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OPINION

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TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019 Volume 191 | Issue 11 technewsiit.com

OPINION CAMPUS SGA A&E SPORTS SLIPSTICK

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Student newspaper of Illinois Institute of Technology since 1928

Meet your 2019-2020 Student Government Association executive board Ethan Castro (He/him) EDITOR-IN-CHIEF As of Friday, April 12, the Illinois Tech Student Government Association (SGA) has concluded its election season for its 20192020 executive board, selecting the new generation of student leaders for the primary advocacy body of the Illinois Tech campus. These individuals will be entrusted to head this vital organization as stalwart representatives of the Illinois Tech student body and had the following comments to share with TechNews: President: Eric Scott "Student Government Association has come incredibly far this year -- maybe farther than any of us initially realized. Through some combination of sometimes blind persistence and good fortune, we have managed to not only impress upon our members the gravity of what we are engaged in, but also to push ourselves to a healthy degree of mechanical professionalism and cultural revival. The vast majority of our organization will be returning this coming academic year, and bringing all of their experience and expertise back with them. Combined with a whole host of new interest across many levels of the student community, and the regular freshman influx we can always expect -- I'm

not sure if we could really be in a better position. It is my sincere hope (and I don't think it's all too far-fetched, if I'm allowed to be an optimist) that SGA is in a position to reprise the role that it was always meant for but never had: to become the central pillar upon which our fledgling community rests -- and a never before seen force for democracy, advocacy, and student agency at Illinois Tech." Executive Vice President: Henry White "I feel very fortunate to have been elected to this position, and I would like to thank everyone who participated in voting. I plan to work diligently to run an efficient senate and represent students from all areas of the Illinois Tech community." Finance Board Chair: Joshua Bowden “I'm really excited to have the opportunity to represent and serve the student body as Finance Board Chair. By increased transparency, consistency, and opening new doors, I hope to lead the change on campus that we'd all like to see.” Vice President of Academic Affairs: Daniel Medina “I have very high prospects for the upcoming academic year. I have always been a firm be-

liever of student empowerment, and it seems like the university is also starting to head in that direction. I am excited to work with faculty and administration to provide more opportunities for our students where they can apply their knowledge to the real world.” Vice President of Communications: Katja Berthold “Thank you for voting me to become your new vice president of Communications! I am honored to be given this opportunity, and I can’t wait to get started. I have some very specific goals for this upcoming year, and those include, but don’t limit to, rerouting HawkLink and getting it to become the main platform for organizations to post about their events, cleaning up our SGA website and making all information easily accessible and understandable to non-SGA members, and becoming a more active and approachable figure so students all over campus feel more comfortable voicing their opinions. My private messaging is always open if anyone ever needs anything!” Vice President of Events: Rishi Shukla “I am actually really excited right now [because of] what I have learned so far from Henry [White] and Eric [Scott] in the Events Committee. I will be able to utilize all of that when

conducting an event. Also, I am excited about working with the new incoming freshmen senators and being a part of their new college experience, helping them build themselves throughout the year.” Vice President of Student Life: Derek Rhea “I look forward to being next year’s vice president of Student Life. I hope to have a positive impact on the climate of SGA and the student body as a whole.” As of the time of this publication, SGA has not released its official voting data for the election beyond naming these individuals as the winners of their respective races. Likely, this information will be made available at the next SGA senate hearing on Wednesday, April 17. Otherwise, TechNews wishes this new cadre of SGA leaders as well as its returning president all the best in fulfilling their duties with professionalism and moral integrity. As representatives of the student body, may this new executive board serve the campus dutifully in the year to come.

Pitch @ Illinois Tech Grand Finale held in Kaplan Institute

Photos by Estlin Mendez (They/them)


2 OPINION

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When administration fails to communicate, our students suffer: a final remark Ethan Castro (He/him) EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1928

McCormick Tribune Campus Center Room 221 3201 South State Street Chicago, Illinois 60616 E-mail: editor@technewsiit.com Website: http://www.technewsiit.com

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MISSION STATEMENT Our mission is to promote student discussion and bolster the Illinois Tech community by providing a newspaper that is highly accessible, a stalwart of journalistic integrity, and a student forum. TechNews is dedicated to the belief that a strong campus newspaper is essential to a strong campus community.

GENERAL INFORMATION TechNews is written, managed, and edited by the students of, and funded in part by, Illinois Institute of Technolog y. The mater ial herein does not necessarily reflect the opinions of Illinois Institute of Technology or the editors, staff, and advisor of TechNews. There will be no censorship of TechNews publication by the faculty or staff of Illinois Tech. Sole authority and responsibility for publication and adherence to the values set forth in this policy rests with the TechNews staff. This paper seeks to bring together the various segments of the Illinois Tech communit y and strives through balance and content to achieve a position of respect and excellence. TechNews strives for professionalism with due respect to the intellectual values of the university and its community. All material submitted becomes the property of TechNews, and is subject to any editorial decisions deemed necessary.

SUBMISSIONS TechNews is published on the Tuesday of each week of the academic year. Deadline for all submissions and announcements is 11:59 p.m. on the Friday prior to publication. Articles, photos, and illustrations must be submitted electronically to the TechNews website at technewsiit.com and must constitute the creator's own intellctual property.

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TechNews | Tuesday, April 16, 2019

The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent the opinions of TechNews or Illinois Tech. I ended the fall 2018 semester with an article in Volume 190, Issue 11 of TechNews titled “Being student-centered: failure(s) to launch.” In this opinion piece, I presented my perspective as a single student of this university about how I believed that there is “a key issue that the university thus far has not adequately been able to address, yet it is very easily and simply stated: the university is bad at communicating with students.” Understandably so, very little has changed in the past semester to make me consider reevaluating that statement. There are many legitimate reasons for this, after all. I’m just one college newspaper writer. A single slam piece from me isn’t exactly revolutionary in any way or commanding of any actual change, especially not on this campus, where cynicism and endless complaints about administration almost seems to be the raison d'être for some students. There’s already enough voices calling for all kinds of radical changes to be made on both sides of the field; mine isn’t any different or somehow more important. I’m not going to delude myself into thinking that just because I’ve been part of a student newspaper for a long enough time that it suddenly makes my opinion more correct or more legitimate than anyone else’s here. I’m also not going to spend another 500+ words pulling examples of students not being listened to just because I think it’ll drive home some conveniently unseen point about how we’re being wrongfully ignored. Instead, I want to discuss why I think any of this is even worth thinking about in the first place; it’s because the end result of my initial claim and its ramifications on the lives of everyday students is what really matters at the end of all my ranting. That university-wide decisions are made on a regular basis without adequate inclusion of the student voice (or without proper communication in general, really) has shown, time and time again, that students end up suffering as a result. This initial article pulled in numerous examples from the fall 2018 semester about how improper communication from on high has led to easily-avoidable situations that lead to frustrated students, at best, and glaring strategic oversights, at worst. At the time, the most documented example of such a communication oversight was the botched opening of the Kaplan Institute, wherein undergraduate students found themselves told they could not enter the new building until next spring de-

spite the fanfare surrounding its opening ceremony that same fall. Indeed, the more I have learned about the entire history of the Kaplan Institute through interviews and conversations with various staff and faculty members of the university, the more egregious of an example it seems to be in terms of poor communication. Beyond the already-mentioned example of the building’s opening being a confusing process for students, there is an even stranger story that has recently been relayed to me by several university officials. When the initial three-story design of the Kaplan Institute by architect John Ronan was found to be financially infeasible by the university, accommodations were made to reduce the scale of the building, including an initial decision to keep the Institute of Design (ID) at its current home in the Downtown Campus instead of moving it into the new building. Of course, that initial decision was somehow never communicated to all involved parties, perhaps in part due to its controversial nature and its clashing with donor contract stipulations, leading to some very confused glances when the groundbreaking speech made later on still included a mention of the building as the future home of ID. For many at the time, a question as simple and as important as “where is ID going to be housed next year?” was way more difficult to get an answer to than you’d think it should be. In the ensuing confusion, we finally ended up with the current version of the Kaplan Institute we see today, a less ideal and compromised version with ID still housed on the second floor and many original ideas (like, for example, many internal walls) scrapped. The sources that relayed this story to me have led me to the conclusion that many current tensions that exist in the building’s use, ranging from noise levels to concerns over the building’s liberal use of open-floor workspaces, are the result of this. Many of these pain points in the building’s current state, contributing to tensions and difficulties between ID and undergraduate students, can be seen as direct ramifications of what are essentially, communication failures and compromises made to try and accommodate them. Confusion, misdirection, and rumors: all the trademark results of a communication failure that us undergraduates are unfortunately so familiar with mark this single story about the Kaplan Institute’s history. And what’s worst about all of this? Who suffers the most because of them? It’s the students. When decisions, events, and other processes proceed sub-optimally due to whatever kind of unforeseen circumstances and transparency suddenly flies out the window, the result is always a situ-

Photo by Ethan Castro (He/him)

ation that makes students sigh and chalk up another reason to give in to the cynicism black hole this university seems to be built upon. But, like in my original article, I want to end with the point that I truly do not believe there is any one person, office, or group at fault for these kinds of “failures to launch.” There is no grand conspiracy to keep us down and out as some kind of university minority. In fact, maybe there aren’t even problems at all. I could be entirely wrong about everything I have said, or be completely misinterpreting university actions. I simply don’t know. I’m just one student here, typing away at a final article instead of doing my other homework or trying to find a job after graduation. However, if you ask me and actually care about my thoughts, Illinois Tech is continuing to face the consequences of what I see as a cultural stagnation. This university is staffed by many wonderful people that I have had the pleasure of working with in some form or another on various classes, projects, events, and other opportunities both for TechNews and otherwise. They are all genuinely interested in serving this university and its students (at least, from my experience and interactions. I understand this may not be the reality for many other students out there, and for that, I am sorry). Rhetoric about “being student-centered” can be thrown around as much as we want, but such radical notions require action behind them to hold up to any kind of scrutiny. Until there is a concerted action to drive that sort of thinking, with students seen as equal stakeholders and with transparent communication made a priority, we will continue to see these “failures to launch” mire what should be momentous and proud occasions in our history. Of course, I’m just one newspaper writer on my way out the door. While I’d like to think I played some role in driving that change, it isn’t my place to judge, and now it certainly isn’t my place to dictate or decide what is correct. I’ll entrust those decisions to the future generations.

Five senses in a semester at Illinois Tech Dan Marten (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER

Sound: After one semester of class in the Kaplan Building, it’s the sounds of that newest showpiece that get to me the most. If only slightly off-putting, that ringing echo of shoe soles on concrete has always struck me as empty and just a little bit soulless. Such critiques ring the ears of any architect of a modernist building, a Mies-inspired one nonetheless, but they reverberate still in Kaplan’s volume. It’s hearing conversation from another IPRO across the hall, the hushed whispers of “what are undergraduates doing upstairs,” and the rap-tap-tapping of pencils on desks during IPRO sessions with nothing to really do. At this point it's even the little things — the buzzing of a loud hand-dryer on a headachestricken Monday morning or an unnecessarily talkative professor — that add to Kaplan’s aura of vague auditory unpleasantness. Smell: I’m sick of coffee. The stuff sort of kills me sometimes; it really does. After a hard week of classes, the smell of it, the taste of it, making it, or even the sight of it — everything about it — makes me want to hurl. The Papacy tried to ban the stuff in the 16th century, and maybe they were on to something. The stringent smell

of soap in the morning cleaning out my French press, the rich dairy from the coffee creamer (morning coffee only), or the sickening sweetness of accidentally adding too much honey to the end product. Even the steam from the machine smells bad after the nth serving. And lest we forget that bitter scent itself, the bitter sharpness of the beans fresh from the container, how its subdued and growing smell fills the room as it brews, or how its aroma seems to force itself into your nostrils when you drink. On the Mondays after easy weeks, the drink is welcome, but by the Friday of a midterm week the stench is abhorrent. Caffeine dependence is real. Touch: The heaviness doesn’t go away. Wake up after 12 hours of sleep and your eyelids still drag, sleep for six and every cell resists all the same. It’s in my forehead, in my arms, in my legs, my back, shoulders, neck, and some days even my hands. For something that’s “all in your head” this feels pretty pervasive. Being slow kinda sucks, especially when before you always prided yourself on being go-go-go, running fast or cranking out essays or however you did it. You never wanted to be the person who sleeps through lab or cancels obligations or literally can’t bring themselves to pick up a call or who drops the only sport they actually

cared about, but, hey, it’s gotta be someone. Taste: I burned my mouth on a 7-Eleven coffee. Sights: The aesthetics of Chicago never fail to disappoint, whatever you’re looking for. Never stop being awed by the night lights during the winter, or how the snow plays off all the car headlights or the Grant Park street lamps. As the clouds roll in late at night, you can see the lights from downtown light up the sky a sickly yellow, like a sky on fire. While the city does sleep, it never shuts off its bright lights. Conversely, be sure to appreciate that coming aesthetic of how Lake Michigan seemingly blends into the sky on a pleasant day, with all the faces of the joggers and bikers and walkers and sprinters and commuters and segway tourists and stunning large Midwest families out and about. Once the sun comes out, that campuswide monotony of early spring and late winter visibly lifts, greys turning to greens. While the city’s gothic architecture can bring solace to anybody feeling grim on its rainy days, I think I’m ready for these trees to finally bloom, these flowers to blossom, and for the love of God for this semester to be over.


