{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1


Po


CONTENTS INTERVIEWS....5 EP INTERVIEW ....12 EP REVIEWS ....15


POSTERS ....20 INTERVIEWS ....32 THE WEEKEND RIOT....48 RECOMMENDATION PICKS ....58

@theweekendriot


Little Time Off

OUR FIRST INTERVIEW!

It’s July 18th, 2015 in Stanhope, New Jersey. The first date of The Stand Up Tour is at the Stanhope House

5

and it’s also Tear in the Radio’s first interview – and we are in no way prepared. With an iPhone and a scrap of paper with last minute questions scribbled on it, Tear in the Radio proceeds to interview pop punk trio Little Time Off from Minneapolis, Minnesota in the backyard, starting with: “I’m Little Time Off and I’m here with Tear in the Radio… oh shit. Take three.” Little Time Off currently consists of lead vocalist/guitarist Chris Mlazgar and guitarist Zay Cram, however at the time, they were joined with former bassist Logan Rieger. “Nothing can match the excitement of tour,” says Mlazgar. “We’re recording new songs and such when we’re at home, but it can’t match the adventure of tour where every single night you’re in a different state.” After noticing Rieger’s wrist tattoo of the All Time Low skull, Mlazgar opens up about how All Time Low, along with Fall Out Boy and Panic! At the Disco were the bands that inspired him to pursue music. “They really got me into actually wanting to create music and tour because what they did looked ridiculous but also so much fun. It’s such a cool atmosphere to wake up in a different city ever night, perform to a bunch of new faces and just jam out to your own music.” Little Time Off actually opened for All Time Low during the Don’t Panic era back in 2012 at The Rave/Eagles Club in Milwaukee – it being a surreal moment at its finest. As for the future, Little Time Off are not letting anything get in the way and are expecting to release their second EP very soon.

PHOTOS: KARL DEMER || TWITTER: @LITTLETIMEOFF


The Icarus Account

Whether you’re reminiscing when you first fell in love or coping with the unexpected heartbreak, The Icarus Account – brothers Trey and Ty Turner – manage to echo all of those emotions throughout the pain and joy heard in their voices in their music. Across from the venue, Ty and Trey Turner tell Tear in the Radio a little about themselves, their music, and how pop punk idols Blink-182 actually inspired this acoustic, sentimental duo. “We were always big music fans growing up, so it was actually a dream to make a career out of it essentially.” Ty gives a little backstory: “One of the key moments in my life was our first concert, and we played a little music but were never serious about it until that one show. I got goosebumps and I knew I wanted to be like that and do that.” The brothers both began songwriting around their early teens, but Trey emphasizes that their songwriting progressed and matured as they grew. “At the end of the day, writing is therapeutic for me and I enjoy expressing my emotions. I’m trying to release something of what I’m feeling and I’m using that as an outlet to express those emotions.” When asked about their influences, Trey and Ty answered with Jack Johnson and Ben Rector – musicians with a definite impact on the band's soft rock/country sound, but the brothers admit they were really into the pop punk scene. “Blink-182 is one of our favorites. We actually got into the screamo phase, too,” Trey laughs. “We liked how Blink-182 and Taking Back Sunday had two vocalists. So, we never really said that either one of us was the lead singer. We’re both trying to sing because we always thought that was cool how they can share that together and what not. For there to be two front man, that was cool and we kind of modeled our music based on them.” The Icarus Account are working on upcoming music for this year.

PHOTOS: SARA KIESLING || TWITTER: @ICARUSACCOUNT

6


THE HOUSE ON CLIFF

As famously said by bassist, William “Bill” Santana: “The House on Cliff is all about grabbing you by your cockles

“Back in the 80s, is when I first met Chad,” Santana says before Jervis corrects him - "1983. We were on the

and just saying, “Hey! We’re here! And we’re ready to sunset strip and Bill was eating out of a garbage can rock!” Chad Michael Jervis interjects, “Bill, that’s not right outside The Roxy.” what she meant.” But Santana isn’t wrong.

“Back then they were part of a group called The

Straight outta Boston, Massachusetts are the classic Similars,” jokes Coleman drawing laughter from the rock infused quartet The House on Cliff – lead vocals Chad room before he gets serious. “Honestly, we all met at Michael Jervis, guitarist Charles Coleman, bassist Bill San- Berklee College of Music and we all kind of had similar tana and drummer Marc Polit – and they have released their highly anticipated sophomore EP Skin & Bones. Tear in the Radio caught up with The House on Cliff the last time they were in New York City where the band gave us an insight about themselves – our first question being “How long have you all known each other?"

7

interests in the same kind of music which was classic rock and we all had a big passion for that, so we wanted to try and make a band where we can harness the spirit of that music. That’s what we’re trying to do.” Polit lowers his glasses and grins at the camera, "Class of 2064."


The House on Cliff really stick true to their dedication of the classic rock genre but they aren’t afraid

to dab into the 1980s hard rock influence or jump into the 90s alternative thrilling scene – The House on Cliff effortlessly manages to pay an homage while remaining true to themselves. Santana gladly lists an array of influences from Bruce Springsteen to Elvis Presley to the Red Hot Chili Peppers to Guns n’ Roses to Queen, Rebecca Black to The Eagles and The Police,” again Jervis interjects. “I’m not too sure about Rebecca Black.”

“You just roll with it, whatever happens, happens,” summarizes the songwriting process within the

band, and as Jervis explains, it’s all a collaborative effort. “One of us would have a verse or chorus in mind, and from there we’ll just work on it. Each of us are very consistent when it comes to writing original material for the group.” The House on Cliff actually does have the potential to resurrect the rock scene that was once so lively in the 1960s to 1970s to the 21st century, but amazingly, they really just see each other as college kids living the dream they’ve always pursued – they only ask for everyone else to tag along. “I would say trying to bring people in all different backgrounds, different ages and different generations kind of together is something we aim for because that’s what’s kinda cool from what I’ve seen in the past year of us playing. We don’t just select to one demographic. We select to a bunch of demographics whether you’re young, whether you’re old, whether -,” it’s Santana’s turn to interrupt Jervis. “It doesn’t matter who’s cockles we’re grabbing.” The band nods in agreement. “That’s one way to put it.”

