Issuu on Google+

STRIPPERS: pass it on SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010


an introduction to the PROJECT APPROACH AND PHILOSOPHY

Ability to live in the present in ways that do not jeopardize the future Sustainable practice in industry calls for an end to the notion that commerce and the environment are diametrically opposed to each other. Building off of groundbreaking work that reframes world commerce as the only force large enough to enact change at a global level, this course prepares students to apply design thinking to the greatest of all problems: building a sustainable ecologic, economic, and social culture in industry. To this end, design management principles are directed toward the convergence of ideals with reality into a harmonic industry: design.

The purpose of this course: Learn about the trends and world conditions that make up the sustainable imperatives. Learn the technical materials and earth science principles underlying the initiative. Learn to frame the issues as part of a closed-loop cycle of material, energy, production, and consumption.

Reframing is the repositioning of the initial idea so that new unimagined connections between ideas and/or entities, such as institutions, emerge where there were none before.

A term used to describe the designer’s practice of generating meaning, knowledge, and ideas in the design process; using an embodied verbal, visual, and kinesthetic style of investigation as well as reasoning and logic to form ideas.

It’s management, but with methods and knowledge that surround and support a design thinking approach to problems.

Experience the frustration in presenting a good cause to an industry that does not grasp the possibilities of what can be done. Gain exposure to pioneering work underway in leading industries and design firms

2

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


So then, how do we do research? These kind of problems usually benefit the most from an ethnographic research approach. Ethnography is ‌ a qualitative description of a specific aspect of the human social condition, based on fieldwork and observation. a scientific approach to investigating and discovering social and cultural patterns and meaning held within particular communities, institutions, and social settings. Characteristics of Ethnographic Research:

“

1. Ethnography is carried out in a natural setting, not in a laboratory. 2. Research is conducted during an extended period of contact within the field site. 3. The objective is to acquire a systemic and holistic overview of the context of the study. 4. Researcher documents emerging themes and native perspectives. 5. Investigation is guided by research questions rather than hypotheses. 6. The focus of analysis is on words, text and images rather than numbers. 7. The researcher is the main data collection instrument.

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

3


EMERGENT STRUCTURES: background

Objectives: REDUCE MATERIAL WASTE REINVENT THE MEANING OF MATERIAL ADAPTATION DEVELOP BEST PRACTICES & INSPIRING CASE STUDIES

Emergent Structures is a non-profit organization conducting a large-scale reclamation project executed by a diverse array of artisans, designers, architects and other creative professionals intended to create an international model of collaborative material re-use. The goal is to coordinate the salvage and distribution of as much of the building materials as possible, and to record the numerous innovative re-use projects that transpire over the ensuing year. Site visits, interviews and photo documentation of individual projects will be conducted to record the process. A gallery show of objects and structures that have been created with the salvaged materials will be held in conjunction with a symposium focusing on this communitywide endeavor to reduce material waste, to reinvent the meaning of material adaptation, and to develop best practices. The efficient reclamation of salvaged building materials will help the City of Savannah realize their vision of a truly sustainable neighborhood redevelopment project.

GREEN APPRENTICE PROGRAM

trolley tours to craft center(s)

LOCAL CRAFT SPECIALIST (Johnnie Powers)

Small-scale production line of local goods

WORK FORCE At risk youth & underemployed apprentices

terrace furniture accompanied by info about artist & project

sales to local businesses and residents

KNOWLEDGE PARTNER (Union Mission/Starfish Cafe)

tourist sales in local shops

FACILITY PARTNER (Southern Pine Co.) TRADE PARTNER (Savannah Area Convention and Visitors Bureau)

INITIATIVE 2

ITERATIVE PROCESS:

studs-to-trusses

SAVANNAH GARDENS REDEVELOPMENT

please curb your porch

GENERAL CONTRACTOR (NorSouth)

deconstruction operated by demo contractor

WORK FORCE Carpentry Apprentice Programs (Harambee House)

Phase 1 educates Phase 2 educates Phase 3 educates

bricks wall caps

DEVELOPER (Mercy Housing)

export community-based reclamation model to other cities

THE RECLAMATION PROJECT

EMERGENCE ZONE INITIATIVE 1

tubs-of-aggregate

DEMO CONTRACTOR (TBD)

INITIATIVE 3

newly discovered innovations

OUTDOOR EATING AREA

LOCAL GREEN RESTAURANT (Thrive Cafe)

charette w/ land owner and tenants

WORK FORCE (Harvest:NorSouth Build:volunteer/students)

outdoor furniture & eating/rest area

KNOWLEDGE PARTNER (US Green Building Council)

ITERATIVE PROCESS: Several similar small-scale projects are in waiting

FACILITY PARTNER (Land owner & tenants)