Tuesday, April 16, 2019 | TechNews

OPINION 3

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TechNews celebrates successful year, continues to be catalyst for change Megan Heurich (She/her)

On April 16, 2019, TechNews publishes its last issue of the 2018-2019 academic year, amid organizational growth and controversial stories that incited major change. Ethan Castro, editor-in-chief of TechNews, recounts the increase in writing volume over the last year. Formerly stretching for content in consistent eight-page issues, TechNews faced a new problem at times this year: too much content. Issues now average 12 pages, even reaching the 20-page maximum on one occasion. TechNews’s dramatic growth is attributed to recent efforts on combating exclusivity and encouraging participation regardless of major or experience level, two components that are typically present in large, liberal artsfocused universities. TechNews is notably less competitive than newspapers at other institutions. Castro describes TechNews as being in a “unique place,” allowing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and other non-liberal arts majors to explore journalism and improve writing, editing, and photography skills, which are not usually part of class curriculum. TECHNEWS WRITER

Rachael Bolek, journalism student and former online managing editor at the Daily Illini (the student newspaper at University of Illinois (U of I)), recounts majors of students on staff. “We’ve had people who major in different forms of engineering to computer science to various other things, too. However, I would definitely say a vast majority of our staff members are in the College of Media (journalism, advertising, etc.) or in communications,” Bolek said. The Daily Illini is published two times a week. Despite frequency, Bolek says publication is competitive, especially in print. Stories sometimes appear only online due to lack of space in print issues. While journalism opportunities are present at U of I, publication is clearly more competitive and earning a high role on staff oftentimes takes years in the making. Perhaps the most surprising opportunity TechNews provides is the ability for international students to improve English skills through reporting. Tarang Vaidya is one student who combined a personal interest in writing with further development in English. Vaidya has a column titled “Boy in the New Country,” where he shares personal experiences of life in the United States. With nearly 50 percent of Illinois Tech students being inter-

national, Vaidya’s column has become widely popular and relatable among the student body. “There’s been a noticeable evolution in their [international students’] writing over the time they’ve been with the organization,” Castro explains. According to The Washington Post, newspapers have been dying for two decades, threatening democracy. This sparks questions about TechNews’ future state, especially with a student body that at times lacks interest in oncampus journalism. TechNews articles do not require approval from the dean of students. Recently, writers have been fierce in the pursuit of uncovering truth and becoming a voice for the student body. Castro recalled recent graduate Soren Spicknall’s controversial stories that inspired change at Illinois Tech. Some of the most notable resulted in the firing of “bigot” adjunct professor Bill Slater and the end of Public Safety discouraging students to venture south of 35th Street. Some of the most diligent TechNews readers happen to be university staff. For some, TechNews serves as the only window into the student perspective. Many instances of on-campus change were due to staff readers addressing issues raised by TechNews re-

porters. Dr. Sally Laurent-Muehleisen, physics professor at Illinois Tech, is one of TechNews’ most devout readers. Laurent-Muehleisen noticed a rise in “impressive, serious journalism” this academic year and wishes more students would take advantage of writing for TechNews. Effective writing skills can greatly impact those in the STEM fields. “Students must learn to communicate with people outside of their narrow academic focus. Lots of STEM funding comes from grants, so students must be able to communicate well. TechNews is an easy way to practice writing skills, get feedback and improve,” said Laurent-Muehleisen. Alexandra Detweiler, editor-in-chief for the upcoming academic year, has witnessed TechNews grow into what it is today. Previously, writers' meetings would consist of a tight-knit group, only a select few. Now, the TechNews office is full during writers' meetings, thanks to continued participation from a larger group. Next academic year, Detweiler plans to increase TechNews’s membership and visibility, continuing momentum from this year’s success.

Hidden History: the best TechNews team that ever was Ethan Castro (He/him) EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

My time with TechNews has come to an end. Over the past three years, I have written a total of 297 articles, and this final one will be my 298th. TechNews has been an outlet for me to explore our university and its various offerings as well as to explore myself and my personal interests. I’ve covered everything from critical editorials about our university’s leadership (both student and staff) to historical trivia pieces about dogs in the World Wars. Working with this paper has led me to pursue styles of writing I never would have thought of otherwise, from music reviews to my scarring experiences with sleep paralysis. Joining and later leading this organization was the best decision I ever made in my time at Illinois Tech. The work I’ve done for TechNews, and, more importantly, the work I’ve seen the rest of the organization do for it have filled me with such an immense sense of pride and accomplishment, even as my educational and personal lives have, at times, left me sorely lacking in fulfillment. I am forever grateful to TechNews for doing this for me, as I depart from this university into the brave new world beyond (no I’m not dying; I’m just graduating, which may as well be dying). But this article should not be about me and whatever accomplishments I’ve done through this paper. If those are truly important and lasting, then they will speak for themselves. It’s not my place to judge. No, instead, my final TechNews article is dedicated to the amazing team that has made all this possible. None of what I have just said would have been even close to achievable if not for the amazing colleagues that have worked just as hard as I have to keep this paper and organization running. My final TechNews article and Hidden History piece goes out to each and every one of the student editorial board members, content contributors, and editors that keep us running and keep us going as a catalyst for positive change on campus. When I first joined the organization at the start of 2017, prior Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Ethan Castro (He/him)

Anoopa Sundararajan, as well as her successor Annie Zorn gave me my initial start, writing basic articles about projects being done by Student Government Association (SGA). It was a simple start, remotely submitting a single article a week about whatever SGA was doing, but even then, the interactions I had with this organization were overwhelmingly positive and supportive of me expressing myself through the paper as I gradually branched into topics beyond SGA. And this was all because of the leadership that came before me and the empowerment their generosity gave me as a fledgling writer. Over the years, I continued to immerse myself more and more in TechNews, eventually coming to serve a full academic year as editor-in-chief, and the appreciation I have for every member of this organization has only grown. TechNews is a team effort, made possible only through the collaboration of numerous members at various stage of our hierarchy, and every single person in this process deserves so much recognition and thanks. My editorial board has done their duties perfectly, and I could not have asked for a better supporting team to keep this publication running, even in its darkest times. Assistant Editor-in-Chief Quinn Castaneda has

been a perfect second-in-command, giving this paper its essential layer of professionalism and consistency both in its writing and personnel structure. The work she has done has been paramount in keeping both TechNews and myself (and probably many others) working as we should, and she deserves much more praise than I can currently type out. Our Information Technology Manager David Sobel has similarly kept this paper anchored on the digital front, managing many of the more technical aspects that I don’t have the experience or knowledge to do myself. As one of the organization’s oldest returning members, he has helped me many times in remembering the cherished memories and progress this paper has made through my tenure. Prashanth Murugan, our distribution manager, was the first hire and official decision I made as editor-in-chief, and I don’t regret a single thing about my choice. No matter the weather, no matter what mishaps have happened with our printer, he has done his Tuesday morning distribution job dutifully, always with a smile on his face. If you’re reading this article in our print version, just know that it’s because of him and the work he did. In addition, all of the contributors that give this paper its character and its content

all deserve much more praise than I can possibly type in a single article. Dan Marten and the lengths he has gone to cite his article sources and the important sociopolitical topics he’s covered, Tarang Vaidya and his stories as an international student new to this country, Grace Arnold and her dedication to covering SGA just as I did years ago, Estlin Mendez’s valued input on various internal affairs as well as their also-valued puzzles, Joshua Ferm’s shared love of LEGO with me, Jack Hamilton’s exploration of his love for video games through his reviews, Kevin Barrera’s similar exploration of his various interests through writing, Tori Belotti’s and Moid Ali’s demonstration that first-year students actually DO care about TechNews, and SO MANY more people that contribute to this paper all amount to what I genuinely see as the best TechNews team I could have ever wanted. Thank you, all of you. Of course, perhaps the best way to end this piece is by looking to the new editorial board that will continue to lead this paper once I have gone. Castaneda will continue to serve as assistant editor-in-chief, Murugan will continue to serve as distribution manager, and Mendez will be stepping in as webmaster, bringing a sense of continuity and incremental improvement that I know will continue to serve as a vital anchoring point for this organization. Dhruvit Savla, stepping in as the newly reinstated business manager, will serve dutifully in keeping this organization buoyant, and I know he will do great. And finally, long-time member Lexi Detweiler will be replacing me as editor-in-chief, and I know for a fact that this paper will continue to grow and give students their voice under her leadership. Along with all the members that will stay with TechNews in the next year, I can graduate from this university confident that I am leaving an organization that has given me so much in the best possible hands I could have asked for. To my TechNews team, thank you. I will never forget my time with this organization, and I hope you will continue to grow both as an outlet for student voices and as individuals within it.

Thank you. All of you. -Ethan Castro

Now under new management! Send Lexi a welcome message at editor@technewsiit.com


4 OPINION

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TechNews | Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Prism offers testimony calling for Finance Board reform before election upset Andrew Adams (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER

This article is the third and final in a series of articles examining Finance Board, its allocations of the Student Activities Fund, and its oversight. Coverage of Finance Board and the Student Government Association (SGA) will continue through regular coverage and new investigations. Leaders from Prism offered public testimony detailing their experiences dealing with Finance Board at the SGA Senate session on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. They reported that Finance Board had mishandled their budget requests, that Prism had received incorrect information from members of Finance Board, and that a member of Finance Board said that clubs like Prism aren’t what Illinois Tech is “about.” This all comes immediately before the end of SGA executive board elections. The election for Finance Board Chair was won by Joshua Bowden, a third year computer science student with no prior history serving on Finance Board. This is effectively unprecedented, as no one interviewed for this story could think of a time that a Finance Board Chair was elected having not first served as a Finance Board Advisor. Emma Kaufman and Claire Joswiak, the president and vice president (respectively)

of Prism, offered testimony at the meeting. Among the claims they made, Kaufman and Joswiak said that in the November 2018 Finance Board hearing, Jorge Morin slammed his fists on the table and Nina Tamras slammed her laptop shut. This behavior was confirmed by Patrick Fina, who was present at both the Finance Board hearing and the senate hearing. Joswiak later used the term “unprofessional” to describe this behavior. Joswiak clarified in an interview that Prism’s “biggest goal” in bringing this testimony forward was “perspective” and stressed that she didn’t want this to be seen as a personal attack toward anyone. Morin, shortly after Prism presented their testimony, turned to the Finance Board advisors sitting behind him. He asked, “Am I aggressive?” They did not respond. The history of Prism and Finance Board has been, to quote Kaufman, “rocky.” Having gone to SGA's Judicial Board three times in the past two and a half years, there have been many opportunities for Prism and members of Finance Board to settle disagreements before Prism decided to come forward with their testimony. Fina stressed in an interview that he and the Office of Campus Life were acting to “support, clarify, and, in a way, interpret." Fina also noted that those present at the meeting “dug deep” in order to directly address the is-

sues brought forth by Prism. Chloe Rubinowicz, a first-year Finance Board advisor, confirmed that Finance Board didn’t know that Prism would speak out at the senate hearing. Though caught offguard, Rubinowicz said that Prism “had every right to be concerned” and that Finance Board “should make an effort to change.” Rubinowicz has significantly changed her opinions several times throughout the semester. Initially Rubinowicz strongly opposed Bowden as a candidate for Finance Board Chair and the possibility of Finance Board meetings being recorded for the public record, though she now says Bowden has a “sense about him” after speaking to him. She also, in an interview, said that she supports Finance Board hearings being recorded and in the SGA meeting on Wednesday offered a friendly amendment to a Bylaws amendment requiring just that. Morin has also changed views throughout the semester. He has alternated several times on supporting Finance Board hearings being recorded. He also made the Finance Board ledger public near the end of the fall semester before pulling it this semester, citing a student org “requesting” it. Rubinowicz said she was fairly sure that student org was Union Board. Ayesha Anees, the President of Union Board, said that she has "no knowledge"

of Union Board asking Morin to remove the ledger from the Finance Board website. Anees stressed that Union Board has not made any official action on the subject and that she personally was glad the ledger was public, saying "students should know where their money is going." Morin was also forcibly removed from the Executive Elections Committee of SGA on April 2 amid accusations of being not entirely impartial, reinforcing a reputation of being difficult to work with that was echoed in Prism's statement. This semester has seen significant public criticism of Finance Board. Throughout the processes of investigation and SGA legislation, Finance Board has shared perspective and information with TechNews, though they have made moves to become less transparent throughout the same time period. With the two powerhouses of Finance Board, Morin and Tamras, graduating, the future of Finance Board is in in question. Rubinowicz says she "hopes this goes well." With this in mind, it is important to remember something that Narkis Garcia said about the Finance Board Chair in an interview at the beginning of this investigation: "You have more power than any of us. Real s---."

