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Downtown Richmond

WORKSPAC CREATIVE

Designing Your Perfect Blend of Art and Commerce

Volume: 3 Issue: 4

FALL 2008

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Downtown News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Hot Properties Manchester Proper; The Paper Company . . . .2 Design Forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Excellence in Design: Richmond’s Federal Courthouse . . . . . . . . . . . .6 MANCHESTER A Different Kind of Revitalization . . . . . . .8 An Arts Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Manchester’s Creativity Inside the Box . . . .11 Unique Natural Amenities . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Exit the Workplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Chris Beschler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Kim Scheeler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Commercial Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 CONTRIBUTORS Executive Editors: Lucy Meade, Venture Richmond Ted Randler, Palari Publishing LLP Managing Editor: Rebecca Jones Words Zachary J. Bardou Dana Callahan Anne Carle Sheri Doyle Terri L. Jones Catherine Saydlowski

Photography Sam Allen Walker Allen Stephanie Garr Justin Martucci J. West Productions Jay Paul

CONTACT DATA City of Richmond

Department of Economic Development (804) 646-5633 www.ci.richm on d .va .u s Carthan F. Currin, Director Dara Glass, Deputy Director Cary Brown, Director of Special Projects

(804) 788-6466

Artful Inspiration The Capitol Square Civil Rights Memorial dedicated on July 21, 2008 commemorates a 1951 walkout led by Barbara Rose Johns with over 450 of her fellow students at Robert R. Moton High School in Farmville. The memorial is designed by sculptor Stanley Bleifeld and depicts the students, as well as attorneys Oliver Hill and Spottswood Robinson III, who filed suit on their behalf.

www.creativeworkspace.biz www.palaribooks.com D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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The Team: Jack Berry Mavis Wynn Jim Watkins Sharon Bassard Lucy Meade Stephen Lecky Lisa Sims Renee Gaines Erika Gay Part time: Terry Hampton, David Jennings

To advertise in upcoming issues call: Palari Publishing LLP (804) 355-1035 or email: dave@palaribooks.coml

D o w n tow n R ich m ond C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC is published and owned in partnership with Palari Publishing LLP. Palari Publishing LLP was established in 1998 in Richmond, Virginia. Palari is a forward-thinking, independent, royalty-based publisher committed to producing innovative periodicals, fiction and nonfiction books. Through our hardcover and trade paperback originals, Palari provides authoritative, well-written nonfiction that addresses topical consumer needs and fiction with an emphasis on intelligence and quality.

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DOWNTOWN NEWS University of Richmond Downtown The “University of Richmond Downtown,” a satellite campus of over 4,500 square feet in the heart of the City of Richmond, will open this fall. UR Downtown will serve as a hub of community-based service, learning, research and collaboration with nonprofit and government partners. The downtown campus, located at 626 East Broad Street, will focus on serving Richmond families through three programs: the Richmond Families Initiative, the Center for Pro Bono Service, and the Family Law Clinic. The goal of UR Downtown is to

allows for engaged, practical education that helps to meet the needs of underserved citizens. “University of Richmond Downtown is an exciting and vital expansion of our local partnerships,” says Edward L. Ayers, President of UR. “Having a space downtown allows the whole university to offer programs and build on our connections with alumni and other local citizens and leaders. The initiative is a wonderful collaboration among the university’s academic programs, generous supporters and long-time allies in the community.”

address pressing community needs through a combination of pro bono legal services provided by law students and attorneys and community-based learning, service and research by undergraduates and faculty. UR will institute rigorous academic assessment of the programs’ effectiveness. UR Downtown springs from collaborations across the university and with community partners. The University of Richmond School of Law and the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement jointly developed this plan to create a centrally located space that

HOT PROPERTIES Manchester Proper

Renovation is underway on another vacated factory building in the historic Old Manchester neighborhood of south Richmond. Manchester Proper, located at 612 Hull Street, is being transformed into a combination of commercial/office and a top floor residential space. There are two floors of commercial/office space (10,000 s.f.) available for lease. An adjoining garage page:2

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and a quiet cobblestone alleyway will provide abundant parking for the red brick building which is located in an up-andcoming community just across the river from Shockoe Slip. The project is being developed by Pareto Development and Construction Services and the architects are Cornerstone Architects. Floor plans are available at www.paretollc.com.