INITIATIVE 4

ROSE DHU ISLAND ECO-VILLAGE

GIRL SCOUTS of COASTAL GEORGIA (Nina Smith)

2-day volunteer ‘feasibility’ harvest

WORK FORCE (Girl Scouts)

planning: needs, on-site storage, hauling

Eco-village build on Rose Dhu Island

KNOWLEDGE PARTNER (USGBC)

“Throughout the living world, the creativity of life expresses itself through the process of emergence. The structures that are created in this process—the biological structures of living organisms as well as social structures in human communities—may appropriately be called emergent structures…”

FACILITY PARTNER (JT Turner)

INITIATIVE 5

PUBLIC SCHOOL (Shuman Elementary PTA)

various projects still to be determined certify & celebrate: apply logo to any approved project in the city in order to raise awareness

KNOWLEDGE PARTNER (Southern Pine Company) FACILITY PARTNER (NorSouth)

INITIATIVE 7

BRANDING RECLAIMED MATERIALS

RECLAIMED MATERIALS

4

charette w/ students, parents and teachers

WORK FORCE (Habitat for Humanity)

-Fritjof Capra The Hidden Connections: A Science for Sustainable Living Nina Smith, Director of Properties for Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia, and mastermind behind the Rose Dhu EcoCamp project, to be built with materials harvested from the project

Apply logo and information plaques to each project above to raise public awareness

SHUMAN PUBLIC SCHOOL GREENING

HARVEST PARTNER (Business: NorSouth/Non-profit: Habitat for Humanity)

INITIATIVE 6

24-HOUR BARN RAZING

Design for Sustainability Department at SCAD

as spectacle and art scene

INITIATIVE 8

INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

late 2011 or early 2012

facilitation // knowledge generation // data collection // manpower promotion // adaptative strategies // iterative growth // dissemination

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


SAVANNAH GARDENS

In 1943, 750 apartments were built in the Savannah Gardens area of Savannah as public housing for World War II ship builders. Originally named the Josiah Tattnall Homes, these ‘demountable’ homes were intended to be dismantled after the war. Instead, shifting from property owner to property owner, they were renamed Strathmore Estates, and steadily fell into disrepair. In the 1990s, 370 units were demolished to make way for Savannah High School. Since then, 30 additional units were demolished.

CONSTRUCTED: 1943 DECONSTRUCTED: 2010

The remainder of the buildings are slated for demolition in 2010 (Phase I began in July 2010), and the ensuing redevelopment will be mixed-use and mixed-income housing and ‘light’ commercial buildings that are environmentally sustainable and economically affordable. The Strathmore Estate homes at Savannah Gardens before deconstruction.

The Emergent Structures Project originated as the result of a meeting convened by The Creative Coast Alliance between several local sustainability leaders and the city agencies, contracted planners and engineers responsible for the Savannah Gardens redevelopment project. Thomas & Hutton Engineering is the lead agency, and C.H.S.A. (Community Housing Services Agency) is the non-profit organization that owns the property.

July 24, 2010. Deconstruction of one of the Strathmore Estates homes at Savannah Gardens.

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

5


PROJECT methodology ENGAGING PEOPLE AROUND POSSIBILITIES

How do you go about bringing real, sustainable change in a complex arena? The team took an approach of building momentum around possibilities for a sustainable system by immersing ourselves in the existing system and by involving stakeholders at the core. From investing time with the Whitemarsh Plaza tenants to discuss their needs, ideas, and values, to consulting with regional professionals, and bringing

community leaders to the table, this kind of approach differs from a typical management-led mandate for change. It requires willingness for flexibility and change along the way. Engaging people around possibilities opens doors to unseen opportunities and builds the momentum needed to spark action toward a shared vision of sustainability.

PROJECT MILESTONES 9 people

3 teams

2 teams CLASS PRESENTATION Narrowing Group Focii

wk1

6

wk2

wk3

1 team PUBLIC PRESENTATION GUESTS: Wendy Armstrong Dennis Hutton Ann Caudill Lizann Roberts Jackie Jackson Teel Paula Kreissler

PUBLIC PRESENTATION GUESTS: Kelly Lockamy Pat Shay Jennifer Fitchorn

wk4

wk5

wk6

wk7

wk8

wk9

wk10

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


Developing Focus

Getting the “system” in the room.

Working with Stella Mathews, landscape architect and green Infrastructure expert.

Six Whitemarsh Plaza tenants.

building possibilities

BUILDING MOMENTUM

Reflecting to build shared vision

Initial sketch of what an outdoor eating area could become.

Paula Kreissler, Wendy Armstrong and Ann Caudill discuss their thoughts on the project.

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

Surveying the physical area of the Plaza.

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

ENGAGING & LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE

Class meeting with Wendy Armstrong.

Yahayra Rosario-Cora denails boards on an Emergent Structures harvest day.