8

PHOTOS: KELSEY STANGER || TWITTER: @THEHOUSEONCLIFF


Manager Q AND A: Olivia Iafrate Name: Olivia Iafrate Hometown: Allston, Massachusetts  Resume: Manager to The House On Cliff  Years Managing: 3 How did you get into management? My mom has been in the music industry most of my life, so I grew up going to shows and observing what is was like working in the industry.  What is a typical day in the life of a manager? When we are on tour I drive the van, check into venues, tell the band/artist what the day is going to be like, make sure the band is where they need to be when they need to be there, sell merch, book hotels, make travel plans, set up interviews, and make sure the band has food/water/whatever they need. When we aren't on the road, I usually do a lot of work on my computer to design merch/CDs, take photos of the guys, order everything, design/update the website, schedule rehearsals for the band, go to meetings, and other things I can't remember that I do.  How do you choose the bands you manage? I don't look for bands to manage. I only focus my time on The House on Cliff. In terms of what I would look for though, the band has to have raw talent, amazing energy on stage, and every member has to be personable, genuine, and in it for the music NOT the fame. Any advice for new managers? Be strong for your band/artist, hold them up and remember sometimes tough love is the way to go. I have a unique managing style with The House on Cliff, we are all great friends and we trust each other no matter what. Trust and understanding is VERY important in this industry. Make sure you believe in the artist/band with every fiber in your being before you sign on to manage them. You will be doing them a disservice if you do not. Love what you do and have fun!

TWITTER: @OLIVIAIAFRATE


Safeliving

Straying from your typical expectations of a rock band, Safeliving really cannot be pinned down to one specific category. It’s a rainy day in New York City but luckily, it has ceased when I meet Safeliving vocalist/guitarist Marco Chan outside the Barnes & Noble at Union Square where inside, Chan explains he’s pretty content with whatever genre is placed on the band. “I’m fine with emo, but I always introduced the band as alternative punk.” Safeliving is a four-piece band consisting of Chan, guitarist/co-vocalist John Rodriguez, bassist Brandon Florich and drummer A.J. Chiarella from Yonkers, NY. Originally, Chan performed as a solo acoustic act with his guitar whereas Florich, Rodriguez, and Chiarella were part of the band One Fell Swoop and both played local shows in Yonkers separately until the three reached out to Chan (Florich and Rodriguez went to school with Chan) and asked if he was interested in starting a full band. Recently, One Fell Swoop played their last show on Safeliving’s EP release show for their debut The Flowers in Your Brain – symbolizing in a way, the closing of one chapter and the beginning of another one. The EP itself actually consists of songs Chan had written quite a long time ago – the oldest being the closing track “Water”, but Chan is pleased that it’s finally great to have an EP as it’s awarding for the band and the songs are finally able to see the light. “Everyone’s sort of different and so I think whatever people find special in any song makes me happy,” Chan smiles. “If anyone can find anything they can relate to in anyway at all, that makes me extremely happy.”

10

PHOTOS: KARINA CORDOVA || TWITTER: @SAFELIVINGNY


The Flowers in Your Brain is a collection of the band’s exploration in how to deal with adversity and trying to deal with continuous struggles – something that really resonates with the band’s name. “I’m not entirely set on what it means,” Chan laughs. “But the idea is that you’re playing it safe in your life but you’re not really living. I always took the safe route and never really took any risks.” As Chan looks back, he advises any aspiring musicians not to make the same mistake as he did. “Take risks. Put yourself out there. Take that first step and look for opportunities to play even if you’re just in high school and want to play in your local talent show, or even poetry slams if you want to perform something. Be excited about new things and let the world surprise you.”


BRANDYN BURNETTE

Q and A: Made of Dreams Does the title Made of Dreams meaning anything significant to you? Made of Dreams represents how passion still shapes so much of our culture and how young kids shouldn’t give up or screw up just because they don’t follow the way everybody else does something. I created Made of Dreams for the younger me’s around the world who are feeling highs & lows, might be alone, but find comfort & healing in music like I have. Being a mixed kid from the middle class, growing up in a racially tense St. Louis, my life has never been easy. My father and mother split when I was 2 and my step-dad and mom split again just over a year ago. I want to be an example of loving people when life is good or bad & persisting no matter what, even when you hit those extreme lows. I feel like that role could almost be more powerful that getting everything I desire in this lifetime. What can you share about your upcoming EP? My next EP - STATE I’M IN - which will be out in May/June of this summer - could be considered a concept record. Once I started trusting more of my productions, I realized an element of my music that was missing beforecreating the soundscape. Now that I’m more involved in the soundscape & musicality of the records, I have more of an attachment to the stories that need to go with each piece of music. I just wanna keep going. Let’s see where we go from there! Do you have any advice for musicians trying to get started with their music? Keep going no matter what. Pick up an instrument to learn how to write your own songs. Find a team of people that believe in what you wanna accomplish. Stay authentic to who you are.

12

TWITTER: @brandynburnette


AMANDA JAYNE

Q and a: Strike a Match What musical experience can you re- Does your album have a particular member that really touched you for theme? the first time and made you think "I want to do that?" There is the overarching theme of love and loss throughout the I can’t quite pinpoint one experience album. What I’m hoping that peothat inspired me the most, but as a ple will pick up on are the hidden teenager, I grew up in the local music metaphors and imagery within each song. For example, in a track scene. I had a taste for independent called “Means & Ways,” there’s a artists and looked up to people who line that reads “close your eyes and took a risk by getting up on stage. Ev- roller coast.” I know that’s not an ery concert I went to made me want to actual word, but I feel like it gives become a performer more and more, the sense of constant, unrestricted so at one point, I just dove in head first! movement. I’m curious to see how listeners interpret lyrics like that.

Which of the new songs are you the proudest of/excited for people to hear?

Over the course of making the record, a lot of older songs I had been performing for a while took on a new shape. I’m most proud of “Playing Dumb” because all of the instruments come together in a tasteful way, but each part is impressive on its own. It definitely exceeded my expectations!

PHOTOS: JUSTIN GROME || TWITTER: @AMANDARJAYNE

13


mj walker

Q and A : The Shift

When writing The Shift, were you writing for yourself or others? When I write music, I just try to be true to the experience. When the magic really happens, it doesn’t feel like I am writing the music at all, but the music is being written through me. So it’s hard to say that “I" am writing the music for anyone, but it’s being written for everyone. When it comes to the writing, were there any themes within the lyrics? Lyrically, the songs were inspired by a spiritual shift that I’ve been stumbling through for the last 3 years. I've spent a lot of time investigating my sense of self, and I saw that ultimately, our ’separate selves' are an illusion. Everything takes place on one screen of life. Seeing that has been a bit disorientating though, and I’ve found myself zig zagging between being a separate identity: Michael, and being at peace, one with everything. That transition of identity is where all of these songs have come from and why I called it “The Shift.” You've received a lot of great feedback on The Shift does it feel that the hard work is finally paying off? It feels great! I was blown away by the support I received when I announced I was releasing a solo album... I was afraid people might not understand, or they would think that Paradise Fears was breaking up. It definitely feels like the hard work is paying off. The Shift EP is just the beginning though… I’ve already written a full album of new songs, and before I release it, I’d also like to play a national tour as MJ Walker.