One Year at Illinois Tech - a reflection Kevin Barrera (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER

It’s been a whole year since I started here at Illinois Tech, and I’m going to be honest, I didn’t expect to make it this far. After all, no one in my family had even ever been to college, so this all new to me. I didn’t exactly come from the best of high schools. There was never really much going on for me after being rejected from the best high schools in the city, so I figured that if I was going to go to school, I was going to get some technical training as something to fall back on. And that’s how I ended up at a vocational academy. Here, there were two groups of students - the International Baccalaureate (IB) students, and the Career and Technical Education (CTE) students. The students in the IB program weren’t exactly the nicest, so I avoided them like the plague, even though they were the most academically advantaged at my school. I stuck through normal advanced placement (AP) and honors classes (fun fact: I took pre-calculus twice because AP calculus was cut), and by that, I mean whatever I was allowed to take. A total of four AP classes were offered at my high school, and I only took two, because I opted to gain transfer credit from dual-enrollment classes instead. AP classes weren’t known for being the best chance of earning credit either. For example, my AP

Language class was full of students that were below the average writing standard, so our teacher accommodated the class around them, and that hindered me and a few other students because we weren't learning anything new. Sad thing was, these students didn’t care to learn. To them, school was a joke. Respect for the instructors was never displayed, ditching school to smoke was an everyday thing, and D marks were celebrated. Everyday in school was sort of personal torture, filled with below standard teaching and social drama. That’s not to say it didn’t have it’s fun moments - some of my fondest memories and best relationships were formed there - but high school wasn’t helping me. A lot of the time, I ended up studying after class on my own with the help of some teachers that were nice enough to stick around. I joined a college readiness program my sophomore year to help me even get into college, all while dealing with the standard problems that come with growing up. I was accepted into nearly all the colleges I applied to (not top 20 colleges - I knew I had no chance), but it all came down to money, as is usually the case. Thankfully, Illinois Tech gave me just enough to make it possible to come here. That summer before the first day was a doozy - I had just gotten out of a toxic relationship so I was all sorts of messed up. One day I’d be partying and having the time of

my life, the next, I was curled up on the couch binge watching “New Girl” on Netflix. And just like that, my first semester started. As a commuter, it took a little while to get used to going to school. 76 Bus to Logan Square Blue Line, then transfer to the Green Line. Almost three hours everyday round trip, but honestly that was least of my problems. I was taking Calculus-I here, and while initially it was going well, I realised I was getting my behind kicked at every weekly quiz. The standard of education here was MUCH higher than what I was used to, and it caught me off guard. I remember getting a 37 percent on my first midterm and having a full-on mental breakdown (in a Dunkin’ Donuts of all places) because I felt inferior to everyone else. I was seriously considering leaving. But, after I calmed down, I contacted my program director from my college readiness program and asked if there was anyway I could receive extra help on calculus (outside of the Academic Resource Center (ARC) here). Within a week, I was receiving roughly an extra eight hours of calculus tutoring every week for the rest of the semester though two tutors - my old high school teachers. The results of my next couple quizzes and second midterm spoke for themselves - nearly perfect scores. It took over half the semester, but I was finally able to get into the groove of things, and realized that I had to

work harder than normal to keep up with the rest of the students here. I finished my first semester completely worn out, but ready for the next. I’d say my only real regret was not being able to write for TechNews as much as I wanted to. I believe I only submitted three articles the whole semester, so I wasn’t really showing much desire to stay as an editor here. Sorry, Ethan. This semester is going smoother than the last, mostly because I know what I was getting into. Thus, I’m focusing more on getting involved and improving my social relationships that I had neglected last semester. I made it a goal to submit at least one article a week and joined WIIT as a radio host (shameless self plug - Thursdays from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.). And while things aren’t completely perfect, I never expected to be in the position that I am in now. A year ago, I was lost and confused whilst entering a weird transition period. Now, I have a clearer grasp on my future plans, and am excited to see what I can do this summer. So, to all you TechNews readers, thank you for being a loyal audience. I’ve always loved writing as a hobby, and TechNews provides a way for it to not just random ideas in a journal. I love this organization, I love this team, and I love what I do. Have a great summer. I’ll see you all next semester.

My Incoherent Ramblings: child of the setting sun Steven Moreno (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER

When I was growing up back in my hometown, I lived on the side of a mountain which panned the length of the city. Since I lived on the western side of the mountain, I was always told that I lived on the sunset side of the mountain, which was always looked at with disdain compared to the sunrise side of the mountain which was always praised for its beautiful morning vistas and brighter overall outlook on the city as a whole. I could never understand why there was such a one-sided opinion against one side over the other for something as simple as a morning view. Eventually I came to realize that the problem lied not with the view or even the people who lived on either side of the mountain. The problem arose from the symbolism people associated with the sunrise and sunset. It seems that the sunrise is placed on a pedestal around the world as a sign of new

beginnings, new opportunity, new life on a planet constantly moving forward. Meanwhile, the sunset is seen as a much more somber and sorrowful sight, one that is associated with ends both of  life and of the day. Now while there is some significance to this interpretation, I cannot help but feel that there is some hypocrisy in holding one event over the other, as one person’s sunset is both figuratively and literally another person’s sunrise. What many seem to forget in their  self-centered view of the world is that there is no beginning or end that is not promptly followed or preceded by another’s end or beginning respectively. What makes a new day so beautiful is not that it’s permanent, but that it is only temporary. The beauty is exemplified by its fleeting nature, by the fact that one was lucky enough to see it when it happened and never again in quite the same way. There will always be another day, another hope, and another life, another new start, even if it is not your own. Now that’s

not to say that you should take joy in seeing the sight of a new day, but you should also take joy when seeing that very same day come to an end as well. Being reminded of the temporary nature of day and that no day will last forever is a sentiment I feel is seldom forgotten in this era of all encompassing technology. The end is the confirmation that whatever the day had in store, be it good or bad, it has ended and will do so with the same amount of grace as it had used when it first started.  Another common criticism of the sunset is not from the scene itself but from what comes after, the night. It is true that the night is somewhat more ominous in appearance compared to the visibility provided by the daylight, but it should be exemplified the significance that the night provides to people as it gives us the opportunity to see all before us not as it is but as it could be. In the dark of the night, the imagination is free to fill in the voids left in front of our very eyes. While some may

use this chance to fill these voids with fears and horrors of the mind, it is nothing more than an illusion. There is nothing in the dark not already there in the light. Anyone should feel free to consider  the world at night no different as the world in light, that is to say a world which has much to offer as one has to give.  I am proud to count myself as one who lives in the land of the setting sun, as one who sees beauty in the end of the day and in the night which follows. This may not be an opinion or belief which is shared by many, but it is an opinion which I feel deserved to be mentioned at least once for anyone to read and judge as they see fit. I fear not the actions of others or the challenges they may put before me, for I know when all is said and done, the day shall end, there shall come the night, and soon the new day will appear ready to start the entire process once more in a way that it never has before.


Tuesday, April 16, 2019 | TechNews

OPINION 5

editor@technewsiit.com

City Council approves controversial developments and sets environmental goals Andrew Adams (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER

At their monthly legislative session on Wednesday, April 10, 2019, Chicago City Council voted on several landmark ordinances and resolutions including approval of creating a tax increment financing (TIF) area around the Lincoln Yards and 78 property developments amid outspoken protests. City Council also adopted a resolution establishing goals for Chicago to use 100 percent renewable energy and passed a major revision to the Chicago Building Code. It was also Mayor Rahm Emanuel's last City Council meeting before Lori Lightfoot will take over the position on May 20. Lincoln Yards is a 14.5 million square foot development from Sterling Bay that is set to include 6,000 homes, with 600 being designated as affordable. The development will be where Lincoln Park is now. The development will be funded by “almost $300 million” from Sterling Bay and 490 million taxpayer dollars, according to Alderman Brian Hopkins of the 2nd Ward. The vote for allocating the tax money and approving the ordinances for the project passed 3114. The 78 development from Related Midwest will have as many as 10,000 homes in the area along Roosevelt by the Chicago river. Both projects have major funding from Chicago taxpayers through the creation of TIF areas, essentially a way to set aside property taxes over a 23 year period for development in a specific area. The debate surrounding the use of a TIF for the developments was heated, in the council chambers and out. Outside of City Hall, protesters holding signs blocked LaSalle Street. Among the protesters were several aldermen-elect, according to reporting from Block Club Chicago. Inside, members of the Coalition for Fair School Funding had brought students on their day off to protest the vote and advocate for delaying or stopping the vote alto-

Photo by Andrew Adams (He/him)

gether. Kate McCarter, a 2nd Ward resident and member of the Friends of North Branch Park, said that the Lincoln Yards project should not have been funded with tax dollars because “community input was not valued” and “feedback was marginalized and not integral to planning” the development. Amy Abramson, another 2nd Ward resident who wore large stickers on her shirt reading “#DelayTheTIF” and “#DelayTheVote,” said that she was “disappointed but not at all surprised” that the vote passed, citing the many last minute changes to the ordinances — some of which happened only hours before the City Council meeting. The discussion on the council floor was also heated. Alderman Raymond Lopez of the 15th Ward said that the Council should address the “unprecedented amount of lies and deception” coming from opponents of the projects, saying that they are a “good deal” for Chicago. Alderman Brian Hopkins of the 2nd Ward, the chief sponsor of the ordinances surrounding the Lincoln Yards development and proponent of the projects, said that the projects were “what tax money is for.” Among the elected officials oppos-

ing the projects, Alderman Scott Wagusepack of the 37th Ward said that there “hasn’t been lies and deception from the community but lies and deception built into the project from day one,” adding that his constituents, some of whom will be affected by the development, didn’t want to “sock away” the money from the TIF for 23 years. Alderman Pat Dowell, the alderman overseeing the area Illinois Tech is in, was unavailable for comment and has not released any statement regarding her opposition to the projects, despite her voting against them. The City Council also unanimously voted to adopt a resolution showing “support of renewable energy goals” and setting a “timeline and milestones” for Chicago relying on solely on renewable sources of energy and fully electrifying the Chicago Transit Authority's (CTA’s) fleet of buses. This vote was supported by a coalition of nonprofits and advocacy groups working as part of the Sierra Club’s Ready For 100 campaign. Its passing makes Chicago the largest city to adopt such a commitment. Kyra Woods, an organizer from the Sierra Club who worked on the campaign, said in a statement that “setting a goal is just

the beginning,” clarifying in an interview that the campaign’s next steps are to get a “better understanding” of how Mayor-elect Lightfoot views the goal and its possible implementation strategies. Woods also stated that the campaign was supported by college students from around the city, with students at the University of Chicago doing the initial feasibility study for the resolution and students from Loyola providing “some really great organizing power.” Illinois Tech has several student organizations focused on sustainability and climate change. Maddy Urig, outgoing treasurer for Engineers for a Sustainable World and current President of Illinois Tech’s chapter of Citizens Climate Lobby, said that it’s “absolutely incredible that a city the size of Chicago is doing something so big,” adding that the Midwest is “kind of notorious” for not engaging with climate issues. The City Council also unanimously adopted a major revision to the city’s building code based on international standards for such codes. This has been the result of an ongoing project of updating the city’s building and electrical codes done by Dr. Judy Freedland in the planning department. This is the first time the code has been updated this much in almost 70 years. Rahm Emmanuel's last meeting ended with a resolution brought forward to thank him for his service, with about a dozen aldermen not involved in drafting it standing in support of the resolution. Several alderman with a public history of disliking the outgoing mayor even stood to acknowledge the parts of his mayorship that were done well. Alderman Walter Burnett of the 27th Ward stood up to say to Emmanuel, “you are a hustler,” going on to clarify that he respects Emmanuel's ability to bring corporations, aldermen, and neighborhoods into coalitions to accomplish his political goals.

Photos by Andrew Adams (He/him)

Looking forward on Larrabee Street: Cabrini-Green Dan Marten (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER Some might consider it ironic to look towards the future of a project so prominently set in the past, but the monumental history of Cabrini-Green is still worth caring for and writing about, lest we lose it. However, I would care a moment to look back and reflect on how I wound up embedded in an issue so far removed from my immediate situation, yet one I’ve found myself so passionate about this last semester or so. For a column that’s genuinely helped me grow as a writer, for getting out of my comfort zone, for producing articles that I’m genuinely proud to attach my name to, I believe that some thank-yous and acknowledgements are in order. First and foremost, thank you to Mary Schmich of the Chicago Tribune, who paved the trail for this same topic with her extensive Cabrini-Green coverage in 2004, arguably at its greatest levels of redevelopment flux. Her even agreeing to meet with me for an interview and providing some amazing sources gave me the confidence I needed to approach something like this.  Thank you to that random YouTube video I watched over winter break about Af-

rican-American representation in animation, which led me to a Wikipedia search for the sitcom “Good Times,” which finally led me to here, the topic of this very column. Thanks to the helpful dude at the Harold Washington Library who helped me get past the Chicago Tribune’s paywalls, to my high school professor Dr. Smith for sending me some amazing advice, and even to the rude cop who told me the neighborhood is called “Near North” now, rather than its old adage. Sincere thanks to Ken Dunn, the philosopher and urban farmer who helped kick this continued interest off, who gave me likely my most bizarre interview I will ever have — collecting compost in a garbage truck on a cold winter morning while talking about Aristotle and the Reagan administration. Thanks to Alderman Walter Burnett Jr., who fit me into his busy schedule for a hasty interview, sandwiched between his 8:30 a.m and 9:30 a.m. appointments, both labelled in his calendar as “be vaguely corrupt.” Further thanks to all the media that has guided me, to the cast and crew behind the documentary “70 Acres in Chicago,” the author of “High-Risers” Ben Austen, and Jan Tichy for meeting to talk about his Project Cabrini-Green. A very unique thank you to Pas-

tors Chuck Infelt and Eric Worringer of the Holy Family Lutheran Church, right in the heart of what used to be the Cabrini red-brick high-rises, who have been more than willing to talk about their experiences preaching and engaging the community both before and after redevelopment, Infelt being the prior and Worringer following. A great deal of their congregation members were former residents and have been incredibly welcoming. Unique thanks to the awkward secretary of the Waverly, Iowa city council who connected me to Infelt, who called the sleepy Iowa town “home” before leaving for the Chicago, as well as serving as mayor after retiring. With people like these, and a host of plans on the horizon, the future of this column is bright, as apparently this city can never run out of history. Along with continued collaboration with Holy Family, I look forward to volunteering at Ken Dunn’s urban farms this summer, hopefully learning as much about city land use policies as I do actual gardening. I’m working to bring “70 Acres in Chicago” to a screening here at Illinois Tech, which would be an amazing event when the goal is to help educate this campus about more of this city’s history, or as much as possible at least. My last, concrete plan is to visit Infelt in his hometown

of Iowa over the summer, to meet face-to-face the man I’ve only talked to over the phone, to see where the man who shaped his own niche of the neighborhood grew up; he has untold hours of stories from spending decades in one of the most turbulent parts of the city, and a shocking amount seems to have gone unrecorded. I can say that I’m looking to do more with this column than keep it in the weekly TechNews issues. While establishing an early platform is important, depending on the volume of work, maybe a book or a collection of short stories or even a biography of the neighborhood’s prolific figures in the future, but whatever form this winds up taking is beyond me. However, with these the excellent people who have my back, and the immense scope of the topic, I can’t see the content stopping soon.    It might be tempting just to let some of those old stories of Chicago slip away, but remembering these lessons as a collective is what makes a city a city, how it keeps its soul and forms a community. There’s got to be a greater sort of consciousness to a city like this beyond knowing your relevant green line stops or enclaves of River North restaurants or Magnificent Mile shops, and as the future stewards of the city it’s high time we embrace it.