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

7


TALKING TO TENANTS: initial conversations DEVELOPING A SHARED VISION

In working to create change within a system made up of individuals with different needs, ideas, and objectives, it is crucial to foster engaging conversations that build mutual understanding and ability to work together. These are the first of the stakeholders with whom we had conversations and developed relationships. The insight we gained from these tenants of Whitemarsh Plaza shaped our understanding of the system, helped us develop focus, and opened the doors on unseen opportunities.

SCOTT Owner, Siciliano’s Pizza

JANET Co-owner, Wiley’s BBQ

• Takes pride in what he does • Knows his customers • Cares about his impact on his customers • Supports his employees

• Former public school teacher & competitive BBQ competitor • Widely known destination for BBQ • New restaurateur • Fast turnover but needs more seating • Environmental ambitions but costconscious • Electric bill = monthly rent

8

C.J. and TERRY Owners, Whitemarsh Beverage Center

ALAN Little Saigon

• 27-year tenant • Started feeling the recession in January • Overhead sensitive • See the potential impact of recycling program

• One of the tenants who has been at Whitemarsh Plaza the longest • Has a military and construction background • Concerned about the potential for new projects to cause a rent increase

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


“‘Can sustainability sell?’ is the wrong question. The real question is: ‘Can a business like ours survive in the long term without sustainability?” -Chris Pomfret, VP of Marketing, Unilever Europe

KEY FINDINGS 1. The site is visually unappealing, and appearance/perception makes a difference. 2. This is a community; tenants care for each other’s success and are invested in each other via the property. 3. There is an opportunity to create visible sustainable practices where few exist. 4. There are major opportunities to address infrastructure problems of the site.

WENDY Owner, Thrive Carry Out Cafe

SONIA Owner, Paws on the Island

• Pioneer for GRA certification in Georgia • Sustainability advocate in Plaza network • Community mindset • Interested in creating strong links between Plaza businesses • Wants visibility for Thrive and her mission • Needs more seating • Interested in outdoor eating area

• Moved business 2 months ago from garage in Rincon • Has one assistant • Currently focused on short-term objectives • Grew up in Savannah Gardens • Believes in reuse of old things that still have value • Regularly patronizes Wiley’s and Thrive

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

9


Physical aspects LOCATION Whitemarsh Plaza is located in a high-traffic area at the intersection of Highway 80 and Islands Expressway on Whitemarsh Island, about 8 miles east of downtown Savannah.

N

Downtown Savannah, GA

Oatland Island, GA

Whitemarsh Plaza Savannah, GA

10

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


HOW DOES TRAFFIC FLOW?

TRAFFIC OBSERVATIONS Key Islands Expressway US Highway 80 Kim Street Access/Exit Expressway Access to Whitemarsh Plaza. Two ways Access to Whitemarsh Plaza. One way Difficult to access Island Road Bus Stop Traffic Light

Existing bus stop across from Whitemarsh Plaza

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

11


WHAT CAN YOU SEE?

SITE VISIBILITY Key Open Vision Obstructed Vision

View of Whitemarsh Plaza. Whitemarsh Plaza is vvisible from the street from multiple angles.

View to Island Towne Centre. Island Towne Centre is a commercial area across the street from Whitemarsh Plaza. Trees obstruct the view of Island Towne Centre from the street.

12

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


COMMERCIAL HUB FOR ISLAND COMMUNITY

LAND USES Key Residence Zone Commercial Zone Restaurants Pet Stores Computer Service Personal Care

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

13


DESIGN FRAMEWORK

Whitemarsh Plaza

Private & Public Entities

Thrive VISIBILITY EAT EDUCATE DEMONSTRATE TEAM CARROTS

OPPORTUNITIES

14

OUTDOOR EATING RECYCLING GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE TEAM STRIPPERS

There is an opportunity to use Whitemarsh Plaza as reference to create visibility in the community about sustainable practices. Furthermore, using Whitemarsh Plaza as a platform to showcase best practices in sustainability, it becomes a model for Chatham County, Georgia and the coastal south.

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


OUTDOOR EATING area OUTDOOR EATING AREA

2

1 3

Area 3

Area 1 TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

15


ALTERNATIVE AREA

1

A BUILDING SIDEWALK LATERAL ACCESS GARBAGE AREA

Outdoor eating area alternative 1 is located in front of Thrive Carry Out Cafe.