The Paper Company

Historic rehabilitation of 3 old warehouse buildings, formerly known as the Cauthorne Paper Companies, is underway in Manchester. The new mixed-use development project is called The Paper Company (203-205 Hull Street at the base of the 14th Street Bridge and across from The Commons at Plant Zero). This project includes 79 studio, one and twobedroom loft apartments,

12,000 s.f. of commercial space, and onsite and adjacent parking, some of which is covered. The apartments —with exposed brick, concrete floors, and open floor plans—offer affordable rents ranging from $700-900 a month. Property Results is leasing the apartments. Commercial spaces range from 1,500-4,000 s.f. Thalhimer Commercial Real Estate is leasing the commercial space. Joseph F. Yates is the architect.

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Miller & Rhoads Residences Open in December Renovation of downtown Richmond’s historic and beloved Miller & Rhoads remains on schedule for completion of the condominiums in December, 2008 and the hotel in January, 2009. Miller & Rhoads Residences will offer 133 one-and two-bedroom homes in a wide variety of floor plans, including terraces with a view of the downtown Richmond skyline, spacious penthouses, multi-level layouts and units overlooking a huge naturally lighted atrium. Prices start at only $149,000. Contact Joyner Fine Properties for information about specific units at 804-967-2459 or go to the website at www.millerandrhoads.com. D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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V [for the home] V [for the home]’s Broad Street location opened for business on September 5—the same day as 1708 Gallery’s InLight RICHMOND exhibit. With its sleek aesthetic and an installation sculpture by Miriam Ellen Ewers in the front window, the shop had no trouble attracting gallery-goers and browsers by the score. V [for the home] is the downtown counterpart to owner Deborah Valentine’s Patterson Avenue location. Valentine has watched Richmond’s interior style develop over the years from anglophile-traditional to a more contemporary approach that incorporates multiple influences. The store’s furniture selections change frequently and run the gamut from unique antiques to vintage Lucite to contemporary artist-made pieces. Valentine also offers an everchanging range of accessories that are virtually guaranteed to be unique accents. “I never buy more than three of anything,” she says. “Once I have sold it, I am not as excited about replacing it. I am always ready for the next thing.”

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DESIGN FORWARD

Bond: “Architecture should be democratic and not force people into acting only in one way.”

ARCHITECTURE & DRAMA believe that architecture is about people, creating spaces that will enable human habitation and endeavor. People are different and the spaces we design should allow for different uses at different times by different people,” Sanford Bond, partner at 3North, says. It is with this thought that they approached their space in the Corrugated Box Building—a community of creative businesses in an open, idea-sharing workspace. The project includes the adaptive reuse of a 40,000 square feet historic warehouse building. 3North is a design collaborative composed of architects, interior designers and landscape architects.

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“Architecture should be democratic and not force people into acting only in one way,” Bond says. Each workspace in 3North has a purpose, but that purpose is

flexible, allowing each space to change and adapt as needed. This philosophy of utilizing space to promote creativity and to use architecture to reflect art and culture is one that Bond believes should be thriving in Richmond, but he doesn’t perceive this as happening: “This has always struck me as odd because we do have such a vibrant art scene for a city our size. We need to get beyond the red brick and white trim.” 3North is working hard to promote new design in Richmond, which will be evident in the design of a new private school, Sabot at Stony Point and the new Richmond Area Association of Retarded Citizens (ARC) building. “The ARC building will be unlike anything in Richmond,” Bond says. CWS

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SPACES FOR INTERACTION

ounded by Kenneth S. Johnson Sr., Johnson, Inc. moved into their 201 West Broad Street space two and a half years ago and have since seen creativity and collaboration grow in the marketing company. “We created a work environment that is open, making us more accessible to each other,” Necole Simmonds, Vice President of Business Development says.