6 OPINION

TechNews | Tuesday, April 16, 2019

editor@technewsiit.com

Person-first and identity-first language: is there a right answer? Bri McKenna (She/they) TECHNEWS WRITER

I was on Facebook the other day when I came across an infographic shared by an acquaintance of mine. It purported to list the correct language to use when referring to people with various kinds of disabilities: “person with a disability” instead of “disabled person,” “person with autism” instead of “autistic person,” and so on. If you clicked on the picture, though, you would see that some of the top comments were informing the makers of the infographic that many disabled people actually prefer the opposite. So what’s behind this divide? And what’s “right”? This is the person-first versus identity-first language debate, and unfortunately, it’s not a simple issue to unravel. Person-first language (PFL) refers to the movement to use words that emphasize the personhood of the disabled person. The “person” word literally comes first, as in “person with a disability,” “boy with diabetes,” or “woman with autism.” Identity-first language (IFL) refers to language that uses these words as grammatical adjectives, putting the identity adjective first. Thus, it would be “disabled person,” “diabetic boy,” or “autistic woman.” Proponents of person-first language claim that it humanizes people and prevents discrimination by dissociating the person from the stigmatized disability. PFL was developed by disability activists and started to gain traction in the 1990s, and it has since been the subject of many campaigns and professional recommendations for language use. Studies have found that people hold more negative feelings about others described using IFL instead of PFL. For example, researchers at the Ohio State University found that describing a group as “the mentally ill” was perceived more negatively than “people with mental illness.” PFL is touted as empha-

sizing the person as someone who just happens to have a disability, indicating they are separable and that the disability is not the defining feature of the person. Proponents of identity-first language say that separating the person from the disability is sometimes impossible and that using PFL only furthers the idea that disability words are dirty words. The movement for IFL has been about embracing these words as identities for members of the disability community, similar to the power in being able to identify as gay or black. Disability scholars argue that PFL’s limited usage just increases stigma by clearly marking disabled people as “different,” since PFL isn’t used in the same situations for nondisabled people or for less stigmatized disabilities. For example, a researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that PFL was used predominantly for highly stigmatized intellectual disabilities, while IFL was still mostly used for physical disabilities and, of course, for those without disabilities. I find it interesting that studies used to support PFL all look at comparisons like “people with epilepsy” versus “epileptics.” That’s not really person-first compared to identity-first, that’s person-first compared to person-less. Would a study comparing “people with epilepsy” to “epileptic people” find the same results? Is the key here including the person in the term (radical, I know), not the order it’s included? I couldn’t find a study that looked at this, but it might be telling. Really, though, respect is the most important piece to this puzzle. Many disabled people are frustrated that their voices aren’t being listened to. Some prominent organizations run by non-disabled people continue to push for PFL despite disabled people, the communities they purport to serve, asking for IFL. It’s a problem when disabled people are being cor-

rected by non-disabled people in the language they use to refer to themselves. Personally, I think that if the idea is that disability is viewed negatively, and we don't want the disabled person to be viewed negatively with the disability, we need to change how we think about disability, not police the finer points of language. We need to address the source of the stigma, not accommodate it with workarounds. PFL just hides it behind grammar and makes it easier for nondisabled people to ignore. Additionally, “person with a disability” is supposed to separate the person from the disability by making them two separate entities, so that the person can be taken without the disability. For people for whom their disability is part of who they are and how they experience the world, how is that possible? Implying that we should separate them implies that a disabled person isn’t good enough while they have their disability. It implies that the disability is a lesser part of the person and that they'd be better without it, which often isn’t possible, may not be wanted, and is just generally untrue. PFL and the debate around it also make disability into an illegitimate identity, and I spent long enough feeling that way on my own without others trying to push it on me. No one debates whether it's “black person” or “person with black skin,” “Muslim person” or “person with Islamic religion,” “gay person” or “person with attraction to the same gender.” Those all sound ridiculous, cringe-worthy, and even possibly offensive, and they don’t sound much like identities when the constructions get mangled. “Disabled” is an identity like the rest of these, which is something that non-disabled people who force PFL don't understand. Even if studies were to show that PFL is viewed more positively, the rhetoric used to support PFL at this point is harmful

to disabled people and their identities. When it comes down to it, though, I don’t see satisfactory studies showing that the difference in construction means that much psychologically. The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, the linguistic premise that the language we speak determines how we think, is often largely overstated. Is this another case of that? We need more studies to know, and in the meantime, we need to stop attacking disabled identities. While there isn’t one correct answer, many disabled people prefer and freely use identity-first language as a sign of a powerful identity and community. Just look at the Coalition of Disabled and Neurodivergent Students on our campus. What’s really most important, though, is using the language that the disabled person you're referring to prefers, whether it's person-first or identity-first. Arguing with or correcting someone’s usage, especially if you’re not disabled, is disrespectful and ableist, no matter how well-intentioned. At the end of the day, I love what IFL stands for. Reclaiming “disabled” and similar words as badges of identity? Fighting the stigma of being disabled? Affirming the worth of disabled people? Heck yeah! (Or does it have to be Tech yeah?) In practice, though, I find myself using both in conversation and casual writing, although I default to IFL. It’s silly that I have to police my use of what my brain considers synonyms because we’ve turned them into signs of two different teams (when neither is inherently negative or offensive). This isn’t a competition. This should be a unified effort for the good of all disabled people. So in conclusion, listen to disabled people. It’s that simple.

"Boy in the New Country" Part 15 - New Year in Chicago Tarang Vaidya (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER

2018...came to an end? Can’t believe it’s already over. A lot of things happened in such a short span. Even though 365 days cumulating 24 hours each seems like a long period, it felt like the year just passed by or to make it sound fast, it just flew by. Anyways, let me talk about my experience of the New Year in the New Country. Like Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, the weather prediction for the New Year was… quick guess… yup RAINY! A few days before New Year's Eve, we in the dorm decided to spend it at Navy Pier since we had heard a lot about the fireworks being the most famous ones across Chicago. We just prayed that the rains didn’t spoil our mood and we would definitely not like the New Year to start on a soggy note. As New Year’s Eve approached, we could see the skies clearing up a little bit. Our hopes of visiting Navy Pier brightened up, but since we all know happiness does not last for long, we could see out of our dorm windows the wonderful downpour (sarcastic) just a day before. We all know how unpredictable Chicago weather is. But such rapid changes just before the start of the New Year was really disappointing. Another reason we were unhappy was for the fact that since we did not predict the rainfall, we chalked out a plan to visit the Lincoln Park Zoo first to see the lights since we missed them during Christmas, grab a bite in the downtown after seeing the lights and then

finally head up to Navy Pier. But guess who struck us bad time… disappointment in full force. It started raining and yet again our visit to Lincoln Park was stalled. So, back to square one, we refrained from going anywhere and decided to leave a bit later for Navy Pier after having dinner. Since the Commons was closed during the winter break, we at the dorm had to rely on our next best friend, the 7-Eleven store. So frequent were our visits, that whenever we went to the store, they would recognize what we came to buy. While checking out, I had a general discussion with one of my friends who was at the store about the plans for the evening. That’s when we came to know that Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) is offering free rides from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. till Navy Pier and back. "Free rides! Ohh yeahhh!" Since the Ventra cards work semester to semester, it was always a tough time for us to load the cards every time we had to go out. Free rides came as a blessing for all of us. Without any hesitation, we all decided to take the journey to Navy Pier after 10 p.m. While we were on our way to the Navy Pier, there was less traffic along the road leading to downtown and we wondered where the traffic is. But as soon as we reached downtown, we came to know, we had to take back our words. There was heavy traffic leading to Navy Pier and that’s where we realized how interesting Navy Pier firework celebrations could be. After reaching Navy Pier it was time to scout for the best place in the house. We looked at various places, saw some social

media pics and guessed where could be the location of the fireworks and what would be the best angle to view them. After going to various places, we finally decided and stayed put at a place by 11:30 p.m. Soon after we reached that place, we could feel the cold wind blowing all over the place. It’s called the Windy City for a reason. Braving the winds and standing in front of the lake on the Pier, we noticed a big object which was like a ship moving out of the Pier, about 600 feet away from us. In about 15 minutes, that object positioned itself and we guessed that the fireworks could be launched from that ship. And we were right. Right at the stroke of 12, the fireworks started. The place was all lit up for the next 15 minutes and everyone was mesmerized by the lights and the amazing display that was on offer. People shouting "Happy New Year," capturing the moments on their phones and uploading the same on social media were some of the highlights that I could definitely experience at that time. After the fireworks were done, it was time to head back home, but not before some clicking some pictures at Navy Pier. It was altogether a different experience at that instant since we had never seen so many people ever at this place, and after midnight too. Heading back to the buses, we were discussing how the other places would have looked during the New Year. We also saw some displays of fireworks along the river, but they hardly lasted for five minutes. One more advantage of coming to Navy Pier on New Year’s Eve. While heading back, we faced two difficulties. First the traffic, and secondly,

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Photos by Tarang Vaidya (He/him)

crowded buses. But it was hardly a temporary affair since people were exploring by getting off at random places and that is when we got a place to sit. In the end, a beautiful evening well spent with everyone. With positivity all around and with a fresh new beginning, here’s wishing you all a very Happy New Year.


Tuesday, April 16, 2019 | TechNews

OPINION 7

editor@technewsiit.com

Spring Break Part 4 - goodbyes are tough Tarang Vaidya (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER

Time sure flies when you are having a great time, especially when you are enjoying your holidays with your people. I was happy about the fact that I could spend the time to explore a new place but sad at the same time since it was coming to an end. But as it is said that everyone must experience this crest and trough of life… Damn… too philosophical. Let me come back again to start the final day of my holiday. One of my friends had an afternoon lecture, and after last night everyone was too lazy to get up early, so we decided to grab brunch at this restaurant called Choolaah which was famous for its Indian Cuisine. The name of the Indian dishes as well as the fragrance all over the place made me nostalgic to the core. We ordered a variety of dishes ranging from vegetarian to non-vegetarian dishes. But the thing that was most distinct that we had was the mango lemonade. Finishing the brunch with a lovely dessert is a must, so we opted to eat the mango kulfi (type of ice cream). After brunch, it was time to head back to my friend’s place before bidding adieu to one of my friends because she had classes the whole day. It was time to rest in the afternoon since my friend had planned to take me to The Duquesne Incline, which is one of the famous spots in Pittsburgh. Packing all my stuff before leaving for Chicago, we left for the place.

Famously called as the City of Bridges, The Duquesne Incline gave a picturesque view of the whole city of Pittsburgh. After reaching the place in the evening, it was just a mesmerizing sight. The confluence of three rivers, the bridges, and the skyline was simply wonderful, and I asked my friend if we were going to go anyplace else after this to which he replied with a negation. We could see the darkness taking over the skies and the lights lighting up the skyline. A treat to the eyes is how I would describe the whole experience. The Duquesne Incline is well connected by roads but the interesting aspect of visiting the top is using a funicular which is used for transporting people and goods from the bottom to the top. An average ride of four minutes is all it takes to reach from the bottom to the top and the ride is an experience one should not miss. There are various observation points at the top from where you can click beautiful pictures of the skyline. Having spent a lot of time at the top walking and going around, it was time for me to head back to Pittsburgh Union Station to catch the Amtrak for Chicago Union Station. But not before grabbing a final bite from the local restaurant Wingharts, but unfortunately it was crowded and seeing the time required to order and eat, I could have missed the train back home. So, we decided to grab a bite at Primanti Bros and order the usual Pittsburgher and a drink to go along with it. A 20-minute walk to Pittsburgh station through the streets of downtown was an

Photo by Tarang Vaidya (He/him)

amazing experience since I could witness the essence of the city in whatever available time I had, but the aura we get at Chicago during the night time is definitely way too better than other places that I have witnessed till now (Maybe exception would be New York). Finally, here we are at the station bidding adieu to each other with a hope that we will catch up again soon. Goodbyes are tough especially when you are separating from your brother from another mother, it is a sentimental affair. But this was not the end and decided that we would catch up again definitely soon. With this final message, I boarded the train and waved him the final goodbye as my train chugged out of the station at 11:59 p.m. sharp. It was always my dream to sit in Amtrak and finally it had come true. The journey was long and close to nine and a half hours long

including the time shift of one hour. Since it was an overnight journey, anything was hardly visible despite having a window seat. But not before morning set in. The lounge café car was one of the best coaches of the train which offered a fantabulous view of the scenery passing by. Sipping a cup of coffee from my seat, I could see that Chicago station was nearing from the fact that I could see the Red Line station and the route 29 bus passing underneath the bridge. Despite a 15-minute delay, the train chugged into the station at 9:00 a.m. Back to Chicago after a fruitful journey just felt amazing. A great trip, catching up with friends and spending quality time with them felt totally refreshing and I was all prepared to face the second innings of the semester.