14

TWITTER: @MJWALKER0 (THAT'S A ZERO)


EP REVIEWS AA - ALLYSON ALAMO | JB - JESSICA BROWN EL - EMILY LASTER | ES - EDWARD SMAKOV ET - EILEEN TEA | SV - SOFIE VASQUEZ

New Jersey pop rock The Stolen’s brand new EP I’m So Dead

grabs the listener’s attention from the first few seconds of the opening track up to the closing one. Each song tells its own story rather than be random ramblings with no feeling or purpose. The chorus is always catchy with a great choice of words, truly capturing the entirety of the song. Some of the best moments within the songs are when the music slows down briefly as seen in “Can’t Get Enough”, where the music and vocals match perfectly. It emphasizes one of the strongest asset of the band: the pairing of the vocals and instruments. The rhythm flows perfectly with the smooth yet rough voice of the lead singer, especially in "Skeleton". The vocals go from low and smooth to loud and raspy, matching the tempo and flow of the instruments perfectly. Overall, The Stolen expresses great potential and sound, and this EP is an extraordinary listen for anyone who enjoys great and meaningful pop-rock songs. Download: I’m So Dead [AA]

Assertive alternative pop trio Beach Weather has already

torn down their low expectations as an 'opening act'. Their catchy, feel good tunes off their debut EP What a Drag resonate electric yet soothing vibes. Favorite song was “Bad Seed” because it was able to grab me immediately, and the rhythm and chorus kept me the most invested out of all five tracks. Beach Weather themselves seem to know what they want to sound like, but they need their style to mature because as of now, the tracks on the EP are pleasant to listen to but they’re not distinctive at all and almost sound like one another. What a Drag aims for a feel-good, bright, and catchy style and there is a substantial amount of musical skill and education; the band only needs to harness and grow it. Hopefully, their upcoming EP will clear up their identity and expand their range between tracks. Download: Swoon [ES]

15


Think Put Up or Shut Up era All Time Low, Blink-182, and Dashboard Confessional all bunched up into one EP – that’s Ohioan pop punk You vs. Yesterday’s Remember This. Remember This is a great intro for those either entering the punk rock/pop scene or craving the perfect dose of nostalgia in the early days of the pop punk genre. The title track is a propulsive punk number with its powerful chorus and layered pop punk guitar riffs. Each song highlights each individual member’s talent right from the string work, rhythmic drum beat, thumping bass, and the sing-along lyrics. Download: Remember This [EL]

Forever is Irrelevant is the second EP by Indiana based pop punk band The Weekend Classic. A concise EP with a great blend of vocals and melodies, it both incorporates the intense, aggressive but also the softer side of pop punk as expressed in their track “Worthless”. The center of the EP is non-stop energy, and is full of twists and turns that keep the listeners engaged like the quick, blasting drums engaged in a catchy beat in the songs. Forever is Irrelevant revolves around honest lyrics, pulsing guitars and raw vocals, and is an EP that keeps on giving. Download: Shattered Glass [JB]

Pop and country tend to clash at each other, but New York

16

bound Jesse Sheppard’s EP is a surprisingly fitting blend of the two. The fast pace guitars and joyous backing vocals with Sheppard’s singing emphasizes on the good times of life as the heavily pop infused rhythm and beat reminds you of all those summer nights. There is an obvious country influence, but the pop tone does tend override the other genre. The EP is not entirely a full length party one as Sheppard embraces honest, heartfelt ballads reflecting on fleeting youth and unconditional romance. The closing track provides a smoothing conclusion with its harmonious vocals of both Sheppard and guest Jackie Evan. Country might not be everyone’s taste, but These Days is an exception as it offers a little something for its listeners, and give it a chance and you’ll find the track for you. Download: Cali Girl [JB]


Imaginative vocals and upbeat rhythms are the highlights

of the emotional journey expressed vibrantly in I the Victor’s EP. Atlanta, Georgia native Rebecca Ramos has opened up about her feelings that you’ll find is not so much different than yours. The opening track establishes the mood of her EP as it starts with _soft spoken word before it begins to swell with synths and a symphonic percussion before finishing in an intense passion. Sometimes there is a bit of an unbalance with Ramos’ soulful vocals and the powerful melodies that tend to mildly drown out her voice, but the EP is able to carry itself highly. Ramos has shaped a personal, revealing EP that expresses her deepest love: crafting music. Pause radiates positive, welcoming vibes and an inspiring passion in a lyrical, rhythmic success. Download: Write to Say [JB]

�innesotan singer-songwriter Clay Borrell leans more towards the side of independent pop with his quote worthy lyrics and acoustic sound – very reminiscent of John Mayer, Gavin DeGraw and Jack Johnson. Lifeline is a journey as he tells his story and creates a welcoming atmosphere to those willing to listen and there’s a distinguished familiarity in his music as if you’ve known him personally. In “Fair-Weather Friend”, a ballad about toxic friendships – Clay’s approach of the song isn’t malicious as he turns his recognition of the reality of the relationship into something beautiful. It’s just a small sample of the genuine emotion expressed in this EP. Download: Sorry for You [EL]

Reminiscent of the masters of the late 1960s to 1970s, and

clearly influenced by the savory vocals and psychedelic buzzes you’d catch in a Led Zeppelin or The Cure record; Sunflower Bean manages to pay a unique homage to such artists while crafting their own tone and sound. The Brooklyn trio, consisting of singer-bassist Julia Cummings, singer-guitarist Nick Kivlen, and percussionist Jacob Faber, deliver a punchy yet composed LP with lyrics about realism and fantasy. Full with harmonious beats accompanied with Cummings’ and Kivlen’s ethereal vocals and Black Sabbath-esque, hard-hitting instrumentals – the LP is far from bland. Jabbing, loud instrumentals. Sweet riffs. Soothing vibes. Human Ceremony might not fit everyone’s taste, but it will sure satisfy a crave for classic rock revisited. Download: Wall Watcher [SV]

17


Misdirection expresses Shorebreak’s passion in the pop

punk genre with its hardcore edge and direct attitude. The opening track “Sunrise” is a surprising intro with its cinematic instrumentals (it’s something you'd hear when the credits roll at the end of a film) and singer Mike Scarola’s soft vocals that when “Around” – a typical track you’d hear in any pop punk album – plays right after, it’s kind of startling in a way. "Around" still is a great song (and it's so fucking good live), but it's not something you haven't heard before. However, the remaining tracks “Paper” and “Fall” really capture Shorebreak’s potential in their music with its appealing, impressive instrumentals that compliments Scarola's singing. Misdirection builds an anticipation for what Shorebreak will bring in the future, don't miss out on it. Download: Paper [SV]

Safeliving has created an EP that consists of an expressive-

ness not often heard in a debut. With lyrics relating to the themes of insecurity and accepting one’s self – there is an immediate appeal to any human being stuck in the middle of figuring themselves out. Lead vocalist Marco Chan’s tone in his performance is casual but it doesn’t fall flat. The accompanying backing vocals of guitarist/co-vocalist John Rodriguez and guest Lisa Sepa only deepen Chan’s performance, as the powerful, instrumentals carry the track steadily and smoothly. The Flowers in Your Brain is a solid debut with creative instrumentals and expressive songwriting. Or in simple terms, it’s lit. Download: Felling [SV]