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Natural elements are brought into play through ten-foot-tall windows providing daylight on the warm glow of hardwood floors. The staff chose the rich colors and each workspace was designed by the person occupying it. A 30-foot ceiling floats above the partitioning walls of offices that line the outer perimeter of the building. D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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Johnson: Founded by Kenneth S. Johnson Sr., Johnson, Inc. moved into their 201 West Broad Street space two and a half years ago and have since seen creativity and collaboration grow in the marketing company.

In the center of the facility are workspaces and meeting areas, like the “living room” and the “green room.” The “living room” is filled with plush couches and coffee tables where the team can have informal meetings. The “green room” is a conference room filled with dark leather furniture and ambient lighting. A custom photo of a forest hangs over the window. “Being in the green room doesn’t even feel like work; it feels like being in your grandfather’s study. When you are in this room, it alters your frame of mind. You take your time in that space,” Simmonds says. CWS FALL 2008

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EXCELLENCE IN DESIGN f you’ve ventured down East Broad Street lately, you might have noticed Downtown’s brand new U.S. Courthouse in Richmond, a 346,000 square-foot, sevenstory building. This represents an investment of $102 million by the federal government. The project was undertaken by the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA).

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Laura Stagner, Project Executive, explained that the need for a new courthouse was identified in the early 1990s when the GSA conducted one of its regular needs projections. Site and design money was originally requested from Congress for the building in 1999, and this request was approved in 2001.

The facility houses the U.S. District Court, U.S. Bankruptcy Court, U.S. Magistrate Court, U.S. Trustees Office, Office of the U.S. Attorney, Federal Public Defender, and the U.S. General Services Administration.

Robert A. M. Stern and Associates architectural firm was chosen by a selection board comprised of members of the GSA and nationally recognized peer architects.

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Gary Zimmerman, Project Manager, points out that

there is no specific “look” in federal buildings. What they seek is excellence in design. “Architects are tasked with bringing the project forth in a way that is dignified and harmonizes with the

site and the community,” says Zimmerman. According to Robert A.M. Stern Architects, the courthouse “bridges the city’s historic commercial core to the west, and the govern-

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John Warner and Jim Webb proposed the name: “Spottswood W. Robinson III and Robert R. Merhige, Jr., United States Courthouse.” The name was approved by Congress, the Senate and signed into public law (No: 110-320) by the president on September 18, 2008. [source http://warner.senate.gov]

provide mental Capitol offices, while Square District to the courtrooms east.” The building occupy the has a 100-foot high top three atrium that faces floors. Visinorth, while the tors traverse courthouse and office public facility face south. galleries that The architects at Stern Robert A.M. Stern face the say, “the strong, atrium to get to public funccurved south elevation tions and courtrooms. fronting Grace and Eighth Streets presents an iconic Judges in the new building face to the Capitol Square use the offices on the District, and opens up the southern edge and have a southern corner of the site view of Capitol Square, to a landscaped public Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia plaza to provide a setting State Capitol Building, and for the adjacent St. Peter’s the Lewis F. Powell CourtChurch and St. Paul’s house to inspire them. Church. Zimmerman added that this view was one of the prioriThe lower four floors of the ties in the project. courthouse building D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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Security is also a priority. Federal buildings have very specific requirements since the bombing of the Murrah Building in Arkansas, and Richmond’s Federal Courthouse takes every required precaution. The building is also on its way to being LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified, which means the courthouse will be designated as a “green” building. Stagner says, “The City of Richmond has a very wellwritten downtown plan. One of its priorities was the development of Broad Street, and this building was designed to support that.” CWS FALL 2008

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MANCHESTER

A Different Kind of Revitalization e’re approaching 100 years of being part of the City of Richmond,” says David Bass. He’s talking about his neighborhood, Manchester, which sits on the south bank of the James River between the Manchester and Mayo Bridges. It was annexed by Richmond in 1910, but Manchester’s history goes back much farther.