CAMPUS

ISA and ISO host International Cultural Night

Photos by Prakarsh Gurmule (He/him)


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editor@technewsiit.com

TechNews | Tuesday, April 16, 2019

A statement from the Union Board executive board Union Board Executive Board We would like to clarify some concerns that have been brought up by students. We understand your frustration with not being able to buy tickets to the events we program or tickets being sold out so fast. We assure you we try our best to make the process of purchasing tickets as fair as possible. All of our ticket sales are made through the University Tickets system. Union Board, like other organizations on campus, submit a “To Sell” form on HawkLink. From there, the Office of Campus Life (OCL) will approve the form, and the staff will make our event visible on University Tickets. To our understanding, tickets are available at the time we request, which Union Board has established as 1 p.m. so students have a fair chance of obtaining a ticket. In regards to our previous and most recent ticket sales for Six Flags, we will review the list of people who might have been able to purchase more than one ticket and refund their money back for the extra ticket(s) they have purchased. We only allow Illinois Tech

students to purchase one ticket, allowing more students to get a chance to purchase tickets. We understand that there was a dropdown menu making it possible to purchase more than one Six Flags ticket, but this was a system error. We will be working with OCL and Illinois Tech University Tickets to investigate this incident further. Our goal for our off-campus events is to get people to explore the city and the amazing events in Chicago. We are very proud of our work and excited to see the student body interest in our events. However, these past weeks we have been getting negative feedback on the Illinois Tech Student Community (ITSC) Facebook page that we felt was necessary to address. One of the comments we received was that Union Board members get early access or are the only people who get to purchase the tickets. Union Board’s executive board or members do not get early access or free tickets. Union Board does reserve one to two tickets for Union Board exec members who go to the event to make sure everything goes smoothly and to make

sure no one is trying to sell their ticket to make a profit. This does not mean that they get a free ticket, they have to pay for it and supervise at the event. Our members also go through University Tickets to purchase their own ticket. Our ticket sales are usually during our general body meeting which in some occasions causes them to not be able to purchase a ticket. In regards to comments asking to see the list of students who purchased a ticket, we are not allowed to reveal this as it would be an invasion of privacy. We will review the list on our side and investigate if there is a script. OCL has reached out to University Tickets to investigate this. We hope for a response soon. Like others, we are students dedicating our time to try to organize these events. We are proud of all our events. We appreciate all the students that speak out about issues dealing with our events. For future events, Union Board will be announcing the amount of tickets that are being sold. If you would like to join us at our general body meeting they are Thursday at

1 p.m. in RE 258 and our office is located in MTCC Room 220. We welcome everyone and anyone to come by and speak with us about their concerns in person. For any more questions or concerns, feel free to email any of the Union Board Exec Members. president@ubiit.org vicepresident@ubiit.org traditions@ubiit.org bogevents@ubiit.org music@ubiit.org oncampus@ubiit.org offcampus@ubiit.org market@ubiit.org We value your opinion and input and only wish to make Illinois Tech a more enjoyable campus. Sincerely, The Union Board executive board

Leadership Academy senior spotlight: Muhammad Hamza Khan Keara Rigg (She/her) LEADERSHIP ACADEMY SCHOLAR

Hamza Khan, a senior from Karachi, Pakistan, is majoring in computer engineering and minoring in software engineering. Throughout his time at Illinois Tech, Khan has been highly involved; currently, he is one of three Senior Resident Advisors for the Office of Residence Life. After graduation, he will be working as a software developer for Grubhub. Khan is passionate about the social impact of technology, and he aspires to use his technical skills to create some type of positive change in the world. He takes a lot of inspiration from Leadership Academy alumnus Emmanuel Klu, who is a software engineer at Google working towards positive social impact and building transformative teams, Question: What do you think makes you a good leader? Khan: I feel my strengths are adaptability and spontaneity. My father was a military commander and because of that, I moved around a lot when I was growing up. I’ve lived in 15 different cities and studied in 11 different schools. Each time I moved, I would have to adjust to the new social constructs and norms that particular school had. These numerous adjustments aided in me developing my strengths. Q: What do you think is vital for anyone to be a good leader? K: The most important thing for any leader to have is empathy. Being able to understand how others perceive a certain situation not

only helps build your relationship with that person, but also allows different perspectives to be brought into discussion, and builds unity among a team. Another important aspect is being able to learn from your mistakes. If you are not making mistakes, then you are not challenging yourself enough. Q: What would you say is an event or time in your life that really turned you into a leader? K: There are three events in my life that stand out as being crucial to my leadership development: While in high school, I was extremely competitive and overconfident. There was a particular competition where I was going to run the 100 meter sprint. On the day of the competition, the finish line markings had been changed. The new way the track was set up, the 200 meter finish line actually appeared before the 100 meter finish line. The race began, and I was way ahead of everyone else. I ran until I hit what I thought was the finish line, but turned out to be the finish marker for the 200 meter. I stood there proud of myself for beating everyone until I saw the rest of the people run past me and kept running. At this point I had realized my mistake, and I was devastated. I learned a huge lesson in humility that day. I needed that failure to knock me down so that I could rebuild myself to be more humble and understand that I don’t know everything. Another key event was the death of my uncle. His son was 16 years old at the time and we have always been best friends. When his father became ill, I was completely helpless; we all were. I learned a lesson in emotional intelligence, staying strong in situations that are

unexpected, and the importance of empathy. The third thing that helped shape my leadership was when I came to America for the first time to attend Illinois Tech. My father had enough money saved to afford one year of my tuition, after that, I had to figure out a way to afford my education. I faced a lot of challenges during my first few years. I was financially troubled and ended up skipping meals just to make ends meet. Being in that situation was very stressful and filled with uncertainty. I was thousands of miles from home and I had to learn to be self-reliant. Because of the circumstance, I had a lot of opportunity for self-reflection. I questioned and explored a lot of areas of my personality and morals that I had not previously looked in to, I was able to find my authentic self ,and because of that, I am able to take those lessons of reflection and authenticity and apply that into helping others. Q: What has the Leadership Academy meant to you? K: The moment I found out I was accepted into the Academy is a moment I will never forget. It was a huge sigh of relief. All of the stress, pain, and uncertainty of my situation was relieved, and I am so incredibly grateful for that. The Leadership Academy has helped me in unimaginable ways. I would not be even two percent of the person I am today if I did not have the experiences through the Academy. I’ve learned the importance of being outside of your comfort zone, good presentation, communication, and facilitation skills. I am able to observe a group, understand dynamics among the group, make deductions about how the team is functioning and effectively communi-

Photo courtesy of Illinois Tech Leadership Academy

cate those observations through leading a discussion. Facilitation is a very important skill to have because without it, a group could make minor changes that will put a Band-Aid over the wound, but they can never heal the wound unless the cause of the problem is understood. Q: What is a piece of advice that you wish someone else had given you when you went through a hard time? K: Your future is always better than the present; hope is a very important part of that. Don’t blame yourself for external factors; sometimes, hardships are circumstantial and there isn’t anything you can do to change them. Tell others about the hardships you are facing; more often than not, the people around you can help you in some way. Never stop trying. Hard work is never neglected; there is always reward for working hard.

John + Pat Anderson’s Cafe opens in Kaplan Institute, students weigh in Upon our return to campus from spring break on Monday, March 25, Illinois Tech students were met with the pleasant announcement that the John + Pat Anderson’s Café on the first floor of the Kaplan Institute was now open for business. Ever since the transition in dining service provider from Sodexo to Chartwells and the closing of Talon’s in Hermann Hall during the summer of 2018, the western half of campus had notably been lacking a quickly accessible dining option that isn’t inside the MTCC. With this new café open, how well does it fill this market gap? Open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, John + Pat Anderson’s Café (named after prior President of Illinois Tech John Anderson and his wife, Pat Anderson) serves a full line of both food and beverages. As a location operated by Illinois Tech Culinary & Hospitality Services, the John + Pat Anderson’s Café accepts student meal plan Bonus Points and even has Meal Exchange options for both breakfast and lunch. In an interview with TechNews, Ben Freund, director of retail for Illinois Tech Culinary & Hospitality Services described how this Ethan Castro (He/him) EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

new café was designed to present a “more local, more artisan feel.” To that end, Freund proudly described to TechNews how this new café sources its coffee locally. Whereas the older retail locations on campus, namely 10 West in the IIT Tower and Global Grounds in the MTCC, serve Starbucks brand coffee, the John + Pat Anderson’s Café serves Metropolis Coffee, hand-roasted and manually machined all in the city of Chicago. In addition, the John + Pat Anderson’s Café is staffed by trained, experienced baristas, who have already demonstrated to many customers of the café their talent for latte art. Freund described to TechNews how he thinks the John + Pat Anderson’s Café is positioned to allow for “a lot more art and finesse” in its various drink options. In terms of food options, John + Pat Anderson’s Café offers an assortment of sandwiches (both breakfast and lunch), quiches, and desserts. At 11 a.m. every day, the café will swap from its assortment of breakfast sandwiches (like the options available at Global Grounds, such as egg, bacon, and cheese sandwiches) to its selection of lunch sandwiches (with options such as a spinach and ricotta sandwich). Of particular note is the chocolate and hazelnut croissant, which has quickly

Photo by Estlin Mendez (They/them)

become a personal favorite of mine. All pastries and sandwiches available at John and Pat Anderson’s Café are made in-house by Illinois Tech Culinary & Hospitality Services through the bakery located in Hermann Hall. The overall initial impressions from the student community seem to be very positive. A thread on the Illinois Tech Student Community (ITSC) asking for feedback on the

new café saw particular attention be paid to the higher coffee quality in comparison to Global Grounds and 10 West, as well as the baristas and their latte art. Capping off the interview with TechNews, one of the café’s baristas as well as its manager, Eli Lindberg, advised that students continue to be on the watch for their tulips, hearts, swans, and other pieces of latte art in the weeks to come.


CAMPUS 9 A human-centered interview about the Institute of Design

Tuesday, April 16, 2019 | TechNews

Up until this point, my TechNews series about the Illinois Institute of Technology Institute of Design (ID) has been rather surface-level in nature. I’ve explored ID from a historical standpoint, looking at the foundation of the school in the Bauhaus and how it came to be a part of Illinois Tech, and I also looked at the various degrees offered by the school at various points in time through its storied history. However, while these articles may have been helpful from an introductory perspective to understand ID, I find that they still lack a more human-centered understanding of the school and its approaches to education and the modern world. It was from this desire of deeper understanding that I interviewed current ID student Prapti Jha to better understand ID from the perspective of someone who is actually in it. Jha is currently at ID pursuing a master of design (MDes) degree, due to graduate in spring of 2019. She obtained an undergraduate degree in architecture in her home country of India and worked with her own architectural design firm for several years. In Jha’s own words, she has “been a creative person all my life,” and so architecture, “as a design field and as an amalgamation of engineering and art,” was a perfect fit for her. Through the various architectural and interior design projects Jha worked on through her firm, she became more and more interested in exploring the underlying concept of design and the power it contained. “Why am I designing this building, and what is the purpose?” Jha found herself asking more and more as her projects increasingly sparked her curiosity in design. In particular, she gave the example of a rural housing project she was a part of where she worked less with architectural planning and more with “understanding people and their needs.” Unknown to her at the time, Jha was actually applying one of the core tenets of the design methodology: the human-centered approach. Much of the ideology taught and apEthan Castro (He/him) EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

plied by ID is based around understanding the core problems within a given situation by understanding the people most affected. “I didn’t know what the term was at the time, but I loved what I was doing and the whole approach.” This human-centered ideology, as well as its universal accessibility and applicability, is perhaps one of Jha’s favorite parts of ID and her design education. “We have people from all the backgrounds you can think of: engineering, humanities, business,” Jha listed during our interview. Indeed, she would later go on to remark the unique dynamics created by the various backgrounds of ID members gives the school its own distinctive experience not easily replicated elsewhere. When asked why she chose ID over any other design or art school, Jha explained that the biggest appeal to her is its “very handson approach,” that has its students “making stuff while thinking,” an approach that many Illinois Tech undergraduate students have heard of and experienced before. Jha believes that the very practice-oriented approach to education that ID offers bestows upon its students a unique opportunity to expand their ways of thinking beyond simple lectures and presentations. She also explained how ID grants its students a large amount of freedom in customizing their degrees and the specializations they acquire. “80 percent of the courses are elec-

editor@technewsiit.com

tives,” so ID students really get to craft their own programs that cater to their particular interests, all the while seeing how the humancentered approach can touch all aspects of life, both professionally and personally. A final unique aspect of ID that Jha shared with TechNews called back to the unique composition of its students, coming from various fields and levels of experience. Particularly because of ID’s master of design methods (MDM) program, many ID students come from halfway points in their careers, meaning that a typical ID class can have students who have just graduated with their undergraduate degrees working with corporate executives taking a sabbatical to continue their education. Coupled with the very applied nature of ID courses, these students will oftentimes be engaging each other on a regular basis, sharing critiques, feedback, and discussions. “ID has provided me with a different way of thinking,” Jha responded when asked what she felt were the most valuable skills and values the school has given her. When approaching problems, she now tries to apply a “human-centered lens” that first prompts her to reframe the problem before immediately jumping into solving and asking the right questions to truly understand the situation. When asked for an example, Jha described a class project she had in partnership

Photo courtesy of Institute of Design

with the popular downtown Chicago marketplace Eataly Chicago as a client. She explained how her group was first presented with the supposed problem that Eataly Chicago had “a very overwhelming experience for customers when they came inside” and was asked to help reduce this feeling of being overwhelmed. When her team began by researching and interviewing shoppers of the store, they found that many customers “loved the overwhelming experience of walking into the store as it set the venue apart from many others.” Instead, Jha and her team found that the struggle many shoppers found when entering Eataly Chicago was in wayfinding after entering. Thus, by applying a human-centered approach from the very beginning, her team had to completely reframe the problem they were presented with to best help their client. Instead of reducing the experience upon first entering the store, they focused more on transitioning this entrance into the actual shopping stages. Jha concluded her interview with TechNews with advice to undergraduate students that “ID is a place, open to everyone, where anyone can equally come in and make an impact, regardless of background or experience.” She also implored undergraduates to take advantage of the various open houses and panels ID holds to get to understand the school better by actually hearing from the people in it. After all, learning about ID through a humancentered inquisitiveness gets at the very core of what the school stands for. ID will be holding one such open panel on Thursday, April 18 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Kaplan Institute, hosting Jha and several other ID students and alumni. Titled “Design + Illinois Tech: An Alumni Panel on the Value of Design for Engineers, Architects, and Tech Professionals,” this panel is particularly targeted towards current Illinois Tech undergraduates and will even feature current ID students with undergraduate degrees from Illinois Tech. More information can be found online at https://id.iit.edu/events/.