LAVATORY FOR BIKE RIDERS SPACE BETWEEN PARKING & SIDEWALK WOOD DECK AT SIDEWALK LEVEL AREA FOR THRU PLANTERS

SPACE BETWEEN PARKING & SIDEWALK PERMEABLE PAVER

LAVATORY FOR BIKE RIDERS SPACE BETWEEN PARKING & SIDEWALK WOOD DECK AT SIDEWALK LEVEL GARBAGE & THRU AREA PLANTERS

Floor Plan 1B

2

C BUILDING SIDEWALK CLOSING LATERAL ACCESS

BUILDING SIDEWALK LATERAL ACCESS GARBAGE AREA

Floor Plan 1A

ALTERNATIVE AREA

B

Floor Plan 1C

A

B

BUILDING SIDEWALK GARBAGE AREA

BUILDING SIDEWALK GARBAGE AREA

BUILDING SIDEWALK CLOSING LATERAL ACCESS

C

GARBAGE AREA PLANTER

Outdoor eating area alternative 2 is located in front of Wiley’s BBQ. Alternative 2 will be the module to be repeated along the south parking area in front of the buiding.

16

PLANTER

PLANTER

SPACE BETWEEN PARKING & SIDEWALK PERMEABLE PAVER

SPACE BETWEEN PARKING & SIDEWALK WOOD DECK AT SIDEWALK LEVEL

SPACE BETWEEN PARKING & SIDEWALK WOOD DECK AT SIDEWALK LEVEL

Floor Plan 2A

Floor Plan 2B

Floor Plan 2C

Section Alternative A

Section Alternative B

Section Alternative C SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


We used the 3D models to help people visualize the outdoor eating area. Additionally, we used voting to record people thoughts and know which version tenants and customers respond to well. You could continue using this methodology.

Umbrella Version

Pergola Version

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

17


ALTERNATIVE AREA

A

3

B

C

PLANTER GARBAGE AREA PERMEABLE PAVER PICNIC TABLES

GARBAGE AREA PERMEABLE PAVER PICNIC TABLES

PLANTER GARBAGE AREA GRAVEL

PICNIC TABLES

MODEL WITHOUT PLANTER BARRIER

18

MODEL WITH PLANTER BARRIER COVERING HALF OF THE AREA

MODEL WITH PLANTER BARRIER

Floor Plan 3B

Floor Plan 3B

Floor Plan 3 C

Section Alternative B

Section Alternative B

Section Alternative C

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


Under the Trees Version

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

19


LOCAL BUILDERS + LOCAL SAMPLES

MATERIALS

Local firms that could develop furniture and planters with reclaimed materials.

Use RECLAIMED MATERIALS from deconstructed structures, such as Savannah Gardens, to develop new ones.

- Structured Green - Step Up Savannah/Chatham County Construction Apprentice Program [CAP] - SCAD Furniture Design class - Harambee House green jobs training Dismantling chimney to reclaim the bricks. [Savannah Gardens, July 2010]

Brick planter near Intersection of York Ave. and Drayton St. in Savannah, Georgia

Rethink how to reuse material in your design proposals or develop design knowing the structural limit of reclaimed material Process of denailing wood to reclaim it. [Savannah Gardens, July 2010]

Wood planter designed by Patrick Shay, built by Dennis Clay, and heart pine recovered by Southern Pine Company

Wood planter near intersection of Whitaker St. and Liberty Ave. in Savannah, Georgia

Who else?

20

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


WICKED PROBLEM The development of the outdoor eating area for Whitemarsh Plaza challenges activates a chain such how to add additional parking, solving site drainage, and the perception/aesthetic issue with the building.

WHITEMARSH PLAZA

CHATHAM COUNTY

OUTDOOR EATING AREA

EMERGENT STRUCTURES ARCHITECTS BUILDING PARKING SPACE ISSUE

ATLANTIC STAR ROOF DRAINAGE

DRAINAGE ENGINEERS AESTHETIC BIOSWALE SYSTEM

PERMEABLE PAVERS SYSTEM

GREEN ROOF

ONE WORLD SUSTAINABLE, INC

DESIGNERS INTENSIVE

EXTENSIVE

SAVANNAH TREE FOUNDATION

WHITEMARSH ISLAND COMMUNITY NETWORKS GROWS TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

21


BUILDING CONTEXT ANALYSIS Key

EXISTING BUILDING CONDITION

Stained exterior walls North facade has air conditioning units, tubes, cables, and kitchen equipment. Garbage area always has the doors open

N

22

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


EXISTING PARKING SPACES: 93

PARKING AREA ANALYSIS Key

Informal parking space/ Grass area Main access/Exit Patron behavior Waste truck behavior Large truck behavior

Affected Entities Whitemarsh Plaza Owners, Manager and Tenants

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

23


DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES

Comments from Refreshing Whitemarsh Plaza Event If you redesign the parking area you have to do it according with the new code stablished by Metrpolitan Planning Commision [MPC]. The code says that every 12 parking spaces you need plant a tree and provide 3’-0” of landscape between the parking and the building, and also between the property line and the parking space.