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“Before the bridges, Manchester was the site of a ferry, and a village green where farmers would sell their goods,” says Ralph White, manager of the James River Park. And as early as the 1730s, developers built textile, tobacco and flour mills. In the 1800s, Manchester began to industrialize, eventually helping Richmond recover from the Civil War. Then in the 1950s, Manchester was a bustling community. “You can just look page:8

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at Hull Street today and see how it was,” says Jeremy Connell, of Pareto Development and Construction Services. “But then it hit bottom. And now it’s obviously coming back.” Connell and his wife, Robyn, moved to Manchester four years ago to be part of the turnaround. They’re now renovating the Manchester Proper on 612 Hull Street into their new home. Connell says the biggest difference they’ve seen in Manchester is the number of people living there. Residential units have swelled from 17 to almost 500 in three years. Legend Brewing Company was one of the early adopters of Manchester. The craft brewery was founded and brewed its first beer in late 1993. Owner Tom Martin keeps customers returning to his 150-seat pub and a 200-seat deck overlooking the James River by offering lunch and dinner menus, an array of

live music events, and free brewery tours every Saturday. David Bass bought a loft two years ago and founded a neighborhood association for all of those new residents, the Manchester Alliance. “I was intrigued by it. I thought it was an opportunity to truly be a pioneer in a neighborhood that was just starting to revitalize.” And Manchester represents a different kind of revitalization. Justin French, owner of French Consulting Company, says: “There is no gentrification, no displacement. It was all industrial, and it became functionally obsolete.” The historic, industrial façade is being preserved, with new uses for the space. Ellie Basch, chef at Manchester’s newest restaurant, Savor, says: “We’re keeping the buildings industrial, but repurposing them for living.” CWS D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC Powered by Venture

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[Opposite page, Clockwise] Legends exterior; Manchester climbing wall; A lecture at Art space; David Bass founder of the Manchester Alliance; [Inset photo] A function at Plant Zero [This page top] Savor interior; [Bottom row] Savor owner and chef Ellie Basch; Legends interior; Legends owner Tom Martin; [Inset] The Corrugated Box Building. D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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An Arts Destination The first time Kellinger saw Manchester, she had a feeling about it. “I drove here four or five years ago and there was some sense that this was the place I needed to be. I did everything I could to get here,” she says. “There’s a huge creative feel to this place.”

ive years ago, Manchester was best known for Caravati’s Salvage Yard, Reynolds Metals and Legend Brewing Company. Then the art scene arrived.

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In 2003, the American Tobacco Company building was sold, displacing the Shockoe Bottom Arts Center and its almost 150 artist studios. At the prompting of Jim Ukrop, Tom Papa of Fountainhead Development started talking to Artworks owners Glenda Kotchish and Paula Demmert about creating a new, safe place for artists to work. They set their sights on the old Westvaco building on Hull Street near the Mayo Bridge. “Manchester was affordable,” Kotchish says. “It was the only place in town that was left.” The old Westvaco building became Plant Zero and Artworks. “Artworks page:10

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has 75 studios and five galleries. Some artists work in the studios, some display, some do both,” says Kotchish. The rest of the building, Plant Zero, has exclusively private artist studios, Artspace gallery, San Marco Cafe and event space. One of those private studios belongs to Liz Kellinger, a painter. “Richmond’s been revitalized by the arts,” Kellinger says. “And people like to see where artists work; they become vested in the arts. Manchester offers that.”

More artists and galleries have heeded the call. “I opened a gallery in Manchester because it is an affordable location and the art scene is growing by leaps and bounds,” says Martin McFadden, President of Artspace Gallery and Co-owner, Director and Curator of 12 12 Gallery. Fourth Fridays, modeled after Broad Street’s First Fridays, solidifies Manchester as a destination for the arts in Richmond. And McFadden says the art scene helps more than just the arts. “We’re making a difference in the local area. We’re offering more to the community as a whole.” CWS D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC Powered by Venture

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Manchester’s Creativity Inside the Box love when people walk into the Corrugated Box building for the first time. The element of surprise on their face as they look around is exactly what we wanted when we transformed the space.” Scott Ukrop, owner of Grace Street Home Additions, said of the eighty-eight-year-old building located in the Manchester District.