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M. Rafiul Islam Zareef (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER The ELECTRI International Foundation Green Energy Challenge is the 2019 edition of the National Competition for National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) Student Chapters. This year the competition will be amongst 33 student chapters, hosted in Las Vegas, Nevada from September 14 - 17. The Illinois Tech student chapter has been participating in the competition for the past few years, notably last year, placing third in the final presentation round of the competition, and placing first in the proposal submissions. They hope to attain top three for their proposed submission to be sponsored for the final round taking place in Nevada. Historically, the team has been graciously sponsored by the Electrical Contractors Association (ECA), Chicago Chapter of NECA, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) local 134, and Gurtz Electric company. We have had representatives from the above competition, come to the chapter meetings and advise the competitors on how to audit and optimize the Provident

Hospital of Cook County. We have also had Tim Taylor of ECA and Brian Haug, Director of Continental Energy Solutions come in to our meetings to advise on Photovoltaic (PV) panel placement, and energy audits. The purpose of the competition is to Energy audit an existing building, explore possible ways to turn the building "Net Zero," and calculate the Return on Investment (ROI) from the savings made from the optimization of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, lighting retrofit, and installing PV Cells for electricity generation, leading to ComEd rebates. The building of choice was the Provident Hospital of Cook County, serving the historic Washington Park neighborhood on 51st Street. The building was built in the 1890s, and then brought into the Cook County Hospital system in 1993. It is most notable for Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, a prominent AfricanAmerican surgeon and founder of Provident. He went on to perform the nation’s first openheart surgery at the hospital in the summer of 1893. This operation was done without Xrays, antibiotics, surgical prep-work or tools of

TechNews | Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Illinois Tech NECA student chapter aiming for Gold at Green Energy Challenge

SGA

modern surgery and the patient, James Cornish, was discharged 51 days after this remarkable recovery. The team consists of eight core members, along with an additional 12 participants who work under team leaders. Core members are as follows. Ryan Schonken – president of IIT NECA Student Chapter, Ryan was responsible for classroom coordination, client communication, community outreach, and team organization. Muhammad Rafiul Islam Zareef – vice president of IIT NECA Student Chapter, Rafiul was responsible for assisting president with coordination, supporting teams with technical analysis and outreach as needed, and project development Kaitlyn Krupa – treasurer of IIT NECA Student Chapter, Kaitlyn was responsible for conducting schematic estimates, performing finance plan analysis and payback periods, and contracting with Student Government Associatoin (SGA) for project’s budget Michael O’Brien - director of IIT NECA Student Chapter, Michael was responsible for the project’s video making and di-

recting, assisting in the energy analysis of the HVAC and lighting system. Ammar Alsamak – secretary of IIT NECA Student Chapter, Ammar was responsible for keeping track of teams’ performances, recording NECA-IIT interacting with the community and people of profession, and project and proposal development. Supporting Team Members: Carlos Vaca: Solar Energy Systems Team Leader Jaime King: Energy Efficiency Analysis (HVAC) Team Leader Peter Upham: Lighting Energy Systems Team Leader The chapter meets every Thursday 6:25 to 9:00 p.m. at the Tech South Smart Lab and is overseen by Dr. Daniel Tomal. They are very ecstatic to showcase their proposal on IPRO day on April 26, 2019, and hope that you drop by to see their findings.

sga@iit.edu

SAAC representative voted in and address from Prism presented at senate hearing Grace Arnold (She/her) SGA SENATOR On Wednesday, April 10, the Student Government Association (SGA) held its eighth senate hearing of the spring semester. These meetings take place with the purpose of approving new senators, representatives, and student organizations, discussing change to SGA’s governing documents, and hearing project and meeting reports from the executive board and current senators. At the hearing on Wednesday April 10, the senate approved a new representative for the Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC), heard an address from Prism, the LGBTQ+ student organization on campus, passed the Records and Accessibility Amendment, and received farewells from members of the executive board who will not be returning next semester. First on the agenda, students Zoey Krevitz and Evan Balizado presented themselves to the senate as candidates for the position of SAAC representative in senate. Krevitz, a sophomore aerospace engineering major in cross country and track and field, thinks SGA is important for creating community between sports and organizations. She believes there is not enough student participation and support for the sports games on campus, and given more funds for the athletic department, she would like to see it spent on new equipment.

Balizado, a freshman biomedical engineering major also involved in cross country and track and field, recognizes SGA as the voice of the students and SAAC as the voice of the athletes on campus. He admitted that not enough money goes towards athletics, and given more funds, he would like to see more bleachers on Stuart Field. During discussion by the senate of these two candidates, senators recognized that Krevitz is a strong candidate as she is currently on the executive board for Dance Marathon and is easily able to stay on top of things and communicate well. Evan was also recognized as being a responsible student. Zoey Krevitz was voted in as the SAAC representative. Next President of Prism Emma Kaufman and Vice President Claire Joswiak presented their address to the senate. They discussed their history with Finance  Board  and want to see constructive change take place. In summary, they had proposed an event that was more expensive event than normal, and offered to be present at the Finance Board hearing, so as to answer any questions. However, although they were permitted to be present at the hearing, they would not be allowed to speak. The event, although allegedly gaining a majority of the Finance Board members’ support in the beginning, ended up being cut. The members of Prism believe that Finance Board has no consistency with following their guidelines, which

can easily be changed with a two-thirds vote from their members. The full text can be found on the senate channel of the SGA slack, found at sgaiit.slack.com. Following this address, Finance Board Chair Jorge Morin admitted that he did not believe that the members of Prism’s account of events was accurate. Additionally, he alleged that Prism has asked for more than $100,000 of Student Activity Fund (SAF) money. After further discussion, Executive Vice President Monica Bhagavan ordered a five to 10 minute recess to allow Finance Board to put together a response. Finance Board Chair Jorge Morin responded that Finance Board had a lot of reservations about spending such a large amount of the SAF on one event. They aren’t trying to be unprofessional, they’re just trying to make the right decision for the student body. He admitted that the process for approving Prism’s budget did take long time, because of winter break and the timing. He and the Finance Board fully support transparency and the recording of hearings that all claims made about the conduct of hearings can be verified. Then, the Records and Accessibility Amendment was presented by President Eric Scott and Senator Derek Rhea. This mandates that Finance Board will record all hearings and advising, and all ledgers from the past four academic years will be available to the student

body online. This amendment is not complete, but is meant to be worked on, and is open to friendly amendments. The amendment will continue to be worked on by the Governmental Affairs Committee and anyone else with input and presented to the senate for approval again. Events Chair Henry White began executive reports by announcing the SGA Banquet in the Pritzker Club on April 26. He thanked the senators and SGA members who were volunteers on the bridge for the last few weeks as well. Finance Board Chair Jorge Morin mentioned that the last Finance Board hearing is April 13, and will be recorded. If you or someone you know is interested in Finance Board, feel free to email Finance Board at fbchair@iit.edu. Finally, Chief Justice Erin Monforti, Vice President of Communications Narkis Garcia, Executive Vice President Monica Bhagavan, and Vice President of Academic Affairs Erin Nelson, who will not be returning to their positions on the executive board next semester, said their farewells and recounted the progress the SGA has made these past couple semesters. The meeting minutes can be found online on the SGA Facebook page, and anyone with questions or comments regarding SGA can direct them to sga@iit.edu.

A&E

Harold's Chicken Shack has ruined fried chicken for me

Kevin Barrera (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER Yes this article has a very baity title, and it was intentional. Long story short, you gotta try this chicken. It’s some of the greatest I’ve ever had. Oh, and half a chicken is way more chicken than should be consumed by one person in one sitting. So don’t do it. I’d always passed by Harold’s Chickens across the city, but I was staying on campus late one day and decided to pass by the one on 35th and Indiana (often considered the best in the city). There’s not much to the interior - just a few tables and sweet posters and pictures of Muhammad Ali and other influential African Americans. The first thing you’ll notice is that to order, you have to speak to the cashier through bullet proof glass. Now to me, it wasn’t too much of a shocker - some restaurants on the West Side are the same - but to my friend, it caught him off guard. You get a lot of choices for food like chicken, gizzards, and fish to name a few, but for the sake of the review, I’ll stick to the chicken. My personal recommendation? One-fourth chicken dinner, white or dark,

Image Courtesy of Tonette C. on Yelp

seasoned with salt and pepper, and with mild sauce (either on the side or poured on, up to you). Each dinner meal comes with the main entree, fries, buttered toast, and a little tiny

coleslaw cup. For well under $10, it’s one of the best deals in the city. The cooking of the chicken is unique to Harold’s when compared to other popular chicken chains. It’s cooked in

a mix of tallow and vegetable oil, and is fried upon order, making it guaranteed fresh. It gives the chicken such a unique, delicious flavor, and quite frankly, makes it hard to find a comparison to, as the chicken is in a league of flavor on it’s own. Popeyes and KFC wish they could hold a candle to Harold’s. The fries are nothing unique, but they are still really good. The toast sits at the bottom of the chicken, so as you eat, it soaks up the chicken flavor, enhancing its taste ten-fold. The coleslaw is absolute money as well - and that’s coming from the guy who’s extremely picky on his coleslaw. And how could I forget the mild sauce? It’s so good that it should be illegal - no kidding. If they sold Harold’s mild sauce in stores i’d keep a whole darn cabinet full of the thing and put it on everything. It has such a different, sweet, one-of-a-kind taste, and other sauces should feel ashamed for not being able to compete against it. My words can’t do this chicken justice. I’d take a punch from prime Mike Tyson just for some Harold’s. It’s that good.


Tuesday, April 16, 2019 | TechNews

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A&E 11

Video game review: "Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice" Jack Hamilton (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER After “Dark Souls III” was announced to be the definitive end to the "Souls" series, many wondered what developer FromSoftware would come up with next. After all, with the "Souls" series they stepped on a commercial landmine, bursting in popularity over such a sustained period of time more so than perhaps any other gaming series in history. But the company decided that all good things must come to an end, and they decided that their “Dark Souls” series, as good as it was, could not go on forever. And so we wondered, what would they come up with next? Well it seems FromSoftware had the same question because “Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice” is basically just more “Dark Souls.” Being a spiritual successor to the souls series, “Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice” will look more than a bit familiar to those at all familiar with previous "Souls" games, albeit not exactly the same. But with bonfires now being sculptor’s idols, stamina is now posture, and depressing fantasy Europe is now depressing fantasy Japan. The similarities between the two games are numerous, so I won't go terribly into detail on them and will be instead focusing more on “Sekiro” on its own terms. In “Sekiro” you play as Sekiro, who starts the game getting his left arm cut off by big baddie Genichiro while on a mission to rescue the divine heir, Lord Kuro of the land of Ashina, the location of the game. Sekiro is left to die, but ends up surviving after being rescued by a man named The Sculptor who replaces Sekiro’s missing left arm with a prosthetic. Now a shinobi on a quest for vengeance,

Sekiro must rescue the divine heir from those who would seek to use his power of resurrection for their own ends. The game takes place in the land of Ashina in Sengoku Era Japan, a century-long warring states period of Japanese history known for its social and political upheaval as various warlords battled each other for power and land. Overall, the story remains relatively shrouded and serves much more as a backdrop to the action and gameplay rather than the focus, but a deeper well of lore waits for those who wish to dig deeper. Unsurprising, considering this was the exact approach taken by the previous "Souls" games, although the story seems considerably shallower now. Much of that is due to the reliance on more real world history, despite being very much so a fantasy setting the game takes place during a real era of Japanese history and the time periods inspirations on the world of “Sekiro” shine even through the heavy fog that covers most of the map. "Souls" games of old were much more stooped in building their world, dark and foreboding, around clearly defined chronological events that led to the culmination of the world you found yourself in in each of the games, while “Sekiro” is more of a brief synopsis on just kind of what's going on in the little world of Ashina. What remains constant between the two, however, is just how depressing and hopeless each world remains. “Sekiro” takes heavy inspiration from the souls series in that regard, its world grim and hopeless, but deep and dripping with atmosphere. The atmosphere has always been one of if not the strongest attribute of the "Souls" series, and with “Sekiro” FromSoftware has displayed their mastery of the craft once again. The grand cathedrals built for beings bigger than you have become the various mountain-

top monasteries of Ashina, with varieties of classical Japanese architecture, various colorful flora, a peculiar thick fog that seems to cover most of the map, and splitting canyons that dot the landscape. Obviously with the change of setting “Sekiro” is much more focused on a Japanese aesthetic than the European setting of the "Souls" series, but the effect and immersion of the atmosphere present in “Sekiro” remains just as strong and continues to lend greatly to the feeling of the game as a whole. In addition, you can use your sweet new robot arm to grapple your way around the map like fantasy Japan Batman, opening up the world a lot more and allowing for additional exploration and interaction with your surroundings. The combat has seen perhaps the greatest overhaul since the "Souls" series, being much more focused on parrying than blocking or rolling. Much of the combat centers around the stat known as posture. Posture most closely resembles stamina of the "Souls" series, being how close your character is to being knocked off balance and stunned. Both your character and the enemies have a posture gauge, which determines how close you are to being stunned. For Sekiro, being stunned means that enemies just get to wail on you for a bit, but for them being stunned allows you to get a “deathblow” which is an insta-kill. Deathblows can be attained by either filling up an enemies posture gauge, by sneak attacking them, or by draining their vitality (basically health) to zero. Posture is drained by blocking, rolling, or getting hit by head on attacks, thus increasing the posture gauge. Deflecting an enemy attack, meanwhile, will increase the enemy posture gauge. Once an enemies posture gauge is full, a deathblow can be performed and they will be instantly killed. Bosses and mini bosses will