Opportunities with Building Aesthetics:

Recycling Opportunity:

Create parking space on the grass area

Change tenant behavior; demonstrate it is possible

Provide vegetation to enhance aesthetic of the north area and promote parking in the back of the building

Get people to recycle

Solve roof drainage

Clean up Plaza

Solve parking lot drainage

Create visible recycling on the Islands

Create parking space on the grass area

Lower costs of waste removal

Improve extra spaces building’s aesthetic

Demonstrate care/respect for customers

Fill vacant units

Create something memorable at Whitemarsh Plaza

Promotion

Implement recycling system Renovate parking pavement Provide 5’-0” sidewalk on east side Solve existing waste management Systems for energy saving : PV Solar Panels Green Roof Rehab wheelchair ramps with reclaimed materials from Savannah Gardens

24

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


FUTURE PARKING SPACES: 125

SOLVING PARKING AREA

Sidewalk Recycle bin Parking spaces on grass area

ADA Code for Parking Spaces

By reducing the parking space width to 8’-6” for standard cars and creating a formal parking area on the grass, Whitemarsh Plaza will gain 32 spaces. [Reference Architectural Graphic Standard]

Alternative 1: Add more parking space on south and north area

Green wall to cover kitchen equipment and mechanical systems

OUTDOOR EATING AREA EXTENDED VERSION & BUILDING AESTHETICS

Bioswale system and sidewalk Extended version of outdoor eating area Alternative 2A: Provide vegetation to enhance aestethic of the north area

Alternative 2: Add more parking, add outdoor eating area in front of the building, increase number of speed bumps in parking lot TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

Alternative 2B: Provide vegetation to enhance aestethic of the north area YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

25


GREEN infrastructure

PHYSICAL ASPECTS DRAINAGE ISSUE

DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES Key Slope Underground drainage system Drainage Roof drain system Flooding area. Flooding condition limits Whitemarsh Plaza tenants to access their operational equipment located on the north area of the land.

Visuals of flooding condition. 26

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


“The nearest GREEN ROOF of this size is about 300 miles away from Savannah, Georgia� - Stella Mathews

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE OPPORTUNITIES What do we need to know to offer better solutions? Existing measures of the Whitemarsh Plaza building

There exists an opportunity to add green infrastructure to solve the drainage issue that Whitemarsh Plaza experiences.

Existing structural capacities of the building Existing topography, and existing land drainage slopes and drainage system. Partition wall in the Space B is of gypsumboard

Green Infrastructure: Opportunities Reduce operating costs and create efficiencies Prolong roof life control stormwater runoff Visibility from road Demonstrate capability for green retrofit Improve aesthetics

Space B has exposed the ceiling. The group understood that the building main structure is in steel frame. The picture above show that the roof is metal mesh supported by steel joists.

Tenant Community Ecotourism Opportunities for collaboration of organizations Demonstrate business value and government value Fit CEF goals Protect fragile parking lot Prevent pollution from entering aquifer Potential to demonstrate TMDL impact

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

27


PERMEABLE PAVERS

Edge Restraint

Interlocking Concrete Paver

Bedding Sand

Aggregate Base

Excavation

Typical permeable paver installation

28

Existing permeable paver 2 miles away from Whitemarsh Plaza

DEFINITION

BENEFITS:

BARRIERS :

Permeable pavement is a breathable pavement system that allows water to flow through its top surface instead of pool on top or run across the surface like normal asphalt or concrete. A permeable paver system is more than just the stone or concrete on top, it is also layers of porous filler and filters which direct, filter and slowly release storm water back into the ground.

• Reduction of peak volume/flow rate of storm water runoff • Reduction of total volume of runoff from paved surfaces • Reduction of pollutant levels such as oil or fuel from parking lots due to filtering of captured storm water runoff • Improved site landscaping benefits • Increase in effective developable areas of a site

• Cost of installation • The parking will have to be closed during the installation time. • Effectiveness increases with square footage relative to the area needing drainage, which can be cost prohibitive. • Require higher maintenance than standard pavement.

Reference Text

Reference Text

http://www.prlog.org/

http://www.paversearch.com/permeable-paversbenefits.htm SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


BIOSWALE SYSTEM Impermeable Aspault

Permeable growing medium

Optional sand layer

Gravel Perforate drain pipe

Uncompacted subgrade

Existing bioswale in Charleston, SC

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

DEFINITION

BENEFITS:

BARRIERS

A bioswale is an urban landform used to convey surface water in order to enhance infiltration and reduce surface runoff. Bioswales are typically moderate gradient devices (approximately one to five percent in channel slope) and may be covered by grasses, landscape fabric, mulch or other vegetation or leaf litter. These landforms are typically integrated into an urban landscape design to enhance the visual appearance, but also may be used in agricultural settings as drain ways to intercept runoff containing silt, pesticides or nutrients.