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Ukrop: “We wanted the open spaces to allow for creative flow between each of the different companies.” D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC

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The building was refurbished by 3North, Grace Street Home Additions and Circle S Studios, with Kristi Lane and Sanford Bond as principal designers. “We wanted to leave as much of the original structure as possible. We used the original beams to define our spaces instead of walls, and added glass panels to a raised roof to let in natural light.” Lane explains.

“We wanted the open spaces to allow for creative flow between each of the different companies and that has definitely happened,” Ukrop says. “We have actually branched new companies off of the collaboration we have in our shared break area,” Lane states. Block walls contrast with the softness of the curtains. The steel warehouse stairs lead to the secondfloor reed art piece on loan from the Visual Arts Center. Sculptural, individual, roofed structures serve as private conference rooms. All these elements combine to give the building a perfect aesthetic balance. “We have created a sense of community here that you don’t get in traditionally designed office space,” Ukrop says. CWS

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Unique Natural Amenities shad. It’s that set of rapids that end just before the Mayo Bridge on the south side of the river.” Just under the Manchester Bridge is the Manchester Wall [photo this page]. The stone bricks are a remnant of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Bridge; and for the last 25 years it’s become a playground for local rock climbers.

here’s no question that Manchester embodies the experience of urban living. But it also offers residents and visitors the chance to enjoy the great outdoors —walking trails, fishing, rock climbing, or even just great views.

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Manchester, which sits right on the James River, “is where the newest parks are being planned and developed,” says James River Park Manager Ralph White. “Floodwall Park is complete,” he says. The floodwall itself was completed and dedicated in 1994, and now a paved trail on top of the wall runs for a mile and a half from the Manchester Bridge to I-95. For the park, White says, “We are in the process of putting more interpretive signs in about animals, the flood and canal mechanisms.”

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Manchester has also become the home of a unique pair of festivals in April that celebrate the outdoors—Earth Day and the Fish Festival. Earth Day happens to coincide with the annual migration of shad upstream for spawning, so Manchester celebrates them together. White says, “In the springtime there is no better place in the United States to go fly-fishing for

Manchester residents are quick to appreciate their natural amenities. Artist Liz Kellinger says, “I walk through Belle Isle all the time, and I go up and down the Buttermilk Trail.” David Bass, head of the Manchester Alliance, takes in the James River and beyond from his rooftop deck. He says, “It’s one of the best panoramic views of the city in town.” CWS

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EXIT THE WORKPLACE Jackson Ward’s Ambiance Bar & Grill, located at 415 N. 1st St., has brought chicken and waffles, a New York comfort food standard, to the historic Richmond district. This gorgeously appointed new restaurant combines a plush and inviting bar with a kitchen that cranks out golden fried fish filets, chicken wings and a variety of other rib-sticking concoctions. The restaurant opens every day at 7 a.m. and stays open until 2 a.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. During Happy Hour, every day from 5–9 p.m., all drinks are half price. Live jazz entertains attendees at an all-you-can-eat buffet for just $10 every Sunday evening starting at 7:30.

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EXIT THE WORKPLACE

Since opening in April, Alex’s Thai Cuisine has been providing Shockoe Bottom with delectable curries of all colors and a myriad of traditional noodle dishes. The restaurant, located at 13 N. 17th St., is a great option for people who live and work downtown and are looking for a quick and delicious lunchtime value. Every day,

Alex’s Thai Cuisine features a different lunch special, served with soup and salad, for only $7. With appetizers as cheap as $2.95 and a variety of entrees under ten dollars, this newcomer offers up fresh, high quality food at an excellent price. In the evenings, nightly seafood dinner specials are only $10.99.

