  

The circle formation of the overall master plan is a clear and strong image signifying knowledge held in the greater circle of life. A crescent moon-kite form of the ‘wau’ sites balance in the circle resulting in a harmonious whole. The circle is a universal form, transcending all knowledge and unifying them to a whole.

Figure 90Various activity held inside the campus

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Positioning the three faculties and the great hall and library complex around a central radial core reinforces the concept while creating a strong beginning to develop a ‘sense of place’ that will be important in guiding the architectural development of the university.

2.  

 

FORM DEVLOPMENT

The basic form development of the site was done to give emphasis on knowledge held inside the circle. As an architecture college the basic development of blocks where done using basic architectural elements like ‘symmetry, datum and rhythm’. The use of ‘mass and void’ and ‘water bodies’ is done to influence the micro climate. The functions are placed to have separate vehicular entries from these the pedestrian pathway are placed to achieve a pedestrian free movement within the site. The common facilities are placed between the hostel and the institution so that it becomes elements to bind the two function and to achieve gradual transition from one space to the other.

Figure 91View of master plan of campus

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3.

DESIGN CONSIDERATION:

3.1.Site Elements

3.1.1. Circular Walkways The plan was laid out in the form of a traditional chakra, or wheel of knowledge, and additional faculties still to come will help complete this circle. The campus is laid out in concentric circles, the central library, resource and multimedia centre situated on the innermost ring, flanked by the medical faculty and the science and information technology faculties on either side. On the opposite side of the radial plan lies the administration complex and great hall, connected by an imposing, glazed cylinder that rises through the roof like a deafening crescendo. A circular network of roads connects the faculties, library complex and administration building around a central plaza comprising green fields and a reflective pond.

3.1.2. Interactive Spaces The basic nature of the university campus to achieve most of interactive spaces or informal and formal gathering spaces, as architecture education is all about exchanging of ideas and preserving from surrounding areas. A series of informal spaces are designing as along the central library, along the water body, chabutra, contours. All the interactive spaces are covered with trees to provide a natural shading from sunlight.

Figure 92View showing various interaction spaces

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3.1.3. Library One of the first things to be seen when entering the campus, this grand space, articulated through the roof. This emphasis on social interaction is highlighted by, yet not confined to, the design of the library, resource and multi-media centre. Separate floors are all fed by the central core, which is flooded with natural light from an extensive skylight overhead. The library’s broad, sweeping staircases at the heart of this are shared by all students in the complex, before they branch off to reach

Figure 93View shoeing entrance to libarary

individual reference areas. 3.1.4. Architecture & Planning Block The orientation of both the blocks have been done towards north so as to gain maximum amount of natural lighting through the building, the façade of building have been made through Glass fibre reinforced concrete jali to get a natural insulation from the extreme sunlight of summer of Aurangabad. A sloped roof with void in-between is also provided to resistance to heat insulate through roof.

Figure 94Front view of architecture block

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3.2.

CLIMATE CONSIDERATION

The open nature of the library complex and administration building’s core areas ensures that this sense of light and space is emphasised inside as well as out. However given the local tropical climate, the conundrum of how to maximise the natural light without attracting excessive solar gain. “While the campus buildings do have some traditional climate-driven architectural elements, such as overhung roofs, other approaches used to combat temperature extremes are more contemporary,” “Here an even temperature is achieved partly through the reflective nature of the skylight, partly through strategically set louvers near the skylight that allow rising hot air to escape, and lastly through the open, walk-through nature of the base of the building that admits fresh air up into the interior,” “Similar principles were also used on the central structure in the administration building, although most enclosed areas of the campus are fully air conditioned.”

Figure 95View showing orientation of site

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3.3.

STRUCTURAL CONSIDERATION

3.3.1. Architecture & Planning Block Façade

  

Glass fibre reinforced concrete is used as the material. As Grc jali of high-strength, alkali-resistant glass fibre embedded in a concrete matrix. The face treatment helped in controlling the heat gain inside the building as well as provide adequate light for internal lighting purpose. The figures shows how jali help in reducing in building temperature.

Figure 98View of jali

Figure 97View of steel bracing

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Figure 96detail of column detail

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3.3.2. Central Library Faรงade Detail

Figure 100View of wooden bracing Figure 99Joinery detail of wooden bracing on wall

Figure 101Front facade detail

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CHAPTER-6 DESIGN TRANSLATION

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CHAPTER-7 BIBLIOGRAPHY

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Times of india Website. Retrieved from www. timesofindia.indiatimes.com https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/aurangabad/City-to-hostpremier-architecture-institute/articleshow/46616148.cms

Architecturelive Website. Retrieved from www.posts.architecturelive.in http://www.posts.architecturelive.in/b-arch-thesis-centre-artarchitecture-mohammad-suhail/

Architecturebrio Website. Retrieved from www.posts.architecturebrio.in http://architecturebrio.com/projects/school-of-planning-architecture25#sthash.8A1Dt6Kg.Lg0Ys7cs.dpbs

Scribd Website. Retrieved from www.scribd.com https://www.scribd.com/

Issuu Web Site. Retrived from www.issuu.org https://issuu.com/

Wikipedia Web Site. Retrieved from www.wikipedia.gov https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurangabad,_Maharashtra.

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Profile for Tejash Singh

Thesis Report on School Of Planning & Architecture  

A thesis Report On "School Of Planning & Architecture" , The proposed site was Aurangabad , Maharashtra. The report compile of Case study on...

Thesis Report on School Of Planning & Architecture  

A thesis Report On "School Of Planning & Architecture" , The proposed site was Aurangabad , Maharashtra. The report compile of Case study on...

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