• Reduces runoff volumes and rates from roofs, pavements, and lawns • Recharges groundwater and sustains base flows to natural water bodies • Reduces sediment, nutrient runoff, and other pollutants • Reduces maintenance requirements compared to conventional lawn surfaces or other irrigated planting • Effective land use through combination of stormwater management and ornamental planting • Aesthetic value • Diversifies site habitat • Can reduce the need for costly stormwater infrastructure

• • •

Reference Text http://www.eoearth.org/article/Bioswale

Reference Text http://www.delafleur.com/168_Elm/PDF_ files/09_bioswale.pdf

Reference Image: http://www.aadl.org/gallery/slideshow/aadlbuildings/malletts

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

Could be expensive Requires maintenance Limited by space that can be dedicated to bioswale Requires time to grow plan

29


GREEN ROOF Extensive System

Functional layers of a typical extensive green roof 1. Roof deck, Insulation, Waterproofing

4. Root permeable Filter Layer

Existing extensive green roof in Atlanta’s Woodruff Arts Center

2. Protection- and Storage Layer 5. Extensive Growing Media 3. Drainage- and Capillary Layer 6. Plants, Vegetation

30

DEFINITION

BENEFITS:

BARRIERS

Extensive green roofs are lightweight veneer systems of thin layers of drought tolerant self-seeding vegetated roof covers using colorful sedums, grasses, mosses and meadow flowers requiring little or no irrigation, fertilization or maintenance after establishment.

• Mitigates Urban Heat Island Effect: Green roofs cool and humidify the surrounding air creating a micro climate which has beneficial effects within the immediate area. • Natural Habitat for Animals and Plants: Green roofs create biodiversity, encouraging wildlife, such as birds, butterflies and insects, to remain within urban areas. • Reduction of Dust and Smog Levels: Green roof vegetation helps to filter out dust and smog particles. Nitrates and other aerosol contaminants are absorbed out of the air and rainfall and contained within its soil.

• •

Reference Text http://www.hydrotechusa.com/benefits.htm

Reference Image: http://www.roofsystemsconsultants.com/ Green.htm

• •

Expensive Requires frequent maintenance for the first six weeks May be require added structure support Long term profitability

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


GREEN ROOF : Intensive System Vegetation Growing Medium Drainage, Aeration, Water Storage and Root Barrier Insulation Membrane Protection and Root Barrier Roofing Membrane Structural Support

Existing intensive green roof in Atlanta’s Woodruff Arts Center

Functional layers of a typical intensive green roof

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

DEFINITION

BENEFITS:

BARRIERS:

Intensive green roofs are more elaborately designed roof landscapes, such as roof gardens and above/ underground parking garage roofs, that are intended for human interaction and will need to be engineered to conform to the load requirements.

• Increased Life Expectancy of the Roof: A green roof protects the roof membrane from climatic extremes and physical abuse, greatly increasing the life of the roof. • Additional Usable Space: Converting or designing normally unused roof areas into green roofs, simply makes sense. Increase your property value by reclaiming the fifth elevation of a building and make it an amenity to be used by the building occupants. • Building Incentives: More and more municipalities and other government agencies are providing incentives that can help offset the cost of a green roof.

• • • •

Reference Text http://www.hydrotechusa.com/ benefits.htm

Reference Image: http://remodeloklahoma.com/pages/ideabook.asp

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

• •

Complicated installation process Expensive Requires frequent maintenance May be require added structure support The site does not provide easy roof access Long term profitability

31


GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE OPTIONS

Use bioswale system and repavement to change parking slope.

Cover small area of the parking lot with permeable pavers, demonstrating the functionality of permeable pavers.

Benefit: Add aesthetic appeal to Whitemarsh Plaza Barriers: Cost of bioswale system

Benefit: Does not reduce number of parking spaces Barriers: Small area to solve drainage problem

Cover Whitemarsh Plaza roof with green roof extensive system.

Cover Whitemarsh Plaza roof with green roof intensive system.

Benefit: Reduce building temperatures and energy costs

Benefit: Add aesthetic appeal to the roof; Reduce building temperatures and energy costs

Barriers: Cost of reinforcing building structure

Barriers: Cost of reinforcing building structure

Replace the whole parking lot with permeable pavers to decrease the land drainage issues. Benefit: Does not reduce number of parking spaces Solves land drainage issues Barriers: Cost of the permeable paver system

Apply to Whitemarsh Plaza the alternatives of bioswale, permeable paver and intensive green roof. Benefit: Solve land flooding problem; Reduce building temperatures and energy costs Barriers: Cost and maintenance of green

32

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

1. Non Point Source Management Program

2. Global Climate Change Mitigation Incentive Fund

$2.2 million from EPA in 2011 dedicated to fund projects in support of Georgia’s Nonpoint Source Management Program Eligible programs include urban stormwater control activities, education/outreach on nonpoint source management, and Best Management Practices demonstration Grant funds 60% of the project 40% to be matched with in-kind or non-federal funds