When I first took a listen to Whosah's sophomore EP, I ex-

18

pected an intense vibe, but was surprised by its pleasant, healing sensations expressed in the softness of their music. There’s a consistent upbeat tone and a somewhat fitting electrifying and overpowering mix of percussion and guitar riffs in there as heard in “Something More” – a personal favorite. “Forget About It” reminds me of 80’s electric pop and the vocals are so much like Marvin Gaye, and the track is so rich with positivity. “Perhaps We Were” already establishes a sad, sympathetic tone with the agony dripping off the vocals, the abused xylophone added to the dread. Work is a passionate, inspiring collection of music, highly recommend you listen when you need a little jab of motivation to pursue your passion. Download: Forget About It [ET]


MARINA CITY

In regards to your upcoming EP Lost Doesn’t Mean Alone and it being a live acoustic album with an actual in studio audience present at the recording - this is something no band has done before, so what inspired you guys to be the first? Honestly we can't take all of the credit. Some of the guys listen to this band called Snarky Puppy, and we stemmed the idea from there. They put on an amazing performance, all while being recorded, and being in the presence of their fans. We wanted to branch off of that idea and do something similar. You’re teaming up with Craig Owens, how did you get that to happen? Did Marina City specifically want to work with him because they knew he’ll be right for the project? We saw his Facebook post about needing bands to produce, and since we had recently played a show with him, we kinda joked about him recording our acoustic EP! We emailed his people, they emailed back, and here we are! Not only is Marina City recording a live, acoustic EP but you’re also filming a documentary series – how did that come to be? Also music videos too – any specific songs or will it be a surprise? We'll be making a music video for all the songs we're recording on this EP! We just wanted this to be a super intimate experience, and even if you can't make it to the recording sessions, this documentary series will make you feel like you have the inside scoop. What should your fans expect/anticipate from this upcoming tour? This is a first for us, so even we don't know what to expect! Just be ready to have a great time! What’s next for Marina City after this tour ends? A ton of surprises, just make sure you stay tuned with all of our social media sites!

19


the stolen sofie vasquez


FRIENDS AT THE FALLS sofie vasquez


pros & icons sofie vasquez


SHOREBREAK CHRIS HOENIGMANN


3pm

ELIZABETH PETERSON


Underdog Champs

Richmond, Vermont group

Q &A with Underdog Champs

How did the band come to be? Nick: I met Justin and Josh through friends in other projects, but we all ended up in a band together called Lying and Low. Mark would book us occasionally on shows, so when he wanted to start a project of his own, he contacted me to help. When it came time to put a band together, Josh and Justin were the first people to come to mind.

What inspired the name Underdog Champs? Mark: I just felt that all of the band members never really got their shot in life and are the best at what they do. Underdog Champs was what we all felt we were in the local music scene.

Tell us a little about your EP Picked Last. Nick: Mark wanted to be a pop punk band at first but I think when we all started writing together, our individual passions really came across. Picked Last was the amalgamation of each of our different styles being.

Underdog Champs – vocals Mark Bradley, guitarist/vocalist Nick Jones, bassist Justin David Mason and drummer Josh Bailey – are the underdogs of the pop punk scene. The band talks to Tear in the Radio about their upcoming music and give us an insight about themselves.

30

squeezed into a pop punk lining Mark: Writing for me is cathartic. I try really hard to put a positive slant on things, but it usually ends up being a venting process. The songs go from being very vague to specific but I like to think people can take what they want out of it. You all are in the process of writing/recording your second EP. Which of the new songs are you the most excited for people to hear? Josh: I’m really stoked about a song called Coming Clean. I feel like musically it’s more progressive and a lot of fun to play live. Also, when we were in pre-production and I

PHOTOS: Brandon Hambright, gabe vasquez || TWITTER: UNDERDOGCHMPSVA


got to learn how to work with midi which gave me the ability to mess around with cool licks and fills and make it my own. Justin: I’m proud of a song called Walls. I feel like it is a different direction than our other music and it will be interesting to see the reaction to something different. I love the song as a whole I think people will really dig it. When performing, do you change anything up depending on your audience? And what’s great about being part of a genre that encourages the audience to go insane at shows? Nick: For the most part, we just try to keep things fresh for the audience. But we have been known to put in joke covers specifically to mess with the crowd. Justin: Seeing a positive and lively crowd response always pushes us to perform at our best and makes it so much more fun. If you weren't in this band, what would you be doing now? Josh: My backup plan in life is to be the front man of a country band. If I wasn’t in this band, I’d be doing that. So if everything falls apart, my name is Josh Ford. Fast forward five years, how is Underdog Champs standing? Justin: Proudly, with a pair khaki shorts on, and pizza in hand.


Royal Street

Providence, Rhode Island funk pop

best experiences they've ever had.

“Every instrument has its own song

“The feeling of having a group and melody. Just feel the vibe of evthe street where vocalist Viana New- of songs that you're so proud of and ery song, and dance, or move to it. ton, drummer Brian Cauti, bassist ready to show the world is just inde- When asked about the band’s future, Zach Brock, and guitarist Alex Beattie scribable,” Newton describes enthuNewton is ready for what comes up were all together when the idea for siastically. “We are just goofing off the band was born. The band knew and having a blast together, while next: “In five years, we are at our fagroup Royal Street is named after

each other for what seemed like for- still making the music we love.” ever to them. They all played shows Influenced by the works of Betogether while in other bands, never yoncé and Taking Back Sunday, The knowing that one day, they would 1975 and Usher, Brand New and the come together through different twists and turns to make music and late Prince – Royal Street’s debut EP

vorite bar, drankin fancy dranks and reminiscing about how fun the past five years has been... We are touring full time, finally feeling like all the

hard work we've put into this band will be an interesting blend of funk become a messed up family (their and bands throughout the years has words, not mine) for over five years. pop and soft rock not meant to be Currently, Royal Street are in the missed. “We want people to really paid off. We have an amazing fan

32

process of recording their debut EP, enjoy listening to every piece of this base and support system and are which they describe as one of the album." Newton expresses. growing in momentum each year.”

PHOTOS: lauren fletcher || TWITTER: @ROYALSTREETBAND


Static Charmer

Hamden, Connecticut natives Stat-

34

and I suggested “Charmer” from Tiger’s Jaw. Matt then formed the ic Charmer are an indie pop rock idea of putting them together and group consisting of vocalist/guitaras a result we ended up with someist Matt Balogh, vocalist/guitarist TJ thing really unique, and we love it! Redding, keyboardist Tyler Doyle, drummer Dan Boney, and bassist/ How long have you all known each The Hype-Man Matt Wilkes. TJ and other? How did the band came to the Hype-Man took the time to chat be? about Static Charmer’s origin and the development of their EP Well, TJ: Matt and I met in 6th grade. We Clearly… sat next to each other in class and became friends through drawing First thing’s first, where did the comics and laughing at stupid things name Static Charmer come from? other kids would say or do. We have TJ: We came upon the name from been great friends ever since! I met two separate names that Matt and Dan, our drummer, through some of I had come up with. He suggested my other friends during high school. “Static” from Jimmy Eat World

When looking for drummers, I remembered that Dan was pretty good and suggested we try him out, and he was bangin’! Tyler, our keyboard player, is actually good friends with Dan, so he introduced him to us. Lastly, Matt Wilkes (aka The Hype‐Man), has been friends with Matt B. since Kindergarten and he is a very good bass player, so we added him to the squad! Matt: I think I met Tyler through Zumba What musicians influenced the formation and the particular sound of Static Charmers?