Every Sunday from 5–9 p.m., Café Rustica, located at 414 E. Main St., is serving up special three course dinners priced at a mere $15. Each week of the month features one of three entrees: roast chicken, pot roast, or a seafood and sausage stew, preceded by an appetizer and followed by dessert. Specials on bottles of wine for the

Sunday suppers start at $12. Featuring signature dishes such as schweineschnitzel and the shrimp, scallop and crabmeat “Mediterranean Short-stack,” this cozy and reasonably priced purveyor of classic European fare is also conveniently located in the Monroe Ward area of Downtown Richmond. CWS



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CHRIS BESCHLER Beschler: “The Mayor has a vision. He wants to improve the quality of life for citizens and make Richmond a place where people want to live. My role is to take that vision and help make it happen as efficiently and effectively as I can.”

esidents are paying a lot of hardearned dollars and they want to make sure they are getting the most for their money,” says Chris Beschler, Richmond’s recently appointed Acting Chief Administrative Officer. Beschler says he understands providing value, having spent nearly three decades in the private sector, where he rose to Vice President of Operations for Yankee Gas, Connecticut’s largest natural gas distribution company. He came to public service in 2006 as Richmond’s Director of Public Utilities. He remains in that job, while also

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pursuing his new role. “The mayor has a vision. He wants to improve the quality of life for citizens and make Richmond a place where people want to live. My role is to take that vision and help make it happen as efficiently and effectively as I can,” says Beschler. That vision calls, in part, for making downtown safer. As Beschler sees it, that includes supporting his colleagues in reducing crime and improving street quality and lighting. Other priorities include improving access to green spaces along the James River, building a regional jail and developing bus lines that would move

people directly to downtown destinations. “This is a big city, with a lot of needs,” says Beschler, who says his biggest challenge is making sure he spends his time on the highest priority issues and advocating for departments that need funding the most. Though slated to serve only through 2008, he says that is not going to stop him from making as much progress as he can. Beschler, a father of five, is passionate about Richmond. “The part of the job I like best is the focus on giving back to the community,” says Beschler. “And that’s the piece that gets me out of bed in the morning.” CWS FALL 2008

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BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS

Scheeler: “I see Richmond as a thriving community with tremendous potential and a quality of life that is truly enviable.”

Kim Scheeler he Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce’s new President and CEO, Kim Scheeler came to Richmond from Tampa, where he served as CEO of their Chamber of Commerce since 2001. Scheeler succeeds Jim Dunn. Observing that Richmond has one of the most respected Chambers of Commerce in the country, Scheeler describes his predecessor as “truly a legend in the business.”

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“It is an honor to have an opportunity to follow [Jim Dunn] and build on what he’s done in the community for the past 18 years,” says Scheeler. Scheeler was chosen from a pool of over a hundred candidates following a nine-month search conducted by Korn/Ferry International. Katherine Busser, Executive Vice President with Capital One, chaired the search committee and cites Scheeler’s “vision, collaborative leadership style and

management expertise” as decisive factors in his selection. Scheeler brings extensive advocacy for regional cooperation, strong financial performance, and expansion of resources for small businesses, and he is enthusiastic about Richmond’s future. “I see Richmond as a thriving community with tremendous potential and a quality of life that is truly enviable,” says Scheeler. D o w n t o w n R i c h m o n d C R E A T I V E WORK SPAC Powered by Venture

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2nd Quarter 2008

COMMERCIAL LISTINGS Building Name 107 S 5th St 10 S 6th St Richmond Plaza Building 7 N 8th St Shockoe Center Exchange Alley Bldg Watkins Cottrell Bldg Canal Crossing Central National Bank 600 E. Broad Street Theatre Row Office Bldg Federal Reserve Bank Of Richmond West Tower - Riverfront Plaza East Tower - Riverfront Plaza One James Center Two James Center Three James Center Edgeworth Bldg @ Tobacco Row The Maggie Walker Bus. & Tech. Ctr 10 E. Franklin Street Metro Chamber Building One Franklin Square 700 Centre Building Seventh And Franklin Building Chesterman Place Riverside on the James Eskimo Pie Bldg Main Street Centre DEQ Bldg The 700 Building Eighth & Main Bldg Former First Union Buildings Wytestone Plaza First National Bank Building One Capital Square The Mutual Building SunTrust Building The Ironfronts Capitol Place The Bank Of America Center Exchange Place One Shockoe Plaza Commercial Block Turning Basin Bldg