Bri McKenna (She/they) TECHNEWS WRITER I bought "Yoshi’s Crafted World" hoping I would have a better time with it than with other "Yoshi" games I’ve played recently, but worried I’d be disappointed. The demo that Nintendo offered had intrigued me, but would the game live up to it? In a surprising turnaround of the "Yoshi" series for me, I’ve had a really good experience with "Yoshi’s Crafted World." The developers broke out of the traditional "Mario" platformer mold, and I think it was entirely due to this that the game kept my attention the whole time it took me to beat it. Instead of having a half-dozen or so worlds with the same number of levels in each, Yoshi’s Crafted World has 16 mini-worlds of two to four levels. You don’t end up feeling stuck in a world long after the developers ran out of level ideas. In fact, each level has a unique aspect that it’s entirely themed around, like

wearing a dinosaur skull as a battering ram or evading ax-wielding killer clowns. There are also a number of mini-game-like levels where you find yourself taking control of cardboard mecha-Yoshi, racing cars, and bopping Monty Moles, among other things. As someone who has spent a significant amount of time crafting, I also enjoyed the aesthetic. More commonly known crafts like paper stars and origami are joined by crafts I haven’t thought about in years, like twirled paper. The costumes add a fun collectible element and are also important for the completionist who wants to get that full-health Smiley Flower, because in addition to being cute, they also take a certain number of hits for you before falling off. Unfortunately, the music was the same melody in a dozen different styles, and it got a little grating at times. Still, I found myself enjoying some of the versions… but also avoiding others. I also was really impressed by the Poochy pup missions. For every single level,

you have the option to play it in reverse, on the “flip side,” in order to collect Poochy’s runaway pups. Since you’re seeing the backside of a crafted set, that means that you’re seeing support material and uncovered props that you can’t see from the front of the level. They modeled every single level like an actual craft scene, complete with the text on the back of the cardboard boxes. I really appreciated that attention to detail, both as a gamer and a crafter. There are endless tasks for the completionist to work on, too. In addition to the varied number of Smiley Flowers you can collect in each level, there are also Smiley Flowers you can get at the end for collecting 100 normal coins, having full health, and collecting 20 red coins. Plus, there are the Poochy pup flowers, and flowers for going on scavenger hunts for craft items for the robot caretakers. In conclusion, I recommend "Yoshi’s Crafted World" to anyone who wants a fun, light-hearted platformer to play, something I didn’t think I’d be able to do after "Yoshi’s

Image courtesy of FromSoftware

require multiple deathblows, however. Dealing enough damage to get their vitality to zero will also allow you to execute a deathblow. Aside from its emphasis on parrying, “Sekiro” also has a much greater emphasis on stealth. Aside from draining vitality or posture, a deathblow can also be performed by sneaking up on an enemy. Your new grappling hook allows you to zoom around the map and get to high up locations perfect for sneaking and performing these stealth deathblows. Although not as good as the "Souls" series entries (with the debatable exception of “Demon’s Souls”), “Sekiro” still offers a different edge that remains interesting and enjoyable in its own right. Fans of the "Souls" series will appreciate a twist on the previous games’ mechanics as well as the return of their meaty difficulty and tough-but-fair gameplay, while newer players will enjoy a solid game carried by a well crafted core combat system. Final Score: 7/10, while the "Souls" games are better, “Sekiro” works more than well enough in its own right and provides well crafted environments supported by good core mechanics and combat system. Weaving all this together is deep atmosphere and a functional while not exceptional story.

"Yoshi's Crafted World" surprised me

Image courtesy of Good-Feel

Woolly World" bored me so quickly. The attention to detail made it really enjoyable to play, and there are endless tasks to keep you busy after you beat the game.

LEGO set review: Minecraft Steve and Creeper Set (set # 30393) Ethan Castro (He/him) EDITOR-IN-CHIEF If you think I can’t possibly write a 350-word article about a 36-piece LEGO set, then boy am I about to make you look like a FOOL. In early 2019, the LEGO Group released a new addition to its line of sets based around the ubiquitous and appropriately block-based video game “Minecraft.” This set, titled the “Minecraft Steve and Creeper Set” has set number 30393, contains a mere 36 pieces, and sells for a bargain price of $3.99, exclusively at Walmart. The set’s very low piece and price counts, along with its packaging consisting of a simple plastic bag instead of the more familiar cardboard boxes LEGO sets are typically sold in, all combine to comfortably define this set as a LEGO polybag. LEGO polybags are smaller promotional sets meant to primarily be sold as impulse purchases, sometimes not even

sold in a retail store’s LEGO aisle but instead found near the checkout aisles or at the ends of an aisle. These polybags will typically contain highly sought-after LEGO minifigures and not much else, as is the case of this “Minecraft” set. By far the largest appeal of this set, even to the most hardcore of LEGO collectors, is that it is an extremely cheap way to get two iconic “Minecraft” characters in LEGO form, the default main character Steve and the explosive Creeper. Unlike most LEGO minifigures, both of these characters pay homage to their blocky roots by substituting the usual cylindrical shape of a LEGO head with perfectly cubic ones instead, just like in their original game. The Steve minifigure otherwise resembles a typical LEGO person, with his simple purple pants and light blue tunic not having much of anything in terms of accent or ornamentation. He does, however, also come with a molded sword piece designed to have the same pixelated appearance as the digital “Minecraft” sword (this one is likely a cobble-

stone sword, based on its dull, grey color). The Creeper figure, however, is notable for having its own unique mold, along with two 1x2 plate pieces on either side and a cube head. The Creeper’s body is a single, unique mold piece, with two legs able to clip onto any LEGO brick and two other legs in the middle of a walking animation. Unfortunately, unlike a real Creeper, this minifigure has no built-in way of exploding and destroying most of your house or to produce its terrifying “ssssssssss BOOM” sound effects. Along with the two minifigures, the set also contains a simple environment consisting of what appears to be a block of trinitrotoluene (TNT), a few rocks, some grass, a flower, a lit torch, some sand, and a few pieces of sugar cane. The set’s designers even bothered to include a little bit of play functionality by designing part of the rock formation to be able to be launched into the air by pressing down on a plate piece in the grass. Overall, I will concede that this set is

Photo courtesy of the LEGO Group

an absolute bargain for just four dollars. That price alone is worth it just to get the Steve and Creeper minifigures, but the addition of the small environment and all of the subtle nods to the “Minecraft” series make this set one of my least-regretted impulse buys ever.


12 SPORTS

editor@technewsiit.com

TechNews | Tuesday, April 16, 2019

2013 Liga Mx Final - Heroics and Heartbreak Kevin Barrera (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER Heading into the second leg of the Liga MX final were two of the biggest names in Mexican soccer - Club America, and Cruz Azul (pronunciation: cruise uh-zool), both fierce rivals hailing from Mexico City, Mexico. Nicknamed “el Clasico Joven” (The young/juvenile classic), this rivalry boasts intense competition and heated matches between the two teams, quite often resulting in scraps on the field, as is quite frequent in Mexican soccer. Club America was entering the final off after clawing their way out of the semi-finals, advancing on just a one goal difference. Cruz Azul however, entered the final in a dominant fashion. Beating their semi-final opponent with a four goal difference, Cruz Azul were heavy favorites to win the title, and were determined to do so, as their last title win happened in 1997, and since then have frequently slipped up in the final, resulting in Cruz Azul fans thinking that they are cursed. America on the other hand, were looking to win their first title since 2005. With the first match ending 1-0 to Cruz Azul, everything looked to be going their way. Early on into the second match, Cruz Azul had a counter attack going when America defender Jesus Molina pulled back Cruz Azul attacker Pablo Barrera, resulting in a controversial red card. Replays showed that while Molina did pull back Barrera, America teammate Diego Reyes had fouled Barrera first, causing him to fall. With America down to 10 men and down a goal from the first game, hope started to falter. In the 20th minute, Cruz Azul forward Teofilo Gutierrez bombed down the right flank and dribbled into the box,

unleashing a powerful low-driven shot into the far corner. The game, now 2-0 in favor of Cruz Azul, seemed to be over. America didn’t have enough men to create good chances, and Cruz Azul were stomping them - that is, until around the 60th minute, were America started to gain control of the match. The game remained relatively uneventful until the 74th minute, when Cruz Azul almost scored a third - the ball had just narrowly missed the goal by a couple of centimeters due to an unlucky bounce. Towards the end 80th minute, Cruz Azul manager Guillermo Vazquez subbed in injured forward Mariano Pavone to give him some time on the field before the final whistle, and the eventual crowing of Cruz Azul as champions. The game was essentially done Cruz Azul fans were cheering and singing in the stands while America fans fell silent. The curse of not winning a title was finally lifted off the shoulders of Cruz Azul. Or so they thought. In the 88th minute of the game, America received a corner kick. The ball was delivered in and floated around for a bit when Aquivaldo Mosquera headed a ball into the far corner from a diving backwards header. Clumsy, but the ball was in, and suddenly, Cruz Azul fans became worried. America fans had mixed emotions. It had sparks of a comeback, but the game was minutes away from ending. In the 92nd minute, America received yet another corner kick. The ball was serviced in by young defender Miguel Layun, who produced a terrible cross, but forced a save from Cruz Azul keeper Jesus Corona, resulting in yet another corner. At this point, every single player is in the box for the corner, including America goalkeeper Moises Munoz. Layun whips in another cross, and the impossible happens. It finds the head of Munoz after a diving header,

Image courtesy of Goal.com

and bounces off the ground, off the leg of a Cruz Azul defender who tried to keep it out, and goes into the top corner. Cruz Azul fans were stunned. Their players were stunned. America fans however, roared in celebration. Against the odds, they had tied the game up in the dying seconds and forced extra-time. In extra-time, both teams looked fatigued. America had been forced to play with only 10 players, yet were still dominating the match, however, they missed two big chances in the 100th and 104th minute. And so, with the match still tied 2-2 at the end of extra time, penalties were to decide the game. As the rain began to fall, the teams lined up. Cruz Azul won the coin toss and opted to kick first. The first shot went straight down the middle, and even though Munoz dove to his right, the ball made contact with

his trailing foot, denying the point. America proceeded to score their penalty. Cruz Azul then step up to take their second penalty kick, and due to the rain, slip and miss their shot. The America heavy crowd went wild after the miss, and America manager Miguel Herrera started to celebrate the misses like a madman on the sideline. Both sides end up slotting away the rest of their penalties, with Layun from America scoring the decisive penalty to give America their 11th title. It was one of the greatest finals in Mexican soccer history. Tensions and emotions ran amok among both sets of fans. And while America celebrated winning the title, Cruz Azul hung their heads in shame - they had no one to blame for the loss but themselves. They were two minutes away from glory, and they threw it all away.

The Miracle of Instabul - A historic UEFA Champions League final Kevin Barrera (He/him) TECHNEWS WRITER May 25, 2005. After a difficult path, Liverpool Football Club (Liverpool FC) and Associazione Calcio Milan (AC Milan) found themselves in the final in one of the most prestigious tournaments in football, the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Champions League. While Liverpool FC were certainly a class squad, featuring stars such as Xabi Alonso and Steven Gerrard, the AC Milan squad they were to face were leagues above in talent. AC Milan fielded a legendary team with superstars such as Kaka, Paolo Maldini, and Andrea Pirlo, with Dida, one of the greatest goalkeepers of all time, guarding their net, while Liverpool had backup keeper Jerzy Dudek in theirs. Prior to the match, AC Milan were regarded as heavy favorites to win the competition due to their experience, most notably, Maldini and Clarence Seedorf, who had won the competition previously - Maldini four times, and Seedorf three times (with three different teams). With Liverpool finishing in fifth place in the league (and ironically failing to qualify for the next edition of the competition), beating AC Milan looked to be an absolute mountain to climb for them. What happened that night was one of the greatest feats of all time. Coming out of the gate guns blazing, AC Milan won a free kick just outside Liverpool FC’s box. Pirlo whipped in a cross that found the foot of captain Maldini, who volleyed it past two Liverpool FC players and their goalkeeper, to make it 1-0 in just 50 seconds. The game stayed relatively back and forth, with both teams having serious penalty shouts, and AC Milan having two huge chances called offside. That is, until the 38th minute, when Kaka played a nice through ball, threading two defenders, to Andriy Shevchenko, who then cut the ball back to Hernan Crespo, cleanly slotting the ball into the bottom left hand corner to make it 2-0. Five minutes later, Milan countered beautifully, with Kaka beating his marker just outside his side’s center circle, and then distributing a magical through ball, leaving the Liverpool defenders out in no man’s land, as Crespo turned on the jets and left his marker in the dust. One-on-one with Liverpool FC’s