PHOTOS: ASHLEY CAMBISACA || TWITTER: @static_CHARMER


TJ: Way too many to write down, but we listen to a lot of bands and we try to mix up a bunch of genres to make an interesting sound. Some influences are Vampire Weekend, The Starting Line, Motion City Soundtrack, Hanson, and Fun. Matt: Agreed. When creating Well, Clearly…, what were the influences on the EP and how was the process of writing and recording? TJ: While deciding on what songs to record and writing the EP, it wasn’t much of a thought process. The songs sort of just happened and when we got to actually recording them, we sort of messed around and went into deeper detail of song structure and switching a few things around. But the demos we brought in were songs we really love that each carries a very deep meaning to us, contrasting the song style, which is poppy and happy.

Are there any particular stories or themes in the writing, on the lyrical side of things? TJ: This is an interesting story. We had all of the songs finished with no intention of making them relate to each other lyrically. However, when listening back we caught a glimpse that it’s telling a story. The theme is “Love, Fear, Loss, and Change.” Each song is about one of those words, and when listened to as a whole, they have a much larger meaning than just the individual songs themselves. This story is also described through the design of the album artwork and inlay of the CDs.

there a lot more and possibly get signed to a label. Another dream of ours is definitely to have our album pressed on vinyl. That would be REALLY amazing. Matt: I’d hope we’d be homies were Taylor Swift by then, and then we’d all go up and interrupt Kanye during every speech. But that’s a little extreme, I know. Lastly, do you have any advice to any musician or band trying to get started with their music? TJ: Matt and I, along with a few other

Matt: We were walking through the neighborhood and discussing our ideas for artwork, and came up with the idea. I had always been fascinated with concept albums, and I thought “Why not a concept EP?” It’s short, but packs one heck of a punch emotionally.

friends run a DIY record label called Big B.o.I Records (no affiliation with the rapper, Big BOI). We accept all demos and listen to them in full. It’s nothing too serious, but we print CD’s and cassettes and will definitely help with the production of the songs to help them reach their full

potential! For anyone just starting, What is Static Charmer’s definition it’s a great way to get your name out of success? there! You can find all the other info Matt: All I remember, other than TJ & Matt: We will answer that queson the Facebook page! the constant trips to Taco Bell and tion when we win our first Grammy. The Coffee Bean (We don’t have those here in CT), was the consump- Fast forward five years, how is Matt: Yeah I made Big B.O.I Records 6 years ago, just as a joke, but it has tion of FOUR two-pound Sour Patch Static Charmer standing? Kids bags that were essentially the TJ: Hopefully we will either have re- evolved into a perfect label for anyreason we got through this EP. Also corded or be working on our second one. Call us. [Or shoot us an email: pitching TJ lyrics to “Rite of Passage” album! Also, it would be amazing to info.bigBOIrecords@gmail.com] have toured with some big bands while half asleep from jetlag. and get our name out

35


3PM

36


Baltimore pop punk trio 3PM are vocalist and bassist Brennan Stark, guitarist Scott Montgomery, and drummer Brandon Millman. They connected with Tear in the Radio to chat about their new music.

Your first EP was Change of Plans, then Slow Me Down followed right after. Any new music coming soon? Brennan: Yes! Now we're headed to the studio to create our third album with multi-platinum producer Matt Squire (One Direction, Panic! At The Disco, Ariana Grande). How has the writing process been for the third album? Scott: We write to push ourselves, and challenge ourselves to do better and better. We also write for our fans, to give them music that can hopefully have such a strong positive impact on their lives like we know some of our favorite bands have done for us. Brandon: Lyrically, all of our songs are about our own life experiences, we find that it gives the songs such life and genuine feeling, especially when being performed, because they are very real to us. Which of the new songs are you the proudest of/excited for people to hear? Brandon: If only I could share that information! All of these songs are on a level we've never been able to write at before. Something just clicked for us and we can't wait to for the world to hear them! How does 3PM define success in their own terms? Brennan: Success to us would be to be able to support ourselves for the rest of our lives with our music, and to have a meaningful impact on as many people as possible. Bands have such a unique ability to be such a positive part of their fans lives and we want to always be there for our fans and to continue making music for them.

PHOTOS: ELIZABETH PETERSON || TWITTER: @3PM_MUSIC

37


Nice Shot, Kid

An actual entry from my iPhone:

Is there a story behind the name? current guitarist Jay from playing shows. We were always interested in February 8th, 2016 writing and performing music, 4 out Well, we started off with a line Holy shit this band is good from Star Wars, messed it up, and of the 5 of us having been in other Heavy jam, pop punk group Nice bands prior to NSK. At the time, we put in on flyers. were influenced by pop punk heavy Shot, Kid – vocals: John Gallagher, hitters like New Found Glory and bass/vocals: Thomas Fasano, guitar/ How did Nice Shot, Kid form? The Wonder Years, paired with a less vocals: Matt Marciano, guitar: Jay Cuconventional mix of August Burns trona and drums: AJ Kay – are really Short answer: Stony Brook UniverRed and Kid Liberty. sity the definition of passion. Their performances guarantee such an excit- Long answer: Matt and John Story time: Who was your first attended the same high school ing energy that you honestly cannot and jammed every now and then. concert? help but let everything go and have Matt was introduced to A.J at that kind of fun where your heart is Stony Brook University, who then The answers here ranged from racing, ears pounding, but you feel so introduced us to Tom and former Green Day and Senses Fail, to Yes and Asia. Steely Dan was mentioned. alive it doesn’t matter. guitarist Saeed. We met our

38


We’re all very surprised that this never came up before, but not nearly surprised enough at some of the name dropping that happened. Not everyone’s first was their favorite, but Tom is stillreeling from that Yes and Asia team up. Side note: Matt is bummed that no one invited him to see Steely Dan. What were the influences when writing the EP Personal Space? Over time, our sound had changed pretty steadily and started to incorporate the heavier elements that can be heard on Personal Space. Our influences there were everything from Four Year Strong to our former guitarist’s love for heavier music like Periphery. We wanted to play around with different song structures and welcome some heavier elements. For our song “Cornered”, I (John) was writing to alleviate some aggression and come to terms with some stuff in my past. “Shelf Life” was written about my girlfriend, and I promise those two songs are not related in any way.

we have coming. What is the best part about being involved the pop punk scene that encourages fans to go absolutely crazy at shows?