Building Address 107 S 5th St 10 S 6th St 111 S 6th St 7 N 8th St 11 S 12th St 23-25 S 13th St 111-117 S 14th St 101-115 S 15th St 219 E Broad St 600 E Broad St 712-730 E Broad St 701 E Byrd St 901 E Byrd St 951 E Byrd St 901 E Cary St 1021 E Cary St 1051 E Cary St 2100 E Cary St 501 E Franklin 10 E Franklin St 201 E Franklin St 411 E Franklin St 700 E Franklin St 701 E Franklin St 100 W Franklin St 1001 Haxall Pt 528-530 E Main St 600 E Main St 629 E Main St 700 E Main St 707 E Main St 800 E Main St 801 E Main St 823 E Main St 830 E Main St 909 E Main St 919 E Main St 1007-1013 E Main St 1106-1108 E Main St 1111 E Main St 1309-1317 E Main St 1 Shockoe Plz 100 Shockoe Slip 111 Virginia St

Building SF 92752 35418 269097 167398 53000 24637 57430 128000 230000 213266 166741 700000 490414 409190 420000 334200 233200 142000 48000 31020 19028 132682 160000 180720 32808 263066 45327 425727 116315 181790 325000 26889 253346 163000 187896 155000 570269 56263 66930 545316 72306 125210 38016 88905

Available SF 0 0 206500 0 14101 7700 3700 62700 200000 6334 53668 3000 1100 1100 35900 9104 26121 46486 0 0 0 31571 51402 31977 8200 26892 7779 28765 8576 102058 12447 0 123391 53726 100228 0 105000 720 21457 105047 8432 20000 2500 12518

% Leased 100 100 23.26 100 73.39 68.75 93.56 93.2 100 97.03 67.81 100 99.78 99.73 91.45 97.28 97.07 67.26 100 100 100 86.32 67.87 83.28 75.01 89.78 82.84 93.24 92.63 51.01 96.17 100 51.3 74.52 46.66 100 81.59 98.72 71.68 80.74 88.34 100 93.42 92.4

Average Rent 15.5 16.5 16.5 18 19 Negotiable 16 17.67 24 29.75 Negotiable 26.95 26.5 22.41 22.5 18 13.06 14 15.13 24.5 13.35 17.24 13.5 14 18 Negotiable 16.5 15 22 14 13.89 18.93 15.5 Negotiable Negotiable 21.47

Select listings of properties for lease in downtown Richmond provided by Kit Tyler and Chuck Ellsworth, Grubb & Ellis | Harrison & Bates www.harrison-bates.com

The City of Richmond Department of Economic Development is here to help any company, large or small, find space Downtown. Call Cary Brown at 646-3061 or email him at brownc@ci.richmond.va.us.

Berkeley Hotel Renovates After earning the coveted AAA Four Diamond Award every year since 1989, many institutions would be tempted to rest on their laurels. But the Berkeley Hotel followed its nineteenth consecutive Four Diamond Award with a renovation. Situated on the edge of Shockoe Slip in Richmond’s River District, the Berkeley Hotel was established in 1988, but its aesthetics harmonize with those of its much-older neighbors. Its architecture and appointments draw on the classic styles of its namesakes, England’s Berkeley Castle and Virginia’s Berkeley Plantation. The hotel’s renovation preserves these elements while furnishing guest rooms with flat-screen televisions, as well as new bedding, desks and chairs. The hotel lobby, restaurant, public restrooms and meeting space will also be refurbished.

John Marshall Hotel Developments

Since opening for business in October 1929, the John Marshall Hotel’s glittering roster of guests included Richard Nixon, Lawrence Welk, and Mary Tyler Moore. The 5th Street landmark is slated for more permanent tenants: 232 luxury apartment units and 24,000 square feet of retail space. The new complex will be called The Residences at the John Marshall. Dominion Partners Realty is the developer and Commonwealth Commercial Partners is leasing the commercial space.



CWS Fall 2008