Image courtesy of The Daily Mail

keeper Dudek, Crespo gave the ball the tiniest of chips to lift the ball over Dudek’s shoulder and into the back of the net, making the game 3-0 just before half. As the referee blew the whistle signalling the end of the half, AC Milan headed back to the locker rooms joyous, while Liverpool FC headed back in despair. It was at this point where fans and analysts effectively called the game settled. AC Milan had just ripped the Liverpool defense to shreds in such a dominant fashion, and AC Milan weren’t known as the type to concede goals - Maldini and Nesta were guardians of the backline alongside Brazilian fullback defender Cafu. But all hope was not lost. Liverpool manager Rafa Benitez made a radical decision to change into a “3-5-2” - three central defenders, five midfielders (the two outermost tracking back to defend and bombing forward to attack), and two forwards. It was a “high risk, high reward play” - Liverpool were able to launch forward attacks constantly, but were exposed on the counter attack if their play failed. And reward it did, as in the 54th minute of play, John Arne Riise sent an inswinging cross

into the box, and found the head of Liverpool captain, Gerrard, who directed the ball into the top right hand corner catching Dida flatfooted. With the deficit now down to merely two goals, the Gerrard’s goal lit a spark into the Liverpool team, and into the fans as well. Just two minutes later, Vladimir Smicer receives the ball from Alonso, and, from well outside the box, absolutely smashes the ball into the left side of the net, just barely outside the reach of Dida. The eruption from the fans and English commentators alike proved that, despite being counted out at the half, Liverpool were still very much in the game. Milan started to look dazed, as they had just suffered a quick one-two punch. The dominant team that controlled the first half were now at a loss for words. Then, in a moment of desperation, Gennaro Gattuso brought down Gerrard inside the box after Gerrard received a layoff pass from teammate Milan Baros, causing the referee to award a penalty in favor of Liverpool. Alonso stepped up to the penalty spot as the crowd went silent. The tension filled the stadium. Milan fans were stricken with fear

and anxiety. A successful conversion of the penalty, and the comeback was complete. 45 minutes of world-class football thrown away by six minutes of madness. Liverpool fans were clutching their jerseys in anticipation, for them, the conversion would mean that mission impossible was possible. Alonso stood up at the penalty spot with the composure of a mountain lion going in for the kill. Alosno ran up, kicked it low and left, and failed. Dida had gotten his hand to it, and saved the penalty. However, the ball landed back at Alonso’s foot and he made sure to kick it into the roof of the net, away from the hands of Dida. The Liverpool crowd erupted in cheers, while silence wafted over the Milan fans. After the equalizer, the game stayed end to end, with both teams missing crucial chances, and both Dida and Dudek producing world-class saves to keep the game tied at three a piece. In penalties, the world watched in anticipation. Milan’s Serginho kicked first, however, he was thrown off by Dudek’s distracting antics in goal, and shot over the crossbar. Liverpool’s Hamann scored his penalty with a broken toe and all. Pirlo then went up for Milan and had his penalty saved by Dudek. Cisse scored for Liverpool to put them 2-0 up in the shootout. Milan’s Tomasson then scored their first penalty of the night. Liverpool’s Riise then had his shot saved to leave the score at 2-1 in favor of the English side. Kaka and Smicer scored for their sides respectively, leaving Shevchenko to step up to keep Milan in the game, at least for one more kick. Shevchenko kicked the ball straight down the middle, but because Dudek didn’t commit to a side, he was able to stop the shot, and win the title for Liverpool with the final score of 3-2 on penalties. The game shocked the football world - Liverpool had done the impossible against one of the strongest teams in history and were giving the utmost praise from football analysts and legends alike. The comeback is known around the world today as “The Miracle of Istanbul”, and is widely accepted as one of the greatest finals of all time. And while Milan were shell shocked, they would eventually get their revenge, as they beat Liverpool 2-1 in their 2007 Champions League final rematch.


Tuesday, April 16, 2019 | TechNews

there are packets of peace scattered about your day you trip over them as you run to your next start time, next beginning: a warm breeze when you're expecting a cold one a double take at an exceptionally bright, silver moon that first moment you curl up in your bed an ensemble’s perfect chord time, like your breaths an inhale, an exhale awareness of each breath will capture you for a moment, a minute, but no more suddenly all-too aware of the tick of the second hand but then, the focus slips it always does the awareness is gone, but you keep breathing the second hand continues but you forget to watch it and you’re happier for it tick, tock it's at once a soothing back and forth of a gentle thumb on your wrist comforting, familiar, predictable and a low, murmured threat a steel tap of a knife quiet but powerful gentle but larger than life slow but unrelenting what is it that you'd like to do today, tomorrow, this evening? mull your options carefully

editor@technewsiit.com

countdown and instead spend the time wishing you’d done something else the weekend is a safe haven until it gets there and you still feel restless, uneasy you count the minutes until you can lie in bed and then wish morning would come faster running a race with the finish line unmarked makes it impossible to pace yourself are you sprinting when you should be walking? are you stopping to smell the flowers with a marathon left? are you running headfirst to the end a few steps away? counting pages until the end of a book wishing to step across another milestone “i enjoy reading,” you keep telling people do you enjoy reading? you think you will: next page next chapter next book if this headache would go away, i’d be happy once i eat, i'll be happy in bed, i’ll be happy when my to-do list is empty, i’ll be happy (but when a task is finally scratched off you’re too busy writing down another to remember to take a breath; the countdown doesn’t end not really it just simply starts again)

Journey of Life The Thoughts I am proud and happy to have all of you on board this raft, You all have played a fantastic role in shaping my life’s draft, You all have propelled me always as the raft’s shaft, And I always hope you all will be there for me in shaping my life’s craft. -Tarang Vaidya (He/him)

The Weather Effect The sudden rains make the air cold, A perfect time for the friends to make gold, And by that, I mean how our talks unfold, Share funny ideas and see how they mold. -Tarang Vaidya (He/him)

Through the window, I see the rainfall, Mesmerizing me; lots of fantastic thoughts I recall, Be it the fun at various places we all went or be it the mall, We will be together in this journey and always be on the roll like a ball. -Tarang Vaidya (He/him)

The Long Lost Meet Meeting a long-lost friend after years is a feeling ecstatic, But it seemed like yesterday coz we were in a mood not static, We set the house on fire coz we were laughing dynamic, In the end, I would say it was great meeting you and it felt fantastic. -Tarang Vaidya (He/him)

there are moments of peace, though, nestled in there sometimes too quick to notice sometimes you’re too happy to remember it’s important sometimes the desperate wish to bottle up the moment spoils it but you nod your head in acknowledgement when you can the first open window at the start of spring brings a gentle breeze you're surprised doesn't bite your skin accompanied by a lazy, friendly stream of sunlight like an apology for the long winter months. others chatter around you; do they feel as grateful as you do? your hands rest on your lap, casually curled in a picture of painless peace a slow, deep inhale: accept the gift and move on it's getting further and further from the time you wanted to be asleep but focusing on the ticking clock doesn't bring you to darkness any more quickly and you realize, abruptly, how much you enjoy the loud hum of the heater you enjoy the darkness of the room, unexpectant you're at peace, you realize why spend these minutes wishing sleep would come? spend them warm, quiet, comfortable at peace

Recovery You took so many things from me: Smiles, laughter, enjoyment, Growth, learning, discovery, Success, opportunities, fulfillment.

For you it was so easy, You only needed a minute to take hold, And then my every minute after Was spent in your shadow. I will need every minute you took from me To take myself back, But these minutes will be mine And mine alone. I can never get that time back, But I will throw you away Like you threw away Three years of my life. -Bri McKenna (She/they)

A&E 13

you love sitting in the passenger seat of the car watching road signs fly by productivity without the need to think. so why are you wishing you would reach your destination? why are you counting down the miles until you arrive? stop pushing peace away don't go through life hesitating to use your favorite pen use it every chance you get speeding through the ink's life that's what it's made for remember to admire the snow you always say is so pretty listen to the birds you always say you love watch the clouds move in the unhurried way that makes you smile love things instead of spending your life talking about how much you love them stop counting down to the end of class the end of the day the end of the week the end of the year each destination isn’t important they only connect all the middle parts together stop counting down: you’re already there. -Alexandra Detweiler (She/her)

-Kevin Barrera (He/him)

Write poetry? Share it with the rest of the Illinois Tech community!

Contact editor@technewsiit.com for more information.


14 SLIPSTICK

TechNews | Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Doors open on the left at Sox-35th Estlin Mendez. (They/them) PUZZLEMASTER

Across 1. Gobbles (down) 7. Sixth sense, for short 10. What you might do at a fly 14. Where the 44-down are stored 15. Dined 16. Neither ___ nor there 17. Characteristic 18. Where you might get off to visit the Museum of Science and Industry 20. Where you might get off to go grocery shopping 22. You probably check it every day 23. Common 24. Start of a scale 25. Anglo-Saxon laborer 26. Large ___ collider 29. Escaped 32. Cry of the Ancient Mariner 34. Sound from a kitten 36. Auction grouping 37. Train route that is the theme of this puzzle 39. Winter hrs. in Michigan 40. Where you can find Ethan Castro after the semester ends 41. Othello: "___ Cassio!" 42. Do ___ others... 43. The end of Lent 45. Famous football player from Notre Dame 48. Get the gold 49. Newcastle United coach 52. Utensil needed to eat soup 55. Where you might get off to visit Depaul University 57. Where you might get off to visit the main branch of the Chicago Public Library

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59. Golf champion Mark 60. Apple store purchase 61. Cry of alarm 62. "Your ___ card may be expiring soon, make sure your rides don't." 63. Buds 64. Website styling language 65. Finishes with Down 1. Iraq's ___ City 2. Ruler of Thebes 3. Recess retort 4. Insulted, but lovingly 5. Some chickens 6. ___ Learning, a nationwide chain of tutoring centers 7. Two below par 8. Right away, in the operating room 9. Apiece 10. Black eye 11. Person who thinks they know a lot about Japanese culture because they watch Anime 12. The good dinosaur in "The Good Dinosaur" 13. Independently organized suite of short talks on a variety of subjects 19. Folksy violin 21. High tech book replacement 24. Abel's brother 26. Product used to hold style in place 27. Warning 28. Home for a bird 29. Seasonal illness 30. Mythology 31. Italian volcano 33. Radical grp. from the 1970s 35. Global commerce grp. 37. Corkscrew-shaped pasta

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38. Biblical garden 42. Good news for the shareholders 44. They might be kept in the 14-across 46. Head over heels 47. They might try to sell you Thanksgiving

desserts 49. Where campers might sleep 50. Les ___-Unis 51. Fictional swashbuckler of Los Angeles 52. Mail

Solution to Doors open on the left at Sox-35th Solution to Doors open on the left at 35th-Bronzeville-IIT 1

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A M I W I F E 14 15 S O S A A T O M 17 18 K I N G D R I V E

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C O N B U O Y S 27 28 29 O N T E S 34 35 36 W A S P L 40 41 G R E 22

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F L 36 L O 40 U R 43 E 29

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E D 37 38 T R E 41 N O D 44 A S T E 48 W I N

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A D E R

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S A L I A R 45 G 49 B E 33

I L N E 42 U 46 47 I P P N I T

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M E W 39 E S T N T O 34

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R O O S E V E L T I N B O X 23 24 N O T R A R E C D E 25 26 27 28 E S N E H A D R O N

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B F F S O S A A L I A S 63 64 65 66 C O T T A G E G R O V E 67 68 69 70 71 O R I O N R O O S E V E L T 72

A C E I T 75 T E R C E

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I N T O 76 D Y E S

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I G O R 77 G U I

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S C A R F S 14 A R M O R Y 17 D E T A I L 1

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E S P S W A T 15 16 A T E H E R E 18 19 G A R F I E L D 7

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df demystifies: “You’re Realized Finality” ™ df (They/them) THAT WHICH FADES

"df demystifies" will cease to be TechNews's singular advice column. Modality becomes an outdated notion of pattern recognition. Wherever you or I shall go becomes fractured and the pieces incongruent. What can be done cannot be undone. Inevitably we will join each other but in what form? It will never cease.    I feel it coming on, so this will be our last chance to discuss what’s to come. My suspicions proved themselves to be correct, I did need a higher dosage and already on this new regiment I can see that the process of my dissolution has begun in earnest. First it was my tongue, turning numb then falling useless out of my mouth. I watched it turn into a sizzling liquid on the

floor before evaporating completely. Then, my left foot, it too sloughing off and melting away to nothing. As I type this out my fingers have gone soft, sticking in parts to the keyboard as I write this. It seems though that active attention delays the process, so I have some faith I’ll be able to finish this final project before my physical form is completely gone. That being said, I’m unsure of what there is to say, what could possibly be said. I am curious to know how they will find me when it’s obvious that I have moved on. Will it be a sludge, the pink goo I dreamed so often about, or will the process be more complete, will this written account be all that is left? My left leg is gone now, I heard a squelch and looked down to see nothing remaining but a barely coherent membrane where a body part may have once been. I am tempted to reach down and touch it, but I do

not want to tempt fate and disrupt what could easily be something quite delicate. In any case: I have to remain focused one last time, try and push out the circumstances of my mind and body to finish the work. After all, reader, I’ve only ever done this for you. The jokes, the self-recrimination, the mindless rambles, it’s all been for you, the one still reading this. Creation is selfish, it presupposes what you have to offer is of some use to people, it takes up resources and time and then demands that others engage with it. It is the ultimate act of navel-gazing, and you’ve been very polite to play along. It should be self-evident, then, that the destruction of the self is the ultimate form of charity. To become no longer is the final admission that existence is a drain on both the environment and those around you; that the audacity on insisting on being around is the act

of violence inherent in life. Personhood is the original sin, and it is through seeking physical nothingness that you are redeemed. It is at long last that the end is upon me, upon this. I will submit this, close my eyes, and let the final tethers of my form unravel into nothing. What awaits for my mind, I do not know. I just know I am ready. Goodbye and, perhaps, later days. Tune in to "are we cool yet?" broadcast live midnight - 1 a.m. every Wednesday morning exclusively on WLPN 105.5FM. I will be there, intermingled in that resonating field, the miracle of radiation suffusing wanted or unwanted. All that glitters in the mind's eye will reveal itself to be illusory and you will feel worse for it. Abandon epistemology, it has no use where we’re going.


Tuesday, April 16, 2019 | TechNews

15


WWII

DR. KING

ASSASSINATION make history with

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Volume 191 Issue 11  

Published on April 16, 2019, this is the eleventh and final issue of TechNews for Illinois Institute of Technology's Spring 2019 semester.

Volume 191 Issue 11  

Published on April 16, 2019, this is the eleventh and final issue of TechNews for Illinois Institute of Technology's Spring 2019 semester.

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