Like a lot of other musicians/performers, we are always excited to bring a lot of energy to our performances, and it is a very gratifying experience to see that energy Lastly, do you have any advice to matched by a crowd. There’s a any musician or band trying to get sense of community in it that is started with their music? cool to be a part of. If the band never happened, what would you be doing right now? John would be hard at work getting verified on Twitter. Tom would still be trying to buy Mitch Hedberg tickets. AJ would be getting along surprisingly well on his quest to pet every dog ever.

If you want to grow, be ready and willing to learn! After a few years together, we are still learning a lot about what it takes to move forward as a band. Make goals and look forward, but don’t forget to reflect on your performance so far. Feed your strengths and understand how to work on your weaknesses, both on an individual level and as a band.

Matt would be on tour with the Ben & Jerry’s Cowmobile.

Jay would be enshrouding himself Any upcoming music? Which of the in vape clouds like a smaller, skinnew songs are you the proudest of/ nier Mysterio.. excited for people to hear? We’re currently working on a number of songs that we are beyond excited to be releasing in the coming months. It’s safe to say that we’re always excited about the next release

least an hour away from each other, a lot of collaboration happens through webcams and Guitar Pro files. This way, no ideas are lost between practices, and we can approach writing sessions with a lot of context and a big head start in the collaborative process. Beyond that, it is no surprise just how important the internet has been in making our music as accessible as possible.

How has technology been a positive or negative factor for the band? Our writing process relies heavily on technology. Since we all live at

TWITTER: @NICESHOTKID

39


SHOREBREAK

40

D

“ o not expect things to just happen for you. Do not expect your friends to care about what you are doing. Do not expect anything. You have to make things happen,” bassist Nick Montanino explains. “You have to make people care. Make it happen for yourself. The whole experience is so much rewarding that way.” Long Island pop punk powerhouse Shorebreak simply describe themselves as a "band that

makes songs”, and as much as that is true, the humble phrase doesn’t do justice to the hard work and dedication Shorebreak have accomplished – and it shows. In December, Shorebreak released ‘Misdirection’ – an EP that proves Shorebreak are far from limiting themselves to musical copycats as they manage to stand out in the pop punk crowd.

first started, we were in love with bands like Blink-182, Angels & Airwaves, Four Year Strong (after this interview, Shorebreak opened up for Four Year Strong. That must’ve been something), and All Time Low. Those were the bands we wanted to sound like.” The band – vocalist Mike Scarola, bassist Nick Montanino, guitarist/ vocals Mike Cowdell, guitarist Tom Vecerina, and drummer/vocals Joe Stewart – have seen some quite suce all went to the same high cess such as opening for one of their school and became great friends favorite bands and being featured in there,” says Montanino on the for- Alternative Press’ AP Discover Spotify mation of Shorebreak. “When we playlist, but they’re not

“W


too quick to jump on the high horse. They’re honest guys just wanting to create music they love, and they’re not afraid to admit the truth: “We’ve made a ton of mistakes in the past and I’m sure we will still make more but those mistakes have helped us learn so much about what we want from this experience. Every major step that this band has taken is more rewarding than the last. We’ve been given some incredible opportunities. I’m excited to see what comes next.”

Q&A: MISDIRECTION

What did you enjoy about writing Misdirection? NM: I feel like one of the best parts of Misdirection is how different each song sounds compared to each other. It’s almost as if we wrote each song for a different listener. As far as lyrical themes go, they just tell personal stories about how we are feeling at this point in time. Honestly, we try to write the music we like to listen to. I’d be lying to you if I said I didn’t listen to Misdirection often. Which of the new songs are you proudest of/excited for people to hear? NM: We were really excited for people to hear ‘Fall’

Were there any musicians who influenced the writing but it turns out the favorite so far has been ‘Paper’. on Misdirection? NM: The most obvious influences on Misdirection would

Last but not least, what’s the greatest thing about

performing? have to be Stickup Kid and With The Punches. There are NM: When we see kids moshing, crowd surfing, and a few others thrown in there that are not so obvious, I stage diving at our shows it feels incredible. It’s probalike to leave that up to the listener to figure out.

bly my favorite part of playing.

PHOTOS: brandon kempf, CHRIS HOENIGMANN (stay loose) | TWITTER: @SHOREBREAKNY


MARINA CITY

42

“Success to me is just being able to do things with the band I didn't think were achievable. Touring, recording, Warped Tour. Everything that I ever dreamed about doing. Yes, making a ton of money would be amazing and that might be success to other people but just being able to meet everyone that connects with us by our music is success to me.” Chicagoan, aggressive pop rock band Marina City – lead vocals Ryan Argast, lead guitarist Todor Birindjiev, guitarist/vocalist Brian Johnson, keyboardist/vocalist Matt Gaudiano, bassist Aaron Heiy, and drummer Eric Somers-Urrea – was named after the corn cob towers located in the heart of downtown Chicago. Argast explains the significance. “The guy who had the idea of creating them wanted to make a city within a city. Politicians and journalists laughed at the idea and made fun of him. However, Marina City was built and is now a Chicago landmark! We are inspired by the story. "A Chicagoan took on a


eally difficult challenge and exceeded expectations. We hope we can do the same with our music.”

Argast was originally signed as a solo artist going by the name Ryan Alan. His producer at

the time was trying to mold Argast as the new Bieber – something Argast wasn’t exactly feeling, and he did not renew his contract. However, Argast did make a few friends. “My backing band consisted of Eric, Brian, Matt, and our original lead guitarist and bassist,” Argast remembers. “We became really good friends during my solo act so I asked if they wanted to start over and become a band. Aaron took over bass duties after a few months and then Todor became our lead guitarist a year ago.” These individual musicians came together and formed their own band that was heavily inspired by very different influences by the members, thus creating a unique sound.

When asked about their EP Wanderlust, Johnson still cannot believe the incredible re-

sponse: “I feel like the amount of hours we've all put into this band have paid off since we began this band. We get to experience things not many get to experience and that by itself is enough payment for what we sacrifice to be a part of Marina City. The songs that came out on Wanderlust were the best of the best of those songs. We're very heavily influenced by ourselves and the music we all collectively listen to and Wanderlust really shows that.” Argast adds, “A lot of our song writing deals with our lives and the struggles we go through as musicians. The music we write is for us. This is our way to express how we feel about things. We sing words we weren't able to say in tough situations. Fortunately, we have found people who connect with the music we do and like us. These songs are windows into our world.”

Marina City will have a two week spot on this summer's Warped Tour as the winners of the

2015 Ernie Ball Battle of the Bands, and they're extremely excited and anxious to hit the road and meet tons of new people! They are working on their live acoustic EP- Lost Doesn't Mean Alone- as of now.