Starting in FY 2008, Congress directed the Economic Development Administration (EDA) to support sustainable construction and resource conservation efforts via the development of a Global Climate Change Mitigation Incentive Fund (Fund). With an expanded mission in FY 2009, the intent of the Fund is to finance projects that foster the green economy by promoting economic competitiveness while enhancing environmental quality. Such projects should promote sustainability (i.e., achieve economic prosperity while protecting natural systems and quality of life for the long term), diversify the economy, foster 21st century higher-skill, higher-wage jobs, and promote EDA’s mission of advancing the economic revitalization of communities and regions suffering from economic distress by making grant-based investments to attract private capital investment and create higher-skill, higher-wage jobs. •Green Building. New construction or renovation that is certified by the US Green Building Council’s under its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEEDTM) or other comparable certification program. In addition, an applicant must demonstrate that the project will result in one (or more) of the following outputs: •Development and/or manufacture of a green end-product •Greening of an existing function or process •Creation or renovation of a green building The Fund has a budget of $25.0 million for FY2010, with over $4.9 million allocated to the Southeast region.

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

33


FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

34

3. Costal Georgia Incentive Grant Program The federal Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) provides funding assistance to states with approved Coastal Management Programs for the purpose of program implementation and administration. Pursuant to the Georgia Coasta Management Program, the Department of Natural Resources’ Coastal Resources Division contributes approximately 60% of Georgia’s CZMA administrative allocation to eligible entities as “Coastal Incentive Grants.” Designed to fund projects that further the mission of the Coastal Management Program, Coastal Incentive Grants allow regional and local coastal issues to be defined and addressed creatively and proactively at the grass-roots level.   Eligible grant applicants include county and municipal governments, state agencies, and government-affiliated educational and research institutions. The Coastal Advisory Council establishes annual funding “themes.” An independent review committee evaluates and scores proposals according to review criteria specified in the Request For Proposals.   Eligibility   Coastal Incentive Grant applicants must meet the following Minimum Eligibility Requirements: Only Georgia Qualified Local Governments (counties and municipalities approved by the Georgia Department of Community Affairs) in the eleven-county coastal area, Georgia state government agencies (except DNR), and Georgia educational and research institutions are eligible for Coastal Incentive Grant awards. Applications from other parties will be considered if, and only if sponsored by an eligible entity. Awards will be made only to eligible entities.

Match Requirements   Grant applicants must match funds requested through the Coastal Incentive Grant Program. Match may be either cash or “in-kind service(s).” Generally, funds from other federal agencies may not be used as match. The required match ratio is 1:1 for all projects.   The federal Coastal Zone Management Act predetermines match requirements.   Funding Priority   The Coastal Advisory Council adopts annual funding priorities, or themes. Greatest consideration will be given to funding proposals that are themerelated. All proposals will be accepted and competitively ranked if they 1) propose research or project activities related to the theme, or 2) are deemed by a local government to be a project of “Critical Local Need.”   Funding amounts available:  $100,000 (themerelated); $50,000 (construction); and $25,000 (demonstrated Critical Local Need.) Themes Projects will overlap with multiple funding amounts including themes -”creating sustainable communities” and construction “green infrastructure.”

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


CONTACT list GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE/ LANDSCAPING/ CONSTRUCTION

Stella Mathews Atlantic Star Design - landscape architect, local green infrastructure expert www.atlanticstardesign.com stellawiggins@gmail.com 912.201.1694 Notes: Met with Stella multiple times about green infrastructure. She wants to be involved in this project. She is in touch with Ann Caudill, Whitemarsh Plaza property mgr. Mike McKenna Green Roof Outfitters, Charleston www.greenroofoutfitters.com mmckenna@greenroofoutfitters.com> 843-566-2742. Sent email to Scott and Wendy after reading newspaper article: “I was reading about the potential green roof at Whitemarsh Plaza and wanted to reach out to you to see if you need any assistance. My company is based in Charleston and if you would like to use us as a resource, I would be happy to share information and try to help you in any capacity.�

Alan Myers-Davis Living Roofs Inc., Charleston www.livingroofsinc.com alan@livingroofsinc.com 865-603-5181 Notes: Saw newspaper article about event, emailed Wendy with interest in getting involved in the green roof aspect. Tanya Mandel Kern Coleman & Co, LLC - Landscape Architect, Savannah tmandel@kerncoleman.com Notes: Met at Refreshing Opportunities event. Very interested in helping and commented on new parking lot regulations. Keith Freeman One World Sustainable - VP k.freeman@oneworldsustainable.com> 912 236 1322 Notes: Has been working with Wendy to design solar panel solutions. Presented to the class. Martin Melaver & Patty McIntosh melaver-mcintosh.com

