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CHARACTER CHARISMA CREATIVITY

DOWNTOWN RICHMOND Bring your business to a hot spot with an innovative vibe, authentic presence and options to fit all lifestyles. Get your free copy of Richmond’s Downtown Development Update to discover the city’s live, work and play opportunities. Call: (804) 788-6466 or Click: www.venturerichmond.com.


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Downtown Richmond

WORKSPAC CREATIVE

Designing Your Perfect Blend of Art and Commerce

Volume: 3 Issue: 2 SPRING

2008

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Downtown News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Design Forward: National Theatre . . . . . . . . .4 Downtown Get Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hot Properties The Power Plant at Lucky Strike . . . . . . . .6 The Garage at Lucky Strike . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Innovation Intersection at Monroe Ward Monroe Park Campus Addition & the Da Vinci Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 From Central Belting to Creativity Center: VCU’s Brandcenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 First Class Facilities: Snead Hall & The Schools of Business & Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Exit the Workplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Christy S. Coleman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Commercial Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

CONTRIBUTORS Executive Editors: Lucy Meade, Venture Richmond Ted Randler, Palari Publishing LLP W O R D S Tyler Bass Terri L. Jones Catherine Saydlowski P H O T O G R A P H Y Elli Morris | Chris Owens | Jay Paul David Schrott | Sarah Whalor

www.creativeworkspace.biz CONTACT DATA

City of Richmond Department of Economic Development (804) 646-5633 w w w .c i.ri ch m o n d .va .u s Carthan F. Currin, Director Dara Glass, Deputy Director Cary Brown, Director of Special Projects

(804) 788-6466

Shadow Play

Constructed in 1930, The Garage at Lucky Strike now houses four businesses. Its renovation from garage to office space made use of the building’s existing skylights that provide a subtle shifting of natural light and shadows throughout the rooms. [see page 7] D o w n t o w n Ri ch m o nd C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC is published and owned in partnership with Palari Publishing LLP.

The Team: Jack Berry Mavis Wynn Jim Watkins Sharon Bassard Lucy Meade Stephen Lecky Lisa Sims Renee Gaines Erika Gay Part time: Terry Hampton, David Jennings

To advertise in upcoming issues call: Palari Publishing LLP (804) 252-3519 or email: DP@theworkfactory.com

www.palaribooks.com

Palari Publishing LLP was established in 1998 in Richmond, Virginia. Palari is a forward-thinking, independent, royalty-based publisher committed to producing innovative periodicals, fiction and nonfiction books. Through our hardcover and trade paperback originals, Palari provides authoritative, well-written nonfiction that addresses topical consumer needs and fiction with an emphasis on intelligence and quality.

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DOWNTOWN NEWS Charles Ryan Associates Moves to Shockoe Bottom Charles Ryan Associates, an integrated marketing communications firm with over thirty years experience recently moved from their county offices to the In Your Ear Music building on East Broad Street. Says Matt Isner of CRA, “We wanted to be back in the creative environment the Shockoe Bottom area offers. Our new location puts us in an exciting place– we are in an area that is growing as fast as our business is growing.” The innovative design of the historic building gives CRA both space for team integration and private work spaces. In addition, an aspect of the In Your Ear space that appeals to CRA is the “history and vision to take four row houses and turn them into one office building while keeping the original integrity of the structures.” Isner continues, “It feels like we have been established here for years.”

Isner: “We wanted to be back in the creative environment the Shockoe Bottom area offers.”

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Style Weekly Relocates Last year, the folks at Style Weekly celebrated their 25th anniversary. To herald this milestone, they thought it time for a bigger space where they could spread their editorial wings. The newspaper staff, which numbers about 50, found exactly what they were looking for in the old VCU Adcenter on East Main. “It has really created an upbeat, lively environment where we can all collaborate,” says editor Jason Roop of the 11,500 square-foot space where they moved March 1. Previously located in Scott’s Edition, Style Weekly also considered a number of other options, including offices in Manchester, on the Boulevard and even near their pre-Scott’s Edition location on Main. This location puts their reporters right smack in the middle of the action. “We’re still covering all of the Richmond area from here,” explains Roop. “We just have more of a bird’s eye view.” It’s no wonder they needed more square footage. Continually expanding their lineup of publications, Style Weekly has recently added Belle and Richmond Giving, a publication about Richmond philanthropy and volunteerism, which debuts in April.