PHOTOS: SERGIO SILVA || TWITTER: @MARINACITYBAND


44

WHOSAH

“Whosah – though not a word found in the dictionary – was formed during a highly competitive game of speed scrabble (or BananaGrams as Hasbro or whoever later marketed it). “At the time, we assumed it would just be a one-time silly name, but it became something we could stand behind.” Dallas Erdahl – guitarist of the personal indie-pop, Minneapolis, Minnesota based group Whosah – joined in on the jamming in 2010 when Whosah was simply the Grimes brothers, Spencer (vocals) and Dave (drums). Following after was the youngest Grime brother, Mack (keys) and former member of Sing It Loud, Nate Flynn (bassist), joined just over a year ago.

Recently, the band has released their sophomore EP Work – a musical project reflecting how the

drive to find success leads to missing how good life is right now, and how other times, our fear of the unknown leads to missing out on how good life could be. “Every note, every rhythm; every word in this record was brought with that balance in mind,” says Erdahl as he touches on the theme of the EP. “Work finds its home in a balance between the toils of labor and the field of dreams.”


Inspired by the works of The 1975, The Strokes, Hellogoodbye and and even Taylor Swift, Work is a

project that digs into the muddled, murky parts of everyday life and asks “What am I missing here? What should I be thankful for? What should I be longing for?” The dream for Whosah as expressed by Erdahl is that the listeners will find the same joy that Whosah has found in savoring that process of discovering themselves – “We’re obsessed with the connection music creates between people. Art is intimate and personal, but reveals how similar our experiences are, how much we need each other.” It’s easy to catch the phrase ‘Making friends and making music’ if you were to search up Whosah online (and you should) and it’s become a motto of theirs. The truth is, they’re not wrong.

When asked how Whosah defines success in their own terms, it was all about connection and be-

ing able to encourage one person to pursue a life that is meaningful and intentional – “Even if it’s just one person each show, we’re succeeding.” It’s brings a new, interesting perspective to the origin of their band name: “We’re all about connecting with people through music, and having a weird word like “Whosah” for a name gets people to come talk to us and start a friendship. Really the name is just a trick; a trick to make friends.”

Photos: Kailey Erdahl || twitter: whosahofficial


VISTA

46

The formation of VISTA really came from themselves. Members lead vocals Hope Vista, drummer Wolfgang Reiter, and guitarist Brian K. Canfield all wanted to take risks, take on a new challenges and create something new. So far, the experience has been pretty productive and VISTA took some time to answer some questions about their debut.

Canfield and Reiter had known each other for the longest and were in a few bands before VISTA, so that when Vista met Canfield, it was through Reiter. Reiter and Vista had met four years earlier, and it wasn’t until last summer when he became her touring drummer when she was solo artist and Canfield was supposed to be one of Vista’s new touring guitarists before VISTA came to life. On May 13th of this year, VISTA are releasing their debut VERSUS - an EP with a widespread range of themes. Vista has written about the grieving process, growing up and leaving home for the first time, and the transition from solo artist to band, all things she’s never written about before. It’s really what the main theme is to the whole EP is: trying new things that haven’t been done before.


Vista want people to take way from VERSUS a sense of empowerment, and be-

ing able to actually feel the music through their bodies, and getting the vibe that they just walked away from a live show. Out of the new songs they’re the proudest of, there’s one song they’re especially stoked about called ‘The Departed.’ “It’s the final part to this trilogy of songs Hope wrote, the first one was a charity single she did call ‘To: Daddy,’ and the second part was on her last EP, it’s called ‘Half Past Fine’ She didn’t really mean to write a three-part thing, but it kind of just fit that way without even realizing it. It’s the opening track, we really wanted that to be what everyone hears first on the EP. It’s really just Hope’s final statement about the death of her dad and finding out a way to move on from the loss of a loved one.”

In terms of the future, it's difficult to look that that far ahead, especially since

they're just starting out, but it's safe to say that VISTA has no intentions of splitting up and fully indend on keeping VISTA alive and kickin' it for as long as they possible can.

PHOTOS: LAUREN TAYLOR | TWITTER: @THISISVISTA


THE WEEKEND RIOT


story + photos sofie vasquez


TWR �t’s been a little over seven years since Bruce Wiegner and Johnny Costa

have known each other. In his younger years, Johnny Costa performed in local gigs around his hometown of New Jersey, and one night, he caught the attention of another musician, Philadelphia native Bruce Wiegner. “I asked the promoter who Johnny was. I was like why is he singing? He’s a little boy! I think he was fourteen at the time.” Costa nods, “I was a baby.” “He had a great voice. After that, we officially met, began playing together and the rest is history,” Wiegner looks to Costa. “Right?” “Can confirm, most of that is true. Except that, I was actually forty-one.” The quick wit and humor is a noticeable trait amongst the pop duo. It’s a reflection of not only their charismatic selves but also their music – something really unique to the duo after a struggle of trying to place themselves into one specific genre. “We love pop,” Wiegner explains. “But we did grow up in punk bands.” When asked how much their music has evolved since they’ve been together, the duo exclaims in unison: “Worlds!” “Seriously,” Wiegner is still trying to cease his laughter, the timing was so perfect the duo still can’t believe it. “The first song we ever did together, there was legit screaming in it. I’m not kidding you. That was in 2011 –.” Costa groans, “We were so emo.” Costa and Wiegner were part of an emo band, then a pop punk emo band where they had emo lyrics but “it was kinda happy” where Costa’s vocals were being strained, and almost completely gone when he got nodules. “While I was singing,” Costa pauses and corrects himself. “Screaming. I remember Bru –.” Wiegner suddenly remembers and starts apologizing while Costa laughs at the memory. Turns out Wiegner would chant for Costa to go “Louder! Louder! Louder!” It’s a funny memory to look back now although it must’ve been terrifying at the moment, however if it wasn’t


for Costa's endangered vocals, the duo would have never realized that perhaps the screamo route wasn’t for them. “Johnny’s got a pretty voice, let’s go the pretty route.” The pretty route being a more pop vibe where both vocals were at play – Wiegner was solely the guitarist in the previous bands – and create an uplifting, happy atmosphere that’s a little bitter, but as Wiegner says: “You need to get a little bitter, to get a little better.” Costa offers a visual representation to symbolize their music. “I’m picturing just a beautiful summer seascape, but you know the water’s not totally blue. It’s kind of grey blue, but it’s hopeful. Our music is very hopeful.” “Honestly, starting was the biggest challenge.” Costa says as he goes in depth about the formation of The Weekend Riot. “It’s so hard to actually get up and start doing a band, and for us, we went through phases of being like a pop punk band, phases of being a boy band for a second and we were just trying to figure out how we wanted to present ourselves to the world. It’s one thing to figure out what you want to do, and it’s another to put it into motion and make it happen.” The Weekend Riot knew what they wanted to be and what they wanted to do, but they understood that they had to do what they were best at. “Luckily before we went public, we tried out a bunch of different styles and different things, and failed at some things,” laughs Wiegner. “And it’s so hard because you want people to care, and that’s why we began doing YouTube covers to give the people what they wanted but then after a few, we’d slide an original in there and see what happens. It ended up being the best thing and best decision we could have ever made.” The Weekend Riot’s weekly YouTube update of #RiotMonday proved to be a success for the duo – it was their way of giving back to their fans as well as allowing exposure for the duo, which proved successful when one of their videos became viral.