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

35


WHITEMARSH PLAZA

Ann Caudill Whitemarsh Plaza property manager anncaudill@aol.com *presentation guest Scott Siciliano’s - owner Janet & Wiley Wiley’s BBQ - owner bbqgeneral@gmail.com C.W. and Terry West Whitemarsh Beverage Center - owners Dustin User Friendly Computer Repair - owner 912-897-9700

CITY/COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Wendy Armstrong Thrive - owner thrivetogo@aol.com *presentation guest Jiten Patel Chevron Gas & Moore - owner also owns Salsarita’s downtown jitenspatel@aol.com Savannah Waste Carole Hoffman Edge carole89@bellsouth.net Sonia Paws on the Island - owner pawsontheisland@gmail.com

Pat Monahan pmonahan@chathamcounty.org

Maryjo Bragan Bragan.Maryjo@epamail.epa.gov

Jackie Jackson Teel MPC - Natural Resources Administrator jacksonj@thempc.org *presentation guest

Karen Bandhauer U.S. EPA, Region 4 - Atlanta 404.562.9122

Dennis Hutton huttond@thempc.org MPC - Director of Comprehensive Planning *presentation guest Bethany Jewel jewellb@thempc.org Laura Walker lwalker@savannahga.gov 36

Alan Little Saigon - owner

Julie Walden Environmental Project Administrator NonPoint Source Program Watershed Protection Branch julie.walden@dnr.state.ga.us (404) 675-1640 Good Resource: Chatham County GIS Online http://www.sagis.org/app/default.htm

SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


OTHERS

Mike Ayers Structured Green - owner

Mary Landers marylanders@savannahnow.com

Chatham Environmental Forum http://www.chathamenvironmentalforum.org/ Notes: In the website there is a member roster

Kelly Lockamy Savannah Urban Garden Alliance (SUGA) garden_muse@comcast.net *presentation guest

Jennifer Fichthorn GreenSweep Savannah *presentation guest

Frank McIntosh Savannah Bicycle Campaign

Mark Fitzpatrick JT Turner Construction mfitzpatrick@jttconst.com Notes: Stella Mathews spoke with him about the project at the USGBC summer social, and he was interested in the process of the project. Paula Kreissler Healthy Savannah - Chairman Buy Local Savannah - board member paula@woundcareclinic.net *presentation guest

TED CHEECHAROEN kcheec20@student.scad.edu

COLLEEN HEINE cmheine@gmail.com

KEN HOLMES holmes.kenneth@gmail.com

Lizann Roberts lizann@me.com *presentation guest Pat Shay Former CEF Chairman County Commissioner pshay@gmshay.com Nina Smith Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia Notes: Interested in using the grant to put a green roof on their new facility that is in the planning stage.

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA yrcora@gmail.com

37


the TEAM TED CHEECHAROEN Songkhla, Thailand

COLLEEN HEINE St. Louis, MO

BIA Interior Architecture, Thammasat Univ., Thailand

BFA Visual Communication University of Kansas

SCAD MFA Candidate: Design Management

SCAD MA Candidate: Design Management

A native of Thailand, Ted Kitipat Cheecharoen worked in Thailand as an interior designer, designing events for brands such as Elle, L’Oreal, and Thai Airways before moving to the United States to pursue his graduate degree in Design Management.

KENNETH HOLMES Clifton, Virginia

YAHAYRA ROSARIO-CORA Cidra, Puerto Rico

BFA Tufts Univ., Museum School of Boston

BA, BS Architecture, Polytechnic Univ., Puerto Rico

SCAD MFA Candidate: Design Management

SCAD MA Candidate: Design Management Design for Sustainability

Ken grew up in a small Virginia town on the edge of horse country; small enough to be a close knit community, but located right in the path of the expanding Washington DC suburbs. He was educated in photography at Boston’s Museum School and Tufts University, and later pursued a Masters of Science in printing color science at RIT in New York. He has worked on the technical sides of the commercial photography industry as well as commercial print manufacturing.

38

After working as a designer for a small graphic design firm, Colleen worked for seven years as Executive Director of a non-profit music organization, Folk School of St. Louis. She saw the Design Management program at SCAD as a way to merge the two very different professional avenues she has traveled. Colleen also plays and teaches bluegrass fiddle.

Yahayra Rosario-Cora, AIT, has been responsible for the management of projects for companies such as Design Graph.net, and she has taught at the Turabo University of Puerto Rico. Her company, YRC Professional Services specializes in the documentation and rise of architectonic data. She has worked for local companies like Héctor Arce Architects, Visura PSC, [A]rmada; Arquitectura PSC and IN_Trope. SCAD SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN | SUMMER 2010 PROFESSOR SCOTT BOYLSTON


Sustainable Design