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DESIGN FORWARD National Theatre eventeen years ago, Helen Reed [left] started HL Reed Design, and her first project was Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Belgrade. Since then, her team has worked primarily on Hospitality Design up and down the East Coast. Their project list and relationship with Johannas Design made them a natural fit for the National Theatre project. HL Reed Design worked to blend the historical and modern aspects of the theatre by using color. “In the color palette of the public spaces and auditorium, Janel Gleich [right, also of HL Reed Design] created a blend of more modern colors with traditional. “I specifically like how the second floor public spaces turned out when the colors were reversed and the green and dark purple are the main colors on the plaster walls,” explains Reed. The restrooms received a special touch too. Reed used a combination of larger tile with glass accents in the women’s restroom, and unfinished steel panels for the walls in the men’s restroom. Reed’s favorite part of the project was watching the dynamics as it came together and seeing how it was received. “Going to the first concert the night it opened was probably, so far, my favorite.” CWS

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DOWNTOWN GET AROUND

Designed for Day-trippers For those Richmonders who want to avoid gas altogether, YeRen Outdoor Adventure on East Main, rents mountain, road, beach cruiser, and hybrid bicycles to those who wish to locomote under their own steam. Owner Mike Tyler [above] says customers rent bikes for a number of reasons—for day trips, to try out a particular type of bike before they buy or even to train for their first triathlon. He also gets a lot of traffic from vacationers and business travelers whose prefer a two-wheeled means of getting around town. When the season is over, Tyler will also sell off a portion of his rental inventory.

Local Motion Nowadays, when you have to hock the good silver to buy a tank of gas, everyone is desperate to find thriftier ways to get from here to there. At Scoot Richmond on West Seventh, “Scooter Lady” Chelsea Lahmers sees a growing number of Richmonders turning to scooters, which get an amazing 70-140 miles to the gallon. Lahmers says the demographic for this frugal little vehicle is broad—from young couples who have recently tried a scooter while on vacation to older RV folks who want a cheaper transportation alternative once they reach their destination. There’s even the midlife-crisis buyer who opts for a scooter over the predictable little red sports car. D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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HOT PROPERTIES

Sam McDonald & Charles Macfarlane

The Power Plant at Lucky Strike he Power Plant at Lucky Strike is an historic restoration of the plant that provided electricity to Tobacco Row starting back in 1930. Charles MacFarlane is both co-owner and developer of the site along with Chris Dillon and Sam McDonald. He explains: “We are converting the use of the building to office space [18,500 square feet]. ODELL Associates, a national architecture firm, will occupy approximately 15,000 square feet for their corporate offices, and we will lease the remaining space to an office, retail, or commercial tenant.”

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ODELL is excited about the project. “It allows them to move back into the city, help to revitalize an historic part of downtown, occupy unique creative space, attract quality employees, have room to grow their business, and make a statement about the type of firm they are committed to being for their employees, their clients, the downtown area and the revitalization of its historic areas,” says MacFarlane. MacFarlane is proud of the interior height and the large windows that will provide plenty of light and cool open space. He also wants to keep the large concrete “table” which held one of the large turbines in the building in its former inception. The table will be used as the entrance to one of the conference rooms on the first floor. CWS page:6

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The Garage at Lucky Strike Jay Smith, Julie Rautio & Robert Shinn

he Garage at Lucky Strike has been an important fixture in Richmond since it was constructed in 1930 on the location of a former tobacco warehouse. Now the building is owned by several partners from Capital Results, a public affairs company, and houses four businesses.

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Rob Shinn, a partner at Capital Results, said his company had been looking for over a year for just the right space. “It’s very difficult to find space in this general size range [about 7 000 square feet].” They chose The Garage because “it has an open feel, four magnificent skylights, and solid brick construction,” says Shinn. At The Garage, trucks once pulled into four garage doors. One of those doors has been incorporated into a freestanding wall in the current building. Julie Rautio, also a partner, enjoys the abundance of natural light. Partner Jay Smith explains, “ We find ourselves collaborating as a team on a number of projects, so having open space and places to work as a group are very important.” CWS D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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Innovation Intersection at Monroe Ward Virginia Commonwealth University’s Monroe Park Campus has undergone a remarkable transition in the last year with the largest expansion of its teaching facilities in its history. The culmination of a half-decade of planning, its classrooms and dormitories have created a new innovative high-tech synergy in the neighborhood. he new Monroe Park Campus Addition is on an 11-acre tract adjacent to VCU’s Monroe Park Campus, east of Belvidere between Main and Canal streets. It’s home to the Da Vinci Center, a facility wherein the brightest students from the Arts, Engineering and Business schools collaborate in projects with the corporate community.

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Major Richmond employer Philip Morris contributed money to the center. “[PMUSA] had always talked with us about engineers not knowing enough about business; and business people, graduates, not knowing enough science and technology,” explains Dr. Eugene Trani, the President of VCU. According to him, the Da Vinci Center’s mission is to encourage a creative interdisciplinary partnership between the schools as well as with the business community. Recent projects include MeadWestvaco challenging the University’s brightest to come up with a container to store food that will counteract food spoilages from the point of production through to eventual market in India and China. VCU’s western expansion will mean big changes for Downtown’s Monroe Ward neighborhood. Standing on a new expanse of fresh, boldly-green grass, Trani gestures toward the north side of Cary, and cites more economic development with a fullsize Chili’s to open its doors near the corner of Belividere and Cary. 

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According to Trani, the Da Vinci Center’s mission is to encourage a creative interdisciplinary partnership between the schools as well as with the business community.

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From Central Belting to Creativity Center

t the Brandcenter—outfitted with sleek, glasspartitioned classrooms, walls that can be used as whiteboards, and avant-garde furniture—is Yahoo!’s basement “Big Idea Lounge.”

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This is a chicly-designed center for students to brainstorm about ideas in advertising under the guidance of Brandcenter Director Rick Boyko [below] and with the help of Apple’s professional computing line. “It’s an environment that looks and feels different and makes our students feel creative,” Boyko says. The 27,000 square-foot building was designed by the internationally renowned architect Clive Wilkinson. 

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Architect Clive Wilkinson has designed spaces for Google, Disney Store Kingdom and advertising agencies such as TBWA/Chiat/Day (Los Angeles), Mother (London) and JWT (New York). For the Brandcenter project, he partnered with Richmond-based Baskervill.

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Snead Hall is designed around a central atrium with a student commons and cafĂŠ, career services center, center for corporate education, auditorium, tiered case study classrooms and team-building breakout rooms.

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First-Class Facilities nead Hall, the new home to the School of Business, is a 125,000 square-foot contemporary facility. The complex includes a fully functioning capital markets and trading room, collaborative learning rooms, central atrium with a student commons and café, career services center, center for corporate education, auditorium, tiered case study classrooms and team-building breakout rooms, along with traditional classrooms and faculty offices.

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Dr. Michael Sesnowitz [top left], Dean of the Business School for the past seven years, said that the need for this new facility has been great. “I think you will see what happened on Broad Street happening here,” he said. “We did about $100 million dollars of construction, and then the private sector moved in and did another $100 million dollars.” On the circular wall of one of the complex’s biggest atriums, a stock ticker is running two floors above the entrance to a new Panera Bread-inspired, AramarkD o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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operated café. The smaller rooms have flat screens on the wall, and the larger rooms have flat screens and projectors. Affixed to the breakout rooms are small devices called RoomWizards [inset photo] which help students spark impromptu meetings away from larger groups right on the spot. The breakout rooms’ architecture encourages competitive time as well as human resource management. Jessica Van Lear [top right], a VCU Senior, said she thought the new buildings were very technologically up-to-date. “I was proud enough to bring my mom down here and show her around,” she says. The second floor houses a particularly fancy, elliptical “Capital Markets Room,” where it is very easy to imagine students knocking out their market analysis style. Dean Michael Sesnowitz recites what must surely become the mission statement of his expanding Business School’s new digs. “I think that students will come if the product you deliver is a first-class product. I think this building will allow

us to teach more effectively and therefore it will enhance the quality of the product we offer.” CWS SPRING 2008

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EXIT THE WORKPLACE

The nice weather means getting outside more and enjoying the city. What better way to do that than to check out some new downtown restaurants and some familiar favorites at lunchtime or right after work. Better yet, visit one of these spots after First Fridays to see and be seen. uLu’s (21 N. 17th St.) opened last October and traffic has been steadily picking up since. The restaurant is run by Paul Keevil (owner of Millie’s) and chef Steve Jurina (chef at Millie’s) as a quirky, affordable downtown hot spot. Lunch, dinner, and even weekend brunch menus offer affordably priced comfort food. Selections range from sandwiches and burgers for lunch to hearty main courses. There’s even a “high-falootin’ mac and cheese” for the young at heart. The décor is decidedly cozy yet unusual with the impressive concrete bar, exposed duct work and distressed copper columns.

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ow, talking about quirky, Halligans Bar & Grill (3 North 17th St.) has taken the theme concept to heart. The bar is fashioned from a brightred fire engine and even the hanging lamps are made of firefighter hats. Relaxation and comfort are key here, and Halligans has quickly become a favorite after opening in January of this year. Specialties include the London broil sandwich and homemade pickles.

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arshall Street Café (23 W. Marshall St.) is a culinary destination in the heart of Historic Jackson Ward. The café provides a comfortable laid-back atmosphere, and simple, hearty menu items like meatloaf, crab cakes, and even po’ boys. But don’t get too relaxed, because on weekends you may run into a jazz band serenading patrons as they enjoy a tasty meal and nice selection of beverages.

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f you jump on over to Historic Monroe Ward, you’ll find a downtown favorite, Chez Foushee (203 N. Foushee St.). In 1989, this restaurant started out as a small deli and caterer and has since grown into a 100 seat dining destination spot. The bright, open dining room is exquisitely decorated to provide a formal, yet comfortable atmosphere. The menu provides a dizzying array of choices including several Mediterraneaninfluenced dishes. As a lunchtime favorite, diners can choose from a selection of wraps and soups to more substantial meals like grilled London broil and roasted turkey breast. A dessert favorite is the white chocolate cheesecake. You may want to make this your first stop after the next First Fridays.

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BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS

Christy S. Coleman

s the newly appointed president of The American Civil War Center, Christy S. Coleman is on familiar turf. She has previously served as president and CEO of the nation’s largest African American museum, The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit from 1999-2005. While there, she launched a successful $43 million Legacy Campaign to grow audiences, increase endowment, address capital and programming needs, and build a new $12 million, 22,000-squarefoot permanent exhibit called And Still We Rise. She has also served as a consultant to the Smithsonian Institution, the Anacostia Museum, Monticello, Mount Vernon, and The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Most recently, Coleman served as Vice President for the Arts

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Consulting Group, Inc. Fortunately for Richmond, Coleman now brings that vast experience to our city. “We are delighted to have Christy join the staff and look forward to her fresh outlook,” says John M. McCardell, Jr., search committee chair. “Her ability to fundraise and knowledge of the museum industry will be of huge benefit to the Center.” Coleman began her career in 1982 as a living history interpreter at Colonial Williamsburg, working full-time while pursuing her education. In 1986, she became assistant educator at The Baltimore City Life Museums where she developed a student volunteer program, educational outreach to area schools, and other initiatives designed to engage the community. In 1989, she returned to Colonial

Williamsburg where she served as a senior interpreter, director of programs, and director of African American interpretations and presentation. She has also written a number of works for the museum field as well as historical drama for screen, theater, and on-site programs. Coleman received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Hampton University, and is married with three children. “The Center’s thought-provoking exhibit, In the Cause of Liberty, and mission—to tell the whole story of the conflict that still shapes our nation—is what intrigued me to this opportunity,” says Coleman. “I am eager to work with the staff to further develop a strategic plan that will take us forward as we plan toward the Sesquicentennial in 2011, and I’m looking forward to leading that charge.” CWS D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC Powered by Venture

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COMMERCIAL LISTINGS Building Name 107 S 5th St 10 S 6th St Richmond Plaza Building 7 N 8th St Shockoe Center Exchange Alley Bldg Watkins Cottrell Bldg Canal Crossing Central National Bank 600 E. Broad Street Theatre Row Office Bldg Federal Reserve Bank Of Richmond West Tower-Riverfront Plaza East Tower-Riverfront Plaza One James Center Two James Center Three James Center Edgeworth Bldg @ Tobacco Row The Maggie Walker Bus & Tech Ctr 10 E. Franklin Street Metro Chamber Building One Franklin Square 700 Centre Building Seventh And Franklin Building Chesterman Place Riverside on the James Eskimo Pie Bldg Main Street Centre DEQ Bldg The 700 Building Eighth & Main Bldg Former First Union Buildings Wytestone Plaza First National Bank Building One Capital Square The Mutual Building SunTrust Building The Ironfronts Capitol Place The Bank Of America Center Exchange Place One Shockoe Plaza Commercial Block Turning Basin Bldg

Building Address 107 S 5th St 10 S 6th St 110 S 7th St 7 N 8th St 11 S 12th St 23-25 S 13th St 111-117 S 14th St 101-115 S 15th St 219 E Broad St 600 E Broad St 712-730 E Broad St 701 E Byrd St 901 E Byrd St 951 E Byrd St 901 E Cary St 1021 E Cary St 1051 E Cary St 2100 E Cary St 501 E Franklin 10 E Franklin St 201 E Franklin St 411 E Franklin St 700 E Franklin St 701 E Franklin St 100 W Franklin St 1001 Haxall Pt 528-530 E Main St 600 E Main St 629 E Main St 700 E Main St 707 E Main St 800 E Main St 801 E Main St 823 E Main St 830 E Main St 909 E Main St 919 E Main St 1007-1013 E Main St 1106-1108 E Main St 1111 E Main St 1309-1317 E Main St 1 Shockoe Plz 100 Shockoe Slip St 111 Virginia St

Building SF 92,752 35,418 269,097 167,398 53,000 24,637 57,430 128,000 230,000 213,266 166,741 700,000 490,414 409,190 420,000 334,200 233,200 142,000 42,676 31,020 19,028 132,682 160,000 167,000 32,808 263,066 45,327 425,727 116,315 181,790 317,749 26,889 253,346 163,000 187,896 111,812 450,000 56,263 71,928 545,316 80,465 118,518 38,016 93,761

Available SF 0 0 43,141 0 10,816 7,700 3,700 54,000 200,000 46,096 53,668 13,500 1,100 1,100 35,900 13,757 6,839 40,655 0 0 19,028 30,962 49,443 31,977 8,200 28,856 4,569 30,776 8,576 102,058 112,266 0 127,091 53,726 100,228 0 19,340 0 15,077 129,840 8,432 15,000 0 12,518

% Leased 100.0 100.0 84.0 100.0 79.6 68.8 93.6 100.0 100.0 78.4 67.8 99.2 99.8 99.7 91.5 95.9 98.9 71.4 100.0 100.0 0.0 86.3 69.1 81.9 75.0 89.0 89.9 92.8 92.6 43.9 64.7 100.0 49.8 74.5 46.7 100.0 95.7 100.0 79.0 76.2 89.5 100.0 100.0 92.8

Average Rent $16.00 $15.50 $16.50 $16.50 $15.00 $16.00 $17.67 $20.00 $29.50 Negotiable $26.50 $26.50 $24.95 $22.50 $15.50 $17.59 $13.00 $13.00 $13.57 $24.37 $13.24 $17.29 $13.50 $14.00 $18.00 Negotiable $16.50 $15.00 $21.50 $13.50 $18.62 $15.36 $22.00

Select listings of properties for lease in downtown Richmond provided by Kit Tyler and Chuck Ellsworth, Grubb & Ellis | Harrison & Bates www.harrison-bates.com

The City of Richmond Department of Economic Development is here to help any company, large or small, find space Downtown. Call Cary Brown at 646-3061 or email him at brownc@ci.richmond.va.us. A New Downtown Delight Broad Appetit (May 18, 2008) at the 100-300 blocks of W. Broad Street. Featuring

Richmond’s

favorite food purveyors, restaurants, chefs, cart vendors and artisans, the street fair is free and offers to feed your mind, body and soul. Musical acts will perform, a huge kids’ area with food carvings, story-telling and—Watch out, Mom!—tomato flinging. Bug chefs David George Gordon and David Gracer will compete in a bug bake-off of sorts. Yes, we mean bugs of the creepy-crawler kind—yummy! Along with 20+ unique food-centric artisans selling their crafts, galleries and stores will participate in this epicurean extravaganza.


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Creative Work Space

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