“The viral video was really cool but even that, it’s just numbers.” Wiegner and Costa both don’t count that as their biggest success. “When we played a sold out show in our hometown, and when we saw all the people, I was all choked up because this is real.” Costa elaborates on how they quantify success. “Being able to see that tangible thing of people in a room who want to be there to see you is the most magical thing in the world, and I try not to take that for granted because it’s incredible.” “It really is,” Wiegner adds as he too remembers that night. “People were singing along to all the songs, and that to me – when people care enough to believe in it – is the greatest thing ever.” “Even if we have to work side jobs and open up a restaurant,” jokes Costa right before Wiegner adds, “And we’ve been talking about it! Bagels But Not Just Bagels! Open from 6am to 7am, so get there quick!” The Weekend Riot has been going strong for almost two years now as May rolls around the corner – the month back in 2014 where the two performed their first ever show together in New York City. Wiegner remembers an intoxicated friend who praised them, “You guys are like One Direction meets Simon and Garfunkel. And I love it!” An interesting comparison, but not exactly wrong. Actually, Wiegner and Costa expresses their desire to accomplish the end goal of being the biggest duo in the world and they are up against Simon and Garfunkel and Hall and Oates. “Every band says that they want to be the biggest band in the world. I don’t know if any band expects it,” Costa explains. “But it’s just like you want to work as hard as you possibly can and make this band as big as it can possibly be.” The Weekend Riot are aware it’s not going to be easy. "It's going to be tough, and it’s a long road but we’re ready to do whatever it takes to do it and be a band as long as we can make it happen.”


“My advice is always fail. You gotta get ready to fail. That’s the thing that got us ready, and people are going to promise you things and it’s not going to come true,” Wiegner advises. Costa reminds everyone about reality: “Be prepared to work really, really hard and be prepared to be poor when you don’t want to be poor. Be prepared to check your bank account and you only have eight dollars in there."

“But just to get yourself out there as much as possible, you have to

dedicate everything to it. If you’re a singer, sing all the time. Get the lessons, do what you have to do to be the best singer you can be. If you’re a guitarist, take your lessons. Go on YouTube tutorials, do the whole thing. And be the best musician you can be and just put yourself out there. Be super vulnerable, people are going to be haters, it’s gonna happen but it’s going to make you stronger.”


The Weekend Riot know where they’re heading right now. “We’ve been writing a lot of new music, an actual EP’s worth of music and as of now, our plan is to get in front of as many people as possible.” As far as new plans for the band, Costa enthusiastically replies. “Oh man, we’re going straight up ska metal like immediately!”


RECOMMENDATIONS

IF

YOU IMAGINE

BEN FOLDS

BRANCHING OUT INTO HARD ROCK, THEN ADDING SOME FUNK, YOU MIGHT APPROACH

BOSTON FOURSOME SOUND LIKE. ONE SECOND IT'S JUST PRETTY PIANO MUSIC, WHAT THIS

E N I N M U R CONUND

AND THEN SOME BIG DRUMS AND A CRUNCHY GUITAR START PUNCHING HOLES

THE PENNSYLVANIA

DUO OFFERS TAUT

EMO JAMS ANCHORED BY SOME SERIOUSLY GREAT DRUMMING. CAN DO CONFESSIONAL LIKE

NEW,

THEY BRAND

OR KICK OUT THE STOPS

WITH AN

AT

THE

DRIVE-IN

LIKE

FURY AND PRECISION, AND THE WHOLE TIME FRONT MAN

MRDJENOVICH'S EARNESTNESS.

DEREK

VOICE ACHES WITH

WALK

NEY


THE FOUR-PIECE ROCK LONG ISLAND DELIVERS

BAND FROM HOOK HEAVY,

INNOCENTLY AWESOME TRACKS, PACKAGED WITH ENOUGH SING ALONG MOMENTS TO GET YOU THROUGH WHATEVER SHIT LIFE HAS THROWN AT YOUR WAY.

K L A T TABLE

ECHO O T S E G MANA R E T I R W G ARD IN SON E H R E Y G O N J I S AND N RALIAN I A T P S U A E RAW, TH D THE T U N O A H G U O PLUGGED N ION THR U T O . M E E IC FEEL EVERY Y L RFUL VO L E A S W R O E P V ALL UNI LE BUT T E N W E G HER WHAT S E T A M I G AN N I G N I S HER PRESS. X E T O NN BUT CA

DANIIELLE THE

UPSTATE

PROU NEW YORK

BAND

INCORPORATES AN EXCELLENT DISPLAY OF KEYS AND SYNTHS INTO THEIR BLEND OF UNIQUE VOCALS, ELECTRIC GUITARS, RHYTHMIC BASS AND UPBEAT DRUMS

CREATING A VIBE VERY REMINISCENT OF

LLS A F E H T FRIENDS AT

HEAVY NEW WAVE AND INFLUENCES, SUCH AS

BRITPOP THE KILLERS.


THE

BRAIN-CANDY GUITAR HOOKS JUST

NEW YORK GIVES POP-PUNK THE MATH-Y YOU DIDN'T KNOW IT NEEDED.

KEEP ON COMING AS THIS FIVESOME MAKEOVER

THEIR KEEN,

SENSE OF MELODY IS CONSISTENTLY AND THE WAY THE PLAYERS

STRAIGHT-UP NAIL THESE TRICKY PIECES IS BEST HEARD RATHER THAN DESCRIBED.

L A E ACS

M

THE MASSACHUSETTS TRIO THE SEATTLE ALTERNATIVE BROUGHT BACK TO LIFE. UNAPOLOGETIC AND PUNCHY

ARE SCENE VOCALS,

A PERFECT FITTING DUET BETWEEN THE GUITAR AND DRUMS AND A THUMPING BASS YOU CAN MOVE

H T U O M Y POTT

YOURSELF TOO, THE TRIO ARE STRAIGHTFORWARD BUT ENERGETIC.


ISSUE #2 COMING SOON (SOME TIME DURING THE SUMMER)

I'D SAY JULY, BUT MAYBE AUGUST A SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL THE MUSICIANS. WE HOPE YOU ENJOY THE MAGAZINE JUST AS MUCH AS WE ENJOYED CREATING IT. I HOPE IT'S NOT TOO SHABBY. - SOFIE


Profile for Tear in the Radio

Tear in the Radio #1 - The Weekend Riot  

This debut issue of Tear in the Radio features over fifteen musicians along with reviews and recommendations all within the underground musi...

Tear in the Radio #1 - The Weekend Riot  

This debut issue of Tear in the Radio features over fifteen musicians along with reviews and recommendations all within the underground musi...

